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Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISES IN EDUCATION, CRISES OF EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Scholar, Department of Education, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014.

 

INTRODUCTION

The capitalist crisis of 2007-09 cast a grim shadow over social existence in developed Western nations. The fallout from the banking crash of September 2008 post-Lehman cascaded over welfare, health, social services and education provision in the form of austerity measures, the drive to cut sovereign debt levels, the erosion of workers’ living standards and vicious service cuts and taxes aimed at the poor and disadvantaged (e.g. the bedroom tax in the UK).

On the back of this maelstrom, the Journal of Education Policy (JEP) celebrated its 25th anniversary by running a special issue on ‘Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis’ in 2010[1]. The JEP is to be congratulated on unveiling articles addressing relationships between the crisis of 2007-09 and education: it was unusual for a mainstream education journal to dedicate a whole issue to this topic. However, with the possible exception of Clarke and Newman’s (2010) contribution[2] it could be concluded that little progress has been made in understanding relations between capitalist crises and education since Madan Sarup’s classic Education, State and Crisis: A Marxist Perspective of 1982. Furthermore, there seemed to be a coy elision regarding the constitution of crisis within or of education itself. The crisis of 2007-09 was basically ‘economic’ in nature, it appears, with various spill-over effects for education: e.g. cuts in expenditure, deepening educational inequalities and rationing of access to higher education (Jones, 2010). Thus: education crisis was derivative of, and consequential upon, economic crisis. Furthermore, the economy, or the ‘economic’ system (for structuralists) is the starting point for analysis of education crisis.

The notion that an ‘education crisis’ can only ever be derivative of a capitalist economic one begs the question as to whether all crises can only ever be basically economic in nature; only ‘economic’ crises fundamentally put either the whole capitalist economy and society at risk, or, are the foundation for crises in other parts of the social system but still basically ‘economic’ in nature; thereby generating spectres of reductionism, economic determinism and crude renditions of historical materialism. On the other hand, references to ‘crisis’ litter media reports and academic outputs in relation to all kinds of topics – and there is nearly always some kind of ‘education crisis’ foregrounded by the print media. In terms of everyday usage the concept appears to have extensive legitimacy, though Gamble notes that ‘the term crisis [is] being thrown around fairly indiscriminately in everyday discourse’ (2009, p.7).[3]

It should be borne in mind that the concept of crisis can be traced back to the writings of Hippocrates (c. 460 – c. 370 B.C.) in ancient Greece, where it was used in relation to medicine, specifically indicating the turning point in the course of a disease or medical condition. In such writings as Epidemics, Book 1, Hippocrates used the concept of crisis to denote the point (the turning point) at which a patient either began to make a recovery from illness, or the disease won out and death resulted (Hippocrates, 1983). Furthermore, reading the ground-breaking work on crisis by Janet Roitman (2011 and 2014), which built on the classic text on the topic by Reinhart Koselleck (1988), indicated that an exploration of the concept of crisis beyond the economic sphere could be a worthwhile project. Maybe there could be essentially ‘education crises’ after all, and with this in view, this paper is structured into three parts, as follows.

Part 1 begins with a rudimentary outline of the concept of crisis. Madan Sarup’s (1982) classical theory of education crisis is then explored, coupled with some evidence showing that Sarup’s approach still has relevance for today (with contemporary examples drawn from the United States, Australia and England). It is demonstrated how contemporary accounts of the 2007-09 economic crisis could supplement and deepen Sarup’s account, whilst also avoiding the issue of the possibility of definitive education crises. This is followed by a brief outline and review of some work by Vincent Carpentier (2003, 2006a-b and 2009), which, although manifesting more sophistication (and much better data) as compared with Sarup’s classic work, nevertheless falls prey to subsuming education crises under economic developments. In the same context, David Blacker’s work on The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame (2013) is examined. This is an attempt to apply Marx’s notion of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall (TRPF) (via the work of Kliman, 2012) to developments in education in the United States (primarily). Blacker stamps the TRPF on contemporary education and thereby develops an original account of education crisis. Yet nevertheless, his rendering of education crisis is still derivative of economic crisis. Blacker also fails to pin down what a falling rate of learning actually is. He prefers to focus on a fall in the mass of learning and the elimination of learning, instead. These developments rest on economic, but also environmental, crisis. This first part of the paper ends with a brief critique of Crisis Fundamentalism: the notion that real, bona fide crises can only be economic ones. This is what the concept of crisis in education is concerned with.

Part 2 takes another tack: a different starting point, an alternative methodological approach. Rather than viewing education crises as flowing from economic ones, it explores the concept of education and what it is to be an ‘educated person’, and then seeks out possibilities for education crises within educational phenomena, institutions, processes and ethics. Such crises are crises of education, it is argued. The work of R.S. Peters (via Robin Barrow, 2011) is the focus here. There is an attempt to work through what an ‘education crisis’ might be on the basis of Barrow’s rendition of what he (Barrow) takes to be the four key components of Peters’ conception of the educated person. The discussion of some of the consequences of this approach is deepened through bringing the work of Janet Roitman (2011, 2014) to the keyboard. Rather than providing a history of the concept of crisis, as in Koselleck (1988), or providing a new (and improved) concept of crisis, Roitman shows the various ways in which the concept has been, and can be, put to work. Hence, Roitman’s approach to crisis is ‘put to work’ on R.S. Peters’ work on the educated person, pace Barrow. The last base in Part 2 examines the notion of ‘education for its own sake’ and what I call ‘island pedagogy’, flowing from the work of Furedi (2004a and 2009) and his followers. The argument here is that this approach to education crisis falls either into an ethics of blame or conjures up an education Colossus; a kind of Nietzschean figure with a monumental drive to learn and teach, unsullied by material interests and motivations. This approach is also basically idealist, transhistorical and sociologically naïve. It is also the flipside of Crisis Fundamentalism (education crises derive from economic ones – crises in education): quintessentially education crises can only arise within the educational sphere itself – leading to a kind of Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education).

The Conclusion argues that we need to think about crisis in relation to education and economy in a new way: such crises are not essentially ‘education’ or ‘economic’ in nature. An anti- (rather than post-) structuralist perspective rooted in class struggle is advanced as a way forward, and neither Crisis Fundamentalism (crises in education) nor Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education) will do. It also discusses the question of whether, and why, exploring the issue of crisis and education is a worthwhile pursuit for critical educators and theorists and for those who wish to move beyond capitalist education and society.

 

The whole paper can be downloaded at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

[1] Journal of Education Policy, Vol.25 No.6, November, edited by Stephen Ball, Meg Maguire and Ivor Goodson. A book based on this special 25th Anniversary was produced by the same three editors, also called Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis, in 2012 (Ball et al, 2012) – but with some additional articles.

[2] Clarke and Newman (2010) explore the notion that crises are ‘socially constructed’ and the roles discourse and social power play in these constructions.

[3] See also: ‘Crisis is much overused in everyday discourse. 24-hour news lives by manufacturing crisis. Most of them are entirely ephemeral. Any event that is in any way out of the ordinary or where there appears to be conflict and the outcome is uncertain becomes labelled a crisis’ (Gamble, 2010, p.704).

Michael Neary

MARKETISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE STUDENT AS CONSUMER

Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer, jointly edited by Mike Molesworth, Lizzie Nixon and Richard Scullion and was published by Routledge in October 2010.

The Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer was launched at the House of Commons on 28th October. The launch was hosted by Baroness Estelle Morris in the Thatcher Room in Portcullis House.

About the Book:

Until recently government policy in the UK has encouraged an expansion of Higher Education to increase participation and with an express aim of creating a more educated workforce. This expansion has led to competition between Higher Education institutions, with students increasingly positioned as consumers and institutions working to improve the extent to which they meet ‘consumer demands’.

Especially given the latest government funding cuts, the most prevalent outlook in Higher Education today is one of business, forcing institutions to reassess the way they are managed and promoted to ensure maximum efficiency, sales and ‘profits’. Students view the opportunity to gain a degree as a right, and a service which they have paid for, demanding a greater choice and a return on their investment. Changes in higher education have been rapid, and there has been little critical research into the implications. This volume brings together internationally comparative academic perspectives, critical accounts and empirical research to explore fully the issues and experiences of education as a commodity, examining:

The international and financial context of marketisation

The new purposes of universities

The implications of university branding and promotion

League tables and student surveys vs. quality of education

The higher education market and distance learning

Students as ‘active consumers’ in the co-creation of value

Changing student experiences, demands and focus

With contributions from many of the leading names involved in Higher Education including Ron Barnett, Frank Furedi, Lewis Elton, Roger Brown and also Laurie Taylor in his journalistic guise as an academic at the University of Poppleton, this book will be essential reading for many.

About the Authors

Mike Molesworth is Senior Lecturer in Online Marketing and Consumer Behaviour at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Richard Scullion is Senior Lecturer in Marketing Communications and Political Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Elizabeth Nixon is Lecturer in Marketing Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

The book can be bought from:

Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415584470/

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775427&sr=1-1

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775597&sr=1-1

A pre-print version of a chapter in the book by Michael Neary and Andy Hagyard, Pedagogy of Excess: An alternative political economy of student life can be viewed here: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/files/2010/10/Pedagogy-of-Excess-preprint.pdf  

Michael Neary and Joss Winn’s chapter 10 in the book, Student as Producer: reinventing the student experience in higher education can be found at: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/1675/1/Future_of_HE_-_Chapter_10.pdf

See also:

Neary, M. (2010) Student as Producer: A Pedagogy for the Avant-Garde; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach? Learning Exchange, Vol.1 No.1, online at: http://learningexchange.westminster.ac.uk/index.php/lej/article/viewFile/15/13

Student as Producer blog, is at: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/blog/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Marketisation of Higher Education

Battle of Ideas Festival, an annual event organised by the Institute of Ideas and taking place at the Royal College of Art, London on October 30-31. Over the course of a weekend over 2,000 people will be taking part in over 75 different debates involving hundreds of incisive and thought-provoking speakers.

Hilton reading Postone

 

This year’s festival includes strands of debates on medical ethics, social policy, scientific evidence and the battle for the past, and keynote debates on trust in an age of cynicism, whether the public is engaged or imagined, the economic and cultural future of the West, the promise and risks of engineering the future, the rights and wrongs of social justice, and what it means to be a liberal today, as well as many more discussions on current themes in the arts, science, health, parenting, education, design, fashion, international relations, religion and secularism, sport and everyday life.

Speakers include: David Aaronovitch columnist; Sarah Churchwell academic; Frank Furedi professor of sociology, University of Kent, Canterbury; Anil Gupta professor, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad; John Harris professor of bioethics; Bettany Hughes broadcaster; Virginia Ironside agony aunt; Wendy Kaminer US-based writer on liberty; Irma Kurtz writer; Norman Lebrecht cultural commentator; Paul Mason broadcaster; Gáspár Miklos Tamás Hungarian philosopher and dissident; Brendan O’Neill editor, spiked; Tim Parks novelist; Fred Pearce author; Anthony Seldon author and master, Wellington College; Roger Scruton philosopher; Dr Richard Smith author; Tarun J Tejpal Indian journalist and novelist; Professor Sir Mark Walport director of the Wellcome Trust; David Willetts MP Science Minister; David Yelland former editor, The Sun; Peter York cultural commentator; and many more. Click here for a full list.

Martin Wolf, chief economics commentator at the Financial Times, said the Battle of Ideas is: ‘a unique opportunity to learn from vigorous exchanges among some of the world’s best-informed and most provocative people’ and the neuroscientist Professor Colin Blakemore called his experience, ‘adrenaline for the mind. A chance for intellectual fisticuffs with some of the best-known and most stimulating thinkers in the world.’

Visit: http://www.battleofideas.org.uk to view this year’s entire festival programme, including an expanded programme of national and international Satellite events, as well as carefully selected readings for each session, specially commissioned Battle in Print essays on selected themes, and videos of previous years’ sessions. The festival brochure can also be downloaded as a PDF document.

** School students aged 16-18 are able to attend a day of the festival for free (the second day costing only £10). There are also a limited number of HALF PRICE Student Champion tickets, allowing university students full access to the weekend festival for just £25. Click here to purchase discounted tickets.**

Tickets are available through online booking, or by phone: 0207 269 9220.

If you know anyone who you think would be interested in this, please do forward this email on to friends and colleagues.

Best wishes

Claire

BATTLE OF IDEAS FESTIVAL

Claire Fox: Director, Institute of Ideas, Signet House, 49-51 Farringdon Road, London EC1M 3JP, 020 7269 9220, 020 7269 9223 (direct): www.instituteofideas.com; www.battleofideas.org.uk; www.debatingmatters.com

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Radical Politics

SPACES OF DEMOCRACY: FORTHCOMING ACTIVITIES

Please see below for details of FIVE forthcoming Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space activities:-

1] SPATIAL JUSTICE: RADICAL SPATIAL FOUNDATIONS
A one-day workshop organised by Chantal Mouffe (node director), The Westminster Centre for the Study of Democracy, and Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, The Westminster International Law & Theory Centre.

Keynote Addresses: David Harvey AND Doreen Massey

Roundtable:
Mustafa Dikec, Engin Isin, Ruth Levitas, Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, David Slater

19th November 2010, 10-6pm, The Pavilion, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 7UW

Admission free but places limited. Please contact Andrea Pavoni at a.pavoni@my.westminster.ac.uk to reserve your seat.

2] During 2009-2011, the new Rutgers University node has organized an extensive university-wide series of nearly two hundred lectures, colloquia, panel discussions, and other events exploring the theme of “Ecologies in the Balance.”
For the current academic year 2010-2011, they have designated eight specific events to inaugurate the Spaces of Democracy initiative at Rutgers.
These are as follows:

Sept 27 Steve Lerner, Research Director, Commonweal
“Sacrifice Zones: The Front Lines of Toxic Chemical Exposure in the US”

Oct 26 Etienne Balibar, Paris X-Nanterre, University of California-Irvine
“Europe: the Final Crisis?

Oct 27 Matthew Jelacic, Architecture, University of Colorado
“Traumatic Urbanization and its Consequences”

Oct 29 Carolyn Finney, Geography, University of California-Berkeley
“There Goes the Neighborhood: Race, Resilience and Environmental Change”

Nov 19 Mazen Labban, Geography, University of Miami
“State, Class, and Oil: Sovereignty Over Natural Resources, Nationalization, and Economic Development in Mexico, 1920-2000”

Feb 9 Ananya Roy, City and Regional Planning, University of California-Berkeley
“The Urban Century: Ecologies and Epistemologies of Dwelling in the Global South”

Feb 23 Daniel Nepstad, Woods Hole Research Institute
“Can Carbon Carry the Global Conservation Agenda?”

March 23 Sharyle Patton, Health and Environment Program, Commonweal
“Our Body Burden of Toxic Chemicals: Implications for Chemical Policy Reform”

For details contact the new Rutgers node Directors: Joanna Regulska and Robert Lake

Joanna Regulska
Professor of Women’s Studies and Geography
Dean of International Programs
School of Arts and Sciences
Rutgers University
77 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA
tel 1-732-932-2699 ext 159
fax 1-732-932-1226
regulska@rci.rutgers.edu

Robert W. Lake
Professor and Graduate Director
Director of the Doctoral Program
Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy
Rutgers University
33 Livingston Avenue, Suite 400
New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA
tel 1-732-932-3133 ext 521
fax 1-732-932-2363
rlake@rutgers.edu>

3] ANANYA ROY ON POVERTY, DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC SCHOLARSHIP: A micro-seminar on the research and activism of ANANYA ROY

(organised by Katharyne Mitchell (node Director University of Washington) and Victoria Lawson at University of Washington).

This includes a public lecture by Ananya Roy: Monday, Oct 11, 6:00pm, Kane Hall; a preliminary seminar on Friday, Oct 8, 2:30 – 5:20pm,

CMU 202 and a concluding seminar on Tuesday, Oct 12, 3:30 – 5:20pm, CMU 202 where there will be a discussion of intersections between public lecture,

Roy’s publications and her public activism and scholarship.

4] CALL FOR PAPERS!!! – Building states and civil societies in Africa: Liberal interventions and global governmentality

Many African states have been subject to donor programmes that place great emphasis on the participation of national and international civil society actors in the formation and implementation of development policy.

Donor policy suggests that the post-Cold War form of civil society is both autonomous from the post-colonial African state, as well as fundamental to the development of responsible liberal democratic states in Africa.

However, a number of studies have documented the emergence of non-state actors that may provide some form of institutional stability but challenge the clear-cut distinction between state and civil society.

Examples include religious organisations, so-called social movements and informal associational practices. This workshop takes as its starting point critical, postcolonial and governmentally derived insights on the limitations of the public/private, state/society, and domestic/international binaries for comprehending African politics and governance.

The aim is to bring together a wide, and sometimes disparate body of research on state-formation and civil society in a post-development context, and to ask whether civil society remains a meaningful term in attempting to understand social, political and economic practices in African societies.

This workshop has been kindly sponsored by the Journal for Intervention and State Building, and the African Studies Association UK.

Papers presented at the workshop will be considered for a special issue of the journal due to be published in 2011/12.

Participants are requested to produce a paper of 7-8,000 words, with Harvard referencing, a month prior to the workshop, and undertake to read and act as a discussant for one other paper, to a facilitate a close engagement with the research presented, and to allow time for 10  papers to be discussed.

Please submit an abstract of 200 words to: Clive Gabay c.gabay@qmul.ac.uk or Carl Death crd@aber.ac.uk by 15 November 2010, with your institutional affiliation.

5] The book WHAT IS RADICAL POLITICS TODAY? (2009) Palgrave-MacMillan, edited by Jonathan Pugh, Newcastle University, is now available for £10 on Amazon.

Including original contributions from Zygmunt Bauman, Will Hutton, Frank Furedi, Clare Short, Ken Worpole, Nick Cohen, Hilary Wainwright, Paul Kingsnorth, Chantal Mouffe, Terrell Carver, Edward W. Soja, David Chandler, Dora Apel, Doreen Massey, Jason Toynbee, James Martin, Michael J. Watts, Jeremy Gilbert and Jo Littler, Gregor McLennan, Tariq Modood, Amir Saeed & David Bates, Alastair Bonnett, Nigel Thrift, Sheila Jasanoff, Saul Newman, David Featherstone, James Heartfield, Alejandro Colás and Jason Edwards, David Boyle, Saskia Sassen.
“Provocative, authoritative and timely …” (New Statesman)

END

For “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network website: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/

For Radical Politics Today magazine: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/publications/magazine/magazine.html

For more on the book What is radical politics today?, published in 2009 by Palgrave MacMillan: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/resources_bookstoread.html

Jonathan Pugh
Senior Academic Fellow
Director “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network
School of Geography, Politics and Sociology
5th Floor Daysh Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
United Kingdom
Honorary Fellow, The Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

David Harvey

SPACES OF DEMOCRACY EVENTS: DAVID HARVEY, DOREEN MASSEY, ANANYA ROY

Please see below for details of FIVE forthcoming, present and related Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space events:-

1] A one day workshop centred around a debate between DOREEN MASSEY and DAVID HARVEY, Friday 19th November, organised by Chantal Mouffe (node Director at the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Westminster). (further details forthcoming).

2] ANANYA ROY ON POVERTY, DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC SCHOLARSHIP: A micro-seminar on the research and activism of ANANYA ROY (organised by Katharyne Mitchell, node Director, University of Washington) and Victoria Lawson at University of Washington).

This includes a public lecture by Ananya Roy: Monday, Oct 11, 6:00pm, Kane Hall; a preliminary seminar on Friday, Oct 8, 2:30 – 5:20pm, CMU 202 and a concluding seminar on Tuesday, Oct 12, 3:30 – 5:20pm, CMU 202 where there will be a discussion of intersections between public lecture, Roy’s publications and her public activism and scholarship.

3] A FILM is being made on NEOLIBERALISING INDIAN CITIES with Director of the South Asia Node of the Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space network, Swapna Banerjee-Guha, from the School of Social Sciences, TISS, India. (further details forthcoming).

4] The book WHAT IS RADICAL POLITICS TODAY? (2009) Palgrave-MacMillan, edited by Jonathan Pugh, Newcastle University, is now available for £10 at some bookstores.

A crisis makes you re-think your life. The recent economic crisis is no exception. All of us are now thinking how the world could be run differently. Despite this, a radical alternative has hardly emerged to mobilise the masses, which begs the question: What is radical politics today? In this book, leading academics, politicians, journalists and activists attempt to pinpoint an answer, debating the issues facing radical politics in the 21st Century. Rarely united in their opinions, they collectively interogate the character and spirit of being radical in our times.

Including original contributions from Zygmunt Bauman, Will Hutton, Frank Furedi, Clare Short, Ken Worpole, Nick Cohen, Hilary Wainwright, Paul Kingsnorth, Chantal Mouffe, Terrell Carver, Edward W. Soja, David Chandler, Dora Apel, Doreen Massey, Jason Toynbee, James Martin, Michael J. Watts, Jeremy Gilbert and Jo Littler, Gregor McLennan, Tariq Modood, Amir Saeed & David Bates, Alastair Bonnett, Nigel Thrift, Sheila Jasanoff, Saul Newman, David Featherstone, James Heartfield, Alejandro Colás and Jason Edwards, David Boyle, Saskia Sassen.”

* Explores the spirit and character of radical politics, at this pivotal moment in history.

* Thirty well known and influential commentators write original 3000 word essays.

* Offers thought provoking and often conflicting opinions.

* The only current wide ranging survey of the state of radical politics, post-crisis.

* Accessibly written for the general public and student audiences.

Recent reviews include:

“Provocative, authoritative and timely …” (New Statesman)

“This stimulating and impressively diverse collection of essays helps us to begin re-thinking our predicament. Anyone who finds themselves in agreement with all the authors here must be seriously confused, since several of the pieces offer directly contradictory analyses. But the strength of the book as a whole lies precisely in bringing different political traditions into productive dialogue” (Red Pepper)

“Jonathan Pugh gathers some of the most innovative and insightful voices from Britain and beyond to stage a series of debates on the central issues facing radical politics today.  This collection is a model for the kinds of discussion we need to move forward.” Michael Hardt (Duke University).

“This is a bold, brave and timely book. As we emerge, blinking into the light after three decades of neo-liberal darkness, Jonathan Pugh has put together a collection of essays that will provoke and provide clues to the question of what comes next; what indeed is radical politics today?” Neal Lawson (Director, Compass).

“This timely and well-planned collection of essays by distinguished and concerned scholars throws much new light on where we should be looking for new ideas. It represents a major contribution to the ongoing debate on the problems of our times.” Lord Bhikhu Parekh

5] A number of participants in the network have also contributed to the following special issue of the journal GLOBALIZATIONS

Special Issue: Globalization and Crisis
Volume 7, Issue 1-2, April 2010

This special issue of Globalizations consists of a set of analyses provided by leading international scholars in the field of both the theoretical and the practical relationship between ‘globalization’ – as each contributor interprets this concept – and ‘crisis’ both historically and in the present context i.e. the most severe global systemic crisis for a century. The articles are intended to provide substantial analytical critique, and contribute to the development of new
understandings of globalization.

Contributors: Editor:

Barry K. Gills, Newcastle University, UK
Foreword: ‘Fair Globalization in Crisis’
Mrs Tarja Halonen, President of Finland
Saskia Sassen
Walden Bello
Grahame Thompson
Ankie Hoogvelt
Henry Veltmeyer
Richard Falk
Craig N. Murphy
V. Spike Peterson
Mustapha Kamal Pasha
Heikki Patomaki
James H. Mittelman
Barry K. Gills
Francois Houtart
Susan George
Wazir Jahan Karim
M. Scott Solomon
Ronaldo Munck
Andreas Bieler
Ingemar Lindberg
Werner Sauerborn
Samir Amin
Jonathan Pugh
Nick Buxton
Gemma Bone

END

For “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network website: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/

For Radical Politics Today magazine: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/publications/magazine/magazine.html

For more on the book What is radical politics today?, published in 2009 by Palgrave MacMillan: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/resources_bookstoread.html

Jonathan Pugh
Senior Academic Fellow
Director “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network
School of Geography, Politics and Sociology
5th Floor Daysh Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
United Kingdom
Honorary Fellow, The Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Radical Politics

Radical Politics

WHAT IS RADICAL POLITICS TODAY?

 

What is Radical Politics Today?

Debate and book launch

1.30pm, 25th November 2009, Canada House, Trafalgar Square, London, SW1Y 5BJ

Hosted by:
Catherine Fieschi (Director of Counterpoint, The Think Tank of the British Council; http://www.counterpoint-online.org/)
Jonathan Pugh (Director, the Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space network; http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org)
Dan Porter (Marketing Executive, Palgrave Macmillan).

Those who are interested in attending should contact: counterpoint@britishcouncil.org

The discussion on 25th November will include … Doreen Massey, Saskia Sassen and David Chandler.

NEW BOOK:

What is Radical Politics Today?

Published November 2009, by Palgrave Macmillan

Edited by Jonathan Pugh, Senior Academic Fellow, Newcastle University

A crisis makes you re-think your life. The recent economic crisis is no exception. All of us are now thinking how the world could be run differently. Despite this, a radical alternative has hardly emerged to mobilise the masses, which begs the question: What is radical politics today? In this book, leading academics, politicians, journalists and activists attempt to pinpoint an answer, debating the issues facing radical politics in the 21st Century. Rarely united in their opinions, they collectively interrogate the character and spirit of being radical in our times.

Including original contributions from Zygmunt Bauman, Frank Furedi, Paul Kingsnorth, James Heartfield, Terrell Carver, Clare Short, Edward W. Soja, David Chandler, Hilary Wainwright, Dora Apel, Michael J. Watts, Jason Toynbee, James Martin, Jeremy Gilbert and Jo Littler, Doreen Massey, Gregor McLennan, Tariq Modood, Nick Cohen, Amir Saeed and David Bates, Alastair Bonnett, Ken Worpole, Sheila Jasanoff, Nigel Thrift, Will Hutton, Saul Newman, Chantal Mouffe, David Featherstone, Alejandro Colas and Jason Edwards, David Boyle, and Saskia Sassen.

The project is ongoing, through the Radical Politics Today magazine and events (see http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org)

To purchase the book:
Order online at http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=375741
http://www.amazon.co.uk/What-Radical-Politics-Today-Jonathan/dp/023023626X
or visit your local bookseller.

Hardback 978-0-230-23625-7
Paperback 978-0-230-23626-4

Those who come to the book launch, or attend Spaces of Democracy and Democracy of Space events more generally, will get 25% off the paperback purchase price.

Keys themes of ‘What is Radical Politics Today?’

*A wide-ranging survey of the spirit and character of radical politics at this pivotal moment in history.
*Thirty influential commentators write original 3000 word essays.
*Offers thought provoking and often conflicting opinions.
*Accessibly written for the general public and student audiences.

Recommendations for ‘What is Radical Politics Today?’

‘This is a bold, brave and timely book. As we emerge, blinking into the light after three decades of neo-liberal darkness, Jonathan Pugh has put together a collection of essays that will provoke and provide clues to the question of what comes next; what indeed is radical politics today ?’ — Neal Lawson (Chair, Compass)

‘This collection is a model for the kinds of discussion we need to move forward.’ — Michael Hardt, co-author of Empire, Multitude and Commonwealth

‘ … we need this sort of sustained critical discussion of the kinds of alternative politics available to us.’ — James Tully (University of Victoria).

‘…a major contribution to the ongoing debate on the problems of our times.’ — Lord Bhikhu Parekh

‘ … what sort of Left can win hearts and minds in this moment of crisis? The answers to these important questions are the stuff of this excellent book.’ — Noel Castree (Manchester University).

‘With impeccable timing, this volume provides a stimulating range of perspectives on what radical politics can offer during this period of crisis and change. It deserves to be widely read and debated.’ — Ruth Lister (Loughborough University).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer Resurrection Five

 

 

The Volumizer was Glenn Rikowski’s AOL blog. It was started up on 29th September 2005. On 30th September 2008, AOL announced that all of its Hometown products, including its blogs and newsletters, would be closed down on 31st October 2008. Glenn’s articles, many of which were written for his students at the Volumizer, will be preserved at The Flow of Ideas. Work has begun on this project, and the latest articles to be included are now available, as listed below:

 

 

 

2006

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2006) School Fees, Local Education Authorities and the 1944 Education Act, 1st April, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=School%20Fees%20and%20the%201944%20Education%20Act

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2006) The Business Takeover of Further Education and the Further Education White Paper, 28th March, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Business%20Takeover%20of%20Further%20Education

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2006) Wolf on Marx without Sparks, 27th March, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Wolf%20on%20Marx%20Without%20Sparks

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2006) Education and Inspections Bill: A Case of Educational Traducianism, 28th February, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Education%20and%20Inspections%20Bill%20(2006)

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2006) Higher Education and Confused Employer Syndrome, 7th February, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Higher%20Education%20and%20Confused%20Employer%20Syndrome

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2006) On Transhumanism and Education, 1st February, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=On%20Transhumanism%20and%20Education

 

 

 

2005

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2005) On Education for Its Own Sake, 17th October, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=On%20Education%20for%20Its%20Own%20Sake

 

 

 

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Profile is at: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski