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Zizek

Zizek

ŽIŽEK, MIGRATION, EXCLUSION

A WORKSHOP

Thursday 19th February 2015, 3-5pm, Lecture Room 213, Brunel University, London

Irregular immigration is at the forefront of global struggles for economic opportunity, for political rights and for security. Pressed by the increasing influence of both global governing institutions and transnational corporations, along with rising cultural diversity, anxiety about the coherence of the imagined national community within Western nations has increased. This anxiety, along with the global economic downturn and concurrent rises in unemployment, is contributing to the sharpening of ideological policing of national borders, with new legislation targeting irregular immigrants and sympathy for the predicament of those immigrants falling. In turn, the plight of those driven by poverty, environmental insecurity and concerns over security to attempt to gain entry into Western nations outside of official channels has become increasingly fraught, with an estimated 2,500 migrants having drowned in the Mediterranean so far this year (as of October 2014).

For Slavoj Žižek these flows of irregular migrants exemplify a shifting of the borders of political and economic exclusion. Having identified the troubling presence of ‘new forms of apartheid’ most prominently found in the slums, sweatshops and construction projects of ‘the developing world’, this surplus of humanity is increasingly apparent on the borders of the Western world.  Arguing that this surplus is not an aberration in the development of global capitalism, but represents its ‘universal singular’ moment, Žižek suggests that as the ‘part with no part’ of the nation political community, irregular immigrants hold a uniquely disruptive presence.

This workshop brings together prominent Žižekian theorists to discuss the trauma, difficulties and radical political potential of the disruptive presence of irregular immigration and the ‘new forms of apartheid’ of the 21st century.

Speakers

Mark Devenney, University of Brighton

Heiko Feldner, University of Cardiff

Chris McMillan, Brunel University

Fabio Vighi, University of Cardiff

 

Organised by Chris McMillan. For more information, contact Chris.McMillan@brunel.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education

DISCOURSE, POWER & RESISTANCE IN EDUCATION – CONFERENCE 2013

Discourse, Power, Resistance: DPR 13      

DISCOURSES OF INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION
9 – 11 April, 2013 – University of Greenwich, United Kingdom

Power can be a wonderful thing, as Terry Eagleton told the DPR conference in 2008: wonderful and essential for the achievement of our best and most generous purposes. But it can also be abused.

A widespread abuse of power is to organise the social world into groups that are included and others that are excluded, using the discourse of the powerful group, like subtly barbed wire, to distinguish the insiders from the outsiders on the grounds of gender, ethnicity, age, wealth, sexuality, class and other grouping. Communities may then disintegrate. The excluded members may seek to be admitted to the privileged group by learning and adopting its discourse; or they may resist this assimilation and celebrate their difference in defiant counter-cultures of their own.

What is the scope of research, learning and teaching in this contested space? What knowledges and methodologies should be included or excluded, and why? These are the issues the conference will consider.

Exchanging words and papers is a powerful academic practice at the heart of DPR. But the conference is about the discourses of inclusion and exclusion, so images, music, performance, display, story-telling – the variously imaginative ways of sharing our understanding – must have their space. DPR13 will include the contributions of the creative and performing arts so that the conference tells and shows a freshly inclusive vision.

Preparations and plans for DPR13 are already well under way with over 60 abstracts accepted and more coming in daily. The Second Call for Papers is Friday 21 December. This is not a deadline but we strongly encourage delegates planning to offer papers, workshops, posters or exhibition work to send abstracts as soon as possible. Details of 12 projects and seminars already in preparation are posted on the website.

Further proposals are being developed and will be posted soon. For further information or to discuss ideas, please contact Jerome Satterthwaite by email at jnsatterthwaite@gmail.com

Conference website for full details and registration: dprconference.com

Power and Education journal: www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Taking to the Streets

RETURN TO THE STREET

27-28 June 2012
Goldsmiths, University of London

A two day conference exploring the shifting role of the street as discourse and real physical space in the context of contemporary culture and politics

Identity formation and public debate do not simply occur online or through new media technologies. As the recent excessive imprisonment of those involved in the UK riots this summer demonstrated, the control and regulation of real bodies within real spaces is still very much at stake. Within the context of riots, protests and occupations in the UK and worldwide – the street appears to have become once more the space where people gather to be heard and counted. Considering this ‘return’ (although it is questionable whether we every really left the street) how might a line be drawn between the type of discourse which pays lip service to banal, neoliberal fetishised notions of street as site and object of subversive cool – incorporating graffiti, fashion, skateboarding, hiphop – and a more critical and engaged examination of processes of exclusion, confrontation and violence which constitute the everyday reality of life on and in the street. The street is and should not simply be flagged up as a site where power relations are toyed with as part of an ongoing Damien Hirst-meets-Banksyesque flirtation between public and private space. Such fetishisation ignores or glosses over notions of territory, surveillance and fear.

Yet at every moment attempts to challenge existing power structures from within the space of the street are at risk of being recuperated in the service of bourgeois, neoliberal modes of consumption. The return to pedestrianised zones in major European cities is frequently part of gentrification processes and occurs within privately owned spaces with the aim of encouraging consumerism rather than increased social interaction precluded by motorised city spaces. The festival atmosphere at protests and occupations might also be considered not simply as a means of creating greater solidarity amongst participants but as embodying a Bakhtinian form of carnival in which the political impetus of the event or movement exhausts itself in a media circus of spectacle and rhetoric staged between protestors and law-enforcement. Similarly, how does the crowd or the collective end up reproducing existing forms of exclusion in claiming to speak for the masses as a homogeneous whole? Those whose access to the street is already restricted due to race, gender or disability must frequently concede their voices to those for whom the street is taken for granted as usable, occupiable and negotiable space. At the same time, a more critical stance is needed towards both the romanticisation and demonization of the crowd in public space. It is, for example, naive to think that issues such as the systemic street harassment of women in Cairo disappeared completely during the occupation of Tahrir Square yet this was the rhetoric widely presented. Conversely, how might the pervasive politics of fear which posits the crowd as unruly mob or herd, keeping people off the streets, through the imposition of curfews and devices like the mosquito be redressed? What needs to be done to encourage greater mobilisation on the street from different groups and individuals?

The aim of this conference is to rethink the street both in terms of its radical potential as site where dissent, critique and change can all be achieved whilst remaining critical as to the limits of such radicality. Where does the street lead us and what happens off the street? How might we avoid the dead ends and turf wars involved both in conceptualising and using the street? How might we set about building a new politics of the street? We welcome proposals for papers, discussions, short films, mini-workshops and other interventions engaging with the above issues and questions.

Topics might include but are not limited to:
– street as fetish object
– societies of discipline and control
– inclusion/exclusion/exchange
– street as site of resistance/containment
– subversive potential/impotential of street art and fashion
– hiphop struggles and activism
– surveillance – cctv and self-mapping apps
– politics of the crowd
– negotiating the street – strategies and tactics
– territory/circulation
– politics of fear
– living and working on the street
– off the street

Abstracts/proposals of 300-500 words should be sent to: S.Fuggle@gold.ac.uk by 3 February 2012.

Programme will be confirmed in early March 2012.

Organised by the Centre for Cultural Studies with the generous support of the Department of Media and Communications, PACE and theGraduateSchool, Goldsmiths.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

STATES OF FEMINISM / MATTERS OF STATE – CONFERENCE

Conference: States of Feminism / Matters of State: Gender and the Politics of Exclusion

2nd and 3rd December

Jan van Eyck Academy

Maastricht

Holland

See: http://www.janvaneyck.nl/

For more info: http://www.janvaneyck.nl/0_2_3_events_info/eve_1012_states_of_feminism.html

Two day conference organised by Sara Farris, Avigail Moss, Kerstin Stakemeier, Rebecka Thor

This two-day conference on contemporary feminism will investigate how feminist thought has developed in relation to the rise of populist politics in Europe, and correspondingly how it relates to questions of nationalism and identity. In the recent resurgence of nationalistic and xenophobic ideologies across Europe, policy makers and the media have increasingly instrumentalised discourses about female emancipation. Paraphrasing Gayatri Spivak’s effective metaphor, contemporary nationalism and xenophobia increasingly take the form of a wide-spread discourse in which “white men claim to be saving brown women from brown men.” Why is the ideal, albeit misleading, approach of female emancipation increasingly used by contemporary nationalism? What kinds of feminism do such nationalistic agendas employ? How can we articulate a feminist perspective that resists such misuses?

In addition to addressing these issues from sociological and philosophical perspectives, States of feminism/matters of state will also consider how aesthetic practices incorporate feminist strategies, and how art can be used as a means of conducting feminist politics. How is this (state of being?) depicted in narratives questioning authorship, polyphonic time, geopolitical space? The conference will include artists working with queer subjectivities in order to be able to discuss the term from multiple positions. As artists and critics, Sara Farris, Avigail Moss, Kerstin Stakemeier and Rebecka Thor ask how feminist thinking pertaining to questions of statehood operates today in politics, art and theory, and how these fields intersect and diverge.

PROGRAMME

Thursday, 2nd December

14.00 – 14.30: Rada Ivekovic, (University Jean-Monnet St. Etienne), “Women at stake in matters of state, nation and society”

Discussant: Chiara Bonfiglioli

15.00 – 15.30: Michaela Mélian, TBA
Discussant: Avigail Moss

16.00 – 16.15: Break

16.15 – 16.45: Vincenza Perilli (Online Journal Marginalia, Bologna), “The colonial inheritance of sexo-racism in Fortress Europe.”

Discussant: Sara Farris

18.00: Dinner at the JvE Academy.

20.00: Screening: “Comrades of Time. Zeitgenössinen.” (Andrea Geyer 2010): Q&A with Andrea Geyer via Skype (Artist, New York)

Discussant: Rebecka Thor

Friday, 3rd December

11.00 – 11.30: Neferti Tadiar (Professor and Chair Women’s Studies in Barnard College, New York), “The Remainders of Feminism and  Nationalism: Lifetimes in Becoming Human”

Discussant: Katja Diefenbach

12.00-13.00: Lunch

13.00 – 13.30: Performance by Johannes Paul Raether (Berlin)

Feminism

Discussant: Kerstin Stakemeier

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Archive

Archive

THE ARCHIVE AND EVERYDAY LIFE CONFERENCE
Call for Proposals:

”The Archive and Everyday Life” Conference
May 7-8, 2010
McMaster University

Confirmed Keynotes: Ann Cvetkovich (An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures), Angela Grauerholz (At Work and Play: A Web Experimentation), Ben Highmore (The Everyday Life Reader; Everyday Life and Cultural Theory), Michael O’Driscoll (The Event of the Archive)

This conference will bring together academics, advocates, artists, and other cultural workers to examine the intersecting fields of archive and everyday life theory. From Simmel through Mass Observation to contemporary Cultural Studies theorists, the objective of everyday life theory has been, as Ben Highmore writes, to “rescue the everyday from conventional habits of the mind…to attempt to register the everyday in all its complexities and contradictions.” Archive theory provides a means to explore these structures by “making the unfamiliar familiar,” hence opening the possibility of generating “new forms of critical practice.” The question of a politics of the archive is critical to the burgeoning field of archive theory. How do we begin to theorize the archive as a political apparatus? Can its effective democratization be measured by the participation of those who engage with both its constitution and its interpretation?

“Archive” is understood to cover a range of objects, from a museum’s collection to a personal photograph album, from a repository of a writer’s papers in a library to an artist’s installation of found objects. Regardless of its content, the archive works to contain, organize, represent, render intelligible, and produce narratives. The archive has often worked to legitimate the rule of those in power and to produce a historical narrative that presents class structure and power relations as both common-sense and inevitable. This function of the archive as a machine that produces History-telling us what is significant, valued, and worth preserving, and what isn’t-is enabled through an understanding of the archive as neutral and objective (and too banal and boring to be political!). The archive has long occupied a privileged space in affirmative culture, and as a result, the archive has been revered from afar and aestheticized, but not understood as a potential object of critical practice.

Can a dialogue between archive theory and everyday life theory work to “take revenge” on the archive (Cvetkovich)? If the archive works to produce historical narratives, can we seize the archive and its attendant collective consciousness as a tool for resistance in countering dominant History with resistant narratives? While the archive has worked to preserve a transcendental, “affirmative” form of culture, bringing everyday life theory into conversation with archive theory opens up the possibility of directing critical attention to both the wonders and drudgeries of the everyday. Archiving the everyday-revealing class structures and oppression on the basis of race and gender, rendering working and living conditions under global capitalism visible, audible, and intelligible-redirects us from our busyness and distractedness, and focuses our attention on that which has not been understood to be deserving of archiving. The archive provides the time and space to think through a collection of objects organized around particular set of interests. If the archive could grant us a space in which to examine everyday life, rather than sweeping it under the carpet as a trivial banality, we could begin to understand our conditions and develop the desire to change them.

How can we envision the archive as a site of ethics and/or politics? Does the archive simply represent a place to amass memory, or can it, following Benjamin, represent a site to make visible a history of the present, thus amassing fragments of the everyday, which can in turn be used to uproot the authority of the past to question the present? In short, what happens when we move beyond the archive as merely a collection and begin to theorize it as a site of constant renewal and struggle within which the past and present can come together? Furthermore, how then does the archive as an everyday practice allow us to understand or change our perception of temporality, memory, and this historical moment?

Areas of inquiry for submissions may include, but are not limited to, the following topics and questions:

* The archive both includes and excludes; it works to preserve while simultaneously doing violence. Are the acts of selection, collection, ordering, systematizing, and cataloguing inherently violent?
* The question of digitization: the internet as digital archive and the digitization of the physical archive. Digitizing the archive renders collections invisible and distant, yet increasingly searchable and quantifiable. Does the digitization of the archive reveal new ways of seeing persistent power structures? Or does it hide them?
* National and colonial archiving: questions of power and national identity. * The utopian, radical potential of the archive as well as its dystopian possibilities.
* Indigenous modes of archiving.
* Visibility and pedagogy: while the archive often works to hide, conceal, and store away, it can also reveal and display that which otherwise remains invisible. Do barriers to access restrict this emancipatory function of the archive?
* Questions of collective memory and nostalgia (for Benjamin, a retreat to a place of comfort through nostalgia is not a political act).
* The archive as revisionist history.
* The archive as a form of surveillance.
* The role of reflexivity with respect to the manner in which the archive is constructed/produced/curated.
* Function of the narrative form for the archive: how does the way in which the archive reveals its own constructedness unravel the concept of the archive as “historical truth”?
* The future of the archive: preservation and collection look forwards as well as into the past. How should we understand the hermeneutic function of the archive and the struggle over its interpretation?
* The relationship between the archive and the archivist/archon.
* Mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in the archive: who speaks and who is spoken for?
* The affective relationship between the archive and the body.

Following the conference, we intend to publish an edited collection of essays based on the papers presented at the conference to facilitate the circulation of ideas in this exciting field of inquiry.
 
“The Archive and Everyday Life” Conference will take place 7-8 May, 2010, sponsored by the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario (John Douglas Taylor Fund). The conference format will be diverse, including paper presentations, panels, round-table exchanges, artistic performances, and exhibitions.
We encourage individual and collaborative paper and panel proposals from across the disciplines and from artists and community members. 

Paper Submissions should include (1) contact information; (2) a 300-500 word abstract; and (3) a one page curriculum vitae or a brief bio.

Panel Proposals should include (1) a cover sheet with contact information for chair and each panelist; (2) a one-page rationale explaining the relevance of the panel to the theme of the conference; (3) a 300 word abstract for each proposed paper; and (4) a one page curriculum vitae for each presenter. 

Please submit individual paper proposals or full panel proposals via e-mail attachment by October 15, 2009 to tayconf@mcmaster.ca with the subject line “Archive.” Attachments should be in .doc or .rtf formats. Submissions should be one document (i.e. include all required information in one attached document).

Conference organizing committee: Mary O’Connor, Jennifer Pybus, and Sarah Blacker

Website: http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Taylor_2010/index.html

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Antinomies of Citizenship  – Etienne Balibar

 

Cassal Lecture in French Culture
Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, and Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Invite you to: ‘Antinomies of Citizenship’, a lecture by Etienne Balibar

Ever since the origins in ancient societies, the concept of the citizen and the corresponding “community of citizens” (the Greek politeia, the Roman civitas) have moved in polarities which accounted for a permanent tension: between rights and duties, membership and exclusion, participation and representation, etc. In periods of crisis of the political institution such as the current ‘trans-nationalization’ of the Law and the global Economy , the constitutive tensions can become genuine antinomies, which confront individuals and collectives with radical choices. This Lecture will try to clarify their formulation and show what is at stake in their uncertain perspectives.

Etienne BALIBAR, born in 1942, graduated in France and the Netherlands. He is currently Professor Emeritus of Political and Moral Philosophy at the University of Paris-Nanterre, and Distinguished Professor of Humanities at the University of California, Irvine. He is also a Fellow of the Birkbeck Institute for Humanities, London. Among his recent publications are ‘Politics and the Other Scene’, and ‘We, The People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship’

 

Tuesday 12th May, 2009
5:00-7:30PM
ST274/5, Stewart House, University of London
32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN.

ADMISSION IS FREE

For more information on our events, visit http://www.rhul.ac.uk/research/harc or contact us at HARC@rhul.ac.uk

 

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