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Tag Archives: Financialization

Andrew Kliman

THE FAILURE OF CAPITALIST PRODUCTION – ANDREW KLIMAN

 Salford Business School presents:

The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the Great Recession

Professor Andrew Kliman of Pace University offers exemplary theoretical insight as well as analysis of economic data, and therefore explains the causes and the development of recent crises in unparalleled ways.

Andrew Kliman is the author of numerous academic articles and books that centre on the creation and the capture of economic value in Marx’s tradition.

Book details: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745332390

For more information please contact:
Dr. Thoralf Dassler
t.dassler@salford.ac.uk

6pm, Tuesday, 6 March 2012
Room G21, Mary Seacole Building
Frederick Road Campus
University of Salford,M5 4WT

**END**

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Money Menace

FOURTH CRITICAL FINANCE STUDIES CONFERENCE

15-17 August 2012
Call for Papers
Essex Business School, University of Essex
Colchester, UK

‘…In what is broadly called commentary, the hierarchy between primary and secondary text plays two roles which are in solidarity with each other. On the one hand it allows the (endless) construction of new discourses. The dominance of the primary text…..is the basis for an open possibility of speaking. But on the other hand the commentary’s only role, whatever the techniques used, is to say at last what was silently articulated “beyond”, in the text. By a paradox which it always displaces but never escapes, the commentary must say for the first time what had, nonetheless, already been said, and must tirelessly repeat what had, however, never been said.’ (Foucault, 1981: 55-56)

Critical Finance Studies Conference

Studying finance critically is playing with / being played by the normative forces of financial apparatuses; risking one’s self in the course of producing radically novel ways of thinking and comprehending finance and, ultimately, of creating new possibilities of life. With this in mind the Fourth Annual Critical Finance Studies conference will be held this year at the University of Essex, Essex Business School, August 15th -17th. With a conference gap in 2011 and with a financial crisis that is still on the agenda, and perhaps even stronger than ever, even compared with 2008, we have decided to devote this year’s conference to the ongoing financial crisis.

The Financial Crisis– futures and pasts re-interpreted

We strongly encourage papers that contribute to our ongoing collaborative research project that seeks to engage finance in new and critical ways and from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. This is especially important when trying to understand the current ‘financial situation’, e.g. how people in everyday work and life are affected, how the environment is affected, how theories cope and adapt in the face of a protracted crisis, and how politicians, professional bodies and professionals respond to or promote change or not. We encourage papers that tackle these sorts of issues and, with this in mind, the conference is organized around three sub-streams: an open stream on theory, method, and critique; a stream on financial imaginaries/imagining finance; and a stream on sustainability/finance (see below for more details). The conference finale will comprise a semi-public and interdisciplinary panel in order to, we hope, create some interesting debates, and inspire new thoughts and create new possibilities of life.

Papers should be submitted to the allocated convenor for each sub-theme. We encourage and welcome passionate academic work in different stages and forms, but they all need to be developed enough so that the audience can be intellectually challenged and involved in discussions. The deadline for an extended abstract (about 1000 words) is 15th April 2012. A review panel will announce their decision of acceptance within two weeks from the deadline. Accepted papers should be submitted in their final form by 1 July 2012.

The conference is organised by Dr Ann-Christine Frandsen at Essex Business School, Essex University in collaboration with Dr Thomas Bay Stockholm University (Forslund and Bay, 2009). The venue will be at the University of Essex, Colchester Campus. The conference language will be English. Discussants will be appointed – introducing papers, chairing sessions, involving participants.

Open Stream: Theory, Method, and Critique

Convenors: Jason Glynos, Department of Government, University of Essex ljglyn@essex.ac.uk & Ann-Christine Frandsen, Accounting Group, Essex Business School, frandsen@essex.ac.uk

We invite papers in finance studies that provoke critical engagement with current practices, open up pathways for effective political mobilization and socio-economic transformation, or sketch out possible counter-visions entailing alternative practices and forms of governance. The open stream is designed to catch contributions that tackle issues that fit the conference theme but do not necessarily fall neatly into one of the titled streams. For example: How might critical engagements with finance tell us something about the way markets are performed in other areas of economic life? What forms of subjectivity might different finance practices promote? How should we think the connections between finance and other sectors of the economy? What role should key concepts such as merit and remuneration, surplus labour, speculation, technology, and competition play in how we theorize and imagine finance?

The politics of financial reform draws on a range of characterizations, diagnoses, and prognoses of the recent financial crisis. Such ‘problematizations’ matter because they set in train path dependencies that invite us to problematize those problematizations themselves. Some, for example, seek to avoid heaping blame onto a few individual ‘bad apples’, one of the most trenchant narratives repeatedly and insistently articulated in the mass media. Some seek to avoid locating the fault with finance as such. Others argue that the financial crisis should be understood as a hubris-induced elite debacle rather than a systems accident or fiasco (Engelen et al 2011). The tension between explanatory and interpretive dimensions in these problematizations is never far from the surface, but what is clear is that the way finance is characterized, problematized, and contested has consequences for citizens and for policy makers, not least because of the sorts of futures they open up or close down. This raises issues about how different theoretical perspectives and methodological techniques shape the way we characterize, problematize, and contest financial practices and associated policy and media representations at elite and popular levels; or about how different sorts of critique emerge, relate, and interact with one another, for example, normative and ideological forms of critique.

We encourage the submission of papers that draw on poststructuralist, post-marxist, psychoanalytic, Deleuzian, Foucauldian, and other traditions, and that explore a range of theoretical, methodological, and critical issues linked to the analysis of finance. What forms of innovative, progressive, and sustainable banking and finance do such perspectives enable us to imagine? What role should experiment play in these efforts to conjure alternative visions? How should these experiments be financed? What innovative means of critique are available to citizens living in democratic polities with a tightly coupled nexus of elites in politics-finance-media? What role should music, film, television, social networking platforms, and other media play in facilitating both the process of critique and the conjuring of counter-visions of finance practice and governance?

Stream 2: Financial Imaginaries/Imagining Finance

Convenor: Christian de Cock, Management Group, Essex Business School cdc@essex.ac.uk

A key area of concern in this stream is the “imaginary of finance”, the semiotic system that gives meaning and shape to the economic field in which finance is embedded. Empirically we encourage the submission of papers that explore how, despite the convulsions of 2008 and their continuing reverberations, this imaginary has remained pretty much intact anno 2012 (in that we have witnessed over and over again the re-articulation of established themes and genres). Established financial imaginaries have no doubt proved extremely powerful in shaping the thoughts and perceptions of key political and economic decision makers and it would be interesting to learn more about the mechanics of this. Theoretically we encourage papers that can enrich and develop the notion of “imaginary” itself within a financial context. Examples could include Lacan’s (Real-Symbolic-Imaginary) or Iser’s (Real-Fictive-Imaginary) triad.  We also encourage the submission of papers that can offer new ways of imagining finance. Following Yusoff and Gabrys (2011), we see imagination as “a way of sensing, thinking, and dreaming the formation of knowledge, which creates the conditions for material interventions in and political sensibilities of the world”. What are the conditions of possibility to change dominant framings of the financial imagination? Can we re-imagine the organization of finance as an ethical, societal, and cultural problem? Can we open up a generative space of unknowing which can create the possibility to take us beyond the seemingly eternal dialectic of economic catastrophe and ‘business as usual’? These are just some of the questions you may help formulate answers to.

Stream 3: Sustainability / Finance

Convenor: Steffen Böhm, Management Group, Essex Business School and interdisciplinary Centre for Environment and Society, University of Essex, steffen@essex.ac.uk

Finance is arguably at the heart of what might be called the global capitalist economy, which is geared towards ever increasing growth of production and consumption. A whole host of critics and social movements have pointed to the unsustainable nature of this self-referential system, and particularly its negative environmental consequences. Specifically, financial service industries have been repeatedly accused of funding environmentally very damaging extractive industry projects (such an open pit mining, oil tar sands, etc), contributing to the creation of speculative bubbles of commodity markets (e.g. leading to higher basic food prices), and endangering the livelihood of indigenous and other communities (threatened by global industries invading their land, for example), to name but a few of the grievances that have been articulated. We are seeking contributions that map, evaluate and expand such critiques of finance and its problematic relation to sustainability.

On the other hand, however, finance increasingly likes to portray itself as part of the solution, rather than part of the problem. The financial services industry has arguably made some efforts to positively contribute to issues such as climate change (e.g. through carbon disclosure), land grab and livelihoods in developing countries (e.g. through the Equator Principles) and environmental protection in more general terms (e.g. through the UN Global Compact). While some might accuse such initiatives as ‘hot air’ or even ‘greenwash’, which often lack real power and impact, there are more concrete efforts to offer sustainable finance solutions, ranging from microfinance to carbon offsetting, from community finance to payments for environmental services. What should we make of this move of finance ‘going green’ and ‘ethical’? What empirical evidence is there to suggest that such finance approaches to solving environmental and social issues are actually working?

Overall, then, we encourage submissions that problematize the relationship between sustainability and finance in its broadest sense. We are not only interested in critiques of current finance approaches to sustainability, but particularly encourage studies of how groups and communities can use money and finance in novel ways to live more sustainable lives. We are hence keen to explore the ways of how finance can make a contribution to another possible world.

For any general enquiry about the conference please contact Ann-Christine Frandsen. Any specific questions related to one of the streams each please contact relevant convenor

Organising committee: (Alphabetic order)
Professor Steffen Böhm
Professor Christian de Cock
Dr Ann-Christine Frandsen
Dr Jason Glynos
Dr Pik Liew
Dr Sumohon Matilal
Chloe Warren – Marketing Officer, EBS

Organiser: Ann-Christine Frandsen Essex Business School, University of Essex, Colchester Campus, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK

Phone: +44 (0)1206 87 869 809

Email: frandsen@essex.ac.uk

To find out more about Essex Business School visit: http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs

In Collaboration with

Thomas Bay, Stockholm University

References:

D. Forslund and T. Bay, (2009). ‘The eve of critical finance studies’.  Ephemera: Theory and Politics in Organization. Vol. 9(4), pp. 285-299.

M. Foucault, (1981). ‘The Order of Discourse’ (Inaugural Lecture at the College de France, given 2 December, 1971). In R. Young (ed), Untying the Text: a Post-Structuralist Reader.  London: Methuen, 1981, pp. 48-78.

Dr Steffen Böhm | Professor in Management and Sustainability | Essex Business School | University of Essex | Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK | Rm 5NW.4.4 | Tel. +44(0)1206 87 3843 | http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/staff/profile.aspx?ID=727
http://steffenboehm.net

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Capitalist Crisis

A CRISIS OF CAPITALISM – ANDREW KLIMAN

Andrew Kliman will speak on “A Crisis of Capitalism (Not Neoliberalism, Financialization, or Stagnant Wages)” for the Student  Action Initiative of  The New School on Wed. Feb. 22 at 8:00 p.m. The  talk will take place at 80 Fifth Avenue (SW corner of 14th St.), Room 529, and it is open to the public. Kliman will investigate the causes of the Great Recession and discuss the surprising results of data analysis which shows that the rate of profit has fallen ever since the end of the post-World War II boom.

Information: student-action-initiative@gmail.com

Andrew Kliman is Professor of Economics at Pace University. He is author of the just-published book, The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the Great Recession, and of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency.

N.Y.U. Professor Bertell Ollman wrote about the new book, “One of the very best of the rapidly growing series of works seeking to explain our economic crisis. … The scholarship is exemplary and the writing is crystal clear. Highly recommended!”

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Andrew Kliman

ANDREW KLIMAN TALK – NEW YORK CITY

Monday February 6th, 2012 @ 7:00 PM:
Bluestockings Books
172 Allen St.
New York, NY 10002
212.777.6028

Andrew Kliman will discuss his just-published book, The Failure of Capitalist Production (Pluto Press 2011), and how he was frequently surprised by what he uncovered when doing the research behind it. Much conventional wisdom on the left attributes the Great Recession to free-market policies, “financialization” of the economy, and stagnant wages. Kliman himself is a leftist economist, yet the more he delved into the data, the more he came to reject such explanations. In the end, he concluded, Karl Marx’s theory of economic crisis fits the facts.

The Great Recession and its persistent after-effects are the results of a half-century-long decline in profitability and the consequences of that decline––decades of weak investment, sluggish economic growth, and mounting debt problems. Kliman will also explore possible pathways out of this crisis of profitability.

See: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745332406&

Biography: Andrew Kliman, a Professor of Economics at Pace University in New York, is the author of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency” (Lexington Books 2007) and other writings on crisis theory, value theory, and related topics.

Interview on the recently released book: http://dietsoap.podomatic.com/entry/2011-11-07T00_29_14-08_00

I bought Kliman’s book: it’s brilliant! It cleared up so many formerly perplexing issues regarding the ‘current’ crisis of capital. I urge one and all to buy it! — Glenn Rikowski (University of Northampton).

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Harvesting

FOOD CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPERS

“The Food Crisis: Implications for Decent Work in Rural and Urban Areas”

The International Center for Development and Decent Work (ICDD) Annual Thematic Conference –University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany, July 4-6

In recent years, food prices have gone up to prohibitive levels for many of the world’s poor. They have remained high and volatile. While many poor city dwellers have had to switch their diets to include only very basic foods, the vast majority of those who are hungry in the world today (over half a billion) are working in agriculture, either as small landholders or as waged agricultural workers. This paradox has sparked a lively debate about the reasons for food price increases. However, the implications for the Decent Work agenda have received less attention. The four dimensions of the Decent Work concept (creating jobs, guaranteeing rights at work, extending social protection and promoting social dialogue) do not explicitly cover the issue of rising food prices. On the one hand, price increases for the most basic household items threaten any gains achieved through the Decent Work agenda. On the other hand, increased food prices may in principle provide an opportunity for agricultural labour, yet the majority of the food producers seem not to have benefited from rising prices. Apparently, the bargaining power of many producers has been weakened vis-à-vis the buyers of agricultural produce. This development points to another dimension not explicitly addressed by the Decent Work agenda: power relations along the food chain. TheInternationalCenterfor Development and Decent Work (ICDD) wants to commit its Annual Thematic Conference “The Food Crisis: Implications for Decent Work in Rural and Urban Areas” to an exploration of the origins of the food crisis, its implications for the Decent Work agenda, and strategies for addressing the crisis.

The general themes to be discussed are:

Assessing the Scope of the Food Crisis: Is there a rural – urban divide? What is the impact on workers and small landholders? What are the implications for the Decent Work agenda?

Origins of the Food Crisis: Financialization, land grabbing, climate change and soil degradation, agribusiness, agro-fuels, EU trade policies, demography, productivity obstacles, and other relevant topics.

Remedies for the Food Crisis: Increasing agricultural productivity, improving logistics, empowering agricultural workers, food sovereignty, and other relevant topics.

We encourage potential contributors to include a gender-sensitive analysis whenever possible.

If you would like to present a paper in one of these areas, please send a brief abstract (less than half a page) by April 1, 2012 to: ATC2012Kassel@icdd.uni-kassel.de

Please include the following information:

Name:

Country:

Organization:

Professor Dr. Christoph Scherrer, “Globalisierung & Politik”, FB 5 – Gesellschaftswissenschaften, Universität Kassel, Nora-Platiel-Straße 1, D-34127 Kassel, Tel.: +49 (0) 561 804 3253 Sekr., scherrer@uni-kassel.de

Fachgebiet: http://www.uni-kassel.de/fb05/fachgruppen/politikwissenschaft/globalisierung-und-politik.html

InternationalCenterfor Development and Decent Work: www.icdd.uni-kassel.de

MA Global Political Economy: http://www.uni-kassel.de/go/gpe

MA Labour Polices & Globalisation: www.global-labour-university.org

Promotionskolleg Global Social Policies and Governance: www.social-globalization.uni-kassel.de

ENGAGE – Certificate Course on Global Economic Governance: http://www.global-labour-university.org/216.html

IKSA – InternationalKasselSummerAcademyon the World Economy: http://www.uni-kassel.de/go/sommerakademie

***END***

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalist Trickle Down Theory

THE RESTRUCTURING OF CAPITALISM IN OUR TIME – BY WILLIAM TABB

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/978-0-231-15842-8/the-restructuring-of-capitalism-in-our-time

The Restructuring of Capitalism in Our Time by William K. Tabb, Columbia University Press, 2012 (now available)

Actions taken by the United States and other countries during the Great Recession focused on restoring the viability of major financial institutions while guaranteeing debt and stimulating growth. Once the markets stabilized, the United States enacted regulatory reforms that ultimately left basic economic structures unchanged. At the same time, the political class pursued austerity measures to curb the growing national debt. Drawing on the economic theories of Keynes and Minsky and applying them to the modern evolution of American banking and finance, William K. Tabb offers a chilling prediction about future crises and the structural factors inhibiting true reform

Tabb follows the rise of banking practices and financial motives in America over the past thirty years and the simultaneous growth of a shadow industry of hedge funds, private equity firms, and financial innovations such as derivatives. He marks the shift from an American economy based primarily on the production of goods and nonfinancial services to one characterized by financialization, and then shows how these developments, perspectives, and approaches not only contributed to the recent financial crisis but also prevented the enactment of effective regulatory reform. He incisively analyzes the damage that increasing unsustainable debt and excessive risk-taking has done to our financial system and expands his critique to a discussion of world systems and globalization. Calling out the wilful blind spots of mainstream finance theory, Tabb moves beyond an economic model reliant on debt expansion and dangerous levels of leverage, proposing instead a social structure of accumulation that places economic justice over profit and, more practically, institutes an inclusive, sustainable model for growth.

William K. Tabb is professor emeritus of economics at Queens College and professor emeritus of economics, political science, and sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He has been a  visiting professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and scholar in residence at Kansai University, Osaka, Japan. He is also the author of Economic Governance in the Age of  Globalization.

Praise for The Restructuring of Capitalism in Our Time

“An incisive analysis of the Great Financial Crisis of 2008, this book ranges over topics that transcend the narrow confines of traditional specialists, producing an overall analysis of the origins, development, and implications of financialization that will be discussed intently by scholars today and in years to come.”—Martin Wolfson, University of Notre Dame

“Of all the many books on the economic crisis, this is the best. William K. Tabb has absolute command of his subject and provides the clearest account yet of the financial folly that has brought the United States to its knees. Eminently readable and reasonable, his book cuts through the clouds of obfuscation by politicians and economists alike to draw a clear lesson: financialization is a cancer running through the American economy, one that continues to suck the life out of industry, corrupt capitalists, and Congress, generating more froth than real growth or jobs. A wonderful book and a real pleasure to read.”—Richard Walker, University of California, Berkeley, and author of The Capitalist Imperative: Territory, Technology, and Industrial Growth

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Geese

IIPE FINANCIALISATION WORKING GROUP

Call for Papers for AHE/FAPE/IIPPE Conference, Paris July 5-8th, 2012

Following two highly successful previous IIPPE conferences in Political Economy, the Association for Heterodox Economics (AHE), the French Association of Political Economy (FAPE), and the International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy (IIPPE) are jointly coordinating the Third International Conference of Political Economy in Paris, July 5-8, 2012. We therefore would like to encourage contributions to that fall under the broad theme of the conference, “Political Economy and the Outlook of Capitalism”.

Given the significance taken by the role of financialisation in the current crisis, the IIPPE Financialisation Working Group encourages contributions which examine the causes and consequences of the crisis in the context of financialisation, as well as those which critically engage with the concept of financialisation itself. Also welcome are submissions which propose alternatives, policies and solutions both in relation to the crisis and to the broader crisis in theoretical economics.

In accordance with the general call for papers, contributions covering the following areas are particularly encouraged:

  • “The Role of Financialisation in the Capitalist World”. This area aims to highlight the importance of financialisation and the role that it has played in the last 30 years in the transformation of capitalist relations of production and specifically the subsumption of real accumulation to finance.
  • The profound inability of mainstream economics to provide either a satisfactory account of the ongoing crisis or to provide any significant alternatives to the current status quo and the resulting opportunities for heterodox economics and Marxist political economy to provide such sound and progressive alternatives.
  • The role and uses of alternative methodologies in the studies of (international) financial markets and critique of mainstream economics
  • How to locate the world economy and the neoliberal nation state in the study of finance
  • Manifestations and consequences of financialisation in developing and emerging countries
  • The financialisation of commodities and natural resources
  • The European crisis and future role of the Euro
  • A critical engagement with the term “financialisation” itself, i.e. its contribution to the literature, differentiation from other concepts such as globalisation, neoliberalism etc.

In addition to submission of individual papers, we would particularly encourage the submission of panel proposals of 2-4 presentation each. Panels which collectively present the work of institutions or other academic groups provide an excellent opportunity to showcase work in a greater depth that is possible in single presentations. It is further hoped that the conference will provide an opportunity to deepen links between groups working on finance from a critical perspective.

Abstracts of individual papers (max. 250 words) or panel proposals (max. 250 words plus abstracts of the individual papers) should be sent to Maria Dafnomili (mdafnomili@econ.soc.uoc.gr) by the end of January 2012.

 

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Dialectics of Class Struggle in the Global Economy

THIRD CONFERENCE OF THE IESE

*Call for Papers for the 3rd Conference of IESE*
*”Mozambique: Accumulation and Transformation in a Context of International Crisis”*
*Maputo, 4-5 September 2012*

IESE (Instituto de Estudos Sociais e Económicos) hereby announces that it will hold a conference on the theme:

*“Mozambique: Accumulation and Transformation in a Context of International Crisiss”, in Maputo, on 4-5 September 2012.*

Nowadays the international crisis is an omnipresent theme in news items, in analyses and in debates on public policies, options and priorities, and on corporate strategies, modes of production, appropriation, distribution and use of surplus, but also on the implications of climate change, the possibility and meaning of the Development State, and the sustainability of the Welfare State. Economies with noteworthy economic growth (such as that of Mozambique and of several other countries in sub-Saharan Africa) have been rather ineffective at reducing poverty, vulnerability and real inequality, in modifying productive structures, in reallocating income between social groups, and in reducing patterns of dependency and instability. At the same time, we witness the emergence of new forms of political organisation and new dynamics of demonstrations and expressions of social struggle outside of the formal institutional framework, related with waves of unemployment and social frustration, particularly among young people. Are we looking at a crisis caused by “failings of the State” reflected in lack of fiscal discipline, failure of the social protection model, and/or by deregulation of finance capital? Or is this a crisis of the social mode of accumulation and capitalist reproduction which, naturally, is of a political nature and has political implications and also affects models and options of the State and of representation, affirmation and political struggle?

Through this conference, IESE intends to introduce new perspectives and approaches, based on a political economy analysis, with relevance forMozambique.

Without prejudicing other relevant questions, the papers proposed should seek to develop problematics related with the following interrogations:
– How are the various dimensions of the crisis characterised, how do they relate to each other and reinforce each other, and what impact do they   have on the options for social, economic and political transformation and  transition? To what extent the crisis is one of financialization of global   capitalist patterns of accumulation and what are the implications for transition and transformation?
– To what extent does emerging from the crisis require fundamental changes in the political and economic patterns of production, accumulation, reproduction and redistribution of wealth, in what directions could such changes occur, and through what political processes could such a transition develop?
– What are the relevance, tendencies and dynamics of foreign investment and its relationship with natural resources and domestic processes of capital accumulation, and what are the implications for transition and transformation? What is the role of emerging economies in this process and what are the challenges and opportunities that they represent in the process of change?
– What role can education play in the dynamics of crisis and change?
– What challenges and pressures for employment and urbanisation emerge from these processes of crisis and change, and what implications do they have for options of social and economic transformation?
– How are the crisis of social security models and the social inequalities that this crisis reveals (with regard to the control, appropriation and redistribution of surplus) characterised, and how do they
  tend to develop? What economic, social and political implications can flow from them? Is this a demographic crisis or a crisis of the mode of accumulation (or both)?
– How can social and economic pressures affect these mass social movements, and what impact can such movements have on future options? How to characterise these movements in Europe, the USA, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa? What do they have in common and in what ways are they different? And what lessons are emerging from these processes?
– How do climate change, and the social pressures resulting from it, contribute to and how are they affected by the other dimensions of the crisis, and what impact do they have on the options for political, economic and social transformation?

***
Researchers interested in presenting papers at the conference are invited to send a summary of their themes (in Portuguese or English), in no more than 750 words to conferencia.crise@iese.ac.mz. The summary should indicate the theme, the problematic, the methodology and the basic sources of information, as well as information on the institutional position of the candidate and his/her contact details. The proposals may be individual or collective. All proposals will be considered and submitted to a jury for selection.

The themes should be relevant forMozambique, although they can have generic theoretical or methodological foci, or may be based on case studies from other countries. In addition to their presentation at the conference, the approved papers will be published by IESE in its series of “conference papers” and later some of them will be selected for publication in a book.

IESE may bear the transport and accommodation expenses for some participants.

For any further information, please contact IESE at the address conferencia.crise@iese.ac.mz.
Important deadlines to bear in mind:
– Summaries of the proposed papers should be submitted to IESE by 10 April 2012.
– IESE will inform the candidates as to whether their proposals have been approved by 15 May 2012.
– The definitive texts of the papers approved for the conference should be delivered to IESE by 5 August 2012.

The Director of IESE

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Eurozone Crisis

THE EURO CRISIS: CAUSES AND REMEDIES

Date: 25 October 2011 , 18:00 to 20:00
Location: JG0001, John Galsworthy Building, Penrhyn Road

Econ Club Panel discussion on: The Euro crisis. Causes and Remedies
With Dimitris Sotiropoulos, José R. Sánchez-Fung, Engelbert Stockhammer and Nick Butler (chair)

Until two years ago the Euro was considered a big success: inflation was low and the poorer countries were catching up rapidly. But since then the situation has changed dramatically. Greece, Ireland and Portugal are in deep recession and had to request support from the other EU countries, because markets have stopped lending to them. A European rescue fund has been set up, but the crisis is spreading to other countries. What are the causes of the crises? What reforms does the Euro system need?

Dimitris Sotiropoulos is a Lecturer at Kingston University. His research focuses on changes in the financial sector and their societal implications. He has recently published Rethinking Imperialism (with J. Milios) He has been living in Greece until a few months ago and will give a first hand report of the situation there.

José R. Sánchez-Fung is Senior Lecturer in Economics at Kingston University and has been Visiting Researcher at the Bank of Finland in Helsinki. His main research area is monetary economics with particular reference to developing countries. He is co-author, with Subrata Ghatak, of the textbook Monetary Economics in Developing Economies.

Engelbert Stockhammer is Professor at Kingston University. He is working on the macroeconomics of distribution and financialization. He has recently published A Modern Guide To Keynesian Macroeconomics and Economic Policies (with E. Hein). He will give a Keynesian account of the crisis.

Nicholas Butler is Head of the School of Economics at Kingston University.

The Econ Club will organise regular extra-curricular events at theSchool ofEconomics to further discussing of timely issues in economic policy and theory. We hope for student participation of these events in the future.

 

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Money Menace

WORKSHOP ON WAGE-LED GROWTH

KINGSTON UNIVERSITY, LONDON, 14 JUNE 2011
The Political Economy Research Group
School of Economics
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Kingston University

Is organizing a workshop …

Wage-led Growth: An Alternative to Finance-led Capitalism?

Date: 14th June 2011 , 09:00 to 18:00

Location: JG0003 Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston, KT1 2EE

Fee: Free, advance registration essential

Neoliberalism has led to a polarization in the distribution of income and given rise to a finance-led growth model that collapsed in the worst crisis since the 1930s. Wage-led growth has recently been proposed as an alternative policy strategy. It aims at linking wage growth to productivity growth and inflation. Growing wages could then generate high demand by fuelling consumption. But such a strategy could also ignite the growth of the capital stock if consumption demand has second round effects on investment, and if wage growth induces technological change and productivity growth. Thus, for a wage-growth policy to be successful, it needs be embedded in an economic policy regime that gives a greater role to labour unions and restrains the financial sector.

The Workshop will introduce recent research on wage-led growth and provide a forum for critical discussion.

Programme: http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/activities/item.php?updatenum=1738

Engelbert Stockhammer
Professor of Economics
Kingston University, Penrhyn Road, Kingston Upon Thames, KT1 2EE, UK
http://staffnet.kingston.ac.uk/~ku44311/
http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/research/perg/

END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: NEW CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS

CALL FOR PAPERS

For Proposed International Sociological Association 2012 Panel:

Title: Marxism and IPE: New Critical Engagements

Abstract:

Accumulation through dispossession, new enclosures, rent becoming profit, general intellect, immaterial labor, multitudes and the common. All of these are Marxist concepts of some variety or another which although prevalent in geography, sociology, anthropology and cultural studies still have not made their way into International Political Economy, where Marxist perspectives remain marginal and somewhat parochial (limited to historical materialist and world-systems analyses).

This panel calls for papers interested in exploring issues of global capital and empire from fresh theoretical angles such as those offered by autonomist Marxists like Hardt & Negri, Christian Marazzi, Sandro Mezzadra, Franco Berardi (bifo), and Silvia Federici, normative Marxists like George Caffentzis, Massimo de Angelis, David Graeber, and Harry Cleaver and Marxist geographers like Saskia Sassen, David Harvey, and Jamie Peck.

We welcome both theoretical engagements with questions of accumulation and valorization in internation al politics as well as more specific studies of the politics of everyday life, e.g., financialization, labor, education, consumption, culture, identity and ecology.    

Please submit your papers titles and abstracts to the conveners, Wanda Vrasti wndvrst@googlemail.com and Nicholas Kiersey kiersey@ohio.edu, by May 25th.

Note, please, that we intend to make this panel the basis of an edited book volume, should it be accepted. Thank you!

International Sociological Association: http://www.isa-sociology.org/

Universities in Crisis (an ISA blog): http://www.isa-sociology.org/universities-in-crisis/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Money Menace

THREE CHEERS FOR MARXIST MONETARY THEORY – COSTAS LAPAVITSAS

LONDON SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY MARXIST THEORY
4th May, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, K.2.31 Raked Lecture Theatre
Costas Lapavitsas (SOAS)
Three Cheers for Marxist Monetary Theory: The Eurozone through the Prism of World Money

The global economic and financial crisis has witnessed a deepening of interest in different forms of critical and radical thought and practice. This seminar will explore the new perspectives that have been opened up by interventions of contemporary Marxist theory in this political and theoretical conjuncture.

It involves collaboration among Marxist scholars based in several Londonuniversities, including Brunel University, King’s College London, and the Schoolof Oriental and African Studies. Guest speakers – from both Britain and abroad – will include a wide range of thinkers engaging with many different elements of the various Marxist traditions, as well as with diverse problems and topics. The aim of the seminar is to promote fruitful debate and to contribute to the development of more robust Marxist analysis.

It is open to all.

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com