Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Empire

Antonio Negri

NEW LINES OF ALLIANCE, NEW SPACES OF LIBERTY

New Book Out Now!

By Félix Guattari and Antonio Negri
Mayfly Books: http://www.mayflybooks.org

Available online for free and in print: http://mayflybooks.org/?page_id=65

New Lines of Alliance, New Spaces of Liberty, by Félix Guattari and Antonio Negri

“The project: to rescue ‘communism’ from its own disrepute. Once invoked as the liberation of work through mankind’s collective creation, communism has instead stifled humanity. We who see in communism the liberation of both collective and individual possibilities must reverse that regimentation of thought and desire which terminates the individual….”

Thus begins the extraordinary collaboration between Félix Guattari and Antonio Negri, written at the dawn of the 1980s, in the wake of the crushing of the autonomous movements of the previous decade. Setting out Guattari and Negri diagnose with incisive prescience transformations of the global economy and theorize new forms of alliance and organization: mutant machines of subjectivation and social movement.

Prefiguring his collaboration with Michael Hardt, Negri and Guattari enact a singular hybridization of political and philosophical traditions, brining together psychiatry, political analysis, semiotics, aesthetics, and philosophy. Against the workings of an increasingly integrated world capitalism, they raise the banners of singularity, autonomy, and freedom to search out new routes for subversion.

This newly expanded edition includes previously untranslated materials and a new introduction by Matteo Mandarini.

“After the highpoint of the subversive decade 1968-1977, Italian autonomist Marxism and French theory of desire meet at the intersection of two different methodologies of subjectivation. Social recomposition of the working class and molecular proliferation of desire merge, and together open a new space for theory and for social action. While the ideologies of the twentieth century are falling, Toni Negri and Félix Guattari trace the lines of a new vision of autonomy.” –– Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi

Published in collaboration with Autonomedia and Minor Compositions

See also ‘New Lines of Alliance: Release Event’ for more details: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/11/20/new-lines-of-alliance-new-spaces-of-liberty-release-event/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Mediation

MEDIATIONS: VOLUME 25 NUMBER 1

‘Marx, Politics … and Punk’

Mediations 25.1 is out. The web site has some minor improvements, the PDF edition some major ones. If the links below don’t work, just navigate to mediationsjournal.org.

Please distribute widely!

MARX, POLITICS… AND PUNK

Volume 25, No. 1Fall 2010

Editors’ Note

Contributors

ARTICLES

Fredric Jameson: A New Reading of Capital

Is Capital about labor, or unemployment? Does Marxism have a theory of the political, or is it better off without one? Fredric Jameson previews the argument of his forthcoming book, Representing Capital.

Anna Kornbluh: On Marx’s Victorian Novel

As out of place as Marx himself might have been in Victorian England, Capital is less out of place than one might have thought among Victorian novels. But this does not have to mean that its mode of truth is literary. Anna Kornbluh explores the tropes that propel Capital in order to establish the novel relationship Marx produces between world and text.

Roland Boer: Marxism and Eschatology Reconsidered

The variations on the thesis of Marxism’s messianism are too many to count. But is it plausible to imagine that Marx or Engels took up Jewish or Christian eschatology, in any substantial form, into their thought? Roland Boer weighs the evidence.

Reiichi Miura: What Kind of Revolution Do You Want? Punk, the Contemporary Left, and Singularity

What does punk have to do with Empire? What does singularity have to do with identity? What does the logic of rock ‘n’ roll aesthetics have to do with a politics of representation? What does the concept of the multitude have to do with neoliberalism? The answer to all these questions, argues Reiichi Miura, is a lot more than you might think.

Alexei Penzin: The Soviets of the Multitude: On Collectivity and Collective Work: An Interview with Paolo Virno

One of the principle conundrums that confronts the theorization of the multitude is the relationship it entails between individual and collective. Alexei Penzin, of the collective Chto Delat / What Is To Be Done? Interviews Paolo Virno.

BOOK REVIEWS

Nataša Kovačević: New Money in the Old World: On Europe’s Neoliberal Disenchantment

What is left of the promise that was Europe? Does anything Utopian remain of the European project, or is it destined to become just another neoliberal power? Nataša Kovačević reviews Perry Anderson’s The New Old World.

Kevin Floyd: Queer Principles of Hope

In the “marketplace of ideas,” Marxism and queer studies are often presumed to be divergent and even opposed discourses. Contemporary work in both fields makes the case for a convergence. Kevin Floyd reviews José Esteban Muñoz’s Cruising Utoptia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity.

Madeleine Monson-Rosen: Under a Pink Flag

Is there a feminine relation to copyright in the contemporary period? Madeleine Monson-Rosen reviews Caren Irr’s Pink Pirates: Contemporary Women Writers and Copyright.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Afghanistan

MALALAI JOYA AND NOAM CHOMSKY: THE CASE FOR WITHDRAWAL FROM AFGHANISTAN

Friday, March 25, 5:30 pm
Harvard University, Radcliffe Quadrangle
Student Organization Center at the Hilles Building (SOCH)
59 Shepard Street (Shepard/Garden), Harvard Red Line, Directions below
Students FREE, $5 suggested donation, no one turned away
RSVP and invite friends on: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=151499161576478&notif_t=event_wall#wall_posts  
Seating is first come, first served
Contact: sarah@haymarketbooks.org

“The bravest woman in Afghanistan” –BBC News

“Joya’s life has been singular and heroic” –New York Times Book Review

“Chomsky is a global phenomenon. Šhe may be the most widely read American voice on foreign policy on the planet” –New York Times Book Review

Malalai Joya is the author of A Woman Among Warlords: The Extraordinary Story of a Woman Who Dared Raise Her Voice

Noam Chomsky is the author of Hopes and Prospects, Gaza in Crisis, Hegemony or Survival and many other titles.
*****
AT A CONSTITUTIONAL ASSEMBLY in Kabul in 2003, Malalai Joya stood up and denounced her country’s powerful U.S./NATO-backed warlords. She was only 25 years old. Two years later, she became the youngest person elected to Afghanistan’s new Parliament. In 2007, she was suspended for her persistent criticism of the warlords and drug barons. Beloved by her people for daring to speak out against U.S.–backed war criminals that dominate the government, Joya has survived at least 4 assassination attempts. Having come face-to-face with the brutality of war, Joya has been demanding an end to the occupation for years. In her book A Woman Among Warlords, just out in paperback, Joya explains the situation of ordinary Afghans: “We are caught between two enemies – the Taliban on one side and the U.S./NATO forces and their warlord allies on the other.” Please join us during Joya’s rare visit to the U.S., as she is joined by world-renowned linguist and political dissident Noam Chomsky, internationally recognized as one of the most critically engaged public intellectuals alive today.
*****
SPONSORED by http://www.haymarketbooks.org Haymarket Books, http://www.harvardpsc.com/ Harvard Palestine Solidarity Committee, http://www.justicewithpeace.org/node/2225 UJP Afghanistan/Pakistan Task Force, http://www.masspeaceaction.org Massachusetts Peace Action, http://nationalpeaceconference.org/ United National Antiwar Committee
*****
DIRECTIONS to SOCH Building:
Walking Directions from Harvard Square: Located on the corner of Garden and Shepard Streets, the SOCH is a 10 minute walk.  Follow Garden St. past the Sheraton Commander hotel.  The main entrance is located on the right side of the building facing the Radcliffe Quadrangle.

Parking Information: Lots surrounding the SOCH are reserved for Harvard affiliates with designated parking passes.  Similarly, parking on streets adjacent to the SOCH is for City of Cambridge residents only. Visitors may purchase a daily permit online at https://www2.uos.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/permit/purchase.pl  

Shuttle Service: Harvard University Shuttle Services are available to all members of the Harvard community with valid ID.  The SOCH is located at the Quad stop.
*****
CONTACT: mailto:sarah@haymarketbooks.org
*****
NATIONAL TOUR DATES : http://www.afghanwomensmission.org/  

*****
—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Imperialism

IMPERIALISM, EMPIRE AND GENOCIDE

Please attend this excellent event and spread the word!

Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London

Workshop Series: ‘Imperialism, Empire and Genocide’ 14th March 2pm-4pm

Venue: Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House, Malet Street, London

The British Empire seems to be making a come back. Historians, politicians and journalists now speak about the positive aspects of colonialism and empire. During a state visit to East Africa in 2005 the then Chancellor Gordon Brown, commented that Britain must stop apologising for its colonial past and, instead, celebrate its achievements. He said, ‘I’ve talked to many people on my visit to Africa and the days of Britain having to apologise for its colonial history are over. We should celebrate much of our past rather than apologise for it.’ Some scholarly work has followed the fashion suggesting that empire is more necessary in the 21st century than ever before. The new approach to the British Empire insists that we must undertake a balance view of the positive contributions made to instilling democratic values, development and political institutions. 

This series of workshops will take a different approach. Speakers will shed light, empirically and conceptually, on the tortured relationship between empire and modernity, colonialism and progress, disclosing the story and contemporary legacy of colonial genocide, imperial conquest and environmental destruction.

Speakers: Professor John Newsinger, Richard Gott and Dr Tom Lawson.

Professor John Newsinger (Professor of Modern History at Bath Spa University), Author of The Blood Never Dried: A People’s History of the British Empire, Orwell’s Politics, United Irishman, Rebel City, Dangerous Men: The SAS and Popular Culture, British Counterinsurgency (new edition 2012). John Newsinger will examine histories of the British Empire, the uses to which they have been put and the crimes they neglect and leave out.

Richard Gott (former Latin America correspondent and features editor for The Guardian, currently an honorary research fellow at the Institute for the Study of the Americas, University of London). Author of Hugo Chávez and the Bolivarian Revolution (2005),Cuba: A New History (2004). Richard Gott will be talking about his most recent book, to be published in the autumn, entitled “Britain’s Empire: Resistance, Repression and Revolt”. The book is conceived as a revisionist history of Empire, written from the perspective of the subject peoples.

Dr Tom Lawson (Reader in History, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Winchester). Author of The Church of England and the Holocaust: Christianity, Memory and Nazism (2006) and Debates on the Holocaust (2010). Tom Lawson will be talking about his latest research into the colonisation of Tasmania where the British government is often portrayed as the benign protector of the Aborigines, unable to curb the destructive urges of the settler population. However Tom will argue this paper argues that what amounted to a genocidal policy was both formally approved in Downing Street, and emerged from an imperial culture that began at home.

This is a free event, however, to confirm attendance please email Ms Olga Jimenez, Events Manager
olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Gaza

PAST IS PRESENT: SETTLER COLONIALISM IN PALESTINE

7th Annual Conference
5- 6 March | Brunei Gallery | School of Oriental and African Studies – London

Organised by SOAS Palestine Society and hosted by the London Middle East Institute

For over a century, Zionism has subjected Palestine and Palestinians to a structural and violent form of destruction, dispossession, land appropriation, and erasure in the pursuit of a new colonial Israeli society. Too often, this Palestine ‘Question’ has been framed as unique; a national, religious, and/or liberation struggle with little semblance to colonial conflicts elsewhere. The two-day conference, Past is Present: Settler Colonialism in Palestine, seeks to reclaim settler colonialism as the central paradigm from which to understand Palestine. It asks: what are the socio-political, economic and spatial processes and mechanisms of settler colonialism in Palestine, and what are the logics underpinning it? By unearthing the histories and geographies of the Palestinian experience of settler colonialism, this conference does not only chart possibilities for understanding Palestine within comparative settler colonial analyses. Rather, it also seeks to break open frameworks binding Palestine, re-align the Palestinian movement within a universal history of decolonisation, and imagine new possibilities for Palestinian resistance, solidarity and common struggle.

Day One: Saturday, 5th March 2011

Registration and Refreshments: 9.00-9.30

Opening and Keynote: 9.30-10.15
Hassan Hakimian – London Middle East Institute

Not Another Racism: Zionism, a Logic of Elimination
Patrick Wolfe – La Trobe University

Session One – Empire, Settler Colonialism and Zionism: 10.45-12.15

Chair: Nelida Fuccaro – School of Oriental and African Studies

Playing the Zionist Card: The British Empire and the Middle East
John Newsinger – Bath Spa University

Literature of Settler Societies: Albert Camus, S. Yizhar, and Amos Oz
Gabriel Piterberg – University of California, Los Angeles

The Settler Colonialism Paradigm and its History in Revolutionary Palestinian Resistance Literature: Poetry and Politics
Naseer Aruri – University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Refreshments: 12.15-12.30

Session Two – Zionism Destroys to Replace: 12.30-14.00

Chair: Laleh Khalili – School of Oriental and African Studies

The Palestinian Labour Market and the Politics of Zionist Settler Colonialism
Gershon Shafir – University of California, San Diego

The Erasure of the Native
Ilan Pappe – University of Exeter

The Second Phase of the Settler Colonial Conquest of Palestine: The 1967 Allon Plan and the Search for a Zionist ‘Settlement’
Gilbert Achcar – School of Oriental and African Studies

Lunch: 14.00-14.45

Session Three – Zionism Controls the Native: 14.45-16.15

Chair: Ruba Salih – School of Oriental and African Studies

Chronicles of a Cultural Destruction: The Appropriation of Palestinian Knowledge during the 1948 War
Gish Amit – Ben-Gurion University

Indigenous Citizens and the Contradictions of Status amongst Palestinians in Israel
As’ad Ghanem – Ibn Khaldun, The Arab Association for Research and Development

Frontier Wars and Robotic Colonisation
Eyal Weizman – Goldsmiths College

Refreshments: 16.15-16.30

Session Four – A Political Economy of Settler Colonialism: 16.30-18.00

Chair: Elisa van Waeyenberge – School of Oriental and African Studies

A ‘Bad Lot’? Palestinian Businessmen and the British Colonial State
Sherene Seikaly – American University of Cairo

The Exploitation of the Palestinian Economy by Israel
Shir Hever – Alternative Information Center

Palestinian Capitalism, Regional Accumulation Processes and Implications for Liberation Strategy
Adam Hanieh – School of Oriental and African Studies

Day Two: Sunday 6th March 2011

Registration and Refreshments: 10.30-11.00

Keynote: 11.00-12.00

Letter from Gaza: On Colonialism, Capitalism and Resistance
Rabah Mohanna – Palestinian Legislative Council, Gaza

Session Five – Indigenous Life and the Reverberations of Settler Colonialism: 12.00-13.30

Chair: Lori Allen – University of Cambridge

Counterfeit Citizenship: On the Politics of Property in Nahr El-Bared
Monika Halkort – Queen’s University, Belfast

Ethnic Cleansing in the Naqab: The Razings of the Bedouin Village of Al-‘Araqib
Mansour Nsasra – University of Exeter

Policing, Self-Policing and Indigenous Collaboration
Mouin Rabbani – Institute of Palestine Studies

Lunch: 13.30-14.30

Session Six – Overcoming Zionism, Dismantling Settler Colonialism:  14.30-16.00

Chair: Jan Jananayagam – Tamils Against Genocide

Decolonising Settler Colonialisms
Lorenzo Veracini – Swinburne University of Technology

The Power and Pitfalls of a Support Movement: Campaigning Against the Jewish National Fund
Selma James – International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network

Towards Common Liberation
Mezna Qato – University of Oxford

Refreshments: 16.00-16.15

Roundtable – Unsettling (Settler) Colonialism: 16.15-18.15

Tickets

Please note SEATS ARE LIMITED – book in advance

Price: £30 (£20 concessions, and £40 organisations) – all tickets include lunch and refreshments

To buy your tickets Online at: – http://www.soaspalsoc.org

By cheque: Send cheques payable to SOAS Palestine Society with attached note of email address to: SOAS Palestine Society, Thornhaugh Street, London, WC1H 0XG

Location:
SOAS Brunei Gallery
Thornhaugh Street
Russell Square
London, WC1H 0XG

Contact:
palestineconference@gmail.com
http://www.soaspalsoc.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Modernism

RETHINKING THE MODERN

Rethinking the Modern: Colonialism, Empire, and Slavery
11-12 July, 2011, Birmingham Midland Institute

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 25th February 2011.
See website for abstract submission details.

For more information on the conference, details on the streams, and contact details for stream co-ordinators see: http://www.warwick.ac.uk/go/rethinkingthemodern.

For general queries, email Gurminder K Bhambra (g.k.bhambra@warwick.ac.uk) or Lucy Mayblin (l.mayblin@warwick.ac.uk).

In recent times, a number of academics and commentators have sought to offer a revisionist history of colonialism. This history presents colonialism as either something that was not as bad as some others make out, something that actually made the modern world and so was essentially a good thing from which the current search for a new global order should have much to learn; or as something to be understood simply in terms of networks of circulation and distribution. The sense of colonialism as a wretched episode of human history that continues to distort the life chances of those unfortunate enough to live under its legacies is slowly being eroded. Similar attempted revisions seek to alter public understandings of modern transatlantic slavery and its continuing legacies. We believe that the historical processes of imperialism, colonialism and slavery shaped, and continue to shape, our common world in ways which have been and continue to be problematic. This conference seeks to confront head-on these new revisionist histories and provide the space for a more adequate understanding of these processes and their legacies as they continue into today. The key questions and topic that this conference seeks to address include the following:

*   In what ways do the standard forms of knowledge production in the academy undermine the lived thought and experience of the colonized and their descendents and, by extension, impoverish our understandings of the human condition?
*   Can there be a ‘global history’ outside of a history of colonialism, imperialism, and slavery?
*   How are minorities identified, constructed, and governed within modernity and colonialism?
*   How do we address the current fashion for regarding colonialism as simply a network of practices?
*   To what extent is the rehabilitation of (old) empire associated with the legitimisation of new forms of imperialism?
There will be 12 key streams in the conference and abstracts should be submitted under these
streams:

  • Imperial Enlightenment and Critical Thought
  • Coloniality / Modernity
  • The Place of Minorities in Modernity and Coloniality
  • Recovering Forgotten Histories
  • Decolonial Thought and Other Philosophies
  • Slavery and its Legacies
  • Migration and Empire: Voluntary and Forced
  • Colonial Desires and Eastern Empires
  • Is Global History / Sociology Possible?
  • From Empire to Neo-Imperialism
  • Reassessing Anti-Colonial and Liberation Movements
  • The Colonial Context of the European Integration Project, Past and Present

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Island

DECOLONIZATION IN THE THIRD WORLD: CHALLENGES, HOPES AND LIMITATIONS

International Conference
Lucienne-Cnockaert Chair and the Department of History, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)
17-18 November 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS
_______________

In Africa, Latin America and Asia, the end of European colonial domination is a period of particular interest as it leads, almost invariably, to a new era characterized by uncertainty and the unknown. Upon achieving independence, previously colonized countries are often confronted with unprecedented cultural, ideological and political upheaval. This is usually indicative of an effort to exorcise the country’s colonial heritage, to rebuild the nation, and to look for ways and means of renewing the culture and social and economic development. The management of independence in the new Third World countries deals not only with which ideological model is best for the development of the nation, but also with establishing proactive socio-cultural, educational and economic policies. These policies are meant to build or re-build societies and nation-states, and to re-establish national identity, as well as combat the inequality and economic under-development inherent to colonialism. However, it would seem that despite important changes and significant results, postcolonial policies must contend with a number of limitations due, in part, to the persistence of prior dependence, to the nature of the political regimes in place and to new forms of economic dependence.

In consideration of the fiftieth anniversary of the decolonization of several African countries, the Lucienne-Cnockaert Research Chair in Modern History of European and Africa will be holding a conference entitled “Decolonization in the Third World: Challenges, Hopes and Limitations” on 17-18 November 2011. This conference will be an opportunity to study the magnitude and complexity of the responsibilities and challenges, and the various administrative paths chosen by the post-colonial societies of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The aim of this conference is first and foremost to examine the objectives and challenges of cultural, educational and economic reforms in the Third World after attaining independence. Researchers will be invited to examine the nature of interracial and inter-religious relations, as well as the role of minority groups and demographically diverse populations (women, youth, ethnic groups, descendents of colonizers, regional groups, etc.) in the process of identity-building and socio-economic development within the new nation-states. A critical evaluation of the various reforms undertaken in postcolonial societies will allow researchers to take note of their limitations and their success, however limited the latter may appear to be. Finally, particular attention will be given to the various types of relations established between Third World countries and the Western world as a whole, and with international organizations and institutions such as UNESCO, the UN, the IMF, the Francophonie and the Commonwealth.

We welcome conference proposals touching upon the following themes:
– Cultural and economic aspects of colonialism
– Discourses and intellectual trajectories of the leaders of  independence movements
– The meaning of national symbols: national anthems, mottos and flags
– The nature of the postcolonial State and the ideologies of independence
– Cultural policies established in order to restore a national identity
– Relationships between native populations and the descendents of colonizers
– Policies respecting women and/or minorities
– Studies of particular concepts or ideologies (pan-Africanism, pan-Asianism, non-alignment, post- colonialism, socialism, etc.)
– Management of regional, ethnic and religious diversity
– Economic planning and development
– Neo-colonialism and international relationships between North and South
– International relationships amongst the South
– Interventions of the IMF and the World Bank: challenges and results
– Memories of independence

Researchers, professors and students interested in participating in this conference are invited to send proposals approximately 300 words in length before 1st March 2011.

Registration fees for this conference are $150 CAD. Travel and accommodation expenses may be reimbursed depending on funding received from granting agencies.

Please send proposals along with a brief CV by email to Professor Patrick Dramé: patrick.drame@usherbrooke.ca
http://www.pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/

The conference will take place at the Université de Sherbrooke on 17-18 November 2011. Papers and presentations may be in either French or English.

Program Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Departments, Université de Sherbrooke and Bishop’s University
Élikia M’BOKOLO, École des Hautes Études en Sciences sociales, Paris
Samir SAUL, History Department, Université de Montréal
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Ibrahima THIOUB, History Department, Université de Dakar
Christopher GOSCHA, History Department, Université du Québec à Montréal
Maurice DEMERS, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Jean-Bruno MUKANYA KANINDA-MUANA, History Department, Université de Montréal

Organizing Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Pascal SCALLON-CHOUINARD, Ph.D. candidate, Université de Sherbrooke
Maxime LANDRY-VALLÉE, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke
Alexander MAJOR, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke

Contact:
Pascal Scallon-Chouinard
Université de Sherbrooke
Email: Pascal.Scallon-Chouinard@USherbrooke.ca
Web: http://pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/index.php?id=2

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Antonio Negri

ANTONIO NEGRI IN ENGLISH ONLINE

We have a method for the destruction of work. We are in search of a positive measure of non-work, a measure of our liberation from that disgusting slavery from which the bosses have always profited, and which the official socialist movement has always imposed on us like some sort of title of nobility. No, we really cannot call ourselves ‘socialists’, for we can no longer accept your disgrace.

At long last,
We are all bastards.
And that most venerable man which I
Did call my father, was I know not where
When I was stamp’d.

—Antonio Negri, Domination and Sabotage

See Negri’s Review of Change the World Without Taking Power, by John Holloway, and much more at … http://antonionegriinenglish.wordpress.com/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Imperialism

NEW (IN)SECURTIES: EMPIRE, ENVIRONMENT AND EMPLOYMENT

Alternate Routes 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS

We are living in increasingly insecure times. In the face of drastic climate change, global economic uncertainty and imperialist wars with no clear battlefield or determined timeline, a good many social scientists have concluded that insecurity, broadly defined and in its many forms, is the new norm. For the next issue, Alternate Routes invites submissions on the various ways in which (in)security has manifested in the new millennium. How has state repression been employed and under what pretexts? What lessons may be drawn from policing dissent? How does ecological degradation threaten our — food, labour, biospheric, geopolitical and physical — security? In what ways are planetary life and the future of the earth threatened? To what extent has labour market restructuring made work more precarious? What groups and persons are most vulnerable to insecure forms of work and labour? How have labour unions been impacted? How may we understand empire today? What relationships are there between war, terror and foreign policy?

Alternate Routes is also interested in Media, Arts and Cultural contributions with political and/or academic merits. This may include works of poetry, verse, photography, graphic design and media analyses. We likewise welcome reviews of books, theater, art exhibits, documentaries and cinema. Finally, Alternate Routes appreciates rejoinders and/or reflections on previously published material. The deadline for submissions is 15 March 2011. For more information on Alternate Routes and our submission policy, please visit http://www.AlternateRoutes.ca. All submissions should be sent directly to editor@alternateroutes.ca. We look forward to your submissions!

Carleton University, Sociology & Anthropology,  1125 Colonel By Drive,  Ottawa, Canada,  K1S 5B6
Phone: 613-520-2600 (ext: 8316)   Email: editor@alternateroutes.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM MIDDLE EAST SPECIAL ISSUE

EXTENDED CALL FOR PAPERS

Historical Materialism has extended the deadline for proposal submissions to its special issue on the Middle East, conceived broadly to include: the Arab world from the Atlantic to the Gulf, Israel/Palestine, Iran and Turkey. The new deadline for abstracts is the 10th of November 2010.

HM is a Marxist journal, appearing four times a year, based in London. HM asserts that, notwithstanding the variety of its practical and theoretical articulations, Marxism constitutes the most fertile conceptual framework for analysing social phenomena with an eye to their overhaul. In its selection of materials, HM does not favour any one tendency, tradition or variant of Marxism.

In the contemporary period, the Middle East remains a key flashpoint of global politics, rent by occupation, imperialism and the fallout of global economic crisis. In this context the insights of Marxism, in all its variations, could provide a much-needed corrective to the a-historical and elite-focused theorizing that typifies analysis of the Middle East. Aiming to publish such analysis, the HM special issue will unite a range of innovative Marxist work on the Middle East across a broad spectrum of academic disciplines, to reflect critically  on the region’s social, political and economic development.

Having received a number of excellent submissions already, contributions are invited on topics such as the following:

• The historical development and contemporary political economy of the Middle East particularly the Gulf and the Arab world outside of Palestine, embracing the development of neo-liberalism, new confluences of capital and capital- state relationships.     

• Questions of regime transition in authoritarian states and the role of workers and contemporary social movements.   

• A comparative analysis of the social and political struggle of women across different countries in the Middle East. 

• Patterns of migrant-worker flows in the Middle East, the role of remittances in national economies, and the potential forms of organizing in these migrant communities in the region.

• Urbanism and the politics of space in the cities of the Middle East.     

• Assessments of developments in Marxist theory or of the work of prominent Marxists within the region

Potential contributors are invited to submit a short abstract (max.  200 words) outlining the key arguments of their prospective paper to Jamie Allinson, Sebastian Budgen and Adam Hanieh at: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk  by November 10, 2010. Final papers (max. 12,000 words length) will be expected to be submitted by 1 May 2011 and the journal will be published in early 2012.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

Alternative Culture

 

COMMONALITIES CONFERENCE

Please join us for “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Contemporary Italian Thought,” a conference sponsored by the journal diacritics. The event, to be held at Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010, will bring together a number of leading thinkers around the theme and question of the common. Participants will include Kevin Attell, Franco “Bifo” Berardi, Remo Bodei, Bruno Bosteels, Cesare Casarino, Roberto Esposito, Ida Dominijanni, Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri (by video conference), and Karen Pinkus. More information can be found at the conference website (www.commonconf.com) or by contacting Professor Timothy Campbell (tcc9@cornell.edu)

Il manifesto
For the better part of a decade the position of Italian thought in the Anglo-American academy has increasingly grown in importance. From issues as far ranging as bioethics and bioengineering, to euthanasia, to globalization, to theorizing gender, to the war on terror, works originating in Italy have played a significant, perhaps even the dominant, role in setting the terms and conditions of these debates. Indeed it might well be that no contemporary thought more than Italian enjoys greater success today in the United States. If twenty years of postmodernism and poststructuralism were in large measure the result of French exports to the United States — Derrida, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault — today a number of Italian philosophical exports are giving rise to a theoretical dispositif that goes under a variety of names: post-Marxist, posthuman, or most often biopolitical. Yet the fact that Italian thought enjoys such enormous success in the United States and elsewhere begs an important question, one put to me polemically recently by a prominent Italian philosopher. Is there really such a thing as contemporary Italian thought? And if there is what in the world do its proponents have in common?

By way of responding, it might be useful to recall some details about the recent reception of Italian thought in the American academy. In the aftermath of the end of the postmodern — which a number of American observers savored as spelling the end of the use and abuse of philosophy by large numbers of literary critics — two works appeared in English within a span of three years: Giorgio Agamben’s ‘Homo Sacer’ and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s ‘Empire’. Stepping into the void left by the departure of what in the United States was known as “theory,” these works made a number of bold theoretical claims about the relation between political power and individual life (Agamben) and globalization and collective life (Hardt and Negri), claims that uncannily – sometimes almost prophetically – addressed some of the most pressing issues in our current state of affairs. Equally a number of important works of Italian feminism appeared over roughly the same period. Works by Adriana Cavarero and Rosi Braidotti, among others, deeply influenced a whole generation of American theorists in fields like gender studies, political philosophy, and law. Looking back it’s difficult to overestimate the influence of all these figures when accounting for the intellectual success of Italian thought today. Certainly it became possible for other voices to be heard, Paolo Virno, and more recently Franco Berardi, Roberto Esposito, and Maurizio Lazzarato among others.

But to take up again the question at hand: what do authors as seemingly different as Agamben and Negri, Berardi and Esposito, Braidotti and Bodei, or Cavarero and Virno have in common outside of the mere fact of writing in Italian? Beyond a common language, is there, for example, such a thing as a common Italian philosophical tradition of which they are all a part? Some, most notably, Mario Perniola, would say yes, one found in the elements of repetition, transmission, mixture, and body that together forged an Italian philosophical culture over the last 300 years. Deleuze and Guattari would have said no, arguing that Italy has historically “lacked a milieu” for philosophy. For them the reason for this lack could be found in Italy’s proximity to the Holy See, which continually aborted philosophy across the peninsula, reducing Italian thought to mere rhetoric, philosophy’s shadow, and allowing only for the occasional “comet” to briefly light up the philosophical sky. Yet what if Italian thought today does in fact enjoy a milieu? What “event” or “events” in the recent past might have fashioned a milieu for the emergence of Italian thought? What would the features of that milieu look like?

Undoubtedly, the decade-long Italian 1968 would have played the decisive role. The votes on abortion, the emergence of counterculture and student and feminist movements, and changes in labor and production all deeply changed the space in which politics — as well as philosophy – was practiced. Indeed one of the central features of the Italian 1968 was precisely the emphasis on politics as philosophy and philosophy as a form (among others) of politics. We can see this in the place 1968 and 1977 awarded political militancy; in the increasing prominence given to questions of subjectivization; and more broadly in the birth of new forms of social and political life separated from those that had previously dominated.

Yet Italy’s long 1968 wasn’t enough on its own. It was only with 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall that politics and philosophy truly begin to pass intensely into each other, to stay with the language of Deleuze and Guattari. Although it may seem less the case for those writing in Italy, when seen from the outside 1989 was experienced as trauma more in Italy than in the rest of Europe. The result forced a number of thinkers to re-examine the fundamental political and philosophical categories that had underpinned decades if not centuries of thought: what meaning would the end of a certain form of common life have for politics, for philosophy, for culture? Such a calling into question of the previous understanding of the common had the effect of reterritorializing politics and philosophy under new terms and new problematics, one of which will be “life,” broadly speaking. It is only when 1968 is considered as the motor for deterritorialization of the common in political theory and philosophy and 1989 as the turn toward its reterritorialization as newly mapped by (among other things) biopolitical theory that something like a milieu is constructed for contemporary Italian thought.

This is not to say that proponents of Italian thought share the same understanding of the common or even celebrate it. Clearly they do not. Yet the centrality of the common raises a number of questions about Italian thought and Italian public life today. What does it mean to be or have in common in 2010? What are the effects of questioning the weight of shared life and what possible futures are there for the common? How might singularities be thought together so as to create new forms of life and what kinds of co-habitations or contaminations might reinforce these new forms of life? These kinds of questions are ones Italian thought, in all its diversity, has placed at the forefront of contemporary theory, questions that in turn raise fundamental questions about the nature of relationality and of a politics that would seek to strengthen relations and to extend them in order to create yet further relationality. Such is the force of Hardt and Negri’s discussion of the capacity for love near the end of Commonwealth, though one can well imagine others, including a capacity for play, for attention, and for compassion too.

Yet the relationality implicit in these new forms of shared life doesn’t only lead to greater and more positive capacities for relationality among singularities. The deterritorialization of the common as biopolitics, the posthuman or even insurrection by no means conjures away the specter of power; thus with greater capacity on the one hand comes the possibility of more intense and invasive forms of power on the other. The question then becomes: how are new forms of the common that are being forged today — shared singularities, mirror neurons, impersonality – also being reterritorialized and recontained, and by whom? Is it possible that more intense forms of relationality might signal a return to the very terms that earlier critiques of the common had attempted to uncover? On the one hand the recent success of social networking sites like Facebook suggests that new forms of virtual relations involving vast numbers of “friends” are not only possible but involve ever greater exposure to others. On the other hand such exchanges continue to be premised on the notion that my body and my opinions belong to me, what the Invisible Committee unforgetably characterized as treating “our Self like a boring box office,” using whatever prosthesis is at hand “to hold onto an I.” In such a neo-liberal scenario, the circulation of information, of goods, of persons, of persons as goods is taken to mean a return to a common mode of being-together. It’s a film we’ve seen countless times before: the common’s reinscription in contexts less open to affect that are continually based upon a conflation of connnectivity with more open modes of relating.

These questions among others will be the foundation for a two-day conference sponsored by the journal Diacritics to be held on the campus of Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010. The conference, titled “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Italian Thought,” will bring together a number of Italian voices so as to think together not only the relation between Italy and the common but to consider emerging forms of the common and common life today as well as consider the efficacy of a term like the common for a progressive (bio)politics. Equally, the event, the first of its kind of recent memory in the United States, is an occasion to register the state of Italian thought today. When seen from the other side of the Atlantic, no other contemporary thought more than Italian seems better suited today to offer what Foucault called an ontology of the present. At a minimum, and pace my doubting Italian philosopher, the editorial and intellectual success of Italian thought merits a closer look.

Featured at the conference will be some of the leading philosophical figures from Italy today, including Franco Berardi, Remo Bodei, Cesare Casarino, Ida Dominjanni, Roberto Esposito, Michael Hardt, and Antonio Negri. The conference will be transmitted over the internet at http://www.commonconf.com. A number of Cornell students will be blogging the conference live over the two days.

Antonio Negri

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Culture

REVIEWS IN CULTURAL THEORY – UPDATE AUGUST 2010

New reviews in Reviews in Cultural Theory are now accessible online at reviewsinculture.com. We’re also seeking reviewers for new and forthcoming books. Please see our list of books for which we’re seeking reviewers below and email us at editors@reviewsinculture.com, if you are interested in contributing a review.

Summer reviews:

Erin Wunker reviews Barbara Godard’s Canadian Literature at the Crossroads of Language and Culture.

Will Straw reviews Davin Heckman’s A Small World: Smart Houses and the Dream of the Perfect Day. 

Evan Mauro reviews Seth Moglen’s Mourning Modernity: Literary Modernism and the Injuries of American Capitalism.

Matthew MacLellan reviews Gerald Raunig’s A Thousand Machines: A Concise Philosophy of the Machine as a Social Movement.

Gerry Canavan reviews Mark Bould and China Miéville’s Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction.

Melissa Aronczyk reviews Guy Julier and Liz Moor’s Design and Creativity: Policy, Management and Practice.

Books for review:

Anderson, Patrick. So Much Wasted: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance. Duke UP, 2010.

Aronczyk, Melissa, and Devon Powers, eds. Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture. Peter Lang, 2010.

Blanco, Maria del Pilar and Esther Peeren. Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture. Continuum Press, 2010. 

Bowman, Paul, ed. The Rey Chow Reader. Columbia UP, 2010. 

Chatterjee, Partha. Empire and Nation: Selected Essays. Columbia UP, 2010.

Coole, Diana and Samantha Frost, eds. New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics. Duke UP, 2010.

Dabashi, Hamid. Brown Skin, White Masks. Pluto Press, 2010.

The Edu-factory Collective. Toward a Global Autonomous University: Cognitive Labor, The Production of Knowledge, and Exodus from the Education Factory. Autonomedia, 2009.

Foley, Barbara. Wrestling with the Left: The Making of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. Duke UP, 2010.

Floyd, Kevin. The Reification of Desire: Toward a Queer Marxism.  University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Fumagalli, Andrea and Sandro Mezzadra, eds. Crisis in the Global Economy: Financial Markets, Social Struggles, and New Political Scenarios. Semiotext(e), 2010.

Gregg, Melissa and Gregory J. Seigworth, eds.  The Affect Theory Reader. Duke UP, 2010.

Grossberg, Lawrence. Cultural Studies in the Future Tense. Duke UP, 2010.

Hill, Rod and Tony Myatt. The Economics Anti-Textbook: A Critical Thinker’s Guide to Microeconomics. Zed, 2010.

Hitchcock, Peter. The Long Space: Transnationalism and Postcolonial Form. Stanford UP, 2010.

Holmes, Brian. Unleashing the Collective Phantoms: Essays in Reverse Imagineering. Pluto Press, 2010.

Johnson-Woods, Toni. Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. Continuum Press, 2010.

Kim, Jodi. Ends of Empire: Asian American Critique and the Cold War. U of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Kusch, Rodolfo. Indigenous and Popular Thinking in America. Duke UP, 2010.

Lanza, Fabio. Behind the Gate: Inventing Students in Beijing. Columbia UP, 2010.

Latour, Bruno. On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods.  Duke UP, 2010.

Lepecki, Andre and Jenn Joy, eds. Planes of Composition: Dance, Theory and the Global. U of Chicago P, 2010.

Merrifield, Andy. Magical Marxism: Subversive Politics and the Imagination. Pluto Press, 2010.

Nguyen, Vinh-Kim. The Republic of Therapy: Triage and Sovereignty in West Africa’s Time of AIDS. Duke UP, 2010.

Paik, Peter. From Utopia to Apocalypse: Science Fiction and the Politics of Catastrophe. U of Minnesota P, 2010.

Pasotti, Eleonora. Political Branding in Cities: The Decline of Machine Politics in Bogota, Naples, and Chicago. Cambridge UP, 2010.

Rancière, Jacques, and Steven Corcoran. Chronicles of Consensual Times. Continuum, 2010.

Seth, Vanita. Europe’s Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500–1900. Duke UP, 2010.

Sharpe, Christina. Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects. Duke UP, 2010.

Sholette, Gregory. Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture. Pluto Press, 2010.

Toscano, Alberto. Fanaticism: On The Uses of An Idea. Verso, 2010.

Reviews in Cultural Theory

Department of English and Film Studies

3-5 Humanities Centre

University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

T6G 2E5

For more about, and the origins of, Reviews in Cultural Theory see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/reviews-in-cultural-theory/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski