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Raya Dunayevskaya

THE DUNAYEVSKAYA-MARCUSE-FROMM CORRESPONDENCE, 1954-1978: DIALOGUES ON HEGEL, MARX, FEMINISM, AND CRITICAL THEORY – BOOK LAUNCH (Los Angeles)

Edited by Kevin B. Anderson and Russell Rockwell

Lexington Books, 2012

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012

6:00-8:00 PM

Peace Center

8124 West Third Street

Los Angeles (near West Hollywood area)

Speakers:

Kevin B. Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins

Ana Maillon, community activist and cultural worker

Kathryn F., student activist

This book presents for the first time the correspondence between the Marxist-Humanist and feminist philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya (1910-87) and two other noted thinkers, the Hegelian Marxist philosopher and social theorist Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) and the psychologist and social critic Erich Fromm (1900-80), both of the latter members of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory. The letters cover topics such as dialectical social theory, Marxist economics, socialist humanism, the structure and contradictions of modern capitalism, the history of Marxism and of the Frankfurt School, feminism and revolution, developments in the USSR, Cuba, and China, and the New Left of the 1960s. Among the thinkers discussed in the correspondence – some of them quite critically– are Rosa Luxemburg, Theodor Adorno, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, V. I. Lenin, Nikolai Bukharin, Leon Trotsky, Mao Zedong, and Daniel Bell. This volume shows the deeply Marxist and humanist concerns of these thinkers, each of whom had a lifelong concern with rethinking Marx and Hegel as the foundation for an analysis of capitalist modernity and its forces of opposition.

Background reading:

K. Anderson, “Marcuse’s and Fromm’s Correspondence with the Socialist Feminist Raya Dunayevskaya: A New Window on Critical Theory,” Logos, Winter 2012  http://logosjournal.com/2012/winter_anderson/

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists, an affiliate of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanists.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-dunayevskaya-marcuse-fromm-correspondence-1954-78-book-launch-los-angeles-2-december

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Karl Marx

KARL MARX

Karl Marx

Imprint: Ashgate

Published: August 2012

Format: 244 x 169 mm

Extent: 684 pages

Binding: Hardback

ISBN: 978-0-7546-7757-4

Price:  $350.00; Website price: $315.00

BL Reference: 335.4-dc22

LoC Control No: 2011934979

Edited by Bertell Ollman, New York University, USA and Kevin B. Anderson, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Series: The International Library of Essays in Classical Sociology

Marx’s approach to analyzing society and especially his critique of capitalist society, continues to influence the work of a large number of scholars world-wide. Unfortunately, there are relatively few clear accounts of what this approach is and how to put it to use. And, despite the many attempts to use Marx’s method to study a variety of subjects, there are relatively few that can serve as useful models. In the present volume, the internationally renowned Marxist scholar, Bertell Ollman, and the social theorist Kevin B. Anderson, have brought together a sampling of the best writings of the past hundred years that illustrate and critique Marx’s method as well as explain what it is and how to put it to work. Anyone wishing to understand better Marx’s dialectical method (along, of course, with the theories created with its help), or to revise this method or to criticize it, or to use it in their own work will find this collection invaluable.

 

Contents:

Introduction

Part I Theory and Method: Reification and the consciousness of the proletariat, Georg Lukács; The age of revolutions: industrial, social-political, intellectual, Raya Dunayevskaya; Putting dialectics to work: the process of abstraction in Marx’s method, Bertell Ollman; The unity of science and revolution: Marxism as critique, Peter G. Stillman; Karl Marx’s Enquête Ouvriere, Hilde Weiss (and Karl Marx).

Part II Political Economy: From financial crisis to world slump: accumulation, financialization and the global slowdown, David McNally; Self-sourcing: how corporations get us to work without pay!, Martha E. Gimenez; The reproduction of daily life, Fredy Perlman; The rise and future demise of the world capitalist system: concepts for comparative analysis, Immanuel Wallerstein; The ‘new’ imperialism: accumulation by dispossession, David Harvey.

Part III State and Politics: The constitution as an elitist document, Michael Parenti; The monopolistic economy: property and contract, Franz Neumann; The worldwide class struggle, Vincent Navarro; The economic and social functions of the legal institutions, Karl Renner; The problem of the capitalist state, Nicos Poulantzas; Reply to Nicos Poulantzas, Ralph Miliband; The Marxist case for revolution today, Ernest Mandel.

Part IV The Individual and Society: Psychoanalysis and sociology, Erich Fromm; The uses and abuses of ‘civil society’, Ellen Meiksins Wood; Labor market and penal sanction: thoughts on the sociology of penal justice, Georg Rusche; The injuries of class, Michael D. Yates; Sports and cultural politics: the attraction of modern spectator sports, Sut Jhally and Bill Livant.

Part V Culture and Religion: The culture industry: enlightenment as mass deception, Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno; Museum, Inc.: inside the global art world (over-the-cliff notes), Paul Werner; The cultural logic of late capitalism, Fredric Jameson; Aroma and shadow: Marx vs Nietzsche on religion, Ishay Landa.

Part VI History: Exploitation, E.P. Thompson; The feudal mode of production, Perry Anderson; The decline and fall of Rome, G.E.M. de Ste Croix.

Part VII Colonialism, Race and Gender: Negroes in the Civil War: their role in the second American revolution, C.L.R. James (J.R. Johnson); Race relations – its meaning, beginning and progress, Oliver C. Cox; The feminist standpoint: developing the ground for a specifically feminist historical materialism, Nancy C.M. Hartsock; Marx’s late writings on non-Western and pre-capitalist societies and gender, Kevin B. Anderson.

Part VIII Ecology: Marx’s ecology in historical perspective, John Bellamy Foster; Marx’s vision of sustainable human development, Paul Burkett; Name index.

 

About the Editors:

Bertell Ollman is Professor of Politics at New YorkUniversity. He has published widely on Marxist theory and his books include Alienation: Marx’s Conception of Man in Capitalist Society (1971, 1976), Marxism: An Uncommon Introduction (1991), Dialectical Investigations (1993) The Dance of the Dialectic: Further Essays on Marx’s Method (2001) and (as editor, with Edward Vernoff) The Left Academy: Marxist Scholarship on American Campuses 3 vols (1982, 1984, 1986). His books have been translated into Spanish, Italian, French, Chinese and Korean. In 2001 he was the recipient of the first Charles McCoy Life Achievement Award from the New Political Science section of the American Political Science Association. 



Kevin B. Anderson is Professor of Sociology, Political Science and Feminist Studies at University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Lenin, Hegel and Western Marxism: A Critical Study (1995); Gender and the Seductions of Islamism (2005), and the co-author, with Janet Afary, of Foucault and the Iranian Revolution. He is the editor of Marx on Suicide (1999, co-edited with Eric A. Plaut); The Power of Negativity: Selected Writings on the Dialectic in Hegel and Marx by Raya Dunayevskaya (2002, co-edited with Peter Hudis); and The Rosa Luxemburg Reader (2004, co-edited with Peter Hudis). His third monograph, single-authored, is Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies (University of Chicago, 2010) for which he received the 2011 Paul Sweezy Book Award from the Marxist Section of the American Sociological Association. He has published numerous articles on Marx and Marxism for over 25 years.

 

Originally at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/karl-marx-by-bertell-ollman-and-kevin-b.-anderson-eds  

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

Raya Dunayevskaya

Raya Dunayevskaya

THE DUNAYEVSKAYA-MARCUSE-FROMM CORRESPONDENCE, 1954-1978: DIALOGUES ON HEGEL, MARX, AND CRITICAL THEORY

Edited by Kevin B. Anderson and Russell Rockwell

This book presents for the first time the correspondence during the years 1954 to 1978 between the Marxist-Humanist and feminist philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya (1910-87) and two other noted thinkers, the Hegelian Marxist philosopher and social theorist Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) and the psychologist and social critic Erich Fromm (1900-80), both of the latter members of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory.

In their introduction, editors Kevin B. Anderson and Russell Rockwell focus on the theoretical and political dialogues in these letters, which cover topics such as dialectical social theory, Marxist economics, socialist humanism, the structure and contradictions of modern capitalism, the history of Marxism and of the Frankfurt School, feminism and revolution, developments in the USSR, Cuba, and China, and emergence of the New Left of the 1960s. The editors’ extensive explanatory notes offer helpful background information, definitions of theoretical concepts, and source references.

Among the thinkers discussed in the correspondence – some of them quite critically– are Karl Marx, G. W. F. Hegel, Rosa Luxemburg, Georg Lukács, Theodor Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, V. I. Lenin, Nikolai Bukharin, Sigmund Freud, Leon Trotsky, Mao Zedong, Daniel Bell, and Seymour Martin Lipset. As a whole, this volume shows the deeply Marxist and humanist concerns of these thinkers, each of whom had a lifelong concern with rethinking Marx and Hegel as the foundation for an analysis of capitalist modernity and its forces of opposition.

978-0-7391-6835-6 – Hardback
April 2012 – $80.00 – (£49.95)

 

978-0-7391-6836-3 – Paperback
April 2012 – $34.99 – (£21.95)

 

978-0-7391-6837-0 – eBook
April 2012, Pages: 330

LexingtonBooks

Kevin B. Anderson is a professor of sociology, political science, and feminist studies at University of California, Santa Barbara. 
Russell Rockwell is an independent scholar based inNew York. 

Contents

Acknowledgments
Editors’ Introduction
Note on Sources
Abbreviations
The Dunayevskaya-Marcuse Correspondence, 1954-78
The Dunayevskaya-Fromm Correspondence, 1959-78
Appendix
Marcuse’s Preface to Dunayevskaya’s Marxism and Freedom
Dunayevskaya’s Review of Marcuse’s Soviet Marxism
Dunayevskaya’s Review of Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man
Fromm’s Foreword to the German Edition of Dunayevskaya’s Philosophy and Revolution
Dunayevskaya’s ‘In Memoriam’ to Marcuse
Dunayevskaya’s ‘In Memoriam’ to Fromm

“[This work] could not have been published at a better time. In addition to an increase of interest in the works of all three thinkers, we are also seeing new social developments that each of them would find it necessary to respond to. This volume discloses the theoretical develop of Dunayevskaya, Marcuse, and Fromm as they engaged the social and political struggles of their day. It is evident that we can learn from them today.” – Arnold L. Farr, University of Kentucky

“This supple meditation on the exchange among three of the most important thinkers of the twentieth century is an absorbing, stimulating and fiercely illuminating contribution to radical philosophy. And further, this collection of correspondence between Dunayevskaya, Marcuse and Fromm is not only historically significant from the perspective of philosophical aficionados, but limpidly demonstrates the continued relevance, if not urgency, of the work of these iconic thinkers for the present historical juncture. And most significantly, the volume speaks to the growing importance of Marxist humanist philosophy for a radical transcendence of domination and oppression as a concrete historical possibility for our times.” – Peter McLaren, Professor, GraduateSchool ofEducation and Information Studies,University ofCalifornia,Los Angeles

“This book is an excellent treatment of an understudied area in the history of the development of Frankfurt School Critical Theory in the U.S. and its intersections with Marxist Humanism. It delivers an original piece of work in the Critical Theory/history of the Frankfurt School literature; it fills an important gap by making the connection between these three important Marxist theorists who all evolved intellectually in the context of the U.S. and emigrated from Europe; and it presents material that will challenge historians of radical thought in the U.S. from the 1950s to the 1970s as well.” – Douglas Kellner, UCLA, editor of the Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse

“Anderson and Rockwell’s edited collection of the correspondence between Raya Dunayevskaya and first Herbert Marcuse, then Erich Fromm, brings Marxist humanism to life. These letters give the reader a close view of these three major theorists’ understanding of the movements and issues of these decades, and of their sometimes corresponding, sometimes clashing political and theoretical outlooks. Anderson and Rockwell’s introduction places these dialogues in context, tracing the political and intellectual evolution of each of the authors, and highlighting the importance of the issues that they grapple with. This collection is a crucial resource for anyone wishing to understand Marxist humanism, the range of views within it, and its relation to Critical Theory.” – Barbara Epstein,University ofCalifornia,Santa Cruz

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

KARL MARX AND THE PRESENT MOMENT

Karl Marx and the Present Moment: Beyond ‘Resistance’ and Toward Human Emancipation

A talk and discussion: with Kevin B Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins

2 p.m. Saturday 14 April 2012 at The Lucas Arms, 245a Grays Inn Road, King’s Cross, London, WC1 (5 minutes from Kings Cross Tube)

MEETING SPONSORED BY THE HOBGOBLIN ONLINE

The Arab revolutions and the Occupy movement have placed both revolution and anti-capitalism at the forefront of global social consciousness. While many are again evoking Marx, the legacy of decades of postmodernism and postmodernized postcolonial thought has left us, at best, with a politics of resistance rather than one of full human emancipation. This talk will explore Marx’s thought in light of this legacy. It will be argued that his multidimensional dialectical vision encompassed both ‘totalities’ like capitalism and the specificities of nation, ethnicity, gender, and anti-colonial resistance. Moreover, his philosophical dialectic, rooted in Hegel, theorized precisely this type of ‘concrete totality.’ And finally, his critique of capital was accompanied by an always implicit — and sometimes explicit — vision of a radically humanist future beyond the exploitative, alienating, and reified world of the capital relation.

Kevin Anderson’s most recent books are Foucault and the Iranian Revolution; Gender and the Seductions of Islamism (with Janet Afary, 2005), Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies (2010), and The Dunayevskaya-Marcuse-Fromm Correspondence, 1954-1978: Dialogues on Hegel, Marx, and Critical Theory (coedited with Russell Rockwell, 2012). He is also the author of Lenin, Hegel, and Western Marxism: A Critical Study (1995) and the coeditor (with Peter Hudis) of The Rosa Luxemburg Reader(2004).

The Hobgoblin: http://www.thehobgoblin.co.uk/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Kevin B. Anderson

Kevin B. Anderson

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Kevin Anderson

THE RETURN(S) OF SOCIALIST HUMANISM AND THE NEED FOR AN ALTERNATIVE – PART II

SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012
2:00-4:30 PM
Westside Pavilion, Community Room A
Corner of Pico and Westwood Boulevards, Los Angeles
Community Room A is on 3rd floor, behind food court
Free parking – first 3 hours

Although humanism was an important theme in Marx’s writings, in recent years radical thought has often rejected all forms of humanism, confusing socialist humanism with liberal or even conservative humanist narratives of individual agency in a Eurocentric context. This series will explore varieties of socialist humanist thought, from Marx’s own humanist writings extending through later socialist humanist thinkers like Jean-Paul Sartre, Frantz Fanon, Erich Fromm, E. P. Thompson, Lucien Goldmann, and Raya Dunayevskaya.  In so doing, we will look at the challenges to humanism that have emerged from movements of the Left and from structuralist and post-structuralist thinkers like Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, and Antonio Negri, some of them connected to Maoism as well.  We will also consider whether socialist humanism offers grounding for a contemporary radical politics that moves us beyond resistance and toward real human emancipation.

Speaker: KEVIN ANDERSON

Kevin Anderson teaches Sociology, Political Science, and Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has written on Marx, Hegel, the Frankfurt School, Foucault, and the Orientalism debate. His most recent books are Foucault and the Iranian Revolution (with Janet Afary, 2005) and Marx at the Margins (2010). He is a member of the U.S. Marxist-Humanists.  His presentation will concentrate more on the philosophical side of these debates.

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists, an affiliate of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org and http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Raya Dunayevskaya

EXPLODING THE MYTHS OF CAPITALISM: U.S. MARXIST-HUMANISTS

You are invited to attend a series of open discussions on…

Exploding the Myths of Capitalism

First & Third Wednesdays, March & April

6:30-9.00 pm

@ChicagoPublic Library,  Harold Washington L ibrary Center, 400 South State St.Chicago IL, Room 3N-6

Progressive change in the United States is severely hampered owing both to the failure of the left to project an alternative to capitalism and to the myths projected by the right regarding the nature of capitalism. On the other hand, Karl Marx projected an alternative socioeconomic system that comes into view in his writings in significant part in and through exploding the myths about capitalism. This series of five classes will explore the myths of capitalism through discussions of selected writings of Marx, and others.

Readings are available online or from U.S.M.H.  Online readings are available from U.S.M.H in pdf format for e-readers etc.

Sponsored by the U.S. Marxist-Humanists

Email: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org

www.usmarxisthumanists.org

Phone: 773-561-3454

 

Schedule andReadings

March 7th:  Myth #1: Capitalism is the Economic System most in Accord with Human Nature         

Contradictory concepts of human nature abound in the culture of capitalism. Human nature is said to be fundamentally greedy and selfish, or, contrariwise, cast in an image of perfection, or both. These concepts are used to justify social and economic policies that promote and protect capitalism, but this can only work if their historical origin in capitalism itself is obscured. This class will explore the concepts of human nature extant in capitalist societies and counterpose them to concepts drawn from the Marxist-Humanist tradition. The myth that capitalism is reflective of human nature will be exploded in a discussion of the following readings:

Readings:

Erich Fromm, Marx’s Concept of Man, pp. 24-43, “The Nature of Man” www.marxists.org/archive/fromm/works/1961/man/ch04.htm

Karl Marx, Grundrisse, “Introduction,” pp. 84-110 www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1857/grundrisse/ch01.htm

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, Chapter 13: Of the Natural Conditions of Mankind as concerning their Felicity and Misery www.earlymoderntexts.com/pdf/hobblev1.pdf  and Chapter 17:  Of the Causes, Generation, and Definition of Commonwealth www.earlymoderntexts.com/pdf/hobblev2.pdf

Karl Marx, Theses on Feuerbach  www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1845/theses/theses.htm

 

Leading the discussion: Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, author, Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity

 

March 21st:  Myth #2: Democracy is Compatible with Capitalism

The rhetoric of the candidates for the Republican nomination for president of theUS, as well as their opponents in the Democratic Party, makes it unequivocally clear that for them, and probably for the majority of Americans, capitalism is entirely conflated with ‘democracy.’ That is, the notion of the ‘free market,’ value production, and the drive to accumulate capital for its own sake have been superimposed on the meaning of democracy as a political system as if to say that only the economic system known as capitalism can facilitate democracy. This myth will be exploded in discussion of the following readings:

Readings:

Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto. www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/

Karl Marx, “Address to the Communist League of March, 1850.”

www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1847/communist-league/1850-ad1.htm

Raya Dunayevskaya, Marxism and Freedom, Chapter VI, The Paris Commune Deepens the content of Capital, pp. 92-102.

Raya Dunayevskaya, Rosa Luxemburg, Women’s Liberation and Marx’s Philosophy of Revolution: Marx’s Theory of Permanent Revolution.” 1843-83, pp. 158-163.

 

Leading the discussion: Anton Evelynov, student activist

 

April 4th: Myth #3: State Forms of ‘Socialism’ are Fundamentally Different from Capitalism

Proponents of capitalism, as well as many post-Marx Marxists, have attempted to identify “socialism” or “communism” with state control of the economy and a centralized state. However, theSoviet Unionas well as “Communist China” and the European welfare state represent not so much a departure from capitalism as a realization of it. This class will explore whether there is an alternative to either reducing a new society to state control of the economy, on one hand, or refraining from the need to seize state power as part of a revolutionary transformation, on the other. The myths regarding state forms of capitalism will be exploded in a discussion of the following readings:

Readings:

Raya Dunayevskaya, Marxism and Freedom, Chapter IV, “Worker, Intellectual, and the State,” pp. 69-77.

Raya Dunayevskaya, State Capitalism and Marx’s Humanism “Lenin vs Bukharin” pp. 10-18.  babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015071598158

“Build It Now”: An Interview with Michael A. Lebowitz radicalnotes.com/content/view/36/39/

John Holloway, Change the World without Seizing State Power, Chapter 2, “Beyond the State?” pp. 11-18.

libcom.org/library/chapter-2-beyond-state

 

Leading the discussion: Ali Reza, Iranian activist and member of Iranian Left Alliance Abroad.

 

April 18th: Myth #4: There is No Alternative to Capitalism

Proponents of capitalism as well as many critics of it have maintained that it is impossible to overcome such phenomena as commodity production, exchange value, alienated labor, and the existence of classes. This stance has within it all of the myths of capitalism, i.e., that capitalism reflects and honors ‘human nature’; that it is a form of democratic practice; and that it prevents the development of state control of the economy. It has also been claimed by many on the left that any effort to spell out the content of a new, post-capitalist society is at best useless and at worst harmful. The myth that there is no alternative to capitalism will be exploded in discussion of the following readings:

Readings:

Karl Marx, Critique of the Gotha Program . www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1875/gotha/index.htm

Raya Dunayevskaya, The Power of Negativity, “Presentation on the Dialectics of Organization and Philosophy,” pp. 3-14.

 

Leading the discussion: Peter Hudis, author of Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

 

Wednesday May 2nd

May Day Celebration and discussion

 

U.S. Marxist Humanists would like to invite all participants in this class to continue the discussion in honor of May Day in a convivial setting, with food and drink. Venue to be announced

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Socialism and Hope

THE RETURN(S) OF SOCIALIST HUMANISM AND THE NEED FOR AN ALTERNATIVE – PART I

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2012
2:00-4:00 PM
Westside Pavilion, Community Room A
Corner of Pico and Westwood Boulevards, Los Angeles
Community Room A is on 3rd floor, behind food court
Free parking – first 3 hours

Speaker:
BARBARA EPSTEIN

Although humanism was an important theme in Marx’s writings, in recent years radical thought has often rejected all forms of humanism, confusing socialist humanism with liberal or even conservative humanist narratives of individual agency in a Eurocentric context.

This series will explore varieties of socialist humanist thought, from Marx’s own humanist writings extending through later socialist humanist thinkers like Jean-Paul Sartre, Frantz Fanon, Erich Fromm, E. P. Thompson, Lucien Goldmann, and Raya Dunayevskaya.  In so doing, we will look at the challenges to humanism that have emerged from movements of the Left and from structuralist and post-structuralist thinkers like Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, and Antonio Negri, some of them connected to Maoism as well.  We will also consider whether socialist humanism offers grounding for a contemporary radical politics that moves us beyond resistance and toward real human emancipation.

Barbara Epstein teaches at University of California, Santa Cruz in the History of Consciousness Department and writes on social movements; her most recent book is The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism.  She is currently working on a project on socialist humanism:  its rise, decline, and continuing relevance for the left.  Her presentation will concentrate more on the political ramifications for the Left of these debates.

PART II: March 31, same time and place
Speaker: KEVIN ANDERSON

Kevin Anderson teaches Sociology, Political Science, and Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has written on Marx, Hegel, the Frankfurt School, Foucault, and the Orientalism debate. His most recent books are Foucault and the Iranian Revolution (with Janet Afary, 2005) and Marx at the Margins (2010). He is a member of the U.S. Marxist-Humanists.  His presentation will concentrate more on the philosophical side of these debates.

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists, an affiliate of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org and http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Herbert Marcuse

THE FRANKFURT SCHOOL AND MARXIST-HUMANISM

THE FRANKFURT SCHOOL AND MARXIST-HUMANISM: RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA’S DIALOGUE WITH HERBERT MARCUSE AND ERICH FROMM AS A WINDOW ON MARXISM IN AMERICA

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011
2:00-4:00 PM
Community Room A, Westside Pavilion, Los Angeles
(Westside Pavilion is at Pico & Westwood Boulevards; Community Room A is on east side of the mall, third floor, behind food court; 3 hrs. free parking in mall lot)

Speakers:
Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins
Kelly Green, student activist

Changes in technology and in the overall structure of modern capitalism – as well as debates over dialectics — were at the center of an important dialogue among Marxists in the U.S.  The discussion took place between the Marxist-Humanist and feminist philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya and the philosopher Herbert Marcuse and the social psychologist Erich Fromm, both formerly of the Frankfurt School. Their dialogue is manifested in books such as Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, Fromm’s Marx’s Concept of Man, and Dunayevskaya’s Philosophy and Revolution, and in their correspondence, which is to be published in book form next year.

Suggested readings:
1. Kevin Anderson, “A Preliminary Exploration of the Dunayevskaya-Marcuse Dialogue (with excerpts from their correspondence and comments by Douglas Kellner): http://www.kevin-anderson.com/preliminary-exploration-dunayevskayamarcuse-dialogue-1954-79-excerpts-correspondence-comments-douglas-kellner/
2. Kelly Green, “Technology, Labor, and the Transcendence of Capital: Revisiting the Marcuse-Dunayevskaya Debate”, in: http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/technology-labor-transcendence-capital-revisiting-marcusedunayevskaya-debate-kelly-green/
3. Raya Dunayevskaya, “The ‘Automaton’ and the Worker,” in Philosophy and Revolution, pp. 68-76
4. Herbert Marcuse, “The New Forms of Control,” Ch. 1 of One-Dimensional Man, at: http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/marcuse/works/one-dimensional-man/ch01.htm

Future meeting (same time and location):
October 8 (date tentative): On the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War: Marx’s writings on race, class, and slavery before and during the Civil War.

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/
Mail to: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org

 

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Kevin Anderson

SOCIALIST HUMANISM, THE ANTI-HUMANIST TURN, AND THE CONSEQUENCES FOR THE LEFT

Sunday December 11, 2010
2:00 PM

Speakers: Barbara Epstein and Kevin Anderson

A look at the contributions of Marxist and/or socialist humanists, and the causes, and consequences for the left, of the challenge emerging from the anti-humanism associated with structuralism and post-structuralism. What would it take to revive socialist humanism as a philosophy of the contemporary left? How does the legacy of Maoism from the New Left affect this? Among the thinkers to be discussed are the socialist humanists Raya Dunayevskaya, Frantz Fanon, Erich Fromm, and Jean-Paul Sartre, and E. P. Thompson; among the structuralists and post-structuralists, Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Claude Lévi-Strasss, and Edward Said.

Barbara Epstein teaches in the History of Consciousness Department at University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (1991) and most recently, The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism (2008), both with University of California Press.

Kevin Anderson teaches in the Department of Sociology at University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Foucault and the Iranian Revolution (2005, coauthored with Janet Afary) and most recently, Marx at the Margins: Nationalism, Ethnicity and Non-Western Societies (2010), both with University of Chicago Press..

Location: NPML 6501 Telegraph Ave. Oakland, CA 94609

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Self Divided

SELF, PSYCHOANALYIS AND SOCIETY IN THE 21ST CENTURY

RC36 Symposium
Gothenburg, Sweden
July 10, 2010

The relationship of self and society has intrigued philosophers, psychoanalysts, and sociologists for over a century. In the early part of the last century, as economic conditions fostered alienation, malaise and despair, the neo-Marxist Frankfurt School, among the first scholars influence by both the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts, as well as Freudian psychology, began to investigate and theorize the social psychological factors that disposed certain people to Fascism. At about the same time, in the US, scholars such as Cooley, James and above all GH Mead began to think about socialization and the formation of self. These early perspectives played a major role in the rise of symbolic interactionism.

These theories have seen a number of developments and transformations. While the work of Reich, Fromm, Adorno and Horkhiemer was groundbreaking, Marcuse, Habermas and Jessica Benjamin have added to that tradition. Surely the work of Althusser, Lacan and Foucault has added a number of other concerns and dimensions.

For the past few years, a number of scholars have gathered together before the American Sociological Association meetings to discuss the vagaries of contemporary selfhood, largely, but not exclusively from a psychoanalytical perspective. This year, given the many European and International scholars that will be attending the ISA, we decided to move our venue to Gothenburg, Sweden, and schedule our meeting the day before ISA meets. The meeting will be sponsored by RC36 Alienation Theory and Research.

We would like to invite all interested scholars to join us in what have been among the most stimulating meetings. Please send an abstract of about 200-250 words to Lauren Langman, Llang944@aol.com and Lynne Chancer, lchancer@hunter.cuny.edu. Please send by April 25, 2010. 

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Unusual Pussus

Unusual Pussus

ENGAGING PETER McLAREN AND THE NEW MARXISM IN EDUCATION

 

David Geoffrey Smith

Interchange, Vol.40/1, pp.93-117 (2009) 

David Geoffrey Smith has written a very interesting and useful article in the latest issue of Interchange. Not only does he review Peter McLaren’s Rage + Hope: Interviews with Peter McLaren on War, Imperialism, & Critical Pedagogy (Peter Lang Publishing, 2006), but he also explores the New Marxism in Education, or the New Marxist Educational Theory (as it is sometimes called). Thus, he examines the impact of McLaren’s work along with other writers on the New Marxism in Education: Paula Allman, Glenn Rikowski, Mike Cole and Dave Hill.

He does spell my name wrong, though: having ‘Glen’ rather than ‘Glenn’ Rikowski. But that’s easily forgivable as Smith has produced an enlightening article. 

You can view the article at: http://www.springerlink.com/content/858j592687nt2554/fulltext.pdf

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk