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Education

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION – VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: www.wwwords.co.uk/rcie/content/pdfs/6/issue6_1.asp

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Volume 6 Number 1 2011   ISSN 1745-4999

SPECIAL ISSUE
Girls and Young Women’s Education and Empowerment in Marginalized Regions of the World
Guest Editors: VILMA SEEBERG & KAREN MONKMAN

Karen Monkman. Introduction. Framing Gender, Education and Empowerment

Halla B. Holmarsdottir, Ingrid Birgitte Møller Ekne & Heidi L. Augestad. The Dialectic between Global Gender Goals and Local Empowerment: girls’ education in Southern Sudan and South Africa

Joan DeJaeghere & Soo Kyoung Lee. What Matters for Marginalized Girls and Boys in Bangladesh: a capabilities approach for understanding educational well-being and empowerment

Vilma Seeberg. Schooling, Jobbing, Marrying: what’s a girl to do to make life better? Empowerment Capabilities of Girls at the Margins of Globalization in China

Kristen J. Molyneaux. Uganda’s Universal Secondary Education Policy and its Effect on ‘Empowered’ Women: how reduced income and moonlighting activities differentially impact male and female teachers

Sofie Haug Changezi & Heidi Biseth. Education of Hazara Girls in a Diaspora: education as empowerment and an agent of change

Payal P. Shah. Girls’ Education and Discursive Spaces for Empowerment: perspectives from rural India

Supriya Baily. Speaking Up: contextualizing women’s voices and gatekeepers’ reactions in promoting women’s empowerment in rural India

Mary Ann Maslak. Education, Employment and Empowerment: the case of a young woman in northwestern China

Joshua A. Muskin, Abdelhak Kamime & Abdellah Adlaoui. Empowered to Empower: a civil society-government partnership to increase girls’ junior secondary school outcomes in Morocco

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS: For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor David Phillips (david.phillips@education.ox.ac.uk). Full details concerning the submission of articles can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/RCIE/04.html

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes access to ALL PAST ISSUES) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeRCIE.asp

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In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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New Media

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

CALL FOR PAPERS:

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA & SOCIAL CHANGE

Media Annual Conference:

Organised by the School of Social Sciences, Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK

Date: Saturday 8th May 2010

Venue: LT-C101, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

Why this conference?

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers and civil society organisations to discuss youth use of new media and the implication this has on identity construction, public opinion, citizenship and social change. Although their development is a recent phenomenon, new media have not only opened up new opportunities for journalism but also empowered audiences and civil society organisations with unprecedented platforms for ‘free’ expression and social activism around the world. New technologies are said to have reinvigorated a sense of a ‘transnational public sphere’ and strengthened marginalized communities and provided a platform for subcultural groups and the voiceless. The possible consequences of such rapid developments on social and political change are not hard to imagine. The sweeping victory of US president elect Barak Obama (in the latest American presidential elections) characterised by the unprecedented outreach to marginalised communities including the youth through YouTube, Facebook, and other internet platforms is a case in point.

This conference aims to map out the above mentioned phenomena, focusing on the role of new media in the perceived social changes. It debates how audiences, users, civil society organisations, political/social groups and subcultures have understood and found in these technologies the right tools and strategies to power their work sustainably.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– Blogging and bloggers as citizen journalists; are bloggers making a social difference?

– Satellite TV and the internet as cites of resistance/alternative media or sets of ‘censored national enclosures’

-E-campaigning and political/social groups

– How are  activists/the youth interacting with platforms like ‘YouTube’, ‘MySpace’, ‘Flicker’, ‘Faithtube’, ‘Facebook’ and ‘Blogging’ to pursue their objectives?

– Challenges of the Internet in war zones

– The new media and women empowerment amongst ethnic minorities.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– In the absence of real democracy in some parts of the Arab and Muslim world is new media creating a new form of social/political capital: e-democracy?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in mobilising public opinion?

– What expectations and perceptions are there regarding changes in cultural and political values?

Attendance: Participation in this conference will be open to academics, researchers, policy makers, government agencies, youth workers, students, parents and other members of the public.

Fees: £35 waged; £10 non-waged and students

Call for submissions: Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 30th November 2009. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s). Deadline for full papers is 10th April 2010.

Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Contact: Please send all submissions and enquiries to:

Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator),

Senior Lecturer in Media & Sociology

School of Social Sciences

University of Northampton

Park Campus

NORTHAMPTON

NN2 7AL

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1604892104

E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk + www.northampton.ac.uk

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Workshop

Workshop

ALTERNATIVE WORK ORGANISATIONS

Call for Papers

Stream at the International Labour Process Conference 2010, Rutgers University 15-17 March 2010

Stream convenors:
MAURIZIO ATZENI, Loughborough University, UK, m.atzeni@lboro.ac.uk
DARIO AZZELLINI, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Germany, dnapress@gmx.net
IMMANUEL NESS, Brooklyn College CUNY, US, manny.ness@gmail.com

Acute and deep economic crises, like the one we are currently experiencing, have always had an important role in reshaping people’s lives and societies. By momentarily breaking the flow of production and consumption, destroying wealth and creating unemployment, economic crises interrupt the regular working of accepted socio-economic systems and open the room to popular protests and searches for alternatives. In the labour movement’s history one of the forms in which the dominating system has been contested and responses to crisis have been found has been through workers’ run and controlled production. Defined as workers self-management or autogestion, to use the more catchy Spanish definition, different forms of  workers’ empowerment at the level of production have been used in different geographical contexts alongside the history of the capitalist system of production. Reverting taken for granted assumptions about property and capital control of the labour process, cases of workers’ self-management can be seen as an alternative work organisation, a theoretical proposal to overcome capitalism and a form of radical struggle and rank and file strategy for collective action.

We thus invite papers with both an empirical and/or theoretical focus, based on historical, contemporary, worldwide cases that can assess workers’ experiences with alternative forms of work organisation, particularly, in relation to the following issues:

• Labour process and decision-making
• Workers’ collective actions and struggles for emancipation
• Social theory of work
• Alternative to capitalist societies

Research questions that address these issues may include:

• What is the historical-political development of workers’ control, its legacy and contemporary cogency?
• What is the theoretical relevance of all these attempts to challenge the `natural’ state of capitalist work relations?
• What would an alternative model look like?
• What would be the state’s role in promoting this alternative?
• Should be workers’ organisations actively supporting factories occupations and self-management?
• Are there feasible, sustainable long-term alternatives to conventional capitalist organisations?
• How market competition influences this new model?
• Which type of values will it be supporting?
• Who is going to take decisions in the new organisations? Will there be any leaders?
• What role, if any, for managers?
• How will tasks be distributed among workers?

We would welcome contributions from both academics and labour activists with different background and interdisciplinary approach based on worldwide examples of alternative forms of work organisations.

We would be happy to discuss initial ideas for papers with potential contributors.

Presented papers will be considered for an edited book on Alternative Work Organisation to be published by Palgrave in Spring 2011.

For further details see ILPC 2010 at: http://www.ilpc.org.uk/ILPC2010.aspx

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

THE JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES

ISSN 1740-2743

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is a free e-journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS)

IEPS is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing policy analysis and development of education policy. It is at: http://www.jceps.com

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Volume 7, Number 1:
June 2009

Michael Viola, University of California Los Angeles, USA
The Filipinization of Critical Pedagogy: Widening the Scope of Critical Educational Theory

Mike Cole, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln, England
On ‘white supremacy’ and caricaturing, misrepresenting and dismissing Marx and Marxism: a response to David Gillborn’s ‘Who’s Afraid of Critical Race Theory in Education’

Guy Senese, Northern Arizona University, USA
‘Like the Other Kings Have:’ a theory of sovereignty and the persistence of inequality in education

Helena Sheehan, Dublin City University, Ireland
Contradictory transformations: observations on the intellectual dynamics of South African universities

Anastasia Liasidou, Roehampton University, London, England
Critical Policy Research and Special Education Policymaking: A Policy Trajectory Approach

Antoinette Errante, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
Structure, Agency and Cultural Capital as Control over Knowledge Production in Policy Formation: Mozambique’s Education Sector Strategic Plan

Angela C. de Siqueira, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil
Higher Education Reform in Brazil: Reinforcing Marketization

Pierre W. Orelus, New Mexico State University, USA
Beyond Political Rhetoric and Discourse: What type of educational, socio- economic, and political change should educators expect of President Barack Obama?

Sara Zamir, Ben-Gurion University at Eilat, Israel, and Sara Hauphtman, Achva Academic College of Education, Israel
The portrayal of the Jewish figure in Literary Texts Included in the Present Matriculation Curriculum in Hebrew for Students of the Arab Sector in Israel

Phoebe Moore, University of Salford, England
UK Education, Employability, and Everyday Life

Rebecca A. Goldstein, Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA, and Andrew R. Beutel, Ramapo Ridge Middle School, Mahwah, New Jersey, USA
‘Soldier of Democracy’ or ‘Enemy of the State’? The rhetorical construction of teacher through ‘No Child Left Behind’

Stephen Philion, St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, USA
Is Race Really Controversial in the University Classroom?

Michelle Early Torregano and Patrick Shannon, Penn State University, Pennsylvania, USA
Educational Greenfield: A Critical Policy Analysis of Plans to Transform New Orleans Public Schools

Dennis Beach and Margata Carlen, University College Borås, Sweden
New partnerships – New interests: An ethnographic investigation some of the effects of employer involvement in trade union education

Rodolfo Leyva, Kings College London, University of London, UK
No Child Left Behind: A Neoliberal Repackaging of Social Darwinism

Ioannis Efstathiou, Institute of Education, University of London, UK
Enhancing Students’ Critical Awareness in a Second Chance School in Greece: Reality or Wishful Thinking?

Mompati Mino Polelo, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana
The Small State, Markets and Tertiary Education Reform in a Globalised Knowledge Economy: Decoding Policy Texts in Botswana’s Tertiary Education Reform

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The Institute for Education Policy Studies

Website Update – May 2009

The Institute for Education Policy Studies is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing analysis of education policy. It is at http://www.ieps.org.uk . The Institute seeks to develop Marxist analysis of policy, theory, ideology and policy development. It also seeks to develop Marxist transformative education theory, analysis and policy analyse and develop socialist/Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives, including Freirean perspectives. The IEPS and its journal address issues of Social Class, ‘Race’, Gender and Capital/ism; Critical Pedagogy; New Public Managerialism and Academic / non-Academic labour, and Empowerment/ Disempowerment.

The IEPS critiques global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, and postmodernist analyses and policy, together with New Public Managerialism . It was set up in 1989 and hosted the formation of the Hillcole Group of Radical Left Educators (1989-2001). The IEPS organises and publicises national conferences and also publishes on-line papers by Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist writers.

IEPS publishes an online journal, the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (http://www.jceps.com/) twice a year. The editors of JCEPS are Prof Dave Hill (Chief/ Managing Editor), Prof Pablo Gentile (Latin America) and Prof Peter McLaren (North America). The journal welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer juried international journal.

The Institute for Education Policy Studies has recently updated its web site. In particular, the biographical details of the Institute’s key writers have been updated, for: Dave Hill, Glenn Rikowski, Paula Allman, Mike Cole, Peter McLaren and Sharhzad Mojab. You can view these updates at: http://www.ieps.org.uk/iepsbios.php

 

The Institute for Education Policy Studies: http://www.ieps.org.uk/

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Jammin for Inclusion: Benefit Concert for Communities Empowerment Network

Ms Dynamite, Bashy, Linton Kwesi-Johnson and Maroon Town come together at Brixton’s ‘Jamm’ on March 25th to celebrate and raise funds for the work of Communities Empowerment Network (CEN), a London based charity.
 
CEN has spent the last 10 years reintegrating excluded pupils back into mainstream education.  CEN deals with an average of 500 exclusion cases a year and has a virtually 100% success in reintegration.

In 2001, Martin Narey, then Director of the Prison Service, stated that ‘the 13,000 children being excluded from school each year might as well be given a ticket to join the prison system somewhere down the line’.  In just about every urban area in Britain, young black people are disproportionately represented in the prison system relative to their numbers in the local population.

Ms Dynamite, Bashy  and Linton Kwesi-Johnson
have put their name to this event because they want to highlight the success of CEN in getting permanently excluded pupils back into mainstream, full-time education as well as acknowledge the immense potential that exists in today’s youth by being on hand to meet and chat to young people.

 Ms Dynamite: R&B and hip song singer-rapper, Mercury Music Prize, double Brit Award and three times MOBO Awards winner. Currently back in business with a new track ‘Bad Gyal’ 2009 is setting up to see a lot more of one of the UK’s finest

 Ashley Thomas AKA BASHY is the hottest artists to emerge in a brand new wave of fresh and exciting British UK musical talent. With over I million hits on youtube for both tracks released independantly in 2008,  an appearance at last years Glastonbury, 2009 promises to be a huge year for this outstanding talent with the release of his first album ‘Catch Me If You Can’

Linton Kwesi-Johnson: is known and revered as the world’s first reggae poet and has recorded several classic reggae albums. He recently became only the second living poet and the first Black poet to have his work published in Penguin’s Modern Classics series under the title ‘Mi Revalueshanary Fren’

Maroon Town: 9 piece globe trotting ska barnstormers who amongst normal band activities also play in high security prisons from Jamaica to Kazakhstan. In May they are off to Tajikisan to perform and collaborate with local artists.

DJ Gerry Lyseight co-founded Brixton’s mythical Mambo Inn; DJed around the world; at festivals such as Glastonbury, Womad and The Big Chill; with everyone from Tito Puente to King Sunny Ade; compiled many albums; hosted radio programmes featuring everyone from Charlie Watts to Rufus Wainwright to Mr. Scruff to Bebel Gilberto to the late Kirsty MacColl.

Some of the young people CEN has supported and reintegrated back into full time education will also perform.

The evening’s compere will be Eugene Skeef composer, poet, percussionist and workshop leader.

Event: ‘Jammin for Inclusion’
Date:    Wednesday 25th March 2009       
Time:   7 till late
Venue: Jamm, 261 Brixton Road, Brixton SW9 2LH 
Price:   £8.00

Note to Editors
For further information contact Deuan German at CEN:  020 8432 0530 or 07958 546 113. Email: deuangerman@hotmail.com

For tickets:  http://www.ticketweb.co.uk/user/?region=gb_london&query=detail&event=313684&interface=

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk