Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Feminist Politics

Feminism

Feminism

ROOMS OF OUR OWN

CONFERENCE ON WOMEN’S SPACES

Women’s Spaces and Feminist Politics: yesterday, today and tomorrow

You are invited to a one-day conference organized by London Women and Planning Forum, Rooms of our Own and Women’s Studies without Walls

FRIDAY 16th MAY 2014, 9.30 for 10.0 – 5.0pm
@ Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Rd, E1 4NS 
Geography Department, First Floor, Room 126

This one-day conference will explore the role of women’s spaces in feminist politics, focusing on women’s centres and other women’s spaces in the past, present and future. During the 1970s there were autonomous women’s centres in most London boroughs and throughout the UK. They provided an exciting, safe and liberating environment for women to share thoughts and experiences and to campaign for change. Many of these centres were funded by local authority grants but as the grant-giving environment diminished most were forced to close. Some have survived by tendering for out-sourced council services such as domestic violence and rape counselling. Many have struggled against the conflation of feminist demands into a generalised equality agenda. During the past decade a new  generation of feminists has started to campaign against the objectification of women in the media, the expansion of pornography, sexism in the workplace and on the street, the lack of representation of women in public life and the sexualisation of young children. This new generation of feminists is largely organized via social media rather than in physical spaces. 

There will be four key sessions.

  1. Why “Women Only”?  Speakers on the history of women’s spaces, lesbian and separatist issues, cultural and religious diversity issues and requirements for women’s safety.
  2. Women’s Spaces past, present and future. A range of speakers looking at Women’s Centres that have closed, those that have survived and ideas for new forms for the future.
  3. Virtual women’s spaces. Speakers from organisations that organise almost exclusively online; benefits and problems.
  4. One hour discussion involving all the speakers and audience chaired by Woman’s Hour’s Jane Garvey, followed by a Networking session

We aim to organise another event following on from this Conference with the opportunity for much more discussion, networking and planning for the future.

Please go to Eventbrite to register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/womens-spaces-and-feminist-politics-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow-tickets-11140033139

£38 for waged +booking fee

£8.50 for unwaged +booking fee  (if this is difficult for you, please email us)

Includes tea/ coffee throughout the day and a vegetarian lunch.
Please let us know if you have particular access and /or dietary requirements
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: 6th May 2014
EMAIL CONTACT: womensspaces@gmail.com

Feminism

Feminism

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Children at Work

MATERIALIST READINGS OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Call for Papers

Materialist Readings of Children’s Literature and Culture: Classic and Contemporary Essays

Call for papers for an edited collection tentatively titled Materialist Readings of Children’s Literature and Culture: Classic and Contemporary Essays.  This collection will consist primarily of new analyses, but will also include previously published essays in order to chart the development of materialist criticism of children’s literature, culture, and film.   

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

• The way in which children’s literature supports or, conversely, challenges class hierarchies, especially as they intersect with gender, sexuality, and race/ethnicity

• The “political unconscious” in works of children’s literature

• Cognitive mapping

• Class conflict in children’s literature and film

• Depictions of the working class, labor history, socialism, and revolution

• Children’s literature and the left

• Materialist-feminist criticism and children’s literature and culture

• Materialist analyses of post-colonial children’s literature and culture 

• The political economy of children’s literature and culture

Please direct inquiries and submissions to the editor, Dr. Angela Hubler, atahubler@ksu.edu.  500 words abstracts, brief biography, and short C.V. are due by September 18th, 2011.  Complete essays must be submitted as an attachment in Microsoft Word, following MLA guidelines for citation and format, by November 18th, 2011.  A potential publisher has expressed interest, and a proposal will be submitted after abstracts are received. 

Editor Angela Hubler is Associate Professor in Women’s Studies atKansasStateUniversity, where she teaches courses in feminist theory, female adolescence, and women’s writing and culture.  Her recent publications analyze literary representations of collective political action in literature for children and adults. Her essays have been published in The Lion and the Unicorn, Children’s Literature Association Quarterly, Critical Survey, Papers on Language and Literature, Women’s Studies Quarterly, the National Women’s Studies Association Journal, and edited collections.  

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Feminism

DIMINISHING RETURNS? FEMINIST ENGAGEMENTS WITH THE RETURN TO ‘THE COMMONS’

_____________________

An international workshop hosted by the Kent Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality and Kent Law School

Wednesday 23 March 2011
Kent Law School
Canterbury, UK*
12-6pm

With presentations by:

Rosemary Coombe (York University, Canada)
Radhika Desai (University of Manitoba, Canada)
Denise Ferreira da Silva (Queen Mary, UK)
Nina Power (Roehampton, UK)

Discussed by:

Donatella Alessandrini (Kent, UK)
Brenna Bhandar (Kent, UK)

The day will consist of two sessions, broken up with a light lunch (provided) and followed by dinner (not provided). Please join us for part or all of the day. More information about the theme of the workshop can be found below.

The event is free but spaces are limited. To book a spot please register by emailing Stacy Douglas at: S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk before 1 March 2011.

*There are some funds available for postgraduate students who wish to travel to Kent for the workshop. If you are interested please email Stacy Douglas at S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk with a brief case for support as well as an estimated cost for your train travel. Information about traveling to Kent can be found here.

_____________________

Background:

Garrett Hardin’s now infamous essay “Tragedy of the Commons” (1968) stands as a Hobbesian analogy for what he claims are the inherent destructive capacities of human beings that perpetually stand in the way of realizing a free community of individuals with shared resources. Hardin’s essay suggests that, when faced with the responsibility of sharing the commons, individual human self-interest – or fear of it – will win out over practices of collectivity, sharing, and mutual aid.

More recently, there has been a resurgence in political theory and political philosophy in addressing the concept of “the commons”. Some of the most popularly cited references to the idea can be found in the work of Slavoj Žižek (2009) and Hardt and Negri (2009). This work has further been expounded upon in international conferences devoted to the “Idea of Communism” in London (2009) and Berlin (2010).  Steeped in the philosophy of Spinoza, Hardt and Negri use a notion of the common that “…does not position humanity separate from nature, as either its exploiter or its custodian, but focuses rather on the practices of interaction, care, and cohabitation in a common world, promoting the beneficial and limiting and detrimental forms of the common” (2009). For Žižek, the commons is comprised of culture (“primarily language, our means of communication and education, but also shared infrastructure such as public transport, electricity, post, etc…”), external nature (“from oil to forests and the natural habitat itself”), and internal nature (“the biogenetic inheritance of humanity”), and are all increasingly enclosed by the forces of global capital. It is the process of our exclusion from these commons (“our own substance”) that Žižek argues should effectively proletarianize us into fighting for something more than capitalist liberal democracy – a system whose laissez-faire violence is justified through the empty gesture of “universal inclusion” without any material bite. Žižek’s answer to this political conundrum is a call for communism.

And yet, the past century has seen vast and varied critical feminist engagements with historically changing concepts of communism and “the commons”. Struggles for universal suffrage, critiques of universality, denouncements of the hollowing out of the welfare state as a result of neoliberalisation, and challenges to the concept of the human, are all examples of a rich and diverse feminist tradition of engagement with the concept of “the commons”. Given the popular return to the idea of the commons, what more does feminist analysis have to give to this conversation? Does the concept still have potential for future feminist projects? If so, what is this potential and what do these projects look like? How do they resonate – or not – with those of the past? Further, given the broader theme of the workshop series, what role – if any – does the “the state” play in these imaginings?

The Kent Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality (KCLGS) and Kent Law School invite you to participate in a workshop exploring the contemporary feminist work of Rosemary CoombeRadhika DesaiDenise Ferreira da Silva, and Nina Power as it resonates or clashes with these questions. For more information or to register, email S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk or visit www.kent.ac.uk/law/kentclgs/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com