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Tag Archives: Food

PASTORAL – ART @ COMPOTES – FOREST GATE

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By Robert White

Compôtes

118 Woodgrange Road, Forest Gate, London, E7 0EW

Bakery, deli, café.

On Friday 12th February 2016, I went to see the opening of the Pastoral art exhibition at Compôtes in Forest Gate, east London. There was some wonderful art on display. The exhibition was curated by Gabrielle Luca Iozzi and featured exhibits by the following artists: Giuseppe Iozzi, Sabela Mahlangu, Fungai Marima, Jose Pindian, and Robert White.

Pastoral is open free to view at Compôtes until March 12th 2016.

The cakes and soup at Compôtes are particularly good. The freshly baked bread is top notch. Compôtes is close to both Forest Gate and Wanstead Park train stations.

Glenn Rikowski: 18th February 2016

SDC14921

Giuseppe Iozzi

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Food, glorious food

Food, glorious food

FOOD AND SOCIETY 2014

BSA Food Study Group Conference:

Food & Society 2014

Monday 30 June 2014, 09:00-19:30

British Library Conference Centre, London

Keynote speaker: Professor Lotte Holm, Institute of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen

 

Call for Abstracts

Poor diet, levels of food waste and intensification of agriculture are key themes in contemporary food research and policy making, yet they can appear disconnected from everyday social practices and the lived experiences of food and food systems. The fourth BSA Food Study Group conference will bring together researchers, practitioners and policy makers to explore this apparent disconnect and showcase the most cutting edge research and practice from within and beyond the sociology of food.

‘Why do people fail to comply with ‘healthy eating’ advice?’ is a central question for public health policy makers. However it is one which generally fails to acknowledge that for consumers, food is also about pleasure and plays an ideological role in constituting family life. What, therefore, can social science tell us about food and eating in everyday life? To what extent are individuals responsible for their unhealthy or unethical eating practices and is it reasonable for them to be ‘blamed’? What is the significance of the social contexts in which lives are lived? How do emotions and ideas about food, pleasure and commensality influence food practices, over and above official dietary advice? What criteria do different groups of consumers use in selecting foods; are issues of provenance, safety and ethics the preserve of the few? What part can and should be played by food policy makers, manufacturers and retailers in addressing food related health and environmental inequalities? And what can industry, policy and academia learn from each other about the so-called ‘gap’ between knowledge and individual ‘behaviour’ and practices? The conference will bring delegates together around these – and other – issues to discuss what is important in food research now.

Call for Abstracts, Symposia, Posters and Images

The conference will provide a forum for the presentation of rigorous research on food and eating from sociology and other disciplines, looking at experiences in both the Global South and North. The presentation of research from related disciplines and topics is welcomed. Particular focus will be placed on the conference themes:

– The enjoyment of food, consumption preparation and eating

– Food ethics including food insecurity and waste

– Production and consumption, including global dimensions

– Procurement and institutional food

– Food health, obesity, morality

– Children’s food and breastfeeding

– Food and related policy (responses and interventions)

– Food and Public Health

We invite abstracts for oral papers lasting 20 minutes, with 10 minutes to follow for questions, and for posters. As in previous years a prize will be awarded for the poster which delegates agree best communicates its aims, methods, findings and conclusions.

We also invite abstracts for symposia with a maximum of three connected papers of relevance to the conference theme.

Acknowledging the methodological diversity of delegates’ research, we also invite the submission of original fieldwork photographs which reflect a research project. These should be submitted with captions of no more than 30 words.

Abstract Submission Deadline: Friday 14 March 2014

Online abstract submission at: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/eventAbstract.aspx?id=EVT10331

Please direct any academic enquiries to the Food Study Group co-convenors:

Hannah Lambie-Mumford: h.lambie-mumford@sheffield.ac.uk

Rebecca O’Connell: r.oconnell@ioe.ac.uk

Andrea Tonner: a.tonner@strath.ac.uk

For administrative issues please contact the BSA Events Team: events@britsoc.org.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: http://wordpress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th JULY 2013

EVENTS

WHAT IS HAPPENING IN SYRIA?

Friday, July 12
7:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St, Toronto (walking distance from Bathurst subway station)
Free admission

A public forum on the nature of the Syrian government and the opposition, and on the aims of world powers and regional countries in Syria.

Speakers:
Elias Asad is a Syrian-Canadian and a member of the Communist Party of Canada.
Ali Mustafa is a Toronto-based freelance journalist and photographer who has recently returned from Syria.

Organized by Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly

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WORKSHOP – ACTIVE HOPE: HOW TO FACE THE NUCLEAR AND CLIMATE MESS WE’RE IN WITHOUT GOING CRAZY

Monday July 8
6:30 – 9:30 pm
Please arrive at 6:15 to begin at 6:30 sharp.
Friends House, 60 Lowther, Toronto (St. George subway)
Suggested donation: $2 – 20 (sliding scale) 

This workshop is designed to help us in this time of planetary emergency and the resulting overwhelm and despair that many of us feel. Join us for an evening of dialogue and experiential exercises based on teachings and practices developed by eco-philosopher Joanna Macy and colleagues. You will come away with a sense of the bigger picture and a context for action.

Facilitator: Natalie Zend, M.A., CTDP is a training and facilitation consultant with 14 years’ experience in international development and human rights. She is a member of the Work that Reconnects Facilitators Network and offers the Awakening the Dreamer symposium, compassionate communication, Open Space and other social technologies internationally and in her local community of Toronto.

Contact: angela@cleanairalliance.org

For more info on the Work that Reconnects: http://workthatreconnects.org/

Sponsored by: Greenspiration, Toronto Climate Action Network, Ontario Clean Air Alliance, Voice of Women for Peace, PeaceWorks

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HAS THE GIANT AWOKEN? UNDERSTANDING THE MASS PROTEST MOVEMENT IN BRAZIL

Thursday, July 11
7:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St, Toronto (walking distance from Bathurst subway station)
Free admission

Brazil is currently witnessing the largest mass protests to hit the country in over 20 years. Originally organized by the Free Fare Movement (MPL) in Sao Paulo against a planned 10 cent public transit fare hike, the protests quickly spread to Rio de Janeiro, Brasilia, and other major cities across the country. At its peak, over 1 million people in over 100 Brazilian cities took to the streets to protest a long list of grievances ranging from political corruption to human rights abuses to World Cup spending.

Who exactly are the protesters taking to the streets? What are the root grievances they want addressed? Why has Brazil erupted now?

Join us for a public forum with four Brazilian activists who will share their perspectives about this exciting moment in Brazilian history.

Speakers:
Mariana Faraz Duarte is a community development and health practitioner concerned with social justice and participatory decision-making mechanisms. She is doing her PhD in Public Health at University of Toronto.
Rubem Silva is a youth activist involved in housing and students’ social movements in Brazil. Currently, he is doing an exchange program in Public Health and Sexual Diversity Studies at University of Toronto.

*We will also hear (via Skype) from two activists in Rio de Janeiro who are involved in the protest movement on the ground.

Endorsed by: Greater Toronto Workers Assembly, Centre for Social Justice, Toronto New Socialists, Socialist Project, Socialist Action

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THEATRE, PEDAGOGY AND COLLECTIVE MEMORY: BOOK LAUNCH AND PLAY READING

Friday July 12
7:00-9:00pm
Aluna Theatre studio
1 Wiltshire Ave. Unit 123, Toronto

Aluna Theatre in partnership with Latin American Researchers of Ontario (LARO) is pleased to invite the public to the book launch of Como Integrar Artes Escénicas y Ciencias Sociales en el Aula / How to Integrate Scenic Arts and Social Sciences in the Classroom: A Pedagogic Experience Based on Historic Memory, written by Jorge Arcila.

The event will also feature a reading and bilingual (English/Spanish) performance of “Real Mother” a scene from the play Harriet’s House/La Casa de Harriet, by Tara Goldstein. Harriet’s House is a play about love, loss, and adoption in a Canadian lesbian family.

The book, “How to Integrate Scenic Arts and Social Sciences in the Classroom” analyzes the research journey of a group of 16 teenagers who collectively explored historical memory through practices of process drama.

Jorge Arcila holds a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Toronto and a Masters in Political Studies from La Pontifica Universidad Javeriana, Colombia. Tara Goldstein is a professor at the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, University of Toronto.

This event is dedicated to the memory of OISE/UT Professor Roger Simon and Arlan Londono, Colombian artist, curator and scholar who recently passed away.

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SEMINAR:  ABLEISM AND THE QUESTION OF THE HUMAN

Tuesday, July 30
1:00-5:00 pm
OISE, 252 Bloor Street West (St. George subway), Toronto
5th Floor, Room 5-280

This conversation promises to provoke questions regarding the meaning of “human” that can be revealed in everyday assumptions of ability. How, for example, do medical, legal, or educational forms of engaging those who are typically excluded do more than confirm the normative order of ableism or, worse, reproducing human degradation?

This free, public, accessible seminar brings us together with Drs. Dan Goodley from Sheffield University, UK; James Overboe, Waterloo University; Anne McGuire, New College, University Toronto along with Rinaldo Walcott and Tanya Titchkosky from OISE with Lead Discussant Dr Kirsty Liddiard, Post-Doc fellow from Ryerson University.

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NEWS & VIEWS

REFORM REKINDLED

By Mark Brenner, Labor Notes

The sight of tens of thousands of striking teachers and their allies marching through the streets of Chicago last fall had a back-story, a little-discussed trend in organized labor—reform movements.

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/2013/06/reform-rekindled

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LABOUR IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA AND CANCER

By Robert Chernomas and Ian Hudson, The Bullet

A recent book, The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills, makes the reasonable point that, “the price of austerity can be measured in human lives.” Austerity programs have obvious negative impacts on well being when public health programs are cut but it also creates poor health in less obvious ways through the stress of a labour market involving high unemployment and a decimated safety net. A quick glance at the history of the United States can help demonstrate that it is not only recent austerity programs that kill but, rather, that when economic policies favour the business community, death and disease will follow. In fact, a reasonable case could be made that ill health and early death are more a result of economics and politics than germs and genes.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/845.php

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SHORTAGE OF PERSONAL SUPPORT WORKERS IN ONTARIO HOME CARE FEARED

By Shawn Jeffords, Toronto Sun

TORONTO – For 28 years Millie Hickson has risen at 4 a.m.

She dresses in her scrubs and gets into her truck and hits the road. She visits her first client at 6 a.m.

Millie is a personal support worker, the glue that holds Ontario’s troubled home care system together. She will spend the next 10 hours bouncing from client-to-client.

But Millie says there is never enough time. Not for anyone.

Read more: http://www.torontosun.com/2013/06/29/shortage-of-personal-support-workers-in-ontario-home-care-feared

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NEW REPORT – IT ALL BEGINS WITH SPACE: MAXIMIZING USE OF PUBLIC ASSETS FOR ENGAGED AND HEALTHIER NEIGHBOURHOODS

The SPACE Coalition and Social Planning Toronto present new research on the importance of having access to safe places for youth (and all residents) to gather and play.

Access to space connects the pieces with regard to human development from 0 to 20 years old (and beyond). When you provide the space for children and youth to learn, play and build their resilience you provide the space for them to grow into Toronto’s healthy, self-reliant, dynamic leaders of tomorrow. Much has been accomplished through the provision of community use policies and programs. However, many barriers to accessing space still exist and service provision remains a patchwork, unable to meet complex neighbourhood needs due to escalating costs and an overall lack of space in neighbourhoods that need it most. The report release coincides with that of the City of Toronto’s Toronto Youth Equity Framework, which also notes that the provision of space is central to meeting the needs of Toronto’s youth.

Read the report: http://spacecoalition.ca/wp-content/uploads/Toronto-Report-Final5.pdf

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THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT BE STANDARDIZED

By Owen Davis, Waging Nonviolence

The ground under education reform is beginning to shift. Families, chafing under years of state and mayoral control, are demanding a return to democratic processes. There’s the feeling of something lurching under the public education system, and with it our understanding of how resistance should look in the years to come. As high school students take to the streets, unions must do the same or fade into irrelevance.

Read more: http://wagingnonviolence.org/feature/the-revolution-will-not-be-standardized/

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VIDEO: DEMOCRACY AGAINST CAPITALISM

From LeftStreamed

Toronto — 24 June 2013.

A presentation by Brian Roper, author of The History of Democracy – A Marxist Interpretation.

Brian Roper is a long-time activist on the socialist left in New Zealand and an Associate Professor in Politics at the University of Otago. He is the author of Prosperity for All? Economic, Social and Political Change in New Zealand since 1935 (Cengage, 2005) and The History of Democracy — A Marxist Interpretation (Pluto Press, 2012). He maintains a blog at http://briansroper.blogspot.ca

Moderated by David McNally.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls181.php

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HOW ONE CITY’S GRASSROOTS ACTIVISTS DID THE ‘IMPOSSIBLE’ AND PUSHED BACK THE POLITICIANS’ AUSTERITY AGENDA

By Mark Vorpahl, Alternet

On June 20, Oregon’s Portland City Council unanimously voted to approve a budget that had been one of the most grassroots-contested examples of austerity in recent memory.

Weeks earlier, in a vote to approve the framework of this budget on May 29, the City Council’s long-maintained show of consensus was broken when Commissioner Amanda Fritz voted “No.” (More on her vote later). However, by the final budget vote last Thursday she had been compelled to change her mind.

So what worked in Portland to move things towards a better outcome? For starters, Mayor Hales and the City Council’s pursuit of austerity was met with a public outpouring of opposition at public budget hearings. The resistance culminated on April 11 when over 400 protesting participants surprised the City Council and overwhelmed their staff.

Read more: http://www.alternet.org/activism/portlands-austerity-resistance-movement-sparks-changes-city

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JOBS/INTERNSHIPS

LABOUR BEAT REPORTER, RABBLE.CA

In partnership with the Canadian Auto Workers union, rabble.ca is pleased to announce our second annual Labour Beat Co-op Placement. The placement will provide the successful candidate with unique opportunities to develop a grounding for reporting on national labour issues. The internship will involve access to meetings, conferences, media briefings and interviews with leaders in the labour movement, and may include shadowing rabble’s Parliament Hill reporter to committees and scrums.

Applications for the Labour Beat reporter are due July 23rd and the position is for 12 hours a week for 26 weeks. This is a paid internship, sponsored by the Canadian Auto Workers.

For more info and to apply: http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/rabble-staff/2013/07/announcing-co-op-placement-opportunity-labour-beat-reporter

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FRENCH-LANGUAGE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ANIMATOR(S), FOODSHARE

FoodShare Toronto is seeking one full-time, or two part-time, French Language Community Development Animator(s) to implement the community development work plan of the Toronto Partners for Student Nutrition, made up of Toronto Public Health, the Toronto District School Board, Toronto Catholic District School Board and Conseil scolair Viamonde, Toronto Foundation for Student Success, the Angel Foundation for Learning, FoodShare Toronto, and St. Felix Centre. The Community Development Animators are promoters of healthy eating in the school and community environments, with a strong understanding of student and youth nutrition programs. They establish new and support existing sustainable student nutrition programs through community development and engagement.

For more info and to apply: http://www.foodshare.net/careers#animator

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Global Economic Crisis

Global Economic Crisis

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 1st JULY 2013

EVENTS

CONFERENCE – WORK IN A WARMING WORLD: LABOUR, CLIMATE CHANGE AND SOCIAL STRUGGLE

Nov 29-Dec 1, 2013
Toronto, Canada

Work in a Warming World (W3): a research initiative among academics and community partners is proud to announce its 1st International Conference.

We invite abstract submissions (deadline: Aug. 15) for panels and papers for a major international conference on the role of labour and work in the struggle to slow global warming.  The Conference is for labour and environmentalists, students, academic researchers, policy makers and the concerned public.

The 3-day Conference will explore 18 themes, creating a forum where researchers and unions can critically discuss particular topics, share knowledge and experiences, while also developing ties that will enable innovation and change. In addition to our keynote speakers—David Miller, Former Mayor of Toronto and President & CEO of WWF Canada and Philip J. Jennings, General Secretary of UNI-Global Union—we will be having a series of panel discussions and paper presentations. We encourage scholars, students and activists to submit abstracts for papers by following the submission guidelines/deadlines located on the W3 International Conference website.

For more information, please contact: Ann Kim (ann_kim@yorku.ca), T: 416.736.2100 ext. 44106.

W3 International Conference Website/Call For Papers: http://www.workinawarmingworld.yorku.ca/w3conference/

W3 Website: http://www.workinawarmingworld.yorku.ca

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BETWEEN THE LINES SUMMER READING FLASH SALE!

From the stunning Harvest Pilgrims to the provocative Eating Fire, we have lots of books for 50% off AND we are offering FREE shipping on ALL BTL titles until July 31st. 

Sale flyer: http://www.btlbooks.com/titleimages/July13%20Flash%20Sale_web.pdf

Don’t forget you can hear about new books, events, and sales through our social media sites:

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BTLbooks
Pinterest – http://pinterest.com/btlbooks/
Twitter – (@readBTLbooks)
BTL YouTube channel – http://www.youtube.com/user/BTLbooks?feature=mhee

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WEBINAR – DIALOGUE CIRCLES: BUILDING INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN IMMIGRANT AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

July 23 in North America
4:00 pm PDT Vancouver, San Francisco
5:00 pm MDT Edmonton, Denver
7:00 pm EDT Toronto, New York

July 24 in New Zealand, Australia
9:00 am EST Melbourne, Sydney
11:00 am NZST Auckland, Wellington

Join Cities of Migration for this free webinar to learn about groundbreaking initiatives in Wellington, New Zealand, and Vancouver, Canada, that are bringing new immigrant and indigenous communities together for intercultural learning and meaningful exchange as an essential part of newcomer settlement and welcome in these multicultural societies.

For more info and to register: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/6961147981

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SYMPOSIUM – ENGAGING GIRLS, CHANGING COMMUNITIES

Saturday, July 6
11am-2pm
Metro Hall
55 John St., Room 308 (South-east corner of King and John, two blocks east of Spadina)

Engaging Girls, Changing Communities (EGCC), in collaboration with Working Women Community Centre, invites you to a youth symposium showcasing 13 youth led community projects.

EGCC is a community-based research in the Faculty of Education at York University, led by Dr. Nombuso Dlamini. It investigates how young women and girls engage in leadership and civic activities in new urban environments.

R.S.V.P by June 28th to Flavia Genovese at EGCCDATA@edu.yorku.ca or by calling 416 736 2100 ext 44562.

Lunch will be provided

Read more about EGCC at the Jean Augustine website: http://edu.apps01.yorku.ca/jeanaugustinechair/projects-research/egcc/
and on https://www.facebook.com/EGCC.York?ref=hl

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WORKSHOP – CAMPAIGN PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR ACTIVISTS AND CHANGE MAKERS

Thursday July 11, 6.30pm – 9pm and
Thursday July 25, 6.30pm – 9pm.

This workshop is designed to help you and your organization learn valuable steps, tools, techniques and approaches that will help you effectively plan and execute a winning campaign plan to help you achieve your policy goals.

Participants will learn the basic components of a campaign, how to choose a strategic campaign goal, choosing strategies and tactics that suit your goals, working with individuals and groups to build influence, and understanding the key ingredients of successful campaigns. It’s recommend that multiple people from one group attend the workshop as there will be ample time to strategize to achieve your goals.

Trainer: Jessica Bell is a facilitator and educator. She teaches advocacy and government relations at Ryerson University. She is the co-founder of Tools for Change, which provides skills-based advocacy training to Torontonians.  More information about Jessica is at http://www.jessicabell.org.

Cost: $25 for one session; $40 for two.  A discount rate is available if more than one person from a group attends.

Register: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4121441342

Location: 60 Lowther Ave, Toronto (near St. George Subway)

Host: PeaceWorks.  For more information email: peaceworks@primus.ca or call at 416-731-6605.  Contact peaceworks@primus.ca if you have difficulty paying
for the course.

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NEWS & VIEWS

FAST FOOD STRIKES: WHAT’S COOKING?

By Jenny Brown, Labor Notes

After years of downplaying strikes, the union that’s funding fast food organizing is now embracing the tactic. The Service Employees have underwritten short strikes by fast food workers in seven cities in the last two months—including the largest, in Detroit, where 400 workers walked out of dozens of restaurants and completely shut down three.

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/2013/06/fast-food-strikes-whats-cooking

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THE TRAINING WHEELS ARE OFF: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE CANADA JOB GRANT

By Michael Mendelson and Noah Zon, Caledon Institute

In this just-published Caledon/Mowat report, authors Michael Mendelson and Noah Zon assess the Canada Job Grant proposal and find it to be deeply flawed. Aside from additional cost of up to $600 million plus administrative expenses and jurisdictional issues, the Canada Job Grant is likely to deliver inferior results at higher costs, while remaining out of reach to many of the unemployed and underemployed Canadians it is intended to serve.

Read more: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Detail/?ID=1013

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THE EXPENDABLES: HOW THE TEMPS WHO POWER CORPORATE GIANTS ARE GETTING CRUSHED

By Michael Grabell, ProPublica

It’s 4:18 a.m. and the strip mall is deserted. But tucked in back, next to a closed-down video store, an employment agency is already filling up. Rosa Ramirez walks in, as she has done nearly every morning for the past six months. She signs in and sits down in one of the 100 or so blue plastic chairs that fill the office. Over the next three hours, dispatchers will bark out the names of who will work today. Rosa waits, wondering if she will make her rent.

In cities all across the country, workers stand on street corners, line up in alleys or wait in a neon-lit beauty salon for rickety vans to whisk them off to warehouses miles away. Some vans are so packed that to get to work, people must squat on milk crates, sit on the laps of passengers they do not know or sometimes lie on the floor, the other workers’ feet on top of them.

This is not Mexico. It is not Guatemala or Honduras. This is Chicago, New Jersey, Boston.

Read more: http://www.propublica.org/article/the-expendables-how-the-temps-who-power-corporate-giants-are-getting-crushe

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THE PERILS OF STANDARDIZED TESTING: 6 WAYS IT HARMS LEARNING

By Saga Briggs, InformEd

Not so long ago, Google famously asked every job candidate for a transcript, G.P.A., and test scores before considering them for a position.

But as you might expect from a fundamentally data-driven company, Google regularly examines its own hiring methods, collecting and analyzing tremendous amounts of information from employees and adjusting its policies accordingly.

In 2011, Google released the results of a study called Project Oxygen, which showed that its old hiring model proved very little about a candidate’s potential for success.

“One of the things we’ve seen from all our data crunching is that G.P.A.’s are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless — no correlation at all except for brand-new college grads, where there’s a slight correlation,” said senior vice president for people operations Laszlo Bock.

Read more: http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/the-perils-of-standardized-testing/

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SNEAK PREVIEW – OUR TIMES SUMMER ISSUE

Our Times’ summer issue is full of interesting and invigorating reading. Journalist and communications strategist Sima Sahar Zerehi talks to Toronto & York Region Labour Council organizer Jennifer Huang, NOW Communications president and CEO Marie Della Mattia, OFL communications director Joel Duff, and Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Ontario director Trish Hennessey about Canadian labour’s revitalized efforts at communicating with the Canadian public. We’re proud to be publishing Part 3 of our series about leadership, feminism and equality in unions in Canada, this time with a focus on revitalizing union women’s committees. And we bring you a day in the life of a recreation-centre director in this instalment of our Working for a Living series. Plus, our film and book reviews give you some excellent ideas for summer reading.

If you would like to order extra copies of this issue (more than 20) as an education resource for your workshops, conferences or schools, please place your order with our business manager by June 26 (email: office@ourtimes.ca).

Telephone: 416-703-7661 Toll free: 1-800-648-6131. Special bulk order prices are available.

Website: http://www.ourtimes.ca

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Food, glorious food

3rd BSA FOOD STUDY GROUP INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: ‘FOOD AND SOCIETY’

Monday 2nd and Tuesday 3rd July, 2012

The British Library Conference Centre, London

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Janet Poppendieck, Hunter College, City University of New York, USA and Alan Warde, University of Manchester, UK

Early booking deadline 24th June 2012 – don’t miss out!

Following the phenomenal success of previous years, the Food Study Group Conference ‘Food and Society 2012’ is back for a 3rd year and this year looks set to be bigger and better than ever!

This 3rd international Conference will look to further examine the role of food in contemporary society through a sociological lens, examining the empirical questions raised by the relation of food to social and intergenerational inequalities. It will also explore the theoretical issues of food as an item of consumption, cultural symbol and commodity, as well as the ever-present environmental concerns and critical implications for food systems and eating practices.

These key themes will be analysed and discussed over 2 days and whether you are an academic, a practitioner, a policy maker or another research user, we would encourage everyone to come together and share in what is sure to be another fascinating event.

The early booking deadline is coming up and registration will soon close. Book now through our website for as little £155 (48% discount), or if you are a concessionary member £70!

To book online and to find out more about speakers and the programme, visit our website: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/food.aspx

Given the emphasis on social scientific approaches, and to enable the committee to select and group papers appropriately, abstract authors are asked to indicate, where relevant, the theoretical and methodological approach in addition to the substantive focus.

Please direct any academic enquiries to r.oconnell@ioe.ac.uk and any administrative enquiries to events@britsoc.org.uk

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

The Pond at Night

The Pond at Night

EDUCATING FUTURE GENERATIONS OF COMMUNITY GARDENERS

Educating Future Generations of Community Gardeners: A Deweyan Challenge

Shane Jesse Ralston

 

Abstract

In this paper, I formulate a Deweyan argument for school gardening that prepares students for a specific type of gardening activism: community gardening, or the political activity of collectively organizing, planting and tending gardens for the purposes of food security, education and community development. Though not identical, a related type of gardening activism, guerrilla gardening, or the political activity of reclaiming unused urban land, sometimes illegally, for purposes of cultivation and beautification, is also implicated. Historically, community gardening in the U.S. has been associated with relief projects during periods of economic downturn and crisis, urban blight and gentrification, as well as nationalism, nativism and racism. Despite these last few unfortunate associations, the American philosopher John Dewey detached school gardening from the nativist’s tool-kit, portraying it as a gateway to more enriching adult experiences, not as a technique for assimilating immigrant children to a distinctly American way of life. One of those experiences that school gardening can prepare children for is environmental political activism, particularly involvement in gardening movements. Dewey did not mention this collateral benefit. Nevertheless, an argument can be made that garden advocacy—or, more specifically, participation in politically-motivated gardening movements—is an acceptable interpretation, or elaboration, of what Dewey meant by “a civic turn” to school gardening.

To read the full article, go to:

Critical Education, Vol.3 No.3 (April 17, 2012): http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/criticaled/article/view/182349

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Harvesting

FOOD CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPERS

“The Food Crisis: Implications for Decent Work in Rural and Urban Areas”

The International Center for Development and Decent Work (ICDD) Annual Thematic Conference –University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany, July 4-6

In recent years, food prices have gone up to prohibitive levels for many of the world’s poor. They have remained high and volatile. While many poor city dwellers have had to switch their diets to include only very basic foods, the vast majority of those who are hungry in the world today (over half a billion) are working in agriculture, either as small landholders or as waged agricultural workers. This paradox has sparked a lively debate about the reasons for food price increases. However, the implications for the Decent Work agenda have received less attention. The four dimensions of the Decent Work concept (creating jobs, guaranteeing rights at work, extending social protection and promoting social dialogue) do not explicitly cover the issue of rising food prices. On the one hand, price increases for the most basic household items threaten any gains achieved through the Decent Work agenda. On the other hand, increased food prices may in principle provide an opportunity for agricultural labour, yet the majority of the food producers seem not to have benefited from rising prices. Apparently, the bargaining power of many producers has been weakened vis-à-vis the buyers of agricultural produce. This development points to another dimension not explicitly addressed by the Decent Work agenda: power relations along the food chain. TheInternationalCenterfor Development and Decent Work (ICDD) wants to commit its Annual Thematic Conference “The Food Crisis: Implications for Decent Work in Rural and Urban Areas” to an exploration of the origins of the food crisis, its implications for the Decent Work agenda, and strategies for addressing the crisis.

The general themes to be discussed are:

Assessing the Scope of the Food Crisis: Is there a rural – urban divide? What is the impact on workers and small landholders? What are the implications for the Decent Work agenda?

Origins of the Food Crisis: Financialization, land grabbing, climate change and soil degradation, agribusiness, agro-fuels, EU trade policies, demography, productivity obstacles, and other relevant topics.

Remedies for the Food Crisis: Increasing agricultural productivity, improving logistics, empowering agricultural workers, food sovereignty, and other relevant topics.

We encourage potential contributors to include a gender-sensitive analysis whenever possible.

If you would like to present a paper in one of these areas, please send a brief abstract (less than half a page) by April 1, 2012 to: ATC2012Kassel@icdd.uni-kassel.de

Please include the following information:

Name:

Country:

Organization:

Professor Dr. Christoph Scherrer, “Globalisierung & Politik”, FB 5 – Gesellschaftswissenschaften, Universität Kassel, Nora-Platiel-Straße 1, D-34127 Kassel, Tel.: +49 (0) 561 804 3253 Sekr., scherrer@uni-kassel.de

Fachgebiet: http://www.uni-kassel.de/fb05/fachgruppen/politikwissenschaft/globalisierung-und-politik.html

InternationalCenterfor Development and Decent Work: www.icdd.uni-kassel.de

MA Global Political Economy: http://www.uni-kassel.de/go/gpe

MA Labour Polices & Globalisation: www.global-labour-university.org

Promotionskolleg Global Social Policies and Governance: www.social-globalization.uni-kassel.de

ENGAGE – Certificate Course on Global Economic Governance: http://www.global-labour-university.org/216.html

IKSA – InternationalKasselSummerAcademyon the World Economy: http://www.uni-kassel.de/go/sommerakademie

***END***

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 23rd JANUARY 2011

EVENTS

SEMINAR – THE FORMS & DYNAMICS OF ANTI-POVERTY ACTIVISM IN TORONTO

Insights on Methods from the Anti-Poverty Community Organizing & Learning (APCOL) Community University Research Alliance (CURA)

Monday, February 7, 2011
4:30 p.m.
Faculty of Social Work, 246 Bloor St West, Room 548
(St. George subway, Bedford exit; next to OISE)

with Grace-Edward Galabuzi & Peter Sawchuk
Ryerson University & OISE, University of Toronto

A seminar sponsored by the Cities Centre’s Community Development Collaborative Program & the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work’s Chow Yei Ching Chair in Housing

The Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning Community University Research Alliance (2009-2014) seeks to apply the methodologies of participatory action, community-based case study research to the study of activism in Toronto to explore the processes of participation, non-participation and past-participation. In this session co-leaders of the CURA will outline for discussion the community-based research process and partnership dynamics involved in the research. Preliminary case study findings will also be presented.

APCOL is a project of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW), OISE/UT.

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INSTITUTE – WOMEN’S RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS!

CEDAW for Change

One Week Institute

May 16-20, 2011

Directed by Alda Facio, LLP and Martha Morgan, JD

Sponsored by Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE), Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT)

Offered in Association with IWRAW-AP

For full information and the online application form, see our website at: http://www.learnwhr.org
For inquiries, contact WHRI Executive Director Angela Lytle at info@learnwhr.org

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WORKSHOP – MARKETING IN NON-PROFIT AND OTHER SOCIAL PURPOSE ORGANIZATIONS

with Sharon Wood & Trish Krause, The Belmont Group

Friday, January 28, 2011
9:30 am-4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto (St. George subway station), Room – TBA    
         
This session will cover basic marketing concepts, including segmentation, targeting and positioning, as they apply to non-profit and other social-purpose organizations. Workshop design will ensure practical applications, participant involvement in small group discussion and problem solving related to content and their own organizational needs, as well as allowing participants’ an opportunity to network. The presenters will survey participants in advance of the session to ensure the design and content is targeted to audience needs.

Participants will have the opportunity to…

* Apply marketing concepts to challenges facing their own organization
* Explore specialized applications of marketing in social purpose organizations related to such issues as branding, social marketing, volunteer recruitment and resource development (scope of applications to be determined by participants’ needs)

By the end of the workshop, participants will understand how to bring the course learning together to create a practical marketing plan for their organization/issue.

Cost: $140 + HST. Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount. A limited number of spaces are available to students at a discounted rate.

To register: Access the online registration form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FY65KMM or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@gmail.com, or 416-978-0022.

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WOMEN’S HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION INSTITUTE (WHRI):  BUILDING A PEACEFUL WORLD IN AN ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

Six Week Institute

May 2 – June 10, 2011

Directed by: Alda Facio, LLP with Debby Danard, PhD candidate; Mary Eberts LLB, LSM, LLM; Angela Lytle, MEd; Angela Miles, PhD; Martha Morgan, JD

Sponsored by: Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE), Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT)

Offered in Association with Fundación Justicia y Género, Costa Rica

For full information and the online application form, see our website at: http://www.learnwhr.org
For inquiries, contact WHRI Executive Director Angela Lytle at info@learnwhr.org

+++++

STUDY GROUP – EXTRACTING PROFITS: PATTERNS OF OPPRESSION AND RESISTANCE IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

In five open study sessions, “Extracting Profits” will discuss patterns of oppression and resistance in Latin America and the Caribbean. The sessions, held from February to May, include readings, brief presentations, and small-group discussions in an informal and spontaneous atmosphere. No registration – everyone welcome.

Sundays, 2 p.m.-4 p.m, OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

1. February 6: Mexico and the Burden of “Free Trade”: NAFTA, capitalist devastation, and community resistance, OISE, Room 5150

2. February 27: Bolivia and the Right to Water
The Bolivian people have taken their “water wars” to the world stage

3. March 20: Haiti and the Struggle for Food Sovereignty
A story of pigs and rice – how Haitians were robbed of their own food supply

4. April 10: Mining in Central America
Canadian corporations at war against rights of indigenous peoples

5. May 15: ALBA and CETA: Fair Trade vs. “Free Trade”
Canada’s trade agreements violate popular rights; ALBA is based on solidarity.

Organized by Toronto Bolivia Solidarity, an action group of OPIRG–Toronto
For more information: torontoboliviasolidarity@gmail.com or
http://t.grupoapoyo.org

See us on Facebook: ‘Toronto Bolivia Solidarity’

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NEWS AND VIEWS

NEW FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – MANUFACTURING MELTDOWN: RESHAPING STEEL WORK

ISBN 9781552664025
$27.95
224pp
February 2011
by D.W. Livingstone, Dorothy E. Smith & Warren Smith

In the 1980s, following decades of booming business, the global steel industry went into a precipitous decline, which necessitated significant restructuring. Management demanded workers’ increased participation in ever more temporary and insecure labour. Engaging the workers at the flagship Stelco plant in Hamilton, the authors document new management strategies and the responses of unionized workforces to them. These investigations provide valuable insights into the dramatic changes occurring within the Canadian steel industry.

”Manufacturing Meltdown explains what has happened to our manufacturing, our jobs, our future and our country. This is something that needed telling and this book tells it very well.” – Bob Sutton, former recording secretary, United Steelworkers Local 1005 and editor of SteelShots

Order from: Brunswick Books Ltd., 20 Maud St. Suite 303, Toronto, Ontario, M5V 2M5, t- 416.703.3598 f- 416.703.6561 orders@brunswickbooks.ca or http://www.brunswickbooks.ca
Also available at your local independent bookstore or order online from http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca

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VIDEO – KEY UNION STRUGGLES: BUILDING THE FIGHTBACK

Toronto, January 18, 2011

As the economic crisis continues, governments and employers are bringing in austerity measures, lowering our living standards and working conditions. A number of unionized workplaces are particular targets, and have the potential to become key centres of resistance. This forum considers the strategies and political approaches needed to win and is a build-up for the January 29th/30th Workers’ Assembly Labour Conference.

Introduced and moderated by Carolyn Egan, USW Local 8300. Presentations by:

* Mark Ferguson, President of the City of Toronto Municipal Workers Local 416 (bargaining with the new Rob Ford administration in Toronto who has threatened to privatize garbage services);
* Gary Howe, Vice-President of Local 1005 Hamilton Steelworkers (facing a lockout and concession demands at US Steel);
* Marion Pollack, National Representative with the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, based in Ottawa. She is a long time activist in the union and in progressive movements.

Organized by the Labour Committee of the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls85.php

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VIDEO – CLC FILES ACCESS TO INFORMATION REQUEST ON PENSIONS

The Canadian Labour Congress has filed an Access to Information request to find out who lobbied the federal Finance Minister and his department against proposals that would enhance the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans.

Last summer Jim Flaherty said that improving the CPP was the best way to ensure the retirement security of Canadians but the minister has now changed his mind in favour of vastly inferior private sector plans. The financial services sector was lobbying hard prior to the finance ministers meeting in Kananaskis in December.

The CLC filed two access requests in late December 2010, and they ask for both internal government and external lobbying materials related to the CPP and private sector Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs). High management fees charged by banks and insurance companies can reduce pension savings by more than 50 per cent. The CPP is a far better option.

Watch the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8R450pP45VE

+++++
      
ARTICLE – $1 BILLION NIGHTMARE

by Royce Millar and Clay Lucas, The Age (Victoria, AU)

Victorians are being slugged more than $1 billion a year for Melbourne’s privatised train and trams, six times more than the architects of the system forecast 11 years ago.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/1-billion-nightmare-20110121-1a026.html

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ARTICLE – ESTABLISHING PRECEDENTS: WOMEN’S STUDENT ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE (CANADIAN) NATIONAL UNION OF STUDENTS, 1972-1979

by Nigel Roy Moses, Memorial University

This article examines young women’s activism in the (Canadian) National Union of Students (NUS) from the time that the national student organization regrouped in 1972 to the endorsement of the NUS Declaration of the Rights of the Woman Student in 1979. The focus is on the problems NUS women faced, the solutions and organizational structures they devised, and how they helped transform the social organization of NUS to better represent their interests. This work makes an important contribution to our knowledge of Canadian student organizing and the women’s movement. Youth activists guided by a particular set of anti-patriarchal cultural orientations and values not only had a profoundly transformative effect on student organization, but were among the social agents producing a much broader social transformation.

Read more: http://library.queensu.ca/ojs/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/2152/3172

+++++

JURAVICH-HEALY WORK WITH OPSEU TO RELEASE HOME CARE MUSIC VIDEO

HAMILTON, ON, Jan. 20 /CNW/ – Who says labour songs are dead? The Ontario Public Service Employees Union has produced a music video with recording artists Teresa Healy and Tom Juravich to highlight the exodus of Ontario’s home care professionals from an unstable work environment.

The song, “What Will You Do When I’m Gone?” was written by Healy and Juravich for a 2008 rally in Hamilton following news that the Victorian Order of Nurses and St. Joseph’s Home Care were dropped from a competition to provide visiting nursing services in the city. Both agencies had close to a century of history in Hamilton.

As a result of the rally, a new moratorium was begun and the Hamilton competition cancelled.

The video is being distributed to media outlets this week and on-line.

OPSEU has produced a web site to host the video which includes a “making of” documentary, background information, a free download of the song, links to the artists’ sites and a form where patients, families and workers can leave their own stories behind.

The site is located at http://www.whatwillyoudo.ca A French version of the site is also available at http://www.queferezvous.ca

For more information or to set up interviews with the artists, contact Rick Janson at 416-443-8888 ext 8383 or 416-525-3324 (Cell).

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

(END)

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Harvesting

PRODUCTIVE FORCES IN CAPITALIST AGRICULTURE

Journal of Agrarian Change

© Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Volume 10, Issue 3 Page 299 – 453
The latest issue of Journal of Agrarian Change is available on Wiley Online Library
 

Productive Forces in Capitalist Agriculture: Political Economy and Political Ecology

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joac.2010.10.issue-3/issuetoc

The Bernstein and Byres Prize in Agrarian Change (page 299)
Deborah Johnston, Cristobal Kay, Jens Lerche and Carlos Oya
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00271.x

Introduction: Some Questions Concerning the Productive Forces (pages 300–314)
HENRY BERNSTEIN
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00272.x

The Accelerating Biophysical Contradictions of Industrial Capitalist Agriculture (pages 315–341)
TONY WEIS
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00273.x

Issues in the Political Economy of Agricultural Biotechnology (pages 342–366)
DAVID WIELD, JOANNA CHATAWAY and MAURICE BOLO
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00274.x

Impeding Dispossession, Enabling Repossession: Biological Open Source and the Recovery of Seed Sovereignty (pages 367–388)
JACK KLOPPENBURG
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00275.x

The End of the Road? Agricultural Revolutions in the Capitalist World-Ecology, 1450–2010 (pages 389–413)
JASON W. MOORE
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00276.x

The Material Conditions of a Polarized Discourse: Clamours and Silences in Critical Analysis of Agricultural Water Use in India (pages 414–436)
PETER P. MOLLINGA
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00277.x

Beyond Industrial Agriculture? Some Questions about Farm Size, Productivity and Sustainability (pages 437–453)
PHILIP WOODHOUSE
Article first published online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.
1471-0366.2010.00278.x

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Global Crisis

GLOBAL CAPITALISM IN CRISIS: KARL MARX AND THE DECAY OF THE PROFIT SYSTEM

A new book by

Murray E.G. Smith

 

http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca/Global-Capitalism-in-Crisis-Murray-EG-Smith/

    • ISBN: 9781552663530
    • Price: $24.95 CAD
    • Publication Date: Mar 2010
    • Rights: World
    • Pages: 172

The world economy is currently experiencing a devastating slump not seen since the Second World War. Unemployment rates are skyrocketing and salaries are plummeting in the developed world, while astronomical food prices and starvation ravage the developing world. The crisis in global capitalism, Smith argues, should be understood as both a composite crisis of overproduction, credit and finance, and a deep-seated systemic crisis. Using Marx to analyze the origins, implications and scope of the current economic slump, this book argues that the crisis needs to be understood structurally, as the result of a system prone to crisis, rather than as an aberration.

CONTENTS:
The Global Economic Crisis: A Marxist Perspective • A Summary of Marx’s Theories of Value, Capital and Crisis • The Necessity of Value Theory: Brenner’s Analysis of the “Long Downturn” and Marx’s Theory of Crisis • Class Struggle and Socialist Transformation: Beyond the Law of Value • The Global Crisis, Marxism and the Malaise of the Anti-Capitalist Left • Appendix 1, The Controversy Surrounding Marx’s Theory of Value • Appendix 2, Socially Necessary Unproductive Labour in Contemporary Capitalism • Bibliography • Index

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Murray E.G. Smith is Professor of Sociology and Labour Studies at Brock University

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski:

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th MARCH 2010


EVENTS

BILL FLETCHER JR. – “OPERATING IN THE OBAMA MOMENT: CHALLENGES FOR PROGRESSIVES”

Public Forum: 2010 Phyllis Clarke memorial Lecture

7:00 PM
Wednesday March 10, 2010
Cara Commons/Lounge 7th floor, 1-148
Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto.

Bill Fletcher Jr. is a longtime labour and international activist and the former President and chief executive officer of TransAfrica Forum. He is the executive editor of The Black Commentator and founder of the Center for Labor Renewal. His latest book is Solidarity Divided.

Co-sponsored and supported by Ryerson’s CUPE Locals 233, 1281 and 3904 and the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University.

+++++

ACCUMULATION CRISIS AS ECOLOGICAL CRISIS: THE END OF CHEAP FOOD, CHEAP ENERGY, AND CHEAP LABOUR

CIS Development Seminar Series
Speaker: Jason W. Moore (Department of Human Geography, Lund University)

Friday, March 19, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
108N – North House, Munk Centre for International Studies, U of T
1 Devonshire Place

Register online at: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8206

Sponsored by Centre for International Studies

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TRIBUNAL SAYS SPECIAL DIET PROGRAM DISCRIMINATES

Government considering scrapping the program in response

Discrimination. That’s the ruling of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario on the way the province’s Special Diet Allowance Program provides benefits to three people who made human rights complaints.

On February 17, the Tribunal issued its decision that the way the program is administered in these three cases violates the Human Rights Code. These three cases are lead cases in a Tribunal proceeding that involves human rights complaints from nearly 200 other people and Social Benefit Tribunal complaints from another 800 people, so the implications are large.

The Tribunal has ordered the government to increase the benefit amounts for these three people – and any other Special Diet recipients with the same medical conditions. And it set out the legal test that will help determine the outcome of the nearly 200 human rights complaints.

But the government seems to be thinking about scrapping the program altogether.

The Special Diet Allowance program is too important to lose. Take Action Now!

To read more: http://www.incomesecurity.org/specialdietdecision.htm

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CANADIAN COMMITTEE ON LABOUR HISTORY ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The Canadian Committee on Labour History will once again be holding their annual general meeting during Congress and your attendance will be much appreciated.

Please mark your calendars for the following:

Date:  Monday, May 31
Time: 12:30 – 2:00
Location:  LB-1042.03, 10th floor of the Library Building, Concordia University, Montreal

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NEWS & VIEWS

MURRAY DOBBINS’ BLOG: HARPER’S STRATEGIC ELECTION BUDGET

As one would expect from Stephen Harper, he has come down with a very strategic budget and a fairly smart one at that. As with his other strategic considerations this one is aimed at achieving the goal he is obsessed with: getting a majority in the next election.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2010/03/04/harpers-strategic-election-budget/

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THE CASE FOR KEEPING OUR HYDRO UTILITIES PUBLIC

By Paul Kahnert, Bullet No. 319, March 2 2010

Most people don’t pay much attention to electricity, except when the lights are out or when they get their bill. But, they soon will. The most valuable asset in virtually every Ontario municipality is its hydro utility. For 90 plus years, local municipal hydro utilities ran at cost and returned ‘profits’ to residents in the form of lower and stable rates. They were well run and virtually debt free.

Debts created by cost overruns at Ontario Hydro’s nuclear power stations were no worse than privately-owned nuclear power stations everywhere else. Yet the debt level of Ontario Hydro opened the door for the Harris Conservatives to ram through a plan to deregulate and privatize Ontario’s power system.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/319.php

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2010 FEDERAL BUDGET A “MAJOR DISAPPOINTMENT” FOR POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

OTTAWA, March 4 /CNW Telbec/ – The organization representing Canada’s university and college educators says today’s federal budget is a major disappointment for post-secondary education, leaving Canada’s researchers behind, providing no new support for universities and colleges to deal with increasing enrolments, and no relief for students grappling with high debt loads and tuition fees.

“The government was supposed to have taken time off to ‘recalibrate,’ but there’s been no change in direction when it comes to post-secondary education and funding for research,” said James Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

To read more: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2010/04/c7181.html

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JAMES LAXER’S BLOG: GEORGE SMITHERMAN, THE PRIVATIZER: NO THANKS

You learn a lot about a candidate for public office when he or she first stakes out a position on a key issue.

In this case, the candidate is George Smitherman, who recently left the Ontario Liberal cabinet, to run for mayor of Toronto. In an in-depth interview with the Toronto Star, Smitherman mused that he would consider privatizing garbage pick-up in Toronto and the privatization of some of the city’s public transit lines.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/blog.html

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ALTERNATIVE BUDGET 2010

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released the 2010 Alternative Federal Budget yesterday along with a six point jobs plan to confront the jobs crisis and tackle the fiscal deficit with less pain and more gain.

The alternative budget and jobs plan would bring unemployment back to pre-recession levels by the end of 2011 and demonstrate there is a better way to get out of deficit through smart investments and smart taxation.

To read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/alternative-federal-budget-2010
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RAISE MY TAXES, PLEASE! EVALUATING HOUSEHOLD SAVINGS FROM HIGH QUALITY PUBLIC TRANSIT

High quality public transit consists of service sufficiently convenient and comfortable to attract travel that would otherwise be by automobile. This paper uses data from U.S. cities to investigate the incremental costs and benefits of high quality transit service.

The analysis indicates that high quality public transit typically requires about $268 annually per capita in additional tax subsidy and $104 in additional fares, but provides vehicle, parking and road cost savings averaging $1,040 per capita, plus other benefits including congestion reductions, increased traffic safety, pollution reductions, improved mobility for non-drivers, improved fitness and health.

This indicates that residents should rationally support tax increases if needed to create high quality public transit systems in their communities. Current planning practices tend to overlook or undervalue many of these savings and benefits and so result in underinvestment in transit quality improvements.

To read more: http://www.vtpi.org/raisetaxes.pdf

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Research on social determinants and health: what sorts of data do we need?
Siegfried Geyer
Journal of Public Health, Volume 55 Number 1
http://www.springerlink.com/content/p81v501h560702n7/

* Get the lead out: Environmental politics in 1970s St. Louis
Robert Gioielli
Journal of Urban History published 5 March 2010, 10.1177/0096144210363070
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0096144210363070v1

* Book review: Jarvis, P. (2006). The lifelong learning and the learning society trilogy, Volumes 1-3.
Shibao Guo
Adult Education Quarterly 2010;60 207-211
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/60/2/207

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Crisis Sublime

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE IN TORONTO

Historical Materialism Conference
York University, Toronto
May 14-16, 2010

Call for Papers
 
Following on the considerable success of the First North American Historical Materialism Conference in April 2007, attended by 400 people, we are pleased to issue a call for papers for our follow-up conference at York University, May 14-16, 2010.

The conference will take place against the backdrop of a profound destabilization of global capitalism alongside significant challenges for labour and social movements. Imperialist wars abound and culture has been drawn into the service of empire. Robust theorizations and critical innovations are needed.

In this context it is vital to develop the resources of historical materialism in addressing the pressing problems of the day and informing all forms of activism, including the intellectual. The conference seeks to combine rich development of historical materialist analysis with critical innovations in areas where such analysis has lagged. The organizers welcome presentations from scholars and activists that reflect the current state of theoretical work and activist mobilization. Themes include:

•       Marxism and Philosophy

•       Political Economy of Capitalism and the Global Crisis

•       Gender, Sexuality and Social Reproduction

•       Race, Empire and Resistance

•       Ecology and the Environment

•       Working Class and Social Movements

•       Labour Processes and Class Relations

•       Art, Marxism, and Everyday Life

•       Revolutionary Experiences since 1848

•       Fascism, Militarism, Fundamentalism

•       State, Culture and Ideology

•       Land, Food and Accumulation by Dispossession

•       Marxism and the Urban Experience

•       Theorizing Crises in Historical and Comparative Perspective

We welcome individual submissions as well as panel proposals. For individual papers, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words; for panel proposals send a 100 word panel abstract along with paper abstracts of up to 250 words. We appreciate your suggestions about which of the above themes your paper might suits, and also welcome papers beyond these themes. Proposals can be submitted by email until January 8, 2010 to torontohm@gmail.com
 
P.S: Some of you will have received invitations to a Historical Materialism conference in New York in January. We are pleased to see this initiative. But that is a distinct event from the Toronto conference in May.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk