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Low-Fee Private Schooling

Low-Fee Private Schooling

LOW-FEE PRIVATE SCHOOLING: AGGRAVATING EQUITY OR MITIGATING DISADVANTAGE?

Edited by PRACHI SRIVASTAVA

2013 paperback 220 pages US$48.00
ISBN 978-1-873927-91-5

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Low-fee private schooling represents a point of heated debate in the international policy context of Education for All and the Millennium Development Goals. While on the one hand there is an increased push for free and universal access with assumed State responsibility, reports on the mushrooming of private schools targeting socially and economically disadvantaged groups in a range of developing countries, particularly across Africa and Asia, have emerged over the last decade. Low-fee private schooling has, thus, become a provocative and illuminating area of research and policy interest on the impacts of privatisation and its different forms in developing countries.

This edited volume aims to add to the growing literature on low-fee private schooling by presenting seven studies in five countries (Ghana, India, Kenya, Nigeria and Pakistan), and is bookended by chapters analysing some of the evidence and debates on the topic thus far.

The book presents research findings from studies across three levels of analysis that have proven relevant in the study of low-fee private schooling: the household, school and state. Chapters address household schooling choice behaviours regarding low-fee private and competing sectors; the management, operation and relative quality of low-fee private schools; and changes to the regulatory frameworks governing low-fee private schools, and the impact of low-fee private schools on those frameworks.

The book does not seek to provide definitive answers since, as an emerging and evolving area of study, this would be premature. Instead, it aims to call attention to the need for further systematic research on low-fee private schooling, and to open up the debate by presenting studies that use a range of methods and, owing to the context specificity of the issue, draw different conclusions. The hope is that these studies may serve as springboards to further research.

Finally, the book does not aim to snuff out the political and vociferous debate surrounding low-fee private schooling and private provision more broadly, or to erase the complications that abound in conducting research in this area, but to engage with them.

The hope is that as the 2015 target date for Education for All and Millennium Development Goals approaches, this book may help us get closer to answering the question: do low-fee private schools aggravate equity or mitigate disadvantage?

 

Contents:

Prachi Srivastava. Low-fee Private Schooling: issues and evidence

Kwame Akyeampong & Caine Rolleston. Low-fee Private Schooling in Ghana: is growing demand improving equitable and affordable access for the poor?

Shailaja Fennell. Low-fee Private Schools in Pakistan: a blessing or a bane?

Pauline Dixon, James Tooley & Ian Schagen. The Relative Quality of Private and Public Schools for Low-income Families Living in Slums of Nairobi, Kenya

Jonathan M.B. Stern & Stephen P. Heyneman. Low-fee Private Schooling: the case of Kenya

Joanna Härmä & Folasade Adefisayo. Scaling Up: challenges facing low-fee private schools in the slums of Lagos, Nigeria

Yuki Ohara. The Regulation of Unrecognised Low-fee Private Schools in Delhi: potential implications for India’s Right to Education Act

Salman Humayun, Rizwana Shahzad & Roger Cunningham. Regulating Low-fee Private Schools in Islamabad: a study in policy and practice

Geoffrey Walford. Low-fee Private Schools: a methodological and political debate

 

Related titles

Education in South-East AsiaCOLIN BROCK & LORRAINE PE SYMACO

The Globalisation of School Choice? MARTIN FORSEY, SCOTT DAVIES & GEOFFREY WALFORD

Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: closer perspectives ROSARII GRIFFIN

Education, Democracy and Development: does education contribute to democratisation in developing countries? CLIVE HARBER & VUSI MNCUBE

The Changing Landscape of Education in Africa: quality, equality and democracy DAVID JOHNSON

School Leadership in the Caribbean: perceptions, practices, paradigms PAUL MILLER

Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives PRACHI SRIVASTAVA & GEOFFREY WALFORD

 

SYMPOSIUM BOOKS
PO Box 204, Didcot, Oxford OX11 9ZQ, United Kingdom
info@symposium-books.co.uk
Specialist publishers of Comparative and International Education.
Please see our online catalogue at www.symposium-books.co.uk for bibliographical details, contents pages, and a secure order form.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

University

University

HIGHER EDUCATION AS IF THE WORLD MATTERED

A conference to be held on 25 and 26 April 2013 organised by: The Higher Education Research Group (Institute for Education, Community and Society, The University of Edinburgh) in partnership with The Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

CALL FOR PAPERS

While higher education is known to enhance people’s life chances, questions remain to be asked about how the goods to be gained from higher education are presently distributed. Despite policies that are meant to increase access to higher education for under-represented sections of society we know that in a highly stratified society and higher education system even widened entry does not guarantee greater social justice in relation to access, for example. Against this backdrop, broad questions that the symposium will address include: To what extent and how do higher education policies and practices make a difference to this world? What are present priorities and how could things be otherwise? To what extent does higher education address community and environmental concerns? To what extent are participants encouraged to make a contribution to the world?

This conference, and a book that will be associated with it, therefore, seek to explore social justice in and through higher education by examining recent policies and practices in relation to six broad strands of higher education: Research and knowledge mobilisation; Curriculum; Pedagogy; Access and participation; Institutional leadership; Quality and educational development. Contributions in each section seek to analyse the assumptions underpinning policy and practice, arrive at judgements about the extent to which the world is seen to matter and offer suggestions on how things could be different from how they are. Running across these six strands are concerns related to internationalisation, funding, and lifelong learning.

Keynote Speakers
Professor Melanie Walker, Free State University, South Africa
Professor Monica McLean, University of Nottingham, UK
Professor Jon Nixon, Senior Research Fellow, Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIE), and Honorary Professor, University of Sheffield, UK
Professor Ray Land, Durham University, UK

For Keynote speaker abstracts and biographies, click here

Author submissions

All submissions are subject to a blind peer review process. Proposals are invited for Individual Papers. Each paper accepted for individual presentation will be allocated a minimum of 30 minutes for presentation and discussion.

Timetable for submissions

All proposals must be submitted via email to fsmit@srhe.ac.uk . The deadline for submission is 1 March 2013.

Call for Papers- Format for submissions

To maintain the high quality of papers presented at the conference, and ensure that the review process has access to a sufficient level of detail on paper proposals to take an informed view, submitting authors are asked to provide a short paper for peer review in two parts.

Please note that both parts will be required at the point of first submission, but there will be no subsequent call for fuller papers for accepted abstracts.

• Part 1 Abstract: a 150 word summary of the proposal which will be printed in the published conference programme and also made available at conference on the CD Rom.
• Part 2 Outline: a maximum 1000 word paper (not including references)

Conference Venue
The symposium will take place at Paterson’s Land, Moray House School of Education, Holyrood Road, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 8AQ. All rooms are equipped with a screen and laptop.

The School of Education is located in the picturesque OldTown area (off the Royal Mile, or Canongate). It is a 10 minute walk (or three minute taxi ride) from Edinburgh Waverley train station to the School of Education. The City of Edinburgh is easily reachable by train and most airlines (Easyjet and Ryanair offer low-budget flights from several cities in England). Travel from Edinburgh Airport to the City Centre (final stop at Waverly Bridge, right opposite Waverley Station) by Airlink bus service takes approximately 30 minutes (and a single journey costs £3.50) and by taxi the cost is between £18 and £20.

The City of Edinburgh offers many attractions for conference participants considering spending the weekend. It also features a wide range of cafés, bistros and restaurants and a good number of reasonably priced hotels close to the conference venue (e.g., IBIS at Grassmarket, The Jurys Inn on Jeffrey Street, The Travel Lodge on St Mary’s Street, and the highly praised Salisbury Green Hotel, situated on the University’s own premises at Pollock Halls).

Conference Fees and Booking

Fees are £150 (£130 for SRHE members) and include all refreshments during the day on both days (excluding dinner) and the conference programme. Any overnight accommodation is to be organised and paid directly by delegates. Sorry, there are no single day fees.

Employees of the University of Edinburgh may attend free of charge, but must register in order to attend this event, and should e-mail their full name, contact details and any special or dietary requirements to Nicola Manches at nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

To book your place visit www.srhe.ac.uk/events/details.asp?eid=77 and click on ‘Book now’.

Further Information

If you require any further information or assistance, please contact the Conference Organiser, Francois Smit at fsmit@srhe.ac.uk

Conference Director:  Carolin Kreber, Institute for Education, Community and Society, The University of Edinburgh.

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Our Universities

THE UNIVERSITY IS OURS!

Edufactory

The University is Ours!

Friday, December 2, 2011  

A Conference on Struggles Within and Beyond the Neoliberal University
April 27-29, 2012
Toronto, Ontario

The university belongs to us, those who teach, learn, research, council, clean, and create community. Together we can and do make the university work.

But today this university is in crisis. The neoliberal restructuring of post-secondary education seeks to further embed market logic and corporate-style management into the academy, killing consultation, autonomy and collective decision-making. The salaries of university presidents and the ranks of administrators swell, but the people the university is supposed to serve — students — are offered assembly-line education as class sizes grow, faculty is over-worked, and teaching positions become increasingly precarious. International students and scholars seeking post-secondary or graduate education are treated as cash cows rather than as people who might contribute to both research and society. Debt-burdened students are seen as captive markets by administrators, while faculty is encouraged to leverage public funds for private research on behalf of corporate sponsors.

The attack on what remains of public education has been total. Over the last year we have witnessed the closure of humanities programmes, further tuition hikes, the replacement of financial support with loans, union lockouts, and the accelerated development of private, for-profit universities. Yet at the same time we have seen growing waves of struggle against these incursions, as students, staff and faculty in Europe, Latin America, and across the Middle East organize, occupy and resist the transformation.

Our struggles are not limited to the university, but are a part the widespread resistance against the neoliberal market logic subsuming all sectors of our society. The university is a key battleground in this struggle, and a point of conjuncture for the various labour, economic and social justice struggles that face all of us – workers and students alike. Crucially, these struggles occur on stolen indigenous lands and manifest through colonialism, racism, sexism, homophobia, ablism and other forms of oppression that hurt and divide us and that shape what sorts of knowledge are considered valuable.

We cannot cede the ideal of the university as a site for struggle and debate. We cannot permit the dissolution of proliferating research, ideas and innovations free from the demands and control of the market. We cannot watch as universities are degraded into a mere site for corporate or state-sponsored research and marketing. The time to mobilize is now!

This conference will connect and chart the varied struggles against neoliberal restructuring of the university inNorth Americaand beyond. We envision a series of debriefings on experiences of resistance, the creation of a cartography of local and global struggles, and a strategizing session for students, teachers, workers and activists. We aim to develop a North American network of struggles.

We encourage presentations that raise questions and generate dialogue among the rest of the participants. Ideally, submissions will indicate the specific outcomes they hope will emerge from the discussion. We encourage participation from those with first-hand experience of these crises, and those engaged in the fight for free and public post-secondary education, especially student groups and trade unions.

For a better future for all – join us!

POSSIBLE THEMES:

ü        Mapping the terrain of campus struggle inCanadaandNorth America

ü        Connecting with and learning from global struggles

ü        Waged and unwaged labour in the university

ü        Abolition of student debt

ü        The university and the occupy movement

ü        The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

ü        The death of the humanities

ü        Militarization of the university

ü        Intersections of university struggles other fights against oppression

ü        Environmental justice

ü        Beyond public education

ü        Radical pedagogy

ü        Academic freedom

ü        The politics of research funding

ü        The economics of the neoliberal university

ü        University and student governance

ü        The undergraduate experience of neoliberalism

ü        Alternative/free/autonomous universities

ü        Organizing the education factory

ü        The suppression of on-campus dissent and organization

Please email submissions to universityisours@gmail.com by January 16th.

Also,if you would like to attend the conference, please RSVP to the same address so organizers can plan for numbers.

This conference is organized by the Edu-factory Collective in collaboration with theUniversityofToronto General Assembly.

Edufactory: http://www.edu-factory.org/wp/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education on Trial

UniCOMMON: THE REBELLION OF LIVING KNOWLEDGE

An extraordinary season of struggle, beyond Uniriot

Uniriot has been several things: the will to compose different political cultures, the desire of conflict and the innovation inside and against the university reformed by the Bologna Process. The attempt of building up a new experimentation outside of any reassuring identity, but creating a new network able to change and being changed by the richness of discussions and the unquestionable reality of the struggle that cross us.

Uniriot.org has been a great platform, a useful tool for the challenge we issued five years ago: not only a showcase of our ideas, but a crossroads of different experiences and projects, new narrations of struggle, communication about the transformations of the university and our research. We have been trying to carry this challenge forward since the movement of 2005, when we created Uniriot, through our experience inside the European struggles during the AntiCPE movement in France, Bologna Burns in Wien and Madrid, until the anomalous wave of 2008 and the incredible autumn we lived in 2010.

We have been profoundly changed during these extraordinary months, together with students, precarious workers and researchers that have passionately animated and continuously organized the struggles of the last year. As we cannot be the same, we close the experience of Uniriot and launch a new political constituent process to live up to our time and the transformations required by the struggles. A new challenge!

The Rebellion of Living Knowledge: UniCommon

UniCommon moves its first step in an era of crisis and austerity: the education reforms enacted without any public funding inside the framework of the failure of the Bologna Process and, at the same time, its extension outside Europe as a tool of exploitation of transnational living knowledge; the dismissal of the public university and the de-qualification of high school education, the massive youth unemployment, precarity and the absence of any future for a whole generation inside and outside the academy.

In this landscape, movements shouted firmly the shelter of public university against cuts, rising tuition fees, free research labor and debt loan, not as mere defence of the extant, but as a strategic field to claim quality of knowledge and free education against any rhetorical meritocracy. Self-education has been our political disposition, focused on the struggle for a qualified and critical knowledge, a device of organization that we are going to practice; our aim is to focus on the transformations of researchers’ status in the era of delegitimization of research work and the peer-review system. Militant research is our collective tool to understand and to map the transformations of the present; self-education is our device beyond the public/private dichotomy to make our university!

UniCommon wants to switch the nexus between education and precarity, creating a new social constituent deal within the new composition of labor, a democratic reappropriation of welfare against private plunders and feudal academic power. We have learnt that where there is a capital relation, there is exploitation of toil, passions, words and knowledge; where there is globalized cognitive capitalism so there is a parasitic power that robs our body, our life.

The European and north-African movements of the last autumn have taught us that the claim for welfare against poverty and rights against exploitation are strictly connected to the claim for democracy and freedom against power and its corruption. Students who have animated the revolts of last years, thousands of precarious and young unemployed took up the book shields to defend their lives: a rioting generation reclaiming knowledge, free access and circulation, income and new welfare, democracy and freedom of choice above our body.

UniCommon is born within the practice of Book Bloc, a common tool of defence, a production of imaginary to express our desire. We have created those book shields as an attempt of combining radicalism and people’s support; the challenge of our time is to build up a wild experimentation, widespread and radical at the same time, to step over the crisis and the failed utopia of cognitive capitalism. The Book Bloc is a transnational practice, against any fixed identity and outside any representation of conflict, it is our defence within the democracy of turmoil!

The failure of Bologna Process does not mean the end of exploitation of our knowledge, on the contrary the crisis deepens the capitalistc command over our body; at the same time, the struggles have showed us their powerful capacity of creating connections despite borders, sharing common projects and practices, shaping a different future where free knowledge, income, rights and citizenship are not just a privilege.

UniCommon is a new compass oriented by self-education, created by the wild demos that blocked the circulation of commodities; it is a device defended by the transnational Book Bloc inside a European space definitely twisted by the Mediterranean revolts, the margins that break into the center to overturn it.

Moreover, Unicommon is a network of communication and political organization, a web platform that will work as a place of information and communication of struggles from high school to the academy, a space of connection among experiences of self-education and autonomous collectives of research. UniCommon.org is a new website inside the 2.0 web time: video as a tool of enquiring and mapping transformations, photos as the continuous effort of imaging the fuzzy movement of our demos and discussions, audios as a precise opinion of different voices, augmented reality to shape and multiply our world.

UniCommon starts from La Sapienza University within a day of large discussions to make a public analysis of the past autumn and to imagine the spring that lies ahead.

Meet you in the struggles, to create the future and subvert the present; to make the university of the common!

°°°°°

Program 24.03.2011

Create the Future, Subvert the Present

10:30 a.m. College of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori, La Sapienza – Roma
Public assembly of students and precarious collectives and networks

Against the dismissal of public university, creating the university of the common

°°°
2:00 p.m. Lunch break

°°°

4:00 p.m. College of Political Science, LaSapienza – Roma
Round table

After the revolt of the autumn toward the general strike of 6th May 2011

Speakers: Ilenia Caleo (Zeropuntotre); Roberto Ciccarelli (Il manifesto), Claudio Riccio (Link), Eva Pinna (Surf), Luca Tomassini (CPU), Giorgio Sestili (Atenei in rivolta), Simone Famularo (Assemblea di Medicina – La Sapienza)  Francesco Sinopoli (Flc-Cgil), Corrado Zunino (la Repubblica)

°°°
7:30 p.m. aperitif break and videos
°°°

Info: http://www.uniriot.org  /  and from 24th  March  >>> http://www.unicommon.org >>>

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

Austerity ConDemed

ARTS AGAINST CUTS

ARTS AGAINST CUTS // DIRECT WEEKEND THIS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY [Jan 15th and 16th]

Camberwell College of Art, Wilson Road Building (off Peckham Rd)

Following on from the fantastic Long Weekend at Goldsmiths in December, the Turner Prize and National Gallery teach-ins, the Book Block and the many occupations and actions that emerged from that weekend, this Saturday 15th and Sunday 16th Arts Against Cuts are organising another weekend of action, planning, imagining, working and thinking together.

The schedule below has been drawn from the great list of proposals sent in. There will be lots of free space for anyone who wished to put forward ideas on the days, organised spontaneity.  Schedule may shift around a bit.

SATURDAY
* Saturday Creche all day
10 – 11            Breakfast (BYO)
11 – 12            Open Meeting
12 – 5              Parallel Spaces and Open Spaces Including…
* The Art of Direct Action, John Jordan talk and Workshop
* Posters and Graffitti in 1968 Atelier populaire oui, Aterlier bougeois non, talk and print making workshop, Warren Carter, Jess Baines, Jo Robinson
* Radical Education Workshop with Radical Education Collective
*  What shall we do with our cultural institutions? Precarious Workers Brigade
* Paid Not Played Choir & Political Music Collective music and lyric workshop
* Alter/ate Mobile Slogan Factory/ Counterproductions and CGTV
* Screen printing and Banner Making all day
5.00 CLOSING MEETING

SUNDAY
10 – 11            Breakfast (BYO)
11 – 12            Open Meeting
12 – 5              Parallel Spaces and Open Spaces Including…
* Object Sabotage with Evan Calder Williams, & Mute
* Mapping and Connecting with Trade Unions
* Video Box – 1-minute videos and Communist Gallery
* Book Block workshop
* Debt and Slavery, David Graeber
* Theatre of the Dead/ Dual Power – Planning for the 29th
* Fact Sheet Workshop and Free School
* EMA working group – Planning for 18th and 19th
* International Student Discussion/ Chelsea Project
5.00 CLOSING MEETING

After party gig with Chicago Boys in Camberwell

Arts Against Cuts was initiated across London Art Schools last Autumn.

 
We want to reclaim the public, critical space that universities and art schools should be, transforming those buildings into art schools for the future, bringing together art students, artists, cultural workers and those fighting the cuts from across the UK to share in defiance against the relentless marketization of our education and our lives. We will share knowledge and skills; we will collaborate across disciplines, ages and backgrounds; we will turn our imagination and desires into tools of disobedience. We will make sure that all the knowledge, ideas, tools and projects which emerge from the event will be disseminated and put into action in streets and public spaces across the country and be shared by all those in the anti-cuts movements. The Direct Weekend will be a feast of non stop workshops and presentations, slide shows and films, how-to sessions and skill shares, and a free space for spontaneous creation of events, actions and expressions. Its not important what art is but what it does, and right now it has the potential to turn the crisis of cuts into an opportunity for change.

http://artsagainstcuts.wordpress.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

AFTER THE MASS EDUCATION PROTEST: CO-ORDINATING MEETING AND UNITY STATEMENT

Over 50,000 students and lecturers marched this Wednesday, making it the biggest education protest since 1985. In the context of the miners’ strike, the student revolt forced Margaret Thatcher to back down from her plans to introduce tuition fees. Now, the issue of tuition fees threatens to turn into Cameron and Clegg’s poll tax.

A very large number of students broke away from the official route of the demonstration to march on the Tory HQ in 30 Millbank. Dozens of protestors got inside the building and onto the roof while a crowd of thousands laid siege outside for several hours.

This represents a real turning point in the resistance to the coalition government’s austerity programme, bringing the spirit of the French and Greek general strikes to the UK. Now there is a real opportunity to build on Wednesday’s mobilisation with protests, student walkouts and occupations on every university and college campus.

The protests have also opened up a lively debate inside our movement about which strategies and tactics are most appropriate and effective. This is to be welcomed – tens of thousands of people are joining our struggle, bringing a wealth of different perspectives.

But we firmly reject the attempt by the right-wing press to witch-hunt protesters and activists. The real vandals are the Tory and Liberal politicians who are wrecking our education. Over 50 protestors have already been arrested, some for nothing more than entering the building. This is an attempt to scare and divide our movement at a time when we most urgently need to unite.

Coordinating meeting: where next after the demonstration?

6pm Monday 15th November, King’s College London

With speakers from the Millbank occupation and across the movement

 

We need unity – stand with the Millbank protesters!

Defence statement to sign and circulate

http://teneleventen.wordpress.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/We-need-unity-defend-the-Millbank-protestors/128397300550227

teneleventen@googlemail.com

Newsflash: post-demo occupation at Manchester University http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/11/student-protests-demand-accounts

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Higher Education

Youth Fight for Jobs LONDON NEWSLETTER

 

Youth unemployment stands on the verge of 1million – That’s 1 in 5 young people unemployed. Whilst the government can afford to spend billions bailing out the banks it can’t afford to put money into decent jobs and free education for young people. Education offer no alternative to the dole queues – universities are set to increase fees to at least £7,000 per year, putting university out of reach for most ordinary people. For young people that have a job, it often comes with a lower minimum wage, worse conditions and poor contracts.

Youth Fight for Jobs was set up in March to provide an alternative to people who want to fight back against unemployment. We had a launch ‘March for Jobs’ where 600 young people marched through the four poorest boroughs of London demanding decent jobs and conditions. Since then the campaign has grown. We have become the focal point for the media on the fight against youth unemployment and have held activity, fortnights of action, protests against the releasing of unemployment figures, meetings, gigs and stunts.

We have a national demonstration taking place on the 28th November marching under the banner of ‘for real jobs – for free education’. For this demonstration we will be doing activity all over London and would like you to get involved in helping us build the campaign and local groups. See: http://www.youthfightforjobs.com

We are also organising a day of action on the 21st November (the week before the demonstration) where we will be leafleting estates, doing stunts and postering around the route of the demonstration which we would like you to get involved in.

We are organising activity across London including:

Greenwich

Lewisham

Hackney

Leyton

Tower Hamlets

Walthamstow

Hillingdon

West Central

East London

Haringey

Camden

Lambeth & Southwark

Croydon

If you would like to get involved in this activity or want help building in your area/school/college/workplace- contact us through the number and email below. Enclosed are a few leaflets for the campaign and also a membership card to join the campaign for £4 waged/£1unwaged.

Yours Sincerely,

Suzanne Beishon, Youth Fight for Jobs Steering Committee, 07716610893, suzbeishon@hotmail.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk