Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Film Noir

Eisenstein

Eisenstein

TALES OF THE 1%: NOIR AND CAPITALISM

CLASS, CRIME & INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR

 

Dennis Broe with Steven Wishnia
Wednesday, April 30, 7:30 pm

Brecht Forum @ The Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn 11217

http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12681&reset=1

 

Brecht Forum: http://brechtforum.org/

 

In the decade between the Popular Front and the Communist Purge (1938-48), lower budget, seedy crime films not only in the US, but also in Europe and Asia, collectively called film noir, were a prominent way that film artists critiqued the new international reign of corporate capital. That critique has continued today where regional formations of the style (Nordic, Asian and Mediterranean Noir) have nourished and kept alive noir’s biting critique of the accumulation of capital where lives are smashed, dreams are brutally broken, and those left standing endure with bitterness and confusion while those who hide behind the laws and accumulate bigger piles of loot.

Dennis and Steven will speak of the body of work in film, fiction and other cultural works about what noir is, and how it came about and new directions in lm and literary noir today.

Dennis Broe is a professor of media arts at Long Island University. His previous book, Film Noir, American Workers and Post-War Hollywood was a Choice Outstanding Academic Book. He has written widely on political economy, movie studio history and the Western in Cinema Journal, Jump Cut, Situations and other journals. He is also a film critic on Pacifica Radio. His latest book from Palgrave/Macmillan is Class, Crime & International Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art, which will be published on May 8.

Steven Wishnia is the author of the novel When the Drumming Stops (Manic D Press, 2012), the short-story collection Exit 25 Utopia, and The Cannabis Companion, and contributed to Long Island Noir. A journalist specializing in housing, labor, and drug issues, he co-edited Imagine: Living in a Socialist U.S.A. He also played bass in the 1980s punk band False Prophets and artist Mac McGill’s multimedia show.

Economics of the 1%

Economics of the 1%

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Bette Davis

FILM NOIR, AMAERICAN WORKERS, AND POSTWAR HOLLYWOOD

AT HARVARD
Discussion/Signing with Dr. Dennis Broe

Monday, Nov 7 @ 7:00 pm
The Harvard Coop
1400 Massachusetts Ave

Selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title

“Broe has broken new ground in the interpretation of cinema itself. With this book film noir has found its most astute and informed critic.” – Gerald Horne, author of Class Struggle in Hollywood 1930-50 and The Final Victim of the Blacklist: John Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten

This award-winning book argues for the central importance of class in the creation of film noir and demonstrates how the form itself came to fruition during one of the most active periods of working-class agitation and middle-class antagonism towards corporate power in American history. Broe expands his analysis of how the classical period of film noir is connected to labor history to include an investigation first of the social and cinematic roots of the Cold War and then, in a coda, of the relationship of noir to the ethos and culture of terrorism in post 9/11 America. This study of a time when labor displayed its power and found its cinematic equivalent on the Hollywood screen is more relevant than ever as organized labor joins the Occupy Movement in fighting for the rights of the 99%.

“Broe’s theory forces the reader to review film noir in a new and provocative light” –Book News

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

The Lighthouse

CULTURES OF SURVEILLANCE

Call for Papers:

“Cultures of Surveillance”: An Interdisciplinary Conference,

Sponsored by The Film Studies Space: The Centre for the Cultural History of the Moving Image,

UCL (University College London), 29 September – 1 October 2011

We are being watched. The amazing part is that we are no longer even surprised by this. The culture of surveillance increasingly surrounds us in Europe where omnipresent CCTV cameras remind us that nothing escapes the invisible gaze of those behind the lens. At UCL, we have long been surveyed by our founder, Jeremy Bentham, who sits in a wooden case in the lobby and peers from glass eyes and a wax head: his own ‘icon’ body signals that he not only knew what surveillance meant but named it through his invention of the Panopticon. That imaginary device, which Bentham proposed would “help reform morals, preserve health, invigorate industry, diffuse instruction, and lighten public burdens,” continues to be a resonant touchstone for questions about the way governments and private agencies keep watch over our interests – and theirs. This conference, held where Bentham goes on watching both literally and metaphorically, proposes to explore, broadly, the interdisciplinary frameworks for understanding modern surveillance and, particularly, how surveillance practices intersect with visual technologies and histories of culture.

Our conference project emerges from an eagerness to think in new ways about surveillance practices as they intersect with culture, visual culture, and moving image studies. We start from the vantage point that there are many frameworks through which surveillance might be imagined today, ranging from the kinds of surveillance that entail keeping a friendly watch over each other to those represented by policing practices, government monitoring, and undercover investigations.

Our call for papers likewise assumes that questions about surveillance have become central to today’s world, as states and cultures grapple with the complex dynamics of security and liberty and as corporations demand ever more precise data about the world’s populations. As a modern panoptical city, Londonstands at the centre of the shift away from a Cold War culture of surveillance toward the post-9/11 order of things. It has long been one of the centres for the development and deployment of surveillance practices ranging from census taking to identification methods (such as fingerprinting, photography, passports, and DNA typing). It has also served over the past two centuries as a crucial nexus for practices of culture that perpetuate – and often question – the work of both social surveillance and self-surveillance: for example, the novel, detective fiction, museums, and the BBC. Visual recording and representations have historically played a central role in surveillance practices throughout the industrialising world: printmaking, photography, the cinema, and televisual moving images have accompanied the rise of the modern police force and the development of security systems in public as well as private spaces. “Cultures of Surveillance” hopes to address these intertwined histories of surveillance, practices of governance, visual technologies, and cultural forms.

This conference is sponsored by UCL’s Film Studies Space, an interdisciplinary centre for the study of the cultural history of moving images. It derives from two ongoing research projects, The Work of Film, investigating the ways moving images have been utilised by states and corporations to guide the conduct of populations; and The Autopsies Project, examining the afterlife of material objects in relation to the history of consumer culture and cinematic memory. We hope that conference presenters will discuss a range of issues in the long history of surveillance practices, from photography to digital media.

We anticipate contributions that analyse the myriad ways that visual culture has been enmeshed with political rationalities. We are keen to expand our frameworks far beyond the sphere of Londonand to look outside the Panopticon. We especially hope that contributions will find new ways of asking what it means to watch and to be watched, and to police and to be policed. We look forward to discussing ways that scholars of the humanities can interrogate the networks of surveillance that both protect and transform our world.

Following an opening lecture by Professor Tom Gunning, The University of Chicago, on Thursday, 29 Sept. 2011, the Conference will take place on Friday and Saturday, 30 Sept. and 1 Oct. 2011.

Topics might include but are not limited to:

* Histories of surveillance technologies and their applications

* The geo-politics of surveillance (in the 19th century? in Cold War culture? After 9/11?)

* Architectures of surveillance – visibility and urban space

* Film and television representations of surveillance / Film and the construction of public space

* Photography and the police

* Constructions of identity and surveillance methods (fingerprinting, passports, census taking)

* The hidden objects of surveillance (cameras, tape recorders, transmitters, interceptors, tracking systems)

* Histories and representations of objects associated with the collection, storage, and retrieval of personal data: from filing cabinets, paper shredders, computers …. (etc.)

* The Obsolete Objects of Surveillance (i.e., objects of surveillance that have fallen out of use)

* How do objects make visible personal data that is otherwise invisible?

* Self-policing: how do we watch them watch us?

* Technologies of the self and new media / Technologies of the self and dead media

* Systems of meaning and truth under surveillance/ imaginary and real inventions for policing and detecting such as lie detectors, truth serums, mind reading

* War-time surveillance: rationing and ration books, black market trading (representations and history)

* Governmental efforts to educate citizens (e.g. road safety campaigns, anti-littering campaigns, anti-smoking campaigns, etc.), both in filmic representation or through tv and press media.

* The gadgets of surveillance in spy films

* The art of CCTV cameras / Cultural plays with CCTV

* Watching cultures and Reality TV

* The relationship of bodies to surveillance technologies.

* The arts of documentary photography

* Prison plans and texts

* Watching you watching me: photography OF the police

* Under-cover policing in Film Noir / Policing practices in TV crime series

* Police procedurals (novelistic, cinematic, televisual)

* Forensic science and the invention of modern vision

* Panopticism and cinematic surveillance: theories, practices, and representations

* The relationship between voyeurism and surveillance

* New visibilities of surveillance / Changing temporalities and spaces of surveillance

* Documentary (as) surveillance

* Self-registration (tattoos, dog-tags) and rights

* Neighbourhood watch, curtain twitchers, vigilante work: putting the everyday under surveillance

* ‘Take back the night’ and women’s relationship to surveillance

* The political economy of visual technology and surveillance

* Advanced capitalism and (visual) cultures of surveillance

* Surveillance regimes in comparative historical, national, and political contexts

* Watching out for the future: surveillance technologies in science fiction

* ‘They have me under surveillance’: Paranoia and modernity

* Design technologies and panopticism / anti-panopticism

* The aesthetics of surveillance

* What can humanities scholars bring to current debates about surveillance?

* How can film studies contribute to debates about surveillance culture?

Individual papers are invited from scholars and researchers in any discipline of the humanities, arts, social sciences, and sciences. Scholars from postgraduate to permanent senior academics are welcome to submit papers. Presentations would equally be welcomed from artists and filmmakers.

One-page abstracts for 20-minute presentations and a brief c.v. should be sent by Wed., 15 June to:

The Culture of Surveillance Conference Organisers

(Lee Grieveson, Rebecca Harrison, Jann Matlock, and Simon Rothon) at deadobjects@gmail.com

Participants will be notified by 30 June 2011

A conference publication is projected.

For more information on our projects, see http://www.autopsiesgroup.com and http://twitter.com/autopsiesgroup

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Books

REVIEWING BOOKS FOR HISTORICAL MATERIALISM

The journal Historical Materialism is looking for book reviewers.

Books to be Reviewed:

If you wish to review any of these books, or would like to propose other books for review, please write to a.toscano@gold.ac.uk 

Theodor W. Adorno, Current of Music (2009)

Chris Alden et al. (eds.), China Returns to Africa: A Rising Power and a Continent Embrace (2008)

Chris Alden, China in Africa (2007)

Bastian van Apeldoorn et al. (eds.), Contradictions and Limits of Neoliberal European Governance: From Lisbon to Lisbon (2009)

Paige Arthur, Unfinished Projects: Decolonization and the Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (2010)

Maurizio Atzeni, Workplace Conflict: Mobilization and Solidarity in Argentina (2010)

Simon Baker, Surrealism, History and Revolution (2007)

Giorgio Baratta, Antonio Gramsci in contrappunto (2007)

Luciano Barca, Cronache dall’interno del vertice del PCI, 3 vols. (2005)

Andrew E. Barshay, The Social Sciences in Modern Japan: The Marxian and Modernist Traditions (2004)

Peter Beilharz, Socialism and Modernity (2009)

Daniel Bensaïd, Strategies of Resistance + ‘Who are the Trotskyists?’ (2009)

Olivier Besancenot and Michael Löwy, Che Guevara: His Revolutionary Legacy (2009)

Roland Boer and Jorunn Okland (eds.), Marxist Feminist Criticism of the Bible (2008)

Sergio Bologna, Ceti medi senza futuro? Scritti, appunti sul lavoro e altro (2007)

AA.VV. Condizioni e identità nel lavoro professionale. Riflessioni sul saggio di Sergio Bologna Ceti medi senza futuro? (2008)

Werner Bonefeld (ed.), Subverting the Present, Imagining the Future: Insurrection, Movement, Commons (2008)

Derek Boothman, Traducibilità e processi traduttivi. Un caso: A. Gramsci linguista (2004)

Philip Bounds, Orwell & Marxism: The Political and Cultural Thinking of George Orwell (2009)

Sarah Bracking, Money and Power: Great Predators in the Political Economy of Development (2009)

Peter Bratsis, Everyday Life and the State (2006)

Dennis Broe, Film Noir, American Workers, and Postwar Hollywood (2009)

Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism (2009)

Alex Callinicos, Bonfire of Illusions: The Twin Crises of the Liberal World (2010)

Andrew Chitty and Martin McIvor, Karl Marx and Contemporary Philosophy (2009)

Mike Cole, Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response (2010)

Sam Coombes, The Early Sartre and Marxism (2008)

Cristina Corradi, Storia dei Marxismi in Italia (2005)

Sean Craven, Against the Spiritual Turn: Marxism, Realism and Critical Theory (2010)

Eric Leif Davin, Crucible of Freedom: Workers’ Democracy in the Industrial Heartland, 1914-1960 (2010)

Michael Decker, Tilling the Hateful Earth: Agricultural Production in the Late Antique East (2009)

Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter, Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games (2009)

Terry Eagleton and Matthew Beaumont, The Task of the Critic: Terry Eagleton in Dialogue (2009)

Stuart Elden, Terror and Territory: The Spatial Extent of Sovereignty (2009)

Ben Fine, Theories of Social Capital: Researchers Behaving Badly (2010)

Roberto Fineschi, Un nuovo Marx. Filologia e interpretazione dopo la nuova edizione storico-critica (Mega 2) (2008)

Maurice Godelier, In and Out of the West (2009)

Jane Hardy, Poland’s New Capitalism (2009)

David Harvey, A Companion to Marx’s Capital (2010)

David Harvey, The Enigma of Capital (2010)

Wang Hui, The End of the Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (2009)

Mobo Gao, The Battle for China’s Past: Mao & the Cultural Revolution (2008)

Richard H. Immerman, Empire for Liberty: A History of American Imperialism from Benjamin Franklin to Paul Wolfowitz (2010)

Ken Jones et al. Schooling in Western Europe: The New Order and its Adversaries (2008) 

Paul R. Josephson, Would Trotsky Wear a Bluetooth? Technological Utopianism Under Socialism, 1917-1989 (2010)

Ray Kiely, Rethinking Imperialism (2010)

John Milios and Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, Rethinking Imperialism: A Study of Capitalist Rule (2009)

David Laibman, Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential (2007)

Luca La Rovere, Storia dei Guf (2003) and L’Eredità del fascismo (2008)

Gianpasquale Santomassimo, La terza via fascista. Il mito del corporativismo (2006)

Tommaso Baris, Il fascismo in provincia (2007)

Loreto Di Nucci, Lo Stato-partito del fascismo. Genesi, evoluzione e crisi, 1919-1943 (2009)

Domenico Losurdo, Marx e il bilancio storico del Novecento (2009)

Manning Marable, Beyond Black & White, 2nd ed (2009)

Marco Maurizi, Adorno e il tempo del non-identico (2004)

George E. McCarthy, Dreams in Exile: Rediscovering Science and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Social Theory (2009)

Terrence McDonough et al. (eds.), Contemporary Capitalism and its Crises: Social Structure of Accumulation Theory for the 21st Century (2010)

Patrick McGee, Theory and the Common from Marx to Badiou (2009)

Jim McGuigan, Cool Capitalism (2009)

István Mészáros, The Challenge and Burden of Historical Time: Socialism in the Twenty-First Century (2008)

Claire Metelits, Inside Insurgency: Violence, Civilians, and Revolutionary Group Behavior (On the Front Lines with the FARC, SPLA, and PKK) (2010)

Andrew Milner (ed.), Tenses of Imagination: Raymond Williams on Science Fiction, Utopia and Dystopia (2010)

Sandra Moog and Rob Stones (eds), Nature, Social Relations and Human Needs: Essays in Honour of Ted Benton (2009)

Rosalind C. Morris (ed.), Can the Subaltern Speak? Reflections on the History of an Idea (2010)

Jerry Z. Muller, Capitalism and the Jews (2010)

Antonio Negri, The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (2009)

Jose Neves, Comunismo e Nacionalismo em Portugal. Politica, Cultura e Historia no Seculo XX (2008)

Aldo Pardi, Il sintomo e la rivoluzione. Georges Politzer crocevia tra due epoche (2007)

David Parker (ed.), Ideology, Absolutism and the English Revolution: Debates of the British Communist Historians, 1940-1956 (2008)

Elizabeth J. Perry, Patrolling the Revolution: Worker Militias, Citizenship, and the Modern Chinese State (2006)

Colloque de Cerisy. La Philosophie Déplacée. Autour de Jacques Rancière (2006)

Jonah Raskin, The Mythology of Imperialism: A Revolutionary Critique of British Literature and Society in the Modern Age, new ed. (2009)

Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, Ideologia (2005)

Andrew Sartori, Bengal in Global Concept History: Culturalism in the Age of Capital (2008)

Simon Skempton, Alienation After Derrida (2010)

Kate Soper et al. (eds.), The Politics and Pleasures of Consuming Differently (2009)

Marc Stears, Demanding Democracy: American Radicals in Search of a New Politics (2010)

Simon Stewart, Culture and the Middle Classes (2010)

Yvette Taylor, Classed Intersections: Spaces, Selves, Knowledges (2010)

Kenneth Surin, Freedom Not Yet: Liberation and the Next World Order (2009)

Leila Simona Talani (ed.), The Global Crash: Towards a New Global Financial Regime? (2010)

Hiroshi Uchida (ed.), Marx for the 21st Century (2006)

Paolo Virno, Multitude Between Innovation and Negation (2008)

Sheldon S. Wolin, Democracy Inc.: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism (2010)

Mark P. Worrell, Dialectic of Solidarity: Labor, Antisemitism and the Frankfurt School (2008)

Li Xing (ed.) The Rise of China and the Capitalist World Order (2010)

Update 6th July 2010 – Revised List

At: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/books-for-review/books-to-be-reviewed/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Noir

Noir

FILM NOIR, AMERICAM WORKERS AND POSTWAR HOLLYWOOD

 

New Noir Book:

“Busts This Town Wide Open”: Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood

Dennis Broe, University of Florida Press

Order now for a 40% Discount with Code Listed Below

Ever since French critics began using the term film noir in the mid-1940s, a clear definition of the genre has remained elusive. Broe’s interdisciplinary examination is a cogent argument for the centrality of class in the creation of film noir, demonstrating how the form itself came to fruition during one of the most active periods of working-class agitation and middle-class antagonism in American history.

In the 1940s, both radicalized union members and protagonists of noir films were hunted and pursued by the law. The book details how, after World War II, members of the labor movement who waged a series of strikes that paralyzed American industry, including Hollywood, were forced to use extralegal means because of pressure applied by new legislation such as the Taft-Hartley Act. In the same way the film noir protagonist moves further and further outside the law in this period until the films become a lament for a change hoped for but not achieved. The book then marks the sharp distinction between noir and the police procedural where the working class cop, now shorn of his or her radical sympathies, becomes the subject of the film.

A coda describes noir under Reagan and Bush (“A Thousand Points of Dark”) and post-9/11 noir which alternately resists and validates the replaying of the Cold War as the War on Terror.

What the Critics are saying:

‘[This is] an intriguing study of U.S. film noir as a left-wing cultural formation. Broe makes an informative and convincing case for the repressed, often overlooked working class determinants of early noir, and his discussion of individual films is consistently insightful. This is an important addition to the literature on the subject.’ James Naremore, author of More Than Night: Film Noir in Its Contexts

‘With keen insight and a deep appreciation of the politics of film noir, Broe has broken new ground in the interpretation of cinema itself. With this book film noir has found its most astute and informed critic.’ Gerald Horne, author of Class Struggle in Hollywood, 1930-50

‘Broe puts the red back in the black. His book contours amidst the shadows of film noir those battles and tussles of the laboring classes that have too often been written out of film history, as out of the authorized narrative of U.S. history. Through wonderfully synthetic overviews and deft extended readings, a panoply of films is shown to chart in devious and overt ways the ups and down of union power and working class perspectives.’ Esther Leslie, author of Walter Benjamin and Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory and the Avant-Garde

‘[The book is] a bracing alternative history of how noir represented the roiling state of American culture in the 1940s … His categorization scheme will carry great weight in all future discussion of noir’s thematic landscape.’ Donald Malcolm, Noir City Sentinel

For a special 40% discount, until October 1, 2009, call toll free 800-226-3822, or order online at: http://upf.com/book.asp?id=BROEXS07 with discount code NOIR9.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk