Skip navigation

Tag Archives: English

Bette Davis

PhD/MA IN ENGLISH AND FILM STUDIES – UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

PhD/MA in English and Film Studies

University of Alberta

Application deadline: January 7, 2013

The Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta invites applications for its MA and PhD graduate programs. We are a large and diverse department, with internationally-recognized strengths in many fields, including Canadian Literature, Cultural Studies, 17th, 18th, and 19th century English literature, American Studies, and modernism. We encourage innovative, interdisciplinary research, and we have a vibrant intellectual climate. Please check our department website (http://www.efs.ualberta.ca/) and the graduate section (http://www.efs.ualberta.ca/en/GraduateProgram.aspx) for a sense of the exciting work going on among our faculty, graduate students, and visitors.

We host a large number of visiting speakers each year, who help make this an exciting place to study. Recent visitors have included Patricia Yaeger, Zacharias Kunuk, Judith Halberstam, Rosemary Hennessy, Lauren Berlant, Claire Colebrook, Ann Cvetkovich, Timothy Brennan, Pheng Cheah, Srinivas Aravamudan, Alberto Toscano, Nobel laureate Derek Walcott, and many, many more. Each year we invite established and emerging scholars to present in our “New Directions in Culture, Politics and Theory” (http://www.crcculturalstudies.ca/event) series. The Canadian Literature Center (http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/clc/) “brings together researchers, authors, publishers, collectors and the reading public to promote the strength and diversity of Canada’s written culture,” and the WRITE program holds dozens of readings each year as well as hosting the oldest Writer in Residence program (http://www.efs.ualberta.ca/Writer-in-Residence.aspx) in Canada. We are thrilled to have Marina Endicott as Writer in Residence this year.  Students in the graduate program also have the opportunity to participate in Banff Research in Culture (BRiC: http://www.banffcentre.ca/programs/program.aspx?id=1210), a residency program designed for junior scholars engaged in advanced theoretical research on themes and topics in culture. Past BRiC faculty include Lauren Berlant, Bruno Bosteels, Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi, Catherine Malabou, Michael Hardt, and Pierre Huyghe.

There are great advantages to studying at the U of A. We offer all incoming PhD students a four year package of funding, with minimum annual guarantees of $28,000 for PhD students and $18,000 for MA students. We also have very high success rates for SSHRC and other major scholarship competitions: currently about half of our PhD students hold a major external award, including two Trudeau scholars and a Vanier scholar. We support student travel for research and conferences, and we have innovative program structures that allow students to pursue exciting and original research.  We have an active and very supportive Graduate Students of English Collective and a department culture that values graduate student participation. Our department is consistently ranked as one of the top graduate programs in English in Canada. Our most recent unit review coined our new slogan: “this is where you come if you want to do innovative work.”

Edmonton is a dynamic and growing city of more than 1 million people with a rich cultural community. With over 30 different festivals throughout the year—including its acclaimed Folk Fest and Fringe Festival—it has certainly earned its name of “Festival City.” Residents of and visitors to Edmonton can explore the beautiful river valley, where the green and gold of the fall trees inspired the University of Alberta’s own colours. Edmonton is home to over 20 theatre companies, and the new, visually inspiring Art Gallery of Alberta (http://www.youraga.ca/).  
 
The neighbourhood closest to the U of A is Old Strathcona, a bustling area with a thriving Farmer’s Market on Saturdays and a lively bar scene at night. A plethora of parks appeal to the outdoor-lovers of any group and in the beautiful prairie summer months, they are the perfect place to sit down, relax and enjoy the long evenings. The Alberta Legislature, the capital of the province, impresses with its manicured gardens and wading pool for cooling off in the summertime. The Rocky Mountain towns of Jasper and Banff are short drives away and excellent places to visit throughout the year.

The application deadline for this year is January 7th, 2013. You can find application information and our “tips” for applying on the website here: http://www.efs.ualberta.ca/GraduateProgram/ApplicationInfo.aspx. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about graduate study in English and Film Studies at the U of A.

Corrinne Harol, Associate Chair, Graduate Studies.
charol@ualberta.ca
780-492-4639

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

D.H. Lawrence

D.H. LAWRENCE: A JOURNEY

Blog item for ‘Serendipitous Moments’ by Ruth Rikowski

http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

In this piece, Ruth Rikowski briefly describes her ‘D.H. Lawrence Summer Journey’. It was actually a journey that we both went on, as she read various f bits out to me, as she was reading this summer 2012.

D. H. Lawrence: an incredible writer; a writer that profoundly changed both of our lives.

Ruth’s initial intention was to find out more about the so-called Nietzschean effect in Lawrence’s work; how much of it was real and how much imagined and/or exaggerated?

Together we concluded that it was more a Nietzschean way of life that Lawrence embraced; the ‘going for life’ mentality. It was this, rather than adhering to any particular philosophical positions of Nietzsche’s, such as the ‘Will to Power’, which Lawrence actually disagreed with.

And it was Frieda Lawrence, his wife, who loved Nietzche and read lots of him, who really drove all this forward – she wanted to nurture a male genius and to live life more fully.

Lawrence himself preferred reading and writing literature.

G. H. Neville, Lawrence’s closest childhood friend said in his book ‘A Memoir of D. H. Lawrence: the Betrayal’ (Cambridge University Press, 1981):

“We bemoan, I bemoan, Lawrence as a lost leader of men. I believe that, could his undoubted gifts have been applied in other directions, he would have become the leader of a new world movement. I know that he could have become such a leader, but I sometimes feel that, even now, he has completed his real work, and that, ultimately, when a right conception of our Lawrence has spread throughout the world, that dreamed-of leadership will yet be his.” (Neville, 1981, p. 142)

Do read the piece, and let us aim to live life more fully – even in the limiting and limited form of life that is capitalist society.

The full article can be viewed at: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/d-h-lawrence-journey.html

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Utopia

THE SPECTRE OF UTOPIA: UTOPIAN AND SCIENCE FICTIONS AT THE ‘FIN DE SIÈCLE’ – BY MATTHEW BEAUMONT

PETER LANG – International Academic Publishers are pleased to announce a new book by
——————————————–
Matthew Beaumont 
THE SPECTRE OF UTOPIA: Utopian and Science Fictions at the “Fin de Siècle”

Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien, 2012. XII, 307 pp.
Ralahine Utopian Studies. Vol. 12
Edited by Raffaella Baccolini, Joachim Fischer, Tom Moylan and Michael J. Griffin

pb. ISBN 978-3-0343-0725-3
CHF 63.00 / €(D) 47.50 / €(A) 48.80 / € 44.40 / £ 40.00 / US-$ 66.95
€(D) includes VAT – only valid for Germany  /  €(A) includes VAT – only valid for Austria  

In the late nineteenth century, a spectre haunted Europe and the United States: the spectre of utopia. This book re-examines the rise of utopian thought at the “fin de siècle”, situating it in the social and political contradictions of the time and exploring the ways in which it articulated a deepening sense that the capitalist system might not be insuperable after all. The study pays particular attention to Edward Bellamy’s seminal utopian fiction, “Looking Backward” (1888), embedding it in a number of unfamiliar contexts, and reading its richest passages against the grain, but it also offers detailed discussions of William Morris, H.G. Wells and Oscar Wilde. Both historical and theoretical in its approach, this book constitutes a substantial contribution to our understanding of the utopian imaginary, and an original analysis of the counter-culture in which it thrived at the fin de siècle.

Contents: 
Utopian fiction – Science fiction – Disaster fiction – Radical publishing – Feminism – Socialism – Occultism.

“Matthew Beaumont is one of the most brilliant of the younger generation of English critics. His work on late Victorian culture puts him among the most suggestive and original scholars of the period. While focused on Bellamy, this wide-ranging study encompasses a rich variety of authors and intellectual currents, all dealing with the elusive but utterly essential idea of utopia. In its theoretical sophistication and historical depth, Beaumont’s work is both innovative and illuminating” (Terry Eagleton, Distinguished Professor of English at Lancaster University and author of ‘Trouble with Strangers’ and ‘Why Marx Was Right’)

“So much has been written about Looking Backward and late nineteenth-century utopian literature that one wonders if these topics can ever come to us fresh again. Beaumont answers this question by placing Bellamy’s utopia within significant yet rarely studied publication and reception contexts, such as the London Bellamy Library books series designed to educate working-class readers, and by presenting utopia as a constructively troubling spectre, a ghost evaluating the readers’ present by haunting them with a sense of the absence of a suppressed better world existing somewhere between possibility and impossibility. Thus Beaumont does refresh utopia for us” (Kenneth Roemer, Piper Professor, University of Texas at Arlington and author of ‘The Obsolete Necessity: America in Utopian Writings, 1888-1900’ and ‘Utopian Audiences’)

“This is a rich and provocative book in which Beaumont challenges conventional readings of utopian writing at the turn of the twentieth century. Written with insight and clarity, it provides fresh perspectives and unsettles old certainties. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with the cultural context of the time” (Ruth Levitas, Professor of Sociology, University of Bristol and author of ‘The Concept of Utopia’)

Matthew Beaumont is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at University College London.

————————————————————-
You can order this book online. Please click on the link below:
————————————————————-
Direct order: http://www.peterlang.com?430725
————————————————————-
Or you may send your order to:
————————————————————-

PETER LANG AG
International Academic Publishers
Moosstrasse 1
P.O. Box 350
CH-2542 Pieterlen
Switzerland
Tel +41 (0)32 376 17 17
Fax +41 (0)32 376 17 27
e-mail: mailto:info@peterlang.com
Internet: http://www.peterlang.com

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

University of Alberta

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA / MA & PhD / ENGLISH & FILM STUDIES

The Department of English and Film Studies at the Universityof Albertainvites applications for its MA and PhD graduate programs. We are a large and diverse department, with internationally-recognized strengths in many fields, including Canadian Literature, Cultural Studies, 17th, 18th, and 19th century English literature, American Studies, and Modernism. We encourage innovative, interdisciplinary research, and we have a vibrant intellectual climate. Please check our Department Website and the Graduate Program section for a sense of the exciting work going on among our faculty, graduate students, and visitors.  This year we have hosted distinguished visitor Claire Colburn, Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott, and a slate of speakers under the New Direction in Culture, Politics and Theory series. Recent distinguished visitors include Lauren Berlant, Mary Louise Pratt, Zacharias Kunuk, Patricia Yaeger, and Judith/Jack Halberstam. The Canadian Literature Centerbrings together “researchers, authors, publishers, collectors and the reading public to promote the strength and diversity of Canada’s written culture,” and the WRITE program holds dozens of readings each year as well as hosting the oldest Writer in Residence program in Canada. We are thrilled to have Richard Van Camp as Writer in Residence this year.  We also sponsor the new Banff Research in Culture program, an exciting residency program in which our graduate students are very active.

The advantages of studying at the U of A right now are great. We offer all incoming PhD students a four year package of funding, with minimum annual guarantees of $28,000 for PhD students and $18,000 for MA students. We also have very high success rates for SSHRC and other major scholarships: currently about half of our PhD students hold a major external award, including two Trudeau scholars and a Vanierscholar. We support student travel for research and conferences, and we have innovative program structures that allow students to pursue exciting and original research.  We have an active and very supportive Graduate Students of English Collective and a department culture that values graduate student participation.Edmonton, a lively city of one million people dubbed “the festival city” for its many arts festivals, is one of the most affordable cities in the country and is laid out around a beautiful river valley. Our department is consistently ranked as one of the top graduate programs in English inCanada. Our most recent unit review coined our new slogan:”This is where you come if you want to do innovative work.”

The application deadline for this year is January 7th. You can find application information and our “tips” for applying on our website. Please feel free to contact Corrinne Harol, Associate Chair, Graduate Studies (charol@ualberta.ca) if you have any questions about graduate study in English and Film Studies at the U of A.

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski