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CLR James

CLR James

BLACK STUDIES: GRAMMARS OF THE FUGITIVE

 

Black Studies: Grammars of the Fugitive
A public lecture with Stefano Harney and Fred Moten
Friday 6th December 2013 @ 6.30pm
Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre / Whitehead Building / Goldsmiths College, University of London

Black Studies Group (London) and Centre for Cultural Studies (Goldsmiths College) are delighted to host a public lecture to be delivered by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney. The publication of their Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (Minor Compositions, 2013) marked a culmination point in an ongoing project in which they have sought to reinvigorate contemporary social thought and aesthetic critique by way of the black radical tradition. Deploying concepts such as “study”, “undercommons”, “debt”, “speculative practice”, “blackness” and “fugitivity”, Harney and Moten have loosened what for many now seems like the strained and distant relations between intellectual thought, academic labour and collective (under)common action. We hope you can join the Black Studies Group in coming together to make delusional plans with both Moten and Harney.

Bios:
Fred Moten received his Ph.D. in English from UC Berkeley. He is a student of Afro-diasporic social and cultural life with teaching, research and creative interests in poetry, performance studies and
critical theory. His books include In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition, Hughson’s Tavern, B. Jenkins, The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (with his frequent collaborator Stefano Harney) and The Feel Trio.

Stefano Harney is Professor of Strategic Management Education, Singapore Management University and co-founder of the School for Study, an ensemble teaching project. He employs autonomist and postcolonial theory in looking into issues associated with race, work, and social organization. Recent books include The Ends of Management (co-authored with Tim Edkins) and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (co-authored with Fred Moten). Stefano lives and works in Singapore.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/486889024765629/?source=1
Goldsmiths Events Page: http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=7091
Contact the organisers: black.studies.reading.group@gmail.com
All welcome, no registration required.

**END**

 

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Paolo Virno

PAOLO VIRNO ON ’THE TURMOIL AND THE THEORY OF EXODUS’ – LIVE STREAMING

Friday 18 March,
6pm GMT/ 7pm CET/ 1pm EST

Live Streaming: http://www.globalproject.info/it/produzioni
New Website: http://www.lumproject.org

::2011 Research Event::
The Virtue of Turmoil: the Revolt between Exodus and Revolution

In full swing of the systemic crisis of global capitalism, the debate among radical transformations is a living one. In fact, on the one hand the financial capitalism and transnational corporations do not accept any form of regulation and consider the crisis to be a structural condition to be viewed as part of the contemporary production of value. On the other hand, the parabola of Obama indicates that reformism has come to halt and neo-Keynesian receipts are blunt weapons. This situation causes a rise in social tension, above all in the old continent, where deflationist policies dragged by Central Bank and Germany hit with more harshness. For about one year now on both sides of the Mediterranean turmoil has been spreading. The protagonists of these movements are the young, students, precarious and migrants. This turmoil indicates a powerful resistance to austerity and raises the question concerning the project of transformation: what is the goal of metropolitan riot? Is the no-future issue enough to explain the passions and the discord that animate the revolts that are taking place from Rome to London, from Athens to Tunis, from Paris to Cairo?

The aim of the LUM cycle of seminars is to deal with these questions, starting from the assumption that the events of the last months have opened a new space of possibility, a space that must not be limited to the cheering narration of the “burned generation”, a generation that rebels against its parents. There is undoubtedly a gap in the future, a lack of job prospects as well as an existential void. There is however also a search for a new kind of politics, for a new way to qualify the transformation that is taking place in the revolts carried out by students and by the young. It is something that urgently questions life and language, social relations and knowledge, the line of colour and sexual difference.

But how can we articulate this research with the revolutionary theory and praxis that we have known and that has taken shape over the past two centuries? Does the desire to gain a monopoly on political decision, the state, lurk among the tumult that penetrates European markets? Does the violent breakthrough differ from the everyday construction of meaning that aims at creating new political institutions? Does the concept of exodus – on which critical thinking has focused on several occasions during the last years – take full account of the unprecedented relationship among turmoil and constitutional praxis?

In order to answer these questions the LUM cycle of seminars sets two goals:

a) To qualify a theoretical and political conceptual constellation able to deal with contemporary change: we will do this through a critical review of texts and political materials that have most informed the debate of movements over the past twenty years.

b) To focus the attention on some revolutionary historical events of the last two centuries, to trace the irreducible discontinuities concerning the present and also, on the contrary, the problematic knots that the great revolutionary experiences have exhibited and that still today remain unresolved.

Seminar Program: [All events will start at 6pm GTM]

1. Actuality of the Revolt (from Europe to the Maghreb, and Egypt) – Augusto Illuminati (Friday, 18th February)

2. On the Concept of Turmoil (in Machiavelli) – Gabriele Pedullà (Friday 4th March)

3. The Turmoil and the Theory of the Exodus – Paolo Virno (Friday 18th March)

4. The Revolution in Europe from 1848 to the Commons (through the political writings of Marx) – Paolo Vinci (Tuesday, 1st April)

5. Jacqueries and Political Institutions – Marco Bascetta (Friday 15th April)

6. 1968 and the Politics of Difference (through the political writings of Carla Lonzi) – Federica Giardini (Wednesday, 29th April)

7. “War Machine” and the Multitude – Francesco Raparelli and Alberto De Nicola (Friday 13th May)

8. Haiti and the Black Jacobins – Fred Moten and Laura Harris (Friday 20th May)

Info:
info@lumproject.org
http://www.lumproject.org
—–

LUM (Libera Università Metropolitana)
presenta:
Il tumulto e la teoria dell’esodo – Paolo Virno

Venerdì 18 marzo, ore 17
Presso Esc, atelier autogestito (via dei Volsci 159 – Roma)
Diretta streaming: http://www.globalproject.info/it/produzioni
Nuovo website: http://www.lumproject.org

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Culture

CULTURE & ORGANIZATION

Call for Papers

There will be a Special Issue of the journal Culture & Organization on: Commodities & Markets

Edited by Stevphen Shukaitis (Autonomedia / University of Essex) & Ming Lim (University of Leicester)

What would commodities say if they could speak? Marx’s wistful question can seem playful in some registers. Paul Jennings, for instance, proposed in his “Report of Existentialism” (1963) that everyday objects are constantly at war with their users: “things are against us,” he gleefully pronounces. And yet, objects voice themselves not only through our playful – or rueful – gaze.  If Marx had listened long enough, these talking commodities would have announced the traumas of their exploitative and violent birthing to him. Eventually, one imagines, they would have described the nature of the various forms of labour necessary for their production in the capitalist mode. As Fred Moten (2003) points out, history is marked by the revolt of the screaming commodity: the body of the slave fighting against its imposed status of thing-liness.

The rise of consumer culture, the proliferation and intensification of the commodity, can be understood as the expansion of the violence of accumulation all across the social field. The ferocious forces which separate the producer from the product of the labour process have not waned; on the contrary, they have become monstrously multiplied and rendered all the more invisible by their ubiquity in the society of the spectacle (Debord 1983). The critique and denunciation of these forces, have, in fact, become yet another commodity in the spectacle; something we witness today in the backlash against banks, bankers and speculators and all the glorified preening of capitalist consumption they stand for. Is this trend, then, the ‘new spirit of capitalism’?    

And yet, an alternative exists to the vicious dynamics described above.  One thinks, for instance, of the practices of Russian constructivists during the 1920s. The Constructivists, employing their artistic practices and knowledges to reconfigure industrial design and production, argued that rather than denouncing the seductive lure of the capitalist commodity it would be possible to utilize these energies to reshape the socialist world. This would move the objects produced for use and consumption from being capitalist commodity to be active participants in the building of this world: it would make them into comrades (Kiaer 2005).  Yet, how attractive is this vision to the postmodern consumer? Is it more or less dangerous than its alternative?

Today, therefore, we need to reconsider the “state of things,” or, put another way, the “state” of things.  Both bloody commodities and comradely objects exist, as a double edge, all around us:  the stubborn existence of sweatshop production and labour exploitation exist side-by-side with the proliferation of ‘helpful’ technologies and all sorts of interactive gadgets and participatory media networks. Fair trade products have moved from the status of marginal subcultural practices to multinational corporate cash schemes. Are we seeing the inauguration of a new era of ethical production through the commodity form (Arvidsson 2006) or the latest and most comprehensive example of alienation, one that is now self-managed through the fetish of ethical consumption?  What would objects now say to us?

This issue aims to find out. Possible areas for inquiry could include but are not limited to:

• Commodity fetishism, surfaces and glosses

• Revolting objects and rebellious products

• The current ‘ethical’ fetishes in production and consumption

• Autoreduction and reappropriation of commodities

• The labour of making labour ‘disappear’ from commodities

• Spectacular society and its other

• The commons in and through the ‘market’ and ‘markets’

• The madness of crowds and the taming influence of objects

References

Arvidsson, Adam (2006) Brands: Meaning and Value in Media Culture. London: Routledge.

Debord, Guy (1983) Society of the Spectacle. Detroit, MI: Red & Black.

Jennings, Paul (1963) “Report of Resistentialism,” Town & Country. Available at www.resistentialists.com

Kiaer, Christina (2005) Imagine No Possessions: The Socialist Objects of Russian Constructivism. Cambridge: MIT University Press.

Moten, Fred (2003) In The Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

We welcome original, high-quality articles between 6,000 to 7,000 words (including references) which are not currently under consideration by other journals and also shorter review articles, commentaries and book reviews.  Potential contributors are welcome to contact the Editors informally, and especially in the case of shorter pieces they may want to submit:  stevphen@autonomedia.org or m.lim@leicester.ac.uk

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Full submission instructions are available on the Culture and Organization publishers’ homepage:   http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14759551.asp. Please read these in full before submitting your manuscript.

Important Dates

• Paper submission deadline: 3rd June, 2011

• Camera ready papers:  30th April, 2012

Publication scheduled for September 2012.

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Karl Marx

BLACK SKIN, WHITE MARX?

Dear all

The Centre for Cultural Studies would like to invite you to this free public event.

I would be very grateful if you would forward the invitation to staff and students who would be interested in attending.

Best wishes
Matt Spencer (Goldsmiths CCS)

————–

*Black Skin White Marx?*

Goldsmiths Centre for Cultural Studies present a special intervention:

Professor Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (University Professor and Director of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, Columbia University, USA) and Professor Fred Moten (Professor of English, Duke University, USA) will be speaking in dialogue with Karl Marx on issues of race, critique and the possibilities for a radical politics to come.

Chaired by Dr Jennifer Bajorek (Senior Lecturer, Goldsmiths Centre for Cultural Studies)

4th June 2010, 1pm-4pm
Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre
Goldsmiths, New Cross, London
SE14 6NW
All Welcome

Goldsmiths Centre for Cultural Studies in association with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Goldsmiths Graduate School, Centre for Postcolonial Studies, Department of Anthropology and Department of Media and Communications.

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Spivak

Polygraph 21

Polygraph 21

POLYGRAPH 21

 

Study, Students, Universities

Issue Editors: Luka Aarsenjuk and Michelle Koerner

Introduction: Available as a PDF file, Luka Arsenjuk and Michelle Koerner

Creating Commons: Divided Governance, Participatory Management, and Struggles Against Enclosure in the University, Isaac Kamola and Eli Meyerhoff

Surplus Knowledge; or, Can We Teach Today? Juliet Flower MacCannell

Destinies of the University, Alessandro Russo, Translated by Roberta Orlandini

Risky Business: Why Public Is Losing to Private in American Research, Christopher Newfield

The Financialization of Student Life: Five Propositions on Student Debt, Morgan Adamson

Axiomatic Equality: Jacques Rancière and the Politics of Contemporary Education, Nina Power

A ‘Nueva Politicidad’, A Different Epistemology: An Introduction to ‘Colectivo Situaciones’ and ‘Universidad Trashumante’, Beatriz Llenin-Figueroa

An Elephant at School and Other Texts, Colectivo Situaciones, Translated by Beatriz Llenin-Figueroa

Walking the Other Country: Reflections on ‘Trashumancia’ and Popular Education, Universidad Trashumante, Translated by Beatriz Llenin-Figueroa

On Study: A ‘Polygraph’ Roundtable Discussion with Marc Bousquet, Stefano Harney, and Fred Moten, Available as a PDF file.

Universities in France: Forty Years After May ’68, Renaud Bécot, Translated by Justin Izzo

The Gated Campus, Its Borderless Subjects, and the Neighborhood Nearby, Gökçe Günel, Books in Review

Marc Bousquet, How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation (2008), Available as a PDF file, Review by Gerry Canavan

Antonio Negri, The Porcelain Workshop: For a New Grammar of Politics (2008); Paolo Virno, Multitude: Between Innovation and Negation (2008); Christian Marazzi, Capital and Language: From the New Economy to the War Economy (2008), Review by Alex Greenberg

John R. Betz, After Enlightenment: The Post-Secular Vision of J. G. Hamann (2009), Review by Lucas Perkins

‘Polygraph’ 21 is at: http://www.duke.edu/web/polygraph/poly21.html

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The University of Utopia
Radicalising Higher Education

 

2nd Annual Research Conference

The Centre for Educational Research and Development of the University of Lincoln

 

Thursday, 4th June, 2009

EMMTEC Conference Centre, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, LN6 7TS

 

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:         

Professor Ron Barnett, Institute of Education:         The Utopian University: Challenges and Prospects

Professor Antonia Darder, University of Illinois: “Breaking Silence: A Study into the Pervasiveness of Oppression”

 

 

THEMATIC WORKSHOPS

Patrick Ainley, Joyce Canaan: “The Student Experience”

Stefano Harney, Fred Moten: “Academic Labour”

Cath Lambert, Mike Neary, Elisabeth Simbuerger: “Teaching in Public”

Dennis Hayes, Terence Karran: “Academic Freedom”

 

 

What is the Conference About?

 

Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) sets out, for the first time, the paradox of the modern (new) world: the possibility of abundance (freedom) in a society of scarcity (non-freedom); and the dangers that are inherent in this paradoxical situation for the development of the emergent capitalist society.

 

More suggests the universality of education as a way of resolving this paradox.  For the humanist More, the highest pleasures are those of the mind, and true happiness depends on their realization.  On More’s fantasy island, Utopia is a universal school for all its citizens, where all civic life is education.  Citizens attend public lectures in the morning, participate in lively discussions during meal-times, and, in the evening, receive formal supervision from scholars. (Meiksins Wood, 1997).

 

In 1953, with the publication of The University of Utopia, the educational philosopher Robert Hutchins extended More’s allegory to a liberal humanist reappraisal of higher education.  Anticipating the vocationalist critique of contemporary higher education, Hutchins wrote ‘The object of the educational system, taken as a whole, is not to produce hands for industry or to teach the young how to make a living. It is to produce responsible citizens’ (p.3). Hutchins’s views have been repeated and endorsed in the increasing volume of critical literature on the commercialisation of higher education.

 

However this critical literature has struggled to provide any convincing alternatives to ‘academic capitalism’ (Slaughter and Leslie, 1997).  This absence of any radical alternative, occurs not because of a lack of imagination, but by virtue of the nature of liberal-humanism itself.  For Zizek (2002) liberal humanism ‘precludes any serious questioning of the way in which this liberal democratic order is complicit in the phenomena it officially condemns, and, of course, any serious attempt to imagine a different socio-political order’ (167). What this amounts to, for Zizek, is ‘a prohibition on thinking… the moment we question the liberal consensus we are accused of abandoning scientific objectivity and recourse to outdate ideological positions’ (168).

 

The aim of this conference is to recover the freshness of More’s critique, while going beyond Hutchins’s liberal fundamentalism, in order to imagine some real radical futures for higher education.  The conference addresses the problem of inventing a form of radicality that confronts the same paradox that emerged in Tudor England, and continues to undermine the progressive development of the postmodern world.

 

 

Why Come to the Conference?

 

The conference will be of interest to all staff in further and higher education who are concerned about the future direction and role of the changing university within the emerging global knowledge economy.

 

We look forward to welcoming you

Register online now at: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/conferences/  

 

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