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Alfred Russel Wallace

Alfred Russel Wallace

ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE: EXPLORER, EVOLUTIONIST, PUBLIC INTELLECTUAL

By Ted Benton

This new book is a contribution to the reassessment of Wallace’s legacy in the centenary year of his death. So far media coverage has focused on Wallace’s independent foundation of the theory of evolution by natural selection, and the attempts by the elite circle around Darwin to obscure Wallace’s achievement. Wallace is now fast achieving the credit that is due to him, but this book takes us much further. It shows that Wallace went on to make further major contributions to evolutionary theory and other aspects of the life sciences and, for more than half a century after the evolutionary breakthrough, became a prominent voice on the left.

From his early years he was inspired by the socialism of Robert Owen, and later was a leading campaigner for land nationalisation, Irish independence, women’s emancipation and for socialism. His thinking on all these topics was bold and original, and has much to offer for us today. It is likely that other contributions to the centenary celebrations will ignore most of this!

The book can be ordered from books@siriscientificpress.co.uk

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

2001

2001

RADICAL ANTHROPOLOCY: EVOLUTION, ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY

Summer 2013

Symbolic culture emerged in Africa over 100,000 years ago, in a social revolution whose echoes can still be heard in myths and rituals around the world. These talks are a general introduction to anthropology, including the latest findings from genetics, evolutionary biology, primatology, cave painting research and archaeology. There is hot food in the venue and plenty of time afterwards for socialising in local pubs.

PROGRAMME:

April 9: Myth, Market and Media: the bauxite-rich Niyamgiri in the London Stock Exchange Samarendra Das

April 16: The evolutionary emergence of language Chris Knight

April 23: The social life of counterfeits and the ascription of meaning and value to things Mark Jamieson

April 30: Ethnomusicology and the anthropology of sound Noel Lobley

May 7: Revolution in Judea: Jesus in anthropological perspective Chris Knight

May 14: Early human culture as reverse dominance Chris Knight

May 21: Culture as creative refusal David Graeber

May 28: Greenham Common: a modern matriarchy June Cleevely

June 4: The secrets of Stonehenge: a critique of Mike Parker Pearson Lionel Sims

June 11: Frogs, moon and sun at the Avebury monuments Lionel Sims

June 18: The origin of the family, private property and the state Chris Knight

June 25: Red stars and snowy mountains: linking folklore and archaeology Fabio Silva

July 2: Radical Anthropology Group Annual General Meeting

 

All talks held at the St Martinʼs Community Centre

43 Carol St, LondonNW1 0HT (2 minutes from Camden tube)

Tuesday evenings, 6.15–9.00 pm.

http://radicalanthropologygroup.org

 

For regular updates on meetings and anthropology news, please follow us on Twitter (@radicalanthro) and Facebook

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Taweret

RADICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Radical Anthropology Taster Day: The Science of Myth, Magic and Folklore

Saturday, Sept 17, 11 to 5 p.m.

Room: V221, SOAS campus, Vernon Square, Penton Rise,
London
WC1X 9EW
(near Kings Cross)

11.10 Introduction to Human Origins

(Chris Knight, 40 mins plus discussion)

12.00 Workshop on decoding fairytales: Sleeping Beauty

(Chris Knight, 60 mins, plus discussion/lunch)

1.45 Lunarchy: Hunter-gatherers and the Moon

(Camilla Power, 40 mins plus discussion)

2.45 Film show: The Moon Inside You

(60 mins, plus discussion)

4.00 Discussion space. What can we learn from anthropology about making another world possible?

This event is free, and all are welcome; if you can, please bring snack foods to share over lunch. Some drinks will be provided, plus bookstall space.

Run by the Radical Anthropology Group, in association with SOAS Student Union

http://www.radicalanthropologygroup.org
For more info or to secure a place, email: camilla.power@gmail.com

2:
An Evening Class Introduction to Anthropology: From Evolution to Revolution

Autumn Term Syllabus 2011

Sep 20 The science of myth, magic and folklore, Chris Knight

Sep 27 The origins of culture and society ’’

Oct 4 Totem and taboo ’’

Oct 11 Early human kinship was matrilineal ‘’

Oct 18 The myth of primitive matriarchy ’’

Oct 25 Noam Chomsky’s politics and linguistics
’’

Nov 1 Apes Like Us: Confessions of a primatologist Volker Sommer

Nov 8 Why don’t apes speak? Chris Knight

Nov 15 The origin of our species Chris Stringer

Nov 22 ‘Woman’s biggest husband is the Moon’ Jerome Lewis

Nov 29 How women initiated the French and Russian revolutions, with Mark Kosman

Dec 6 Neanderthals and the symbolic revolution Camilla Power

Dec 13 A Christmas fairy tale: The Shoes that were Danced to Pieces, Chris Knight

All lectures are held at the St Martinʼs Community Centre, 43 Carol St, London NW1 0HT (2 minutes from Camden Town tube)

Tuesday evenings, 6.15–9.00 pm.

http://radicalanthropologygroup.org

 

 

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Revolt

REPETITION AND REVOLT

The Theory Reading Group at Cornell University invites submissions for its seventh annual interdisciplinary spring conference:

Repetition and Revolt

Featuring keynote speaker Rebecca Comay (University of Toronto)

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
April 14-16, 2011

Wavering between the occurrence of the novel and the recurrence of the routine, the concept of revolution often divides along a line suggested by its etymology.  Thus, even as Copernicus upset the world system of his time, he did so by describing an orbit, a stable circle.  Put simply, this legacy reminds us that every proposed overturning might yield nothing more than a mere return, a tendency that threatens to undermine radical upheavals in domains ranging from the political to the aesthetic to the scientific.  As Robert Frost suggests, it may well be in the nature of “total revolution” to put “the same class up on top.”

This critical ambiguity can emerge whenever we attempt to account for the possibility of change or difference.  Does this division reveal something essential about revolution, or does it indicate a fault in the ways in which we think about revolution?  In what ways has contemporary thought attempted to reckon with or reconcile the competing meanings of this term?  How do philosophical and theoretical discourses account for change and difference, not only in the realms of politics, literature, art, and science, but also within philosophy and theory themselves?  What forms of critique, resistance, or action can we find in contemporary thought, and what do these forms disclose about the potential or limits of the concept of revolution?

Suggested topics:

* Paradigm shifts and epistemic breaks

* Theories of literary innovation

* Copernican revolution or Ptolemaic counterrevolution

* Theories of the event

* Aesthetics and politics

* The figure of the genius

* Repetition and difference

* Revolution and globalization

* The finite and the infinite

* Secularization, the post-secular, the new atheism

* The future of critique

* Collapse, catastrophe, and crisis

* Evolution and Darwinism

* Eternal return

* Utopia and dystopia

* Revolutionary violence and messianism

* Law and exception

* Theories of transgression

* Ruptures critical and diacritical

* Revolutions in media/social mediation

* Turns: political, linguistic, ethical, (anti)social, comic

Please limit the length of abstracts to no more than 250 words.

The deadline for submission of 250-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations is February 15, 2011.

Please include your name, e-mail address, and phone number.  Abstracts should be e-mailed to repetitionrevolt@gmail.com

Notices of acceptance will be sent no later than February 25, 2011.

For more information about the Cornell Theory Reading Group, visit: http://www.arts.cornell.edu/trg  

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Socrates

DEMOCRACY IN EVOLUTION

Call for Papers
Democracy in Evolution
First International Conference
Los Angeles, Saturday July 16, 2011
http://www.condition.org/confer.htm

~~~~~~~~~~~~
“We don’t have too many choices now. We are a society that is one hundred percent dependent on science. We’re going to go up in our population in the next 40 years; we can’t deal with the population we have without destroying our environment.”
-J. Craig Venter -60 Minutes -November 22, 2010
~~~~~~~~~~~~
We are a small group researching the further evolution of democracy as a function of underlying evolutionary biology. Our findings tell us that democracy is, in fact, a stage into a further and inevitable mode of human interaction.

This is a call for papers for that first international conference tentatively scheduled for Los Angeles, Saturday, July 16, but subject to change per response – further notices continuing.

BRIEFLY STATED
1 – All government/economy so far has evolved out of the neonate ignorance and pecking order of human origins as warm-blooded, cerebrating vertebrates -but-

2 – Continuing existence under genetic imperative defaults to science as the best and only agency of that existence.

Findings so far are broadly laid out in the two short essays: – Democracy and Further   http://www.condition.org/oped.htm and (more detailed) – How We Came to ‘Democracy, The Best Form of Government’ – Why It Isn’t and Where It’s Going, http://www.condition.org/democ.htm

These findings take us into considering evolution of democracy well beyond the Constitution. Given such ‘aperture into the unknown’, papers are expected to cover a lot of territory.

MISSION STATEMENT
The continuing evolution of democracy entails successively greater interaction with science. What are the dynamics of that interaction? What are the implications of those dynamics and the consequences and logistics entailed?

ABSTRACT
Deadline is May 16, but the sooner we receive abstracts and responses, the better we understand the nature of this singularly new inquiry and the earlier our updates and communications.

Abstracts should be limited to 250 words – all formats accepted.
OPENING SPEECH
Dr. David Scholler will discuss the evolutionary nature of problems and their frequently conflicting institutionalizations as they exist in democracy today.

~~~~~~~~~~~~
It is our intention to hold this exploratory, no-fee conference in a Los Angeles centrally-located area on Saturday, July 16 of 2011. Material and discussion coming from the natural sciences primarily and their governmental relationships in general -biology, anthropology, environmental science, economics, political science, social science, legislative process et cetera.

Your response in any aspect of this unique undertaking would be greatly appreciated.

Perry Bezanis

For the DH Group
perryb@condition.org
(310)833-8231

~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Crisis Theory

CRISIS OF LABOR, CRISIS OF CAPITAL

Crisis of Labor, Crisis of Capital: A Global View from the End of the American Century

A talk by Beverly Silver

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19TH, 2010
THE SKYLIGHT ROOM (9TH FLOOR)
6.30 PM – 8.30 PM
CUNY GRADUATE CENTER, 365 FIFTH AVE @ 34TH STREET

BEVERLY SILVER is Professor of Sociology at the Johns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on problems of development, labor, social conflict and war, using comparative and world-historical methods of analysis. Her work recasts a variety of issues in a broad spatial and temporal framework in order to identify patterns of recurrence, evolution and “true novelty” in contemporary processes of globalization. She is author of Forces of Labor: Workers’ Movements and Globalization since 1870, which won several awards, including the 2005 Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award of the American Sociological Association.

Free and open to the public.

SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS

END****

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

DELEUZE & RACE

 

Jason Adams

While the relevance of Gilles Deleuze for a materialist feminism has been amply demonstrated in the last two decades or so, what this key philosopher of difference and desire can do for the theorization of race and racism has received surprisingly little attention. This is despite the explicit formulation of a materialist theory of race as instantiated in colonization, sensation, capitalism and culture, particularly in Deleuze’s collaborative work with Félix Guattari.

Part of the explanation of why there has been a relative silence on Deleuze within critical race and colonial studies is that the philosophical impetus for overcoming eugenics and nationalism have for decades been anchored in the conventional readings of Kant and Hegel, which Deleuze laboured to displace. Through the vocabularies of psychoanalysis, deconstruction, and moral philosophy, even the more sophisticated theorizations of race today continue the neo-Kantian/neo-Hegelian programme of retrieving a cosmopolitan universality beneath the ostensibly inconsequential differences called race.

Opposing this idealism, Deleuze instead asks whether the conceptual basis for this program, however commendable, does not foreclose its political aims, particularly in its avoidance of the material relations it seeks to change. The representationalism and oversimplified dialectical frameworks guiding the dominant antiracist programme actively suppress an immanentist legacy which according to Deleuze is far better suited to grasping how power and desire differentiate bodies and populations: the legacies of Spinoza, Marx and Nietzsche; biology and archeology; Virginia Woolf and Jack Kerouac; cinema, architecture, and the fleshy paintings of Francis Bacon. It is symptomatic too, that Foucault’s influential notion of biopolitics, so close to Deleuze and Guattari’s writings on the state, is usually taken up without its explicit grounding in race, territory and capitalist exchange. Similarly, those (like Negri) that twist biopolitics into a mainly Marxian category, meanwhile, lose the Deleuzoguattarian emphasis on racial and sexual entanglement. It would seem then, that it is high time for a rigorous engagement with the many conceptual ties between Foucault’s lectures on biopolitics, Deleuze and Guattari, and Deleuze-influenced feminism, to obtain a new materialist framework for studying racialization as well as the ontopolitics of becoming from which it emerges. While it will inevitably overlap in a few ways, this collection will differ from work done under the “postcolonial” rubric for a number of important reasons.

First, instead of the mental, cultural, therapeutic, or scientific representations of racial difference usually analyzed in postcolonial studies, it will seek to investigate racial difference “in itself”, as it persists as a biocultural, biopolitical force amid other forces. For Deleuze and Guattari, as for Nietzsche before them, race is far from inconsequential, though this does not mean it is set in stone.

Second, as Fanon knew, race is a global phenomenon, with Europe’s racism entirely entwined with settler societies and the continuing poverty in the peripheries. The effects of exploitation, slavery, displacement, war, migration, exoticism and miscegenation are too geographically diffuse and too contemporary to fit comfortably under the name “postcolonial”. Rather, we seek to illuminate the material divergences that phenotypical variation often involves, within any social, cultural or political locus.

Third, again like Nietzsche, but also Freud, Deleuze and Guattari reach into the deep recesses of civilization to expose an ancient and convoluted logic of racial discrimination preceding European colonialism by several millennia. Far from naturalizing racism, this nomadological and biophilosophical “geology of morals” shows that racial difference is predicated on fully contingent territorializations of power and desire, that can be disassembled and reassembled differently. That race is immanent to the materiality of the body then, does not mean that it is static any more than that it is simple: rather what it suggests is that its transformation is an always already incipient reality.

Possible themes:

CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS – Oedipus and racialization – fascist desire – civilization, savagery and barbarism – earth and its peoples – delirium and hallucination as racial – miscegenation

CAPITALISM – faciality – colonization and labor migration as racializing apparatuses of capture – urban segregation – environmental racism

POLITICS – hate speech and law as order-words – D&G, May ’68 and the third world – Deleuze and Palestine – Guattari and Brazil – terrorist war machines and societies of control – Deleuzian feminism and race

SCIENCE – neuroscience and race – continuing legacies of racist science and the “Bell Curve” debate – kinship, rhizomatics and arboreality – animals, plants, minerals and racial difference – miscegenation – evolutionary biology and human phenotypical variation – vitalism and Nazism

ART – affects of race (sport, hiphop, heavy metal, disco…) – primitivism (Rimbaud, Michaux, Artaud, Tournier, Castaneda, etc.) – vision, cinema and race – music, resonance and bodies

PHILOSOPHY – geophilosophy: provincializing canonical philosophy – race and becoming – decolonizing Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Schelling… – the effect of criticisms of Deleuze (Badiou, Zizek, Hallward) on antiracism Chapters will be between 4000 and 7000 words long.

Arun Saldanha will write the introduction and a chapter called “Bastard and mixed-blood are the true names of race”.

Jason Michael Adams will write the conclusion.

For more details on this project, contact Jason Adams at: adamsj@HAWAII.EDU

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Against Educational Illiteracy: Why Creationism is Wrong and Evolution is Right

Professor Steve Jones

Thursday June 4th 2009, University College London, 17.00 reception, 17.30 lecture, 18.30 refreshments, Great Hall, Strand Campus, WC2R 2LS
All Welcome

Steve Jones is Professor of Genetics and Head of the Biology Department at University College London.  

Guests are kindly requested to register online: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/sspp/education/annual/

Or RSVP to leonie.taylor@kcl.ac.uk

Leonie Taylor
Marketing & Publicity Officer
Department of Education & Professional Studies
King’s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building
Rm 1/1 Waterloo Bridge Wing
Waterloo Road
London SE1 9NH
Tel : +44 (0)207 848 3139
Fax: +44 (0)207 848 3182

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Marxism 2009 – A Festival of Resistance

 

CAPITALISM ISN’T WORKING…

COME AND DISCUSS THE ALTERNATIVE AT…

Marxism 2009 – a festival of resistance

Thursday 2nd – Monday 6th July 2009, central London

BOOK NOW TO GET £5 OFF YOU TICKET PRICE!

Online: http://www.marxismfestival.org.uk

Phone: 020 7819 1190

Over 1,000 people have already bought tickets for Marxism 2009. We are now entering the last full week of the £5 discount on Marxism tickets: get yours now at:  http://www.marxismfestival.org.uk or call us in the office on 020 7819 1190.

With the current £5 discount, prices are: Waged – £40, Unwaged – £27, HE student – £20, FE student – £10.

Remember, if you can’t afford to pay now but want to get the £5 discount you can register before 31st March and postdate your payment – just give us a call in the office: 020 7819 1190.

Highlights include:

* Alex Callinicos vs Slavoj Zizek – a debate on “What does it mean to be a revolutionary today?”

* David Harvey on Marx’s Capital and debating Chris Harman on “The crisis of neoliberalism”

* Tariq Ali on Pakistan’s deepening crisis

* Terry Eagleton on “Socialism and culture”

* Sheila Rowbotham discusses pioneering gay rights campaigner Edward Carpenter

* Gary Younge speaks on Obama’s rise to power

* Ghada Karmi participates in a course of meetings on Palestinian liberation

* Michael Billington and Sam West take part in a tribute to Harold Pinter

* Bernadette McAliskey speaks 40 years on from her election to parliament and the Battle of the Bogside

* John Bellamy Foster takes part in a course on “Marx and Darwin” and speaks on Marxist ecology

Other participants include: Tony Benn, Paul Gilroy, Eamonn McCann, Mark Serwotka, Sally Hunt, Jeremy Corbyn MP, Nick Broomfield, Michael Rosen, Istvan Meszaros, Roy Bailey and David Ferrard, Pat Devine, Danny Dorling, Zoe Williams, David Edgar, Haifa Zangana, Steven Rose, Ambalavaner Sivanandan, Ben Fine, Ron Oppenheim and Natalie Adler, Jeremy Dear, Ludi Simpson, Leo Zeilig, Graham Turner, Chris Searle, Adam Tooze, Costas Lapavitsas, Omar Puente… and many more!

Courses and meetings include: Capital for beginners * The Marxist method * The economic crisis – causes, consequences and questions * Resistance and recession in Britain * The culture of crisis * The International Socialist tradition * 1989 and the collapse of the Soviet block – before, during and after * Islam and Islamism * Lenin and Leninism * Trotsky * Revolution and beyond * Racism, segregation and multiculturalism * British society today * The fight against fascism * Women’s liberation * LGBT rights * The US – then and now * China – from Mao to markets * Imperialism today and the “war on terror” * Pakistan * Voices from the Middle East * Palestine’s fight for freedom * Latin America * Africa * Climate Change – saving the planet * Darwin and Marx – evolution revolution * Education * Students and the struggle * Capitalism and the media

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Rouge Forum – Update 3rd February 2009

 

 

A Message from Rich Gibson

 

 

Dear Friends

February 12th is Charles Darwin’s 200th birthday. Sounds like a good day to remind people about evolution, dialectics, and leaps of change! Have a party! Happy Happy Merry Merry–Charles!

A reminder: set aside May 14th to 17th for the Rouge Forum Conference at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, just minutes from the Detroit Airport. Here is the conference information and call for proposals: http://web.mac.com/wayne.ross/Rouge_Forum_Conference_2009/Welcome.html

United Teachers of LA called for a test boycott, perhaps the first large school worker union to do so: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2009/01/teachers-plan-t.html

Though the boycott is limited to what many RF activists feel is second-tier testing, the idea could well spread. Messages of support can go to the UTLA leadership at: http://www.utla.net/node/863

In France, a general strike was kicked off by teachers and students, proving once again our long held thesis that school workers and students are well positioned to initiate, if not fully carry through, action for social justice: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2009/jan/29/strike-france-teachers

From the EdNotes blog, a video the United Federation of Teachers (NYC) would prefer that we not see (scroll down a bit):
http://ednotesonline.blogspot.com/

Colleague Chalmers Johnson, author of the Nemisis trilogy, weighs in with “The Looming Crisis at the Pentagon,”
http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175029

We all noticed that Exxon recorded the highest profits ever http://money.cnn.com/2008/02/01/news/companies/exxon_earnings/
and military contractors expect no layoffs whatsoever. War, in many instances, means work.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123327750721631485.html

Bill Zucker sets up a shout, “I want some Tarp!” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGfQk9XXm24

Those who wonder what their NEA union leaders and staff are paid can check EIA, a right-libertarian site, here (there are instructions on how to check on the LMR 2) http://www.eiaonline.com/archives/20090126.htm Note that NEA past president Reg Weaver took home $554,524 and he probably was able to live on his expense account.

The Rouge Forum blogspot is up and running at: http://therougeforum.blogspot.com/ You are welcome to chime in!

Thanks to Eric, Kev, Wayne, Bob, Amber, Tom, Perry, Angie, Stella, O, Donnie A, Jim B, Peter M, Hannah, Beau, Dave, Tommie, Sandy, and Sherry.

All the best

Rich Gibson

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk