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Philosophy

Philosophy

TRANSDISCIPLINARITY: ANTI-HUMANISM AND GENDER STUDIES

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP)
Kingston University London
www.kingston.ac.uk/crmep

Workshop: Transdisciplinary Problematics
Anti-Humanism and Gender Studies
17-18 May 2012, London

This two-day workshop will examine the notion of a transdisciplinary problematic, via the cases of anti-humanism and gender studies. The first day will approach theoretical anti-humanism from the standpoint of its destructive effect upon disciplinary fields in the humanities and as a radical problematisation of the discipline of philosophy in particular. The second day will focus on gender studies as a transdisciplinary problematic and on the transdisciplinary nature of the concept of gender itself. Topics will include the historical reconstruction of ‘gender’ as a boundary-crossing concept; the relation of its conceptual content to its functioning as a general concept across disciplines; the transformation of the disciplines in the humanities by ‘gender’ and gender studies; and the current productivity of ‘gender’.

Day 1: Anti-humanism
17 May 2012, 10.00-18.00
Bolivar Hall, 54 Grafton Way, London WC1

Introduction: Peter Osborne & Eric Alliez (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Etienne Balibar (Philosophy, University of Paris X/Irvine)
       ‘Anti-Humanism, and the Question of Philosophical Anthropology’
       Respondent: Patrice Maniglier (University of Essex)
Nina Power (Philosophy, Roehampton University/Royal College of Art)
       ‘Is Antihumanism Transdisciplinary?’
David Cunningham (English, University of Westminster)
       ‘Intersciences, Philosophy and Writing’
       Respondent: Simon Morgan Wortham (English, Kingston University)

Day 2: Gender Studies
18 May 2012, 10.00-18.00
Large Common Room, Goodenough College, Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N

Introduction: Stella Sandford (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Tuija Pulkkinen (Women’s Studies, University of Helsinki)
       ‘Disciplinarity and Transdisciplinarity in Gender Studies’
Sara Heinamaa (Philosophy, University of Helsinki)
       ‘Sex, Gender and Embodiment: A Critique of Concepts’
Elsa Dorlin (Political Science, University of Paris VIII)
       title tba
Ken Corbett (Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis, New York University)
       ‘The Transforming Nexus: Psychoanalysis, Social Theory and Queer Childhood’
Respondent: Lynne Segal (Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck, London)

The event is free, but registration is essential @: http://workshopthree.eventbrite.com/

Further information and background texts, go to: http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/activities/item.php?updatenum=1962

Other enquiries: S.Sandford@Kingston.ac.uk

This is the third public workshop of the AHRC-funded project ‘Transdisciplinarity and the Humanities: Problems, Methods, Histories, Concepts’, 2011-2013 (AHRC 914469)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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The Island

ONTOLOGY AND POLITICS

 

MANCHESTER WORKSHOPS IN POLITICAL THEORY 2011: August 31st – September 2nd 2011

Call for Papers: Ontology and Politics Workshop

Convenors: Paul Rekret (Queen Mary), Simon Choat (Kingston), Clayton Chin (Queen Mary)

Despite its pervasiveness, the question of the relation between ontology and politics continues to be a crucial one for Continental philosophy.  While the place and status of the question of being in the realm of the political has occupied much of social theory in the past twenty or thirty years, we remain no closer to drawing any common ground on these themes.

Post-structuralist or post-foundational political thought has insisted on the inherent contingency of any political ontology and has, from this notion, sought to draw out a framework for an emancipatory politics grounded in the concepts of difference and otherness. However, such a stance finds itself increasingly challenged today. On the one hand, thinkers such as Alain Badiou and Jacques Ranciere call for the need to think a politics grounded in a conception of universality rather than alterity, while on the other hand, so-called speculative realism more fundamentally challenges the very notion of ontology as it has been conceived by the majority of Continental thinkers in recent decades.  This panel aims to explore the intersections of politics and ontology and the resulting implications for thinking both the political and the philosophical.

We invite papers addressing the following and any other related themes:
-Is there a place for reflection on ontology in the theorisation and study of politics?
-Is there a necessary transitivity between the ontological and the political?  How should this relation be conceived?
-Is there a necessarily leftist or emancipatory ontology?
-Should the politics which has generally been thought to follow from post-foundational or post-structuralist ontologies be re-evaluated in light of recent critiques?
-Does a new and different relation between ontology and politics follow from recent speculative materialist ontologies?

If you would like to present a paper at this workshop, please submit an abstract of 300-500 words (or a full paper) to p.rekret@qmul.ac.uk or S.Choat@kingston.ac.uk by 15 June 2011.

For more information on the conference see: http://manceptworkshops.wordpress.com/

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WHAT IS A COMMANDMENT? 

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy

Monday 28 March 2011, 6.00-8.00pm

‘What is a Commandment?’

Giorgio Agamben: Visiting Professor, Philosophy, University of Paris 8

Venue: Clattern Lecture Theatre, Main Building,

Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston University

The event is free

See: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/crmep

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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The Man in Black

Philosophy

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN MODERN PHILOSOPHY SEMINARS

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP)
Kingston University London
Research Seminars, Semester 2, January-April 2011
Thursdays/Fridays, 6-8pm

Open to all

20 January
‘Hegel’s Other Woman: The Figure of Niobe in Hegel’s Lectures on Fine Art’
Andrew Benjamin (Aesthetics and Critical Theory, Monash University)
Venue: Art Workers Guild Lecture Hall, 6, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AT

27 January
‘Lacan and the Cahiers pour l’analyse’
Tom Eyers (CRMEP, Kingston)
Venue: John Galsworthy Building, Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston

3 February
‘Basic Concepts of Transcendental Materialism’
Rainer E. Zimmermann (Philosophy, University of Applied Sciences, Munich)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

10 February
‘”Look Out It’s Real”: Documentary Truth and Tear Gas’
Hito Steyerl (Artist, Berlin)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

11 March
‘Assembling Untimeliness: On Gerhard Richter’s Paintings’
Paul Rabinow (Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

17 March
‘Disjunctive Captures of the Body and Movement’
Bojana Cvejic (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Venue: John Galsworthy Building, Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston

14 April
‘Eleven Theses on Marx and Marxism’
Étienne Balibar (University of Paris X and Irvine, University of California)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

Dr Stella Sandford

Principal Lecturer in Modern European Philosophy
Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy
Kingston University

Holmwood House
Penrhyn Road Campus
Kingston upon Thames
KT1 2EE
+44 (0)20 8417 2088
www.kingston.ac.uk/crmep

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

EUROPEAN PHILOSOPHY AFTER THE EPISTEMOLOGICAL BREAK

Philosophical Journal Nowa Krytyka, Socially Involved Journal Recykling Idei and Althusser Studies Journal Décalages and Szczecin University are inviting for the conference:

European Philosophy After the Epistemological Break

Date: 16 – 20. IX . 2010

Place: Pobierowo, ul. Grunwaldzka 66

Poland

The leading theme of the conference will be the conditions and possibilities of Louis Althusser’s philosophy, with the emphasis made on the effects which it is able to produce in the current politico-philosophical conjuncture. To examine the consequences of “philosophical intervention in politics” and “political intervention in the world of philosophy” we will try to map the key concepts of Althusser’s theoretical apparatus. Thus, during the conference, next to the tangle of misunderstandings concerning the notion of anti-humanist critique of subject and ideology, one will find possibility to discuss also the reception of Althusser’s late works concerning the “materialism of encounter”, or the epistemological concepts of theoretical practice and epistemological break. The other goal of the conference is to establish constant, international collaboration between critically oriented philosophical circles. 

CONTACT: 

Jerzy Kochan „NOWA KRYTYKA” / jerzy_kochan@poczta.onet.pl /

Mateusz Janik „RECYKLING IDEI” / m.janik@recyklingidei.pl /

To see the program, go to:  http://www.recyklingidei.pl/aktualnosci/european_philosophy_after_the_epistemological_break 

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European Philosophy

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT CAMPAIGN – UPDATE 8th JUNE 2010

From http://savemdxphil.com/

Posted on 8 June 2010
http://savemdxphil.com/2010/06/08/announcement-8-june-the-crmep-is-moving-to-kingston-university/ by aletheiaticverse http://savemdxphil.com/author/aletheiaticverse/

The campaign to save our philosophy programmes has just won a partial but significant victory: Kingston University
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/ in south-west London announced today that it will re-establish our Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy http://www.web.mdx.ac.uk/CRMEP/ (CRMEP) at Kingston, by employing the four senior staff in Philosophy at Middlesex (Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford). Our MA and PhD programmes (full-time and part-time) will be re-launched at Kingston this September, and all current post-graduate students will be invited to move along with the staff. Institutions in France and Germany have also made significant new proposals for collaboration with the CRMEP, which may allow it to expand the European dimensions of its work considerably in the near future.

This remarkable turn of events would never been possible without the extraordinary local and international campaign that began six weeks ago, to save our philosophy programmes.

Like Middlesex, Kingston is a post-1992 university, with a commitment to widening participation in education. Unlike Middlesex, Kingston is expanding rather than cutting back its provision in humanities subjects, and it is investing in research in these areas. In addition to taking on CRMEP staff, Kingston will be making a number of other high-level appointments over the coming months, and is launching its own London Graduate School in conjunction with colleagues from several other Universities internationally.  We believe that Kingston will provide an enthusiastic and supportive base for the activities of the CRMEP.

Although we have not won all the demands made by our campaign, the move to Kingston is a major achievement. We have found a way to keep all of our postgraduate programmes open, and to keep most of the CRMEP staff together in a single unit. We have preserved a place in London for the unique academic community that has built up around the Centre and its distinctive research interests, and this will continue to be a place where the criteria for entry and participation remain as open as possible. The campaign has directly refuted the line that Middlesex managers have repeated for many years now – a variation of the line that ‘there is no alternative’ but to follow the neoliberal way of the world, and to close down small academic departments in favour of large vocational ones. The campaign hasn’t merely proved that ‘another way is possible’: it has helped to indicate what needs to be done to make such a way a reality, and shown that there are universities in the UK and in Europe that are willing to embrace it.

We hope that the campaign will continue, evolving to become one of several contributions from a range of institutions across London and the region to a broader and deeper struggle in support of philosophy, the humanities and public education more generally. Some of the protestors who made the biggest impact in our campaign came from supportive universities such as Sussex, KCL, SOAS, Westminster and Goldsmiths. This emerging network of education activists isn’t going to disperse, and is likely to play an important role in the struggles that will soon affect the entire sector. Although the closure of Philosophy at Middlesex is yet another indication of the ongoing commercialisation of education in the UK, our campaign, along with other recent mobilisations at universities up and down the country, has helped change the balance of power across higher education. The campaign to save philosophy at Middlesex has already made a powerful intervention in the fight for public education in general and for endangered humanities programmes in particular. The future looks challenging but there is now much to build on, at Middlesex, at Kingston and across the UK.

Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Fanaticism

FANATICISM

On the Uses of an Idea

By ALBERTO TOSCANO

Published 7h June 2010

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EVENTS:

Thursday 3 June, 1pm at the RSA, London: A special introduction to Fanaticism: On the Uses of an Idea. For more information and book your free place: http://www.thersa.org/events/our-events/fanaticism-on-the-uses-of-an-idea

Friday 2 July, 2-3.30pm at the Marxism 2010 Festival in London, Room 3E at ULU, 2-3.30. For more information and to book:  https://www.marxismfestival.org.uk/2010/bookonline.html

Thursday 8 July, 6.45pm: Launch talk at the ICA. Further details to be announced here: http://www.ica.org.uk/7945/Talks/Talks-listings.html

Monday 11 October, 6.30 -8.00pm at the LSE, Wolfson theatre as part of the Forum for European Philosophy talks. Further details to be announced here:http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/forumForEuropeanPhilosophy/events/Default.htm

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“A tour de force in every sense – Toscano wipes the smug smiles off the self-righteous faces of the New Philosophers.” Mike Davis, author of Planet of Slums

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Fanaticism is usually seen as a deviant or extreme variant of an already irrational set of religious beliefs. Drawing a straight line from the Peasant Wars to Bolshevism, this view of fanaticism is today invoked by the West in order to demonize and psychologize any non-liberal politics. Alberto Toscano’s compelling counter-history explores the critical role fanaticism played in forming modern politics and the liberal state, and undermines the idea that liberalism and fanaticism are irrevocably opposed. 

Tracing its development from the traumatic Peasants’ War of early sixteenth-century Germany, to contemporary Islamism, Toscano tears apart the sterile opposition of “reasonableness” and fanaticism. Instead, in a radical new interpretation, he places the fanatic at the very heart of politics, arguing that historical and revolutionary transformations require a new understanding of its role. Showing how fanaticism results from the failure to formulate an adequate emancipatory politics, this illuminating history sheds new light on an idea that continues to dominate debates about faith and secularism.

The ‘fanatic’ is the figure that we are all scared of – whether it’s the Islamic fundamentalist primed for a suicide bombing or the Christian anti-abortionist planning to murder a doctor. The fanatic is a whirl of contradictions: at once cold-blooded and insanely passionate, opportunistic but principled, backward and yet technologically sophisticated, murderous and prepared to risk everything to human rights. He or she is driven by abstract principles, whether religious or secular, that threaten the very basis of a pragmatic liberal democracy. But are these oppositions really the way to understand the conflict between religion and state, terror and democracy?

In this tour de force examination of political and philosophical rhetoric through the ages, Alberto Toscano examines the use of the term ‘fanatic’. Following its use by Martin Luther in the Reformation, the rationalists in the Enlightenment, and liberals in the Cold War and the present day, he finds our understanding of it dictated by the prejudices of the day.

Toscano argues that there is an unsettling intimacy between political behaviour regarded as fanatical, and rational, emancipatory politics: supposedly liberal political projects are also marked by fanaticism. Moreover, while a liberal would claim that passion and abstract principles (such as universal rights) are the jurisdiction of the fanatic and have no place in rational politics, we should seek to reclaim a place for these supposedly negative terms at the heart of contemporary politics. For example, finding that nineteenth century slavers called abolitionists fanatics for their ‘mad’ adherence to the Rights of Man, he asks us to reconsider who we regard as a fanatic.

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ALBERTO TOSCANO is a lecturer in sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of The Theatre of Production, translator of Alain Badiou’s The Century and Logics of Worlds and co-editor of, among others, Alain Badiou’s Theoretical Writings and Antonio Negri’s Political Descartes. He has published numerous articles on contemporary philosophy, politics and social theory, and is an editor of Historical Materialism.

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 424 4 / $26.95 / £16.99 / CAN$33.50 / 304 pages

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For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/tuvwxyz/tuv-titles/toscano_alberto_fanaticism.shtml

To buy the book in the UK:

http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844674244/Fanaticism

or

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fanaticism-Uses-Idea-Alberto-Toscano/dp/184467424X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273744261&sr=8-1

To buy the book in the US:

http://www.amazon.com/Fanaticism-Uses-Idea-Alberto-Toscano/dp/184467424X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273744586&sr=1-1

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Visit Verso’s new blog for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers. http://versouk.wordpress.com/

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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European Philosophy

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT MIDDLESEX PHILOSOPHY CLOSURE

From p.hallward@mdx.ac.uk

Dear all

Further to my last message, about the closure of Philosophy at Middlesex: all of us who teach philosophy at Middlesex have been overwhelmed by the tremendous outpouring of support from students and staff at other universities that we’ve received in the last 24 hours. Middlesex students are mobilising quickly, and we will meeting tomorrow and in the coming days to discuss how best to organise a forceful campaign to save Philosophy at Middlesex, and more importantly, to protect other vulnerable departments in similar situations both at Middlesex and in universities across the UK. 

I promise to keep future messages about this to a minimum, but here are a few more bits of information:

There’s now a petition to save Philosophy at Middlesex, at: http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/save-middlesex-philosophy.html

Middlesex Philosophy students have set up a Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=119102561449990 (3600+ members in the first day).

Nina Power, who graduated with a PhD in Philosophy from Middlesex a couple of years ago, has a Guardian comment piece on the closure, at: www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/apr/29/philosophy-minorities-middleqsex-university-logic

We will be posting new information about the campaign on our temporary blog, at  http://mdxphilcampaign.blogspot.com/, and hope to replace this soon with a campaign website. 

If you haven’t yet written to the people behind this decision, they are: 

Vice-Chancellor of the University, Michael Driscoll, m.driscoll@mdx.ac.uk;

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise, Waqar Ahmad, w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk;

Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic, Margaret House, m.house@mdx.ac.uk

Dean of the School of Arts & Education, Ed Esche, e.esche@mdx.ac.uk

The full set of emails is then: m.driscoll@mdx.ac.ukw.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk;m.house@mdx.ac.uke.esche@mdx.ac.uk

This fight is only just beginning,

Yours in solidarity,
Peter

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Nietzsche

CLOSURE OF PHILOSOPHY AT MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY – A MESSAGE FROM PETER HALLWARD

Dear friends and colleagues

I regret to say that Middlesex University has just decided, rather abruptly, to close all its Philosophy programmes and to shut down our Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP; http://www.web.mdx.ac.uk/crmep/)  

Staff include Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Mark Kelly, Christian Kerslake, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford.  Some members of the Centre may be laid off more or less immediately, and some will remain temporarily, to teach out the programmes.

As you might expect we’re scrambling to put together a response, and to begin with we’re asking colleagues and friends to send a brief email or letter about the closure to the University administrators who have made this unexpected decision. If you have time to write such a message, please feel free to extract some points from a draft letter that a few of our most recent collaborators will be sending later today to Times Higher Education, below.

The main people involved in the decision are as follows:

Vice-Chancellor of the University, Michael Driscoll, m.driscoll@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:M.Driscoll@mdx.ac.uk>

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise, Waqar Ahmad, w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk mailto:w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk

Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic, Margaret House, m.house@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:m.house@mdx.ac.uk>

Dean of the School of Arts & Education, Ed Esche, e.esche@mdx.ac.uk mailto:e.esche@mdx.ac.uk

(The full set of emails is then: m.driscoll@mdx.ac.uk; w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk>; m.house@mdx.ac.uk; e.esche@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:e.esche@mdx.ac.uk>).

If you are able to send this sort of message, and are willing for your message to be posted subsequently on a campaign website or blog, please copy or blind-copy (BCC) it to our campaign email, savemdxphil@gmail.com   <mailto:savemdxphil@gmail.com> .

By tomorrow I expect we’ll have set up a petition to save the CRMEP, and will get back to you about this soon.

Although it may already be too late to save Philosophy at Middlesex, some decisive action now may help protect other vulnerable subjects at the University, and in the UK more generally. It’s been very encouraging, over the course of today, to receive dozens of messages of support and solidarity.

I’ll circulate more information about the campaign to save the CRMEP once we’ve had time to set up a basic website or blog.

All best,
Peter

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

European Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY CLOSURE AT MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

Late on Monday 26 April, staff in Philosophy at Middlesex University in London were informed that the University executive are to close all Philosophy programmes: undergraduate, postgraduate and MPhil/PhD.

Philosophy is the highest research-rated subject at Middlesex University, with 65% of its research activity judged ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ in the UK government’s recent Research Assessment Exercise. It is now widely recognised as one of the most important centres for the study of modern European philosophy anywhere in the English-speaking world. Its MA programmes in Philosophy have grown in recent years to become the largest in the UK, with 42 new students admitted in September 2009.

Middlesex offers one of only a handful of programmes left in the UK that provides both research-driven and inclusive post-graduate teaching aimed at a wide range of students, specialist and non-specialist. It is also one of relatively few such programmes that remains financially viable, currently contributing close to half of its total income to the University’s central administration.

Needless to say, Radical Philosophy very much regret this decision to terminate Philosophy at Middlesex, and its likely consequences for the teaching of philosophy in the UK.

This is a shameful decision which essentially means the end of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, a hub for internationally renowned scholarship (http://www.web. mdx.ac.uk/ crmep/; staff include Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Mark Kelly, Christian Kerslake, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford). This act of wilful self-harm by the University must be resisted.

Please join the facebook group and spread the word: http://www.facebook .com/group. php?gid=11910256 1449990

Campaign email: savemdxphil@ gmail.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Nietzsche

NIETZSCHE’S POETRY

Friedrich Nietzsche: The Peacock and the Buffalo

Continuum have published ‘The Peacock and the Buffalo’ – the first complete English translation of all 275 poems and aphorisms by Friedrich Nietzsche, presented in a hardback bi-lingual edition.

“This is the first complete English translation of Nietzsche’s poetry. ‘The Peacock and the Buffalo’ presents the first complete English translation of the poetry of the celebrated and hugely influential German thinker, Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). From his first poems, written at the age of fourteen, to his last extant writings, this definitive bi-lingual edition includes all his 275 poems and aphorisms. Nietzsche’s interest in poetry is no secret, as evidenced in his literary and philosophical masterpiece, ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra’, not to mention the poetry included in his published philosophical works. This important collection shows that Nietzsche’s commitment to poetry was in fact longstanding and integral to his articulation of the truth and lies of human existence. ‘The Peacock and the Buffalo’ is a must-read for anyone with an interest in German literature or European philosophy.” (The Publishers)

The collection was translated and compiled by James Luchte, who is a Lecturer in European Philosophy at the University of Wales, Lampeter, UK.

Continuum will be celebrating the launch of this book towards the end of the month with a competition through their blog http://continuumphilosophy.typepad.com, Twitter http://twitter.com/continuumphilos and Facebook page http://is.gd/aVp5R.

At Continuum: http://www.continuumbooks.com/search/default.aspx?Text=Friedrich%20Nietzsche (Projected publication date: 6th May 2010)

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Peacock-Buffalo-Poetry-Nietzsche/dp/1441118608/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1271590056&sr=1-3

Glenn Rikowski

I have written a few articles on Nietzsche myself, see:

Rikowski, G. (1998) Nietzsche’s School? The Roots of Educational Postmodernism, a paper prepared for the Social Justice Seminar, Semester 2, University of Birmingham, School of Education, 24th March, at The Flow of Ideas web site: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Nietzsche[a]s%20School

Rikowski, G. (1998) Three Types of Apprenticeship, Three Forms of Mastery: Nietzsche, Marx, Self and Capital, a departmental paper, School of Education, University of Birmingham, 5th June:
http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Three%20Types%20of%20Apprenticeship%20-%20Three%20Forms%20of%20Mastery

Rikowski, G. (2006) What Can Nietzsche Teach Ya? 16th October, Northampton, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=What%20Can%20Nietzsche%20Teach%20Ya

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Gramsci

Gramsci

THE GRAMSCIAN MOMENT

 

The Gramscian Moment: Philosophy, Hegemony and Marxism

Peter D. Thomas

http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=227&pid=29354

Publication year: 2009
Series: Historical Materialism Book Series, 24
ISBN-13 (i): 978 90 04 16771 1
ISBN-10: 90 04 16771 4
Cover: Hardback
Number of pages: xxv, 477 pp.
List price: € 115.00 / US$ 170.00

Antonio Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks are today acknowledged as a classic of the human and social sciences in the twentieth century. The influence of his thought in numerous fields of scholarship is only exceeded by the diverse interpretations and readings to which it has been subjected, resulting in often contradictory ‘images of Gramsci’.

This book draws on the rich recent season of Gramscian philological studies in order to argue that the true significance of Gramsci’s thought consists in its distinctive position in the development of the Marxist tradition. Providing a detailed reconsideration of Gramsci’s theory of the state and concept of philosophy, The Gramscian Moment argues for the urgent necessity of taking up the challenge of developing a ‘philosophy of praxis’ as a vital element in the contemporary revitalisation of Marxism.

Peter D. Thomas (Ph.D, 2008) studied at the University of Queensland, Freie Universität Berlin, L’Università “Federico II”, Naples, and the Universiteit van Amsterdam. He has published widely on Marxist political theory and philosophy. He is a member of the editorial board of the journal Historical Materialism: research in critical Marxist theory.

REVIEWS

Peter Thomas’ book should become the standard text in English on Gramsci’s thought. Acquainted as he is with the latest wrinkle in the Italian debate on Gramsci, Thomas combines an unmatched philological research into the sources and a mastery of the ongoing debates about the sense we should make of key ideas like hegemony. He deftly overturns the received orthodoxy and the various abuses of the ideas of the Marxist militant by theorists of cultural studies, both restoring Gramsci’s work to its true status and opening up fruitful possibilities for understanding his contribution to political theory more generally. The best book on Gramsci’s political theory for three decades — Alastair Davidson, Author of Antonio Gramsci: the Man, his Ideas, and Antonio Gramsci: Towards an Intellectual Biography

Peter Thomas’s Gramsci is the one we need in an era of economic and geopolitical crises that bears some resemblances to Gramsci’s own time. This Gramsci is no embarrassed culturalist, confused strategist, or incipient post-Marxist. Thomas’s Gramsci, developed from rigorous critical study of the Prison Notebooks and of the now extensive scholarly literature, is a deeply consequent thinker intent on reconstructing revolutionary Marxism in opposition to the most advanced bourgeois thought of his day. This is also a Gramsci for whom political economy is of central methodological and substantive significance.  Not content with scholarly interpretation, Thomas draws his Gramsci into dialogue with contemporary radical thought, illuminating both sides of the conversation. This is a book that will recast the understanding of Gramsci, especially but not exclusively in the Anglophone world — Alex Callinicos, Professor of European Studies, Social Theory and International Political Economy, King’s College, London

What superlatives can I use to describe this book? Terms like ‘outstanding,’ ‘superb’ and ‘tour-de-force’ suggest themselves, but even these do not fully capture the extraordinary power of The Gramscian Moment. Peter Thomas’s erudite, wide-ranging, and staggeringly sophisticated reading of Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks completely overturns the dominant interpretations including those of Louis Althusser and Perry Anderson. Never again will we be able to read Gramsci solely through their lenses. Henceforth, Thomas’s magisterial exploration of Gramsci’s thought will become the critical point of reference for all serious work in the field. But Thomas does more than meticulous exegesis. He also insists on the actuality of Gramsci’s work, urging that we approach it in the spirit of “both continuation and transformation, fidelity and renewal.” He succeeds brilliantly on all counts — David McNally, Professor of Political Science, York University, Toronto

Peter Thomas’s The Gramscian Moment demonstrates the extent to which Gramsci’s thought represents a singular synthesis of virtually the entire tradition of Western political thought. The richness of his interpretative frameworks allows him both to integrate partial approaches and contributions and to throw new light on the central questions inherited by this tradition. This work succeeds in presenting Gramsci as a “living classic”, an author absolutely central to our understanding of modernity. Given its scope, richness and originality, I have no doubt that this work will represent a milestone in Gramscian scholarship and an important contribution to contemporary debates in political theory and philosophy — Stathis Kouvelakis, Author of Philosophy and Revolution and Co-editor of a Critical Companion to Contemporary Marxism

The Gramscian Moment is the most thorough and illuminating philosophical study of Gramsci yet to appear in English. It sets a new standard for work not only on Gramsci himself but on the whole complex of issues associated with his legacy – on the mechanics and dimensions of hegemony, on the role and nature of the subject of political action, on the relation between theory and practice, and between civil society and the state. Thomas does more than any previous reader of Gramsci to demonstrate how his philosophy can fairly claim to meet Marx’s famous prescription – not merely “to interpret the world but to change it” — Peter Hallward, Professor of Modern European Philosophy, Middlesex University, London

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk