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Marx's Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

NEW MARXIST PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER, RACE, AND COLONIALISM

International Marxist-Humanists Public Meeting in London

Thursday 7th November 2013, 7.30pm

The Artists Room, Conway Hall, Red Lion Square (Holborn Tube)

Convened by David Black

 

Speakers: 

Heather Brown on “Marx and the Dialectics of Gender and the Family” 
Kevin B. Anderson on “Marx and Said on Colonialism”
Peter Hudis on “Frantz Fanon as a Hegelian-Marxist” 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Antonio Gramsci

ANTONIO GRAMSCI AND REVOLUTIONARY MARXISM TODAY

ALLIANCE FOR WORKERS LIBERTY DAY SCHOOL

Originally 24th November, now Saturday 15th December 2012

Antonio Gramsci and Revolutionary Marxism today. An AWL day school.

Saturday 15 December, 2012 – 14:00 – 19:00. Central London (tbc).

[Event moved from 24 November because of the Lewisham Hospital demonstration now called for that day. Come back to http://www.workersliberty.org/15decgramsci later for more details].

This is a day school on the ideas of Italian communist revolutionary Antonio Gramsci, and what they can bring to revolutionary Marxist politics and working-class struggle today.
Sessions will include:
● Showing of the short film New York and the Mystery of Naples: A Journey through Gramsci’s World, featuring Dario Fo, Giuseppe Fiori, Cornel West and Edward Said.

Plus workshops on
● Gramsci on “East and West”
● Gramsci’s idea of a socialist newspaper
● Education and revolution
● The Gramscian revolutionary party

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/awl-gramsci-day-school-moved-from-24-nov-to-15-dec

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Postcolonial

STRUGGLES, STRATEGIES AND ANALYSIS OF ANTICOLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Interface Journal – http://www.interfacejournal.net

Special issue editors: Aziz Choudry, Lesley Wood, Mandisi Majavu

REMINDER:- Deadline 1 November 2012

Scholars of empire (e.g. Ananya Roy 2005 & Derek Gregory 2004) point out that the “colonial present” is not only the initial moment of the colonial encounter, but also the constant manufacturing of ‘democracies’, ‘freedoms’, economies and histories in a manner that advances the goals of empire even long after empire has supposedly withdrawn from the colony. Raghavan (1990), for example, described economic globalization through the GATT (now the WTO) as ‘recolonization’ of the nominally independent states of the global South.

While anticolonial and postcolonial movements are the subject of a rich body of thought and sites of significant knowledge production in themselves, challenges to the conceptual accuracy and appropriateness of the widely-used terms ‘postcolonialism’ and ‘postcolonial’ also come from Indigenous scholars and activists (L.T. Smith, 1999; Venne, 2004; M.Jackson, 2004, 2007; Coulthard; 2011; Watson, 2008; A.Smith, 2005) and critical race feminists (Thobani, 2007) based in settler colonial states such Australia, Canada, Aotearoa/New Zealand and the USA. 

This special issue of the open-access, online, copyleft academic/activist journal Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements (http://www.interfacejournal.net/) links anticolonial and postcolonial accounts of movements and their praxis to resist the ‘colonial present’ that is embodied in state policies, intergovernmental institutions, processes and agreements such as the World Bank, IMF, and WTO, domestic and global capital.and indeed in some cases, NGOs and ‘civil society’ movements themselves. 

The editors are seeking papers that examine the praxis and the politics of anticolonial and postcolonial movements. How are the ideas of Fanon, Cabral, Cesaire and other activist/intellectuals relevant to movements today in continuing struggles for self-determination, justice and liberation, and against the co-optation of independence struggles by domestic elites and contemporary forms of colonial violence and imperialism? How do these movements conceptualise feminism? Do middle class activists, NGOs and academics have a role to play in these movements, and popular struggles in present-day, or formerly colonized territories? 

Papers may question the meaning of postcolonialism, anticolonialism or decolonization and its relevance/implications for organizing. How do analyses of colonialism and practices towards decolonization inform contemporary struggles in different contexts? Contributors are encouraged to explore regional and historical and other contextual differences in the way that these movements have developed. 

General submissions

As in all issues of Interface, we will accept submissions on topics that are not related to the special theme of the issue, but that emerge from or focus on movements around the world and the immense amount of knowledge that they generate. Such general submissions should contribute to the journal’s mission as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses from specific movement processes and experiences that can be translated into a form useful for other movements.

In this context, we welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements – in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We thus seek work in a range of different formats, such as conventional articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews — and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally is geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

We can accept material in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. Please see our editorial contacts page for details of who to submit to.

Deadline and contact details

The deadline for initial submissions to this issue, to be published May 2013, is November 1 2012. For details of how to submit to Interface, please see the “Guidelines for contributors” on our website. All manuscripts, whether on the special theme or other topics, should be sent to the appropriate regional editor, listed on our contacts page. Submission templates are available online via the guidelines page.

 

Published first in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-struggles-strategies-and-analysis-of-anticolonial-and-postcolonial-social-movements-deadline-1-november

 

**END**

 

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Edward Said

DEORIENTALIZING CITIZENSHIP?

We are delighted to announce that registration is open for the Second Symposium: Deorientalizing citizenship? Experiments in political subjectivity

12-13 November 2012

Goodenough College, London

 

Keynote lectures by

– Walter Mignolo (Duke University) Citizenship, Knowledge and the Limits of Humanity (II)

– Saba Mahmood (University of California, Berkeley) Religious Liberty, the Minority Problem and Geopolitics

 

You can find the preliminary programme via: http://www.oecumene.eu/files/oecumene/2ndSymposiumProgramme.pdf

To book the event (£30 for 2 days) and for further details, please follow:  http://www.oecumene.eu/events/2nd-symposium

 

Thinking about ‘citizenship after orientalism’ involves addressing two theoretical issues. Firstly, what do we understand by orientalism thirty years after Edward Said’s seminal investigation? How can orientalism be re-articulated beyond its cultural or representational forms? Secondly, what do we mean by citizenship as a possible mode of political subjectivity? Is any articulation of political subjectivity which enacts a claim to rights, or to the right to claim rights, to be understood as citizenship? Keynote speakers Saba Mahmood and Walter Mignolo together with a selection of panelists will address these questions from multi-disciplinary perspectives.

– Panel 1 ‘Orientalism, colonialism and citizenship’: Sukanya Banerjee (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Jack Harrington (The Open University), Alessandra Marino (The Open University), Meyda Yeğenoğlu (Istanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi)

– Panel 2 ‘Democratizing politics, decolonizing citizenship’: Bela Bhatia (Tata Institute of Social Sciences), Oscar Guardiola-Rivera (Birkbeck, University of London), Charles Hirschkind (University of California, Berkeley), Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck, University of London)

– Panel 3 ‘The universal after orientalism’: Gurminder Bhambra (University of Warwick), Sudeep Dasgupta (University of Amsterdam), Antke Engel (Institute for Queer Theory), Vivienne Jabri (King’s College London)

– Roundtable ‘Citizenship After Orientalism: An Unfinished Project’: Discussion of Citizenship Studies Journal special issue.http://www.tandfonline.com.libezproxy.open.ac.uk/toc/ccst20/16/5-6 (free access to selected journal articles for participants of the Symposium will be provided prior to the event)

 

The Symposium is organised by the European Research Council funded project Oecumene: Citizenship after orientalism based at The Open University. To receive up-dates regarding the symposium and other project activities, please register via www.oecumene.eu/user/register

If you have any further queries please feel free to contact the project team on Oecumene-Project@open.ac.uk.

We look forward to seeing you at our Second Symposium in November.

Kind regards,

The Oecumene Team

 

**END**

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Edward Said

Edward Said

2012 EDWARD W. SAID MEMORIAL LECTURE

The lecture, entitled ‘What’s Left in Postcolonial Studies?’ will be delivered by Professor Benita Parry.

6pm, Tuesday, 29th May

Mathematics Institute (Room MS 0.3), University of Warwick 

Sponsored by the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at Warwick, the Memorial Lecture series has been set up to honour the life and work of Edward W. Said, who died in 2003. Said, who was Professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, was an internationally renowned literary and cultural critic and one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. Besides his work as a cultural critic, Edward Said was very well known as an impassioned spokesperson for the Palestinian people in their struggle for justice, freedom and autonomy, and as a commentator on Middle Eastern politics more generally. His commitment to secular humanism and his engaged style of intellectual practice has served as a model and inspiration for many of his readers, both within and outside the academy.

Benita Parry is Professor Emerita of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. She has published widely in postcolonial studies and the literatures of colonialism and imperialism. Her many publications include the monographs, Delusions and Discoveries:India in the British Imagination, 1880-1930(1972, rev. 1998) and Conrad and Imperialism: Ideological Boundaries and Visionary Frontiers (1984); the collection, Postcolonial Studies: A Materialist Critique (2004); and the edited volumes, Cultural Representations of Imperialism: Edward Said and the Gravity of History (1998) and Postcolonial Criticism and Theory (1999).

Useful links:

Getting to Warwick: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/directions

The Mathematics Institute is located in the Zeeman Building: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/interactive/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

SEVENTH ANNUAL EDWARD SAID MEMORIAL LECTURE

The University of Warwick
The Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies, invites you to

The Seventh Annual Edward Said Memorial Lecture

By Mourid Barghouti, poet, essayist, author of the acclaimed “I Saw Ramallah” (1997)

On Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011
at 6 pm
Warwick Arts Centre Conference Room
Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry

The lecture is free and open to the public.
Complimentary tickets must be obtained by calling the Warwick Arts Centre Box office at 02476 524 524. For directions consult: www.warwickartscentre.co.uk

RSVP and  Enquiries: Department of English 02476 524 928, http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/events/edwardsaid/

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor,  north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

SSPT ANNUAL CONFERENCE: 16-17 JUNE 2011, UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX

‘FORMS OF DOMINATION AND EMANCIPATION’

STUDIES IN SOCIAL & POLITICAL THOUGHT (SSPT)

[T]he fact above all which so demoralizes the modern world [is] that the greater the efforts made, the more terrible are the new forms in which the old social problems reappear- C. L. R. James

Research students and scholars working in philosophy, social, political or theory more broadly construed are invited to submit an abstract of up to 400 words on any topic related to the conference theme ‘Forms of Domination and Emancipation’. Please ensure the abstract is prepared for blind review. Presentations will likely be 20-30 minutes in length.

Keynote speakers include Chris Arthur (ex-Sussex) on “Dialectic of Domination and Emancipation” and Stathis Kouvelakis (Kings College London) on “The Actuality of Revolution?”

Papers presented at the conference will be considered for publication in the Winter 2011 issue of Studies in Social & Political Thought.

The deadline for submissions is 15 April 2011

Notification of acceptance will be sent out within two weeks.
Abstracts or questions should be addressed to: sspt@sussex.ac.uk

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
Forms of domination – Capital; (neo-)Liberalism; Patriarchy; Imperialism and (neo-)Colonialism; Hegemony; Ideology; Biopolitics; Discipline; Governmentality; Psychology and Psychoanalysis; Legality and Legitimacy.

Forms of emancipation – Communism and Communization; Radical Democracy; the State; Politics of Difference, Otherness, Non-Identity; Anarchism; Multitude; Psychology and Psychoanalysis; New Social Movements.

Possible thinkers include but are not limited to:

Alain Badiou; Walter Benjamin; Judith Butler; Gilles Deleuze; Frantz Fanon; Michel Foulcault; Antonio Gramsci; G.W.F. Hegel; C.L.R. James; Freud and Lacan; Henri Lefebvre; Rosa Luxemburg; Karl Marx; Antonio Negri; Evgeny Pashukanis; Jacques Rancière; Edward Said; Early Frankfurt School; Neue Marx-Lektüre; Value-Form Theory; Théorie Communiste.

Some participants might also like to consider the relations between different thinkers and forms of domination and emancipation.

END

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

Taweret

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT

NEW EDITION FROM VERSO:

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT: Nature, Capital and the Production of Space

By NEIL SMITH

New and updated edition with a new foreword by DAVID HARVEY
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“Smith provides a brilliant formulation of how the production of a particular kind of nature and space under historical capitalism is essential to the unequal development of a landscape that integrates poverty with wealth.” –– EDWARD SAID
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In UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT, a classic in its field, NEIL SMITH offers the first full theory of uneven geographical development, entwining theories of space and nature with a critique of capitalism.

Featuring groundbreaking analyses of the production of nature and the politics of scale, Smith’s work anticipated many of the uneven contours that now mark neoliberal globalization.

DAVID HARVEY’S new foreword highlights the increasingly uneven nature of the globalized economy, and notes that this inequality, along with accelerating levels of urbanisation and environmental degradation, have only accelerated since the book was first published. Smith’s analysis is thus more urgent and relevant than ever.

While globalisation has not led to a weakening of state power in the political sphere, it is increasingly difficult to conceive of distinct state economies – for example by the 1980s the majority of trade across national borders took place within corporations. National and international organisations rival states in economic power – in 2007 Harvard University had more money in its bank account than the GDP of some 39 countries. Thus, Smith argues, the global system can increasingly be defined more in terms of geoeconomics than traditional geopolitics.

In recognition of the dramatic changes in capitalism and its geography over the quarter century since this volume was written, Neil Smith has updated the text with a discussion of the current crisis of neoliberalism and the rise of geoeconomics.

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT is a radical attempt to reconstruct the politicalbasis of society, in order to produce a genuinely social geography by encouraging a revolutionary imaginary.
———————————-
Praise for UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT

“A foundational text of great historical significance, constantly worthy of reappraisal…You will not be disappointed.” David Harvey

“Smith attempts no less than the integration of nature and space in the Marxian theory of capitalist development … he improves the clarity even of the arguments made in disagreement with him. His book should be widely read, used, and discussed.’ –ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING

“UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT provides a theoretical discussion of immense range – from nature through space and the economy – whereby Neil Smith extends David Harvey’s Marxist conception of the geography of capitalism” – GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW

“One of the most important books of specifically geographical social theory to be written in the English language in the last thirty years.” – Scott Prudham, author of KNOCK ON WOOD: NATURE AS COMMODITY IN DOUGLAS-FIR COUNTY
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NEIL SMITH is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the City University of New York and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. He is author or editor of nine books that explore the broad intersection between space, nature, social theory, and history and is co-organizer of the International Critical Geography Group. His website is http://neil-smith.net/
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ISBN: 978 1 84467 643 9 / £16.99 / Paperback / 344 pages
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For more information and to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/704-704-uneven-development
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ACADEMICS BASED OUTSIDE NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN INSPECTION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT tamar@verso.co.uk

ACADEMICS BASED WITHIN NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN EXAMINATION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT clara@versobooks.com
———————————
Become a fan of Verso on Facebook:
UK page – http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789
US page – http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pages/Verso-Books-USA/123812329709

And get updates on Twitter too:
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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Kevin Anderson

SOCIALIST HUMANISM, THE ANTI-HUMANIST TURN, AND THE CONSEQUENCES FOR THE LEFT

Sunday December 11, 2010
2:00 PM

Speakers: Barbara Epstein and Kevin Anderson

A look at the contributions of Marxist and/or socialist humanists, and the causes, and consequences for the left, of the challenge emerging from the anti-humanism associated with structuralism and post-structuralism. What would it take to revive socialist humanism as a philosophy of the contemporary left? How does the legacy of Maoism from the New Left affect this? Among the thinkers to be discussed are the socialist humanists Raya Dunayevskaya, Frantz Fanon, Erich Fromm, and Jean-Paul Sartre, and E. P. Thompson; among the structuralists and post-structuralists, Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Claude Lévi-Strasss, and Edward Said.

Barbara Epstein teaches in the History of Consciousness Department at University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (1991) and most recently, The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism (2008), both with University of California Press.

Kevin Anderson teaches in the Department of Sociology at University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Foucault and the Iranian Revolution (2005, coauthored with Janet Afary) and most recently, Marx at the Margins: Nationalism, Ethnicity and Non-Western Societies (2010), both with University of Chicago Press..

Location: NPML 6501 Telegraph Ave. Oakland, CA 94609

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Books

THIRD WORLD PROTEST – BOOK LAUNCH WITH RAHUL RAO

Book Launch – Third World Protest: Between Home and the World, by Rahul Rao

Date of event: 1st November 2010

Venue: Khalili Lecture Theatre, School of Oriental & African Studies, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG

Speaker: Dr Rahul Rao

Chair: Dr Stephen Hopgood

Rahul Rao, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, discusses his new book /Third World Protest: Between Home and the World/.

If boundaries protect us from threats, how should we think about the boundaries of states in a world where threats to human rights emanate from both outside the state and the state itself? Arguing that attitudes towards boundaries are premised on assumptions about the locus of threats to vital interests, Rahul Rao probes beneath two major normative orientations towards boundaries – cosmopolitanism and nationalism – which structure thinking on questions of public policy and identity. Insofar as the Third World is concerned, hegemonic versions of both orientations are underpinned by simplistic imageries of threat. In the cosmopolitan gaze, political and economic crises in the Third World are attributed mainly to factors internal to the Third World state with the international playing the role of heroic saviour. In Third World nationalist imagery, the international is portrayed as a realm of neo-imperialist predation from which the domestic has to be secured. Both images capture widely held intuitions about the sources of threats to human rights, but each by itself provides a resolutely partial inventory of these threats. By juxtaposing critical accounts of both discourses, Rao argues that protest sensibilities in the current conjuncture must be critical of hegemonic variants of both cosmopolitanism and nationalism. The second half of the book illustrates what such a critique might look like. Journeying through the writings of James Joyce, Rabindranath Tagore, Edward Said, and Frantz Fanon, the activism of ‘anti-globalization’ protesters, and the dilemmas of queer activists, Rao demonstrates that important currents of Third World protest have long battled against both the international and the domestic, in a manner that combines nationalist and cosmopolitan sensibilities.

*Please note that the book will be available at the event at a 20% discount

— 
Lecturer in International Relations
Centre for Inter national Studies & Diplomacy
School of Oriental & African Studies
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG
Tel: +44(0)20 7898 4534
http://goog_1113873052

Third World Protest:  Between Home and The World: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199560370.do

Available now through all good bookshops, or direct from Oxford University Press

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Books

ERNEST GELLNER: AN INTELLECTUAL BIOGRAPHY

A NEW TITLE FROM VERSO

By JOHN A. HALL

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“Ernest Gellner was a great twentieth-century intellectual, and John Hall’s fine biography conveys a vivid sense of the man and of the extraordinary range of his ideas, while commenting with great intelligence upon them. A must read.” Michael Mann, Professor of Sociology, UCLA

“The authentic voice of Ernest Gellner: honest, cool and reasonable. Mr. Hall is to be congratulated for reminding us of how much we miss it today.” WALL STREET JOURNAL

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Ernest Gellner (1925–95) was a multilingual polymath and a public intellectual who set the agenda in the study of nationalism and the sociology of Islam. Having grown up in Paris, Prague , and England , he was one of the last great Jewish thinkers from Central Europe to experience directly the impact of the Holocaust.

His intellectual trajectory differed from that of similar thinkers, both in producing a highly integrated philosophy of modernity and in combining a respect for nationalism with an appreciation of the power of modern science.

Gellner was a fierce opponent, in private as well as in public, of such contemporaries as Michael Oakeshott, Isaiah Berlin , Charles Taylor, Noam Chomsky and Edward Said. As this definitive biography shows, he was passionate in the defence of reason against every form of relativism – a battle that his intellectual inheritors continue to this day.

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Praise for ERNEST GELLNER: AN INTELLECTUAL BIOGRAPHY:

“This is a fascinating biography of one of the seminal and most interesting thinkers of the later twentieth century … John Hall has done a great deal to make clear the complex background and underlying motives of this remarkable man and thinker.” Charles Taylor, Professor Emeritus at McGill University in Montreal

Praise for Ernest Gellner:

“Gellner’s world is austere. But therein lies its attraction. Not much real comfort for our woes is on offer; the consolations peddled in the market are indeed worthless. What Gellner offered was something more mature and demanding: cold intellectual honesty.” John A. Hall

“A university don and intellectual of the first rank, Mr Gellner understood the needs of the press. He loved public debate and infuriated less nimble opponents with cutting wit and memorable epigrams. He poured out articles and books – more than twenty by one count – routinely apologising: ‘I’ve written another; I just couldn’t help it.’“ THE ECONOMIST

“As a philosopher Ernest Gellner was a maverick and a gadfly. Yet neither of these quite captures the uniqueness of his subversiveness.” Steven Lukes, Professor of Sociology, New York University

“Ernest Gellner was a scholar in the classic mould, whose intellect and influence could not be confined within national boundaries or within the bounds of any one academic discipline.” Edward Mortimer, Foreign Affairs Editor of the FINANCIAL TIMES

“Although known primarily as a philosopher, Gellner had a vertiginous perspective on life. He expanded his interests into the fields of anthropology and social and political theory, exposing with a dazzling and at times controversial lucidity the patterns by which modern society has been shaped.” TIMES

“David Glass, the sociologist, once said “with a touch of irritation”, that he wasn’t sure whether the next revolution would come from the right or from the left; but he was quite sure that, wherever it came from, the first person to be shot would be Ernest Gellner.” The GUARDIAN, obituary of Ernest Geller.

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JOHN A. HALL is the James McGill Professor of Comparative Historical Sociology at McGill University in Montreal . His previous books include Powers and Liberties; Liberalism; Coercion and Consent; Intern ational Orders; and (with Charles Lindholm) Is American Breaking Apart? He taught at the Central European University in the early 1990s, when Gellner had returned to Prague, and gained an appreciation at that time of his background in Central Europe .

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 602 6 / $49.95 / £29.99 / CAN$62.51 / Hardback / 400 Pages

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For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/465-ernest-gellner

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Karl Marx

MEETING ON ‘MARX AT THE MARGINS’ – WITH KEVIN B. ANDERSON

Location: Niebyl Proctor Marxist Library, 6501 Telegraph Ave. Oakland, CA 94609

Saturday September 25th, 2010
2:00 PM

Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies

Author event Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies by Kevin B. Anderson 

Marx’s critique of capital was far broader than is usually supposed. To be sure, he concentrated on the labor-capital relation within Western Europe and North America. But at the same time, he expended considerable time and energy on the analysis of non-Western societies, as well as race, ethnicity, and nationalism. While some of these writings show a problematically unilinear perspective and, on occasion, traces of ethnocentrism, the overall trajectory of Marx’s writings was toward a critique of national, ethnic, and colonial oppression and toward an appreciation of resistance movements in these spheres.

In 1848, in the Communist Manifesto, Marx and Engels espoused an implicitly and problematically unilinear concept of social progress. Precapitalist societies, especially China, which they characterized in ethnocentric terms as a “most barbarian” society, were destined to be forcibly penetrated and modernized by this new and dynamic social system. In his 1853 articles for the New York Tribune, Marx extended these perspectives to India, while viewing the communal social relations and communal property of the Indian village as a solid foundation for “Oriental despotism.” Postcolonial and postmodern thinkers, most notably Edward Said, have criticized the Communist Manifesto and the 1853 India writings as a form of Orientalist knowledge fundamentally similar to the colonialist mindset.

END

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