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Education

IRELAND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION (IICE 2011)

CALL FOR PAPERS

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Ireland International Conference on Education (IICE-2011)
October 3-5, 2011, Dublin, Ireland (www.iicedu.org)
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The IICE is an international refereed conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practices in education.

The IICE promotes collaborative excellence between academicians and professionals from Education.

The aim of IICE is to provide an opportunity for academicians and professionals from various educational fields with cross-disciplinary interests to bridge the knowledge gap, promote research esteem and the evolution of pedagogy. The IICE 2011 invites research papers that encompass conceptual analysis, design implementation and performance evaluation. All the accepted papers will appear in the proceedings and modified version of selected papers will be published in special issues peer reviewed journals.

The topics in IICE-2011 include but are not confined to the following areas:

*Academic Advising and Counselling
*Art Education
*Adult Education
*APD/Listening and Acoustics in Education Environment
*Business Education
*Counsellor Education
*Curriculum, Research and Development
*Competitive Skills
*Continuing Education
*Distance Education
*Early Childhood Education
*Educational Administration
*Educational Foundations
*Educational Psychology
*Educational Technology
*Education Policy and Leadership
*Elementary Education
*E-Learning
*E-Manufacturing
*ESL/TESL
*E-Society
*Geographical Education
*Geographic information systems
*Health Education
*Higher Education
*History
*Home Education
*Human Computer Interaction
*Human Resource Development
*Indigenous Education
*ICT Education
*Internet technologies
*Imaginative Education
*Kinesiology & Leisure Science
*K12
*Language Education
*Mathematics Education
*Mobile Applications
*Multi-Virtual Environment
*Music Education
*Pedagogy
*Physical Education (PE)
*Reading Education
*Writing Education
*Religion and Education Studies
*Research Assessment Exercise (RAE)
*Rural Education
*Science Education
*Secondary Education
*Second life Educators
*Social Studies Education
*Special Education
*Student Affairs
*Teacher Education
*Cross-disciplinary areas of Education
*Ubiquitous Computing
*Virtual Reality
*Wireless applications
*Other Areas of Education

 

Important Dates:

*Extended Abstract (Work in Progress) Submission Date: June 15, 2011 
*Research Paper, Student Paper, Case Study, Report Submission Date: June 30, 2011
*Proposal for Workshops: July 15, 2011 
*Notification of Workshop Acceptance/Rejection: July 20, 2011 
*Notification of Extended Abstract (Work in Progress) Acceptance/Rejection: June 25, 2011
*Notification of Research Paper, Student Paper, Case Study, Report Acceptance /Rejection: June 25, 2011
*Camera Ready Paper Due: July 10, 2011
*Early Bird Registration Deadline (Authors and Participants): June 1, 2011- July 31, 2011 
*Late Bird Registration Deadline (Authors and Participants): July 31, 2011 – September 15, 2011
*Conference Dates: October 03-05, 2011

 
For further information please visit IICE-2011 at www.iicedu.org

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitorg

CAPITORG: EDUCATION AND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE HUMAN IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY – GLENN RIKOWSKI

The Praxis and Pedagogy Group of GradCAM present:

Glenn Rikowski

“Capitorg: Education and the Constitution of the Human in Contemporary Society”

Wednesday May 25th 2011

6.00 – 8.00pm

Henry Clarke Room, NCAD, 100 Thomas Street, Dublin

Our lives are increasingly constrained by the social relations that capital coordinates. The educational discourse of neoliberalism; promoting literacy for job opportunities, economic advancement, and individual success are of paramount importance to producing human capital rather than human beings. Neoliberal literacy includes training students and workers to accept “a new work discipline” and conditioning their will to maximise the accumulation of capital and wealth. As students increase their marketability, they are “always already shaped by the labyrinthine circuits of capitalist desire” (Peter McLaren and Ramin Farahmandpur, 2002)

We not just learning, teaching, and living in neoliberal capitalist societies, but are becoming “a new life-form: human-capital” through “the capitalization of humanity” (Glenn Rikowski, 2002).

Flyer for the event: http://www.gradcam.ie/glenn_rikowski.pdf

The Capitorg: http://www.ccfi.educ.ubc.ca/publication/insights/v10n02/html/kim/kim.html (Many thanks to Soowook Kim: Glenn)

Dr. Glenn Rikowski is a Senior Lecturer in Education Studies in the School of Education at the University of Northampton

Now is the time to ask questions.

Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin: http://www.gradcam.ie

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Marx and Education - Jean Anyon

MARX AND EDUCATION – JEAN ANYON

There was only one Karl Marx, but there have been a multitude of Marxisms. This concise, introductory book by internationally renowned scholar Jean Anyon centers on the ideas of Marx that have been used in education studies as a guide to theory, analysis, research, and practice.

Marx and Education begins with a brief overview of basic Marxist ideas and terms and then traces some of the main points scholars in education have been articulating since the late 1970s. Following this trajectory, Anyon details how social class analysis has developed in research and theory, how understanding the roles of education in society is influenced by a Marxian lens, how the failures of urban school reform can be understood through the lens of political economy, and how cultural analysis has laid the foundation for critical pedagogy in US classrooms. She assesses ways neo-Marxist thought can contribute to our understanding of issues that have arisen more recently and how a Marxist analysis can be important to an adequate understanding and transformation of the future of education and the economy.

By exemplifying what is relevant in Marx, and replacing that which has been outdone by historical events, Marx and Education aims to restore the utility of Marxism as a theoretical and practical tool for educators.

Selected Table of Contents

Series Editor Introduction

Introduction

1. Neo-Marxism in Education, 1970s – 1980s

2. Neo-Marxism in Education, 1990 – 2005

3. Current Issues: Economic Problems, Education Policies

4. Extending Marxist Theory and Practice

March 2011 | 120 pages | Paperback: 978-0-415-80330-4

Routledge

Series: Routledge Key Ideas in Education

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415803304/

At amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marx-Education-Routledge-Ideas-Educati/dp/0415803306

At amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marx-Education-Routledge-Ideas-Educati/dp/0415803306/ref=sr_1_5_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1301434167&sr=1-5

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education on Trial

UniCOMMON: THE REBELLION OF LIVING KNOWLEDGE

An extraordinary season of struggle, beyond Uniriot

Uniriot has been several things: the will to compose different political cultures, the desire of conflict and the innovation inside and against the university reformed by the Bologna Process. The attempt of building up a new experimentation outside of any reassuring identity, but creating a new network able to change and being changed by the richness of discussions and the unquestionable reality of the struggle that cross us.

Uniriot.org has been a great platform, a useful tool for the challenge we issued five years ago: not only a showcase of our ideas, but a crossroads of different experiences and projects, new narrations of struggle, communication about the transformations of the university and our research. We have been trying to carry this challenge forward since the movement of 2005, when we created Uniriot, through our experience inside the European struggles during the AntiCPE movement in France, Bologna Burns in Wien and Madrid, until the anomalous wave of 2008 and the incredible autumn we lived in 2010.

We have been profoundly changed during these extraordinary months, together with students, precarious workers and researchers that have passionately animated and continuously organized the struggles of the last year. As we cannot be the same, we close the experience of Uniriot and launch a new political constituent process to live up to our time and the transformations required by the struggles. A new challenge!

The Rebellion of Living Knowledge: UniCommon

UniCommon moves its first step in an era of crisis and austerity: the education reforms enacted without any public funding inside the framework of the failure of the Bologna Process and, at the same time, its extension outside Europe as a tool of exploitation of transnational living knowledge; the dismissal of the public university and the de-qualification of high school education, the massive youth unemployment, precarity and the absence of any future for a whole generation inside and outside the academy.

In this landscape, movements shouted firmly the shelter of public university against cuts, rising tuition fees, free research labor and debt loan, not as mere defence of the extant, but as a strategic field to claim quality of knowledge and free education against any rhetorical meritocracy. Self-education has been our political disposition, focused on the struggle for a qualified and critical knowledge, a device of organization that we are going to practice; our aim is to focus on the transformations of researchers’ status in the era of delegitimization of research work and the peer-review system. Militant research is our collective tool to understand and to map the transformations of the present; self-education is our device beyond the public/private dichotomy to make our university!

UniCommon wants to switch the nexus between education and precarity, creating a new social constituent deal within the new composition of labor, a democratic reappropriation of welfare against private plunders and feudal academic power. We have learnt that where there is a capital relation, there is exploitation of toil, passions, words and knowledge; where there is globalized cognitive capitalism so there is a parasitic power that robs our body, our life.

The European and north-African movements of the last autumn have taught us that the claim for welfare against poverty and rights against exploitation are strictly connected to the claim for democracy and freedom against power and its corruption. Students who have animated the revolts of last years, thousands of precarious and young unemployed took up the book shields to defend their lives: a rioting generation reclaiming knowledge, free access and circulation, income and new welfare, democracy and freedom of choice above our body.

UniCommon is born within the practice of Book Bloc, a common tool of defence, a production of imaginary to express our desire. We have created those book shields as an attempt of combining radicalism and people’s support; the challenge of our time is to build up a wild experimentation, widespread and radical at the same time, to step over the crisis and the failed utopia of cognitive capitalism. The Book Bloc is a transnational practice, against any fixed identity and outside any representation of conflict, it is our defence within the democracy of turmoil!

The failure of Bologna Process does not mean the end of exploitation of our knowledge, on the contrary the crisis deepens the capitalistc command over our body; at the same time, the struggles have showed us their powerful capacity of creating connections despite borders, sharing common projects and practices, shaping a different future where free knowledge, income, rights and citizenship are not just a privilege.

UniCommon is a new compass oriented by self-education, created by the wild demos that blocked the circulation of commodities; it is a device defended by the transnational Book Bloc inside a European space definitely twisted by the Mediterranean revolts, the margins that break into the center to overturn it.

Moreover, Unicommon is a network of communication and political organization, a web platform that will work as a place of information and communication of struggles from high school to the academy, a space of connection among experiences of self-education and autonomous collectives of research. UniCommon.org is a new website inside the 2.0 web time: video as a tool of enquiring and mapping transformations, photos as the continuous effort of imaging the fuzzy movement of our demos and discussions, audios as a precise opinion of different voices, augmented reality to shape and multiply our world.

UniCommon starts from La Sapienza University within a day of large discussions to make a public analysis of the past autumn and to imagine the spring that lies ahead.

Meet you in the struggles, to create the future and subvert the present; to make the university of the common!

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Program 24.03.2011

Create the Future, Subvert the Present

10:30 a.m. College of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori, La Sapienza – Roma
Public assembly of students and precarious collectives and networks

Against the dismissal of public university, creating the university of the common

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2:00 p.m. Lunch break

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4:00 p.m. College of Political Science, LaSapienza – Roma
Round table

After the revolt of the autumn toward the general strike of 6th May 2011

Speakers: Ilenia Caleo (Zeropuntotre); Roberto Ciccarelli (Il manifesto), Claudio Riccio (Link), Eva Pinna (Surf), Luca Tomassini (CPU), Giorgio Sestili (Atenei in rivolta), Simone Famularo (Assemblea di Medicina – La Sapienza)  Francesco Sinopoli (Flc-Cgil), Corrado Zunino (la Repubblica)

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7:30 p.m. aperitif break and videos
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Info: http://www.uniriot.org  /  and from 24th  March  >>> http://www.unicommon.org >>>

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

PANEL AND BOOK LAUNCH – “EDUCATING ELITES: CLASS PRIVILEGE AND EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGE”

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), room 5-250
252 Bloor St. West (St. George subway station), Toronto

10:00am – 11:45am (Panel)
11:45am – 1:00pm (Book Launch / Lunch Reception)

Panelists:

– Jane Kenway, Professor Monash University – “Elite Schools, Trans-national Capitals, and Global Elite Formations”
– Paul Tarc, Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario – “The Uses of International Education for (Becoming) Elites: The Case of the International Baccalaureate”
– Adam Howard, Associate Professor Colby College – “Shifting Landscapes: Elite Education in the New Economy”
– Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández, Assistant Professor CTL, OISE – “Notes on the Emergence and Significance of Elite Schooling as a Subject of Educational Research”

Chair : Kari Dehli, Professor SESE, OISE

Books by the panelists will be on sale from the Toronto Women’s Bookstore: http://www.womensbookstore.com

Co-sponsors: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education – Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning; Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education; Comparative, International & Development Education Centre; Centre for Media and Culture in Education, Toronto Women’s Bookstore
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COMMON THREAD COMMUNITY CHORUS OF TORONTO – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR MENNONITE NEW LIFE CENTRE & JUSTICIA FOR MIGRANT WORKERS

March 26
7:30 pm
St Simon’s Anglican Church, 525 Bloor Street East
Sherbourne subway station (Glen Road exit)

Tickets: Adults $20/advance – $25/door;  Students & Seniors $15/advance – $20/door; Children under 10 – free

http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca/sites/default/files/poster-spring-2011.jpg

– Mennonite New Life Centre: http://mnlct.org
– Justicia for Migrant Workers:  http://justicia4migrantworkers.org
– Proyecto Altiplano:  http://myspace.com/proyectoaltiplano/stream

Common Thread Chorus: http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca

For Tickets: 416-410-5022 or info@commonthreadchorus.ca
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CU EXPO 2011 – COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS: BRINGING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES TO LOCAL ACTION

May 10-14, 2011
Waterloo Region, Ontario

CU Expo 2011 will showcase the exemplars in community-university partnerships worldwide, and explore and introduce creative ways of strengthening our local communities.

The conference is expected to draw over 800 people from Canada and around the world who are passionate about the power of community-university partnerships as a vehicle for social change. Students, community leaders, researchers, educators, funders, policy makers and others invested in community-building will be in attendance.

The CU Expo movement began in Canada as a response to individuals involved community-university partnerships needing a forum to share experiences, strategies and ideas. CU Expo 2011 will address the conference objectives, themes and streams through a variety of session offerings and opportunities for dialogue.

Learn more: http://www.cuexpo2011.ca/

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BUILDING SOLIDARITY: CAMPUS LABOUR STRUGGLES AND THE STUDENT CONNECTION

A forum to discuss and unite worker and student struggles at U of T

March 31, 2011
6-9pm
Bahen Centre, University of Toronto
Room 2175 (40 St. George Street)

A brief overview of the working conditions at the University of Toronto shows that something is just not right: most contract faculty members have virtually no job security; largely racialized food-service workers are paid less than a living wage; post-doctoral fellows have zero input in the drafting of their contracts; female administrative staff members receive less pay than their male counterparts; and non-tenured professors fear termination for voicing opinions on contentious political issues.

Meanwhile, students at the U of T are also engaged in pitched battles to keep post-secondary education accessible and equitable. Campaigns to eliminate ever-increasing tuition fees, to defend equity-based programs under threat of extinction, to challenge autocratic room booking policies, and to overturn unrepresentative and unaccountable governing bodies are just some of the issues that they organize around everyday.

In short, there is a whole host of injustices that plague both workers and students on this campus. As a working group of the newly-formed University of Toronto General Assembly, Student-Worker Solidarity (SWS) seeks to challenge this state of affairs by bringing different campus workers together to speak with students about their issues, while also providing students with an opportunity to relay their concerns to workers.

With this forum, SWS hopes to begin the conversation in order to create new ways of thinking about and participating in the struggles of those who make our University what it is.

Speakers will include members of the following:

– Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 3902
– United Steelworkers (USW) Local 1998
– UniteHERE Local 75
– University of Toronto Faculty Association (UTFA)
– University of Toronto General Assembly (UTGA)

**Refreshments will be provided
**Email utgeneralassembly@gmail.com for more information
**This event is endorsed by OPIRG-Toronto

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES –  HOUSING ALTERNATIVES

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto
Room 12-199

with Joe Deschênes Smith and Michael Shapcott

– Joe Deshchênes Smith will talk about investment process for new affordable housing, as well as attributes of the Home Ownership Initiative’s 2nd mortgage for low/modest income home-buyers.
– Michael Shapcott will discuss the social economy elements of the Precarious Housing report recently released by Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute.

Moderator: David Hulchanski, Director, Centre for Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact Lisa White: secspeakerseries@gmail.com

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

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PANEL – PAUL ROBESON: THE TALLEST TREE IN OUR FOREST

Wednesday, March 23
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
East Common Room, Hart House
University of Toronto
7 Hart House Circle

Speakers:
– Ken Jeffers (City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation)
– Norm Kelly (Writer and Playwright)
– Lee Lorch (Civil rights activist and York Professor Emeritus)
– Rathika Sitsabaiesan (Scarborough-Rouge River Federal NDP Candidate)

Sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States

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NEWS & VIEWS

UFCW CANADA RELEASE: WORKERS’ ACTION CENTRE LAUNCHES PROVINCIAL INITIATIVE – “UNDERCOVER STORIES ON WAGE THEFT”

Wage theft, in its various incarnations, is a workplace plague in Canada which is evident in a variety of communities. It is a particularly painful in immigrant communities. Many employers continuously abuse Employment Standards protections of these precarious workers as a means to simple but effectively improve profits.

On behalf of the 250,000 UFCW Canada members across Canada, we say NO to Wage Theft and YES to the much needed advocacy initiatives by the Workers’ Action Centre in Toronto. No worker deserves to get less than their fair wage. Every worker deserves to be heard.

We commend the Workers’ Action Centre on their initiative entitled “Undercover Stories on Wage Theft” and their advocacy in support for this initiative. We encourage you to take the time to support this important campaign.

To learn more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org

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ALTERNATIVE FEDERAL BUDGET 2011 LAUNCHED – RETHINK, REBUILD, RENEW: A POST-RECESSION RECOVERY PLAN

From Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

The Alternative Budget presents a comprehensive recovery plan designed to:

– get Canadians working in good jobs again;
– reduce record-high income inequality, strengthen Canada’s middle class, and improve supports for Canada’s poor and most vulnerable;
– protect public programs that all Canadians rely on — including public health care and public pensions;
– manage Canada’s debt-to-GDP ratio without vital public program cuts;
– get serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and
– launch a multi-pronged initiative to expand high value-added production in key sectors.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/afb2011

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TEACHING ABOUT LABOR ISSUES AND THE WISCONSIN WORKER FIGHTBACK

From Rethinking Schools

According to labor historian Mark J. Naison, the movement of workers that began in Wisconsin and is now spreading to other states is “the most important labor struggle in the United States in the 21st century.”

The current uprising of workers in Wisconsin and other states presents a powerful opportunity to teach students about what the protests are about and why their teachers and neighbors are joining the struggle.  It’s an opportunity to critically examine issues, and to model for students’ responsible civic action and engagement in the political process.

As members of teacher unions, we have an additional responsibility, summarized by the late Howard Zinn in an interview published in Transforming Teacher Unions:

“If teacher unions want to be strong and well-supported, it’s essential that they not only be teacher unionists but teachers of unionism. We need to create a generation of students who support teachers and the movements of teachers for their rights.”

Embrace this “teachable moment” and share with us in the comments what resources you are using, how you are using them, and how your students are responding.

Read more: http://rethinkingschools.org/news/WIProtestTeachingResources.shtml

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BOOK – THE SPIRIT LEVEL: WHY GREATER EQUALITY MAKES SOCIETIES STRONGER

[The authors] Wilkinson and Pickett make an eloquent case that the income gap between a nation’s richest and poorest is the most powerful indicator of a functioning and healthy society. Amid the statistics that support their argument (increasing income disparity sees corresponding spikes in homicide, obesity, drug use, mental illness, anxiety, teenage pregnancies, high school dropouts—even incidents of playground bullying), the authors take an empathetic view of our ability to see beyond self-interest…There is evidence that the human brain—with its distinctively large neocortex—evolved the way it has because we were designed to be attentive to, depend on, and be depended on by others.

Ordering information: http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Level-Equality-Societies-Stronger/dp/1608190366

Hear Wilkinson give a 1:34:42 speech on the subject of his book. The volume is okay after he’s introduced. The graphics he uses appear on your screen as he proceeds through the presentation.

http://www.fhs.sfu.ca/news/events/special-guest-speaker-dr.-richard-g.-wilkinson

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MAYTREE FOUNDATION – THE “PILOT” FOR RECRUITING TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS FOR LOW-SKILLED JOBS SHOULD BE ABOLISHED

The latest Maytree discussion paper argues that the growth in the temporary foreign worker program is contrary to Canada’s social and economic interests. It suggests that those currently in Canada under the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training should be granted permanent residence.

Read more: http://bit.ly/eVP7jX

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NO FARE IS FAIR – A ROUNDTABLE WITH MEMBERS OF THE GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY TRANSIT COMMITTEE

By Ali Mustafa, The Bullet

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA) is a promising new initiative aiming to build a united, non-sectarian, and militant anti-capitalist movement in the city among a diversity of rank-and-file labour unionists, grassroots community organizers, and youth alike. Since the GTWA’s inception in early 2010, mass public transit has emerged as one of the organization’s key political battlegrounds. In this in-depth roundtable discussion, members of the GTWA’s transit committee Jordy Cummings, Lisa Leinveer, Leo Panitch, Kamilla Pietrzyk, and Herman Rosenfeld explore both the opportunities and obstacles facing the campaign Towards a Free and Accessible TTC.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/480.php

(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Edu-factory

THE REALLY OPEN UNIVERSITY (ROU)

The Really Open University is an ongoing process of transformation by those with a desire to challenge the higher education system and its role in society.

Instigated by students and staff of higher education institutions in the city of Leeds (UK), the ROU is non-hierarchical and open to anyone who wishes to see an end to the commodifcation of knowledge and the creation of a free and empowering education system where creative and critical thought is fostered.

Background

Universities have traditionally been elite institutions benefiting a privileged minority. Their (anti)social role has been to reproduce the elite of society, enclosing knowledge in the minds of the few and cementing a small ruling class. There has been no ‘golden age’ of the university – it has never been an institution in the common interest.

More recently, higher education has undergone an accelerated process of privatisation and expansion. This has further contributed to the (anti)social role of the university, as the academy increasingly operates as a factory producing highly-trained yet docile workers. Universities are now run as businesses, with students as consumers and lecturers as creators of products. Knowledge has become a commodity that can be bought and sold, its ‘value’ determined by its ability to generate further private profit.

The 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review & Browne Report exacerbates the threat to knowledge with proposals to increase student fees to £9000 a year, while higher education faces funding cuts of 40%.  All this results in students taking on more debt for a hollowed-out ‘education’, lecturers being forced to carry out ‘economies exercises’ and staff working longer and harder hours for less money.

It doesn’t have to be like this.

A Really Open University is Possible

Imagine an education system where participants teach what inspires them, and learn what they are passionate about – a space where people share and develop their skills and knowledge not in the individual quest for jobs and profit but in a mutual attempt to create a more equitable and sustainable world…

The ROU sets out to change the expectations that people have of higher education, and by extension, the rest of our lives.

The multiple crises currently faced (higher education, neo-liberalism, climate change) open a crack for other narratives. Higher education could act as a laboratory of subversion, where collaboration creates collective solutions, and questions are asked about how people really want to live their lives.

In order to resist cuts and transform the university it is necessary to demystify the current system and move beyond the outdated and destructive model of neo-liberalism that currently governs it.

The ROU does not want to defend the university – we are not interested in maintaining an institution where our collective capacities are directed towards reproducing an elite or a highly-trained reserve army of labourers. We desire the transformation of the university, the creation of a common institution that works in the interests of all people in common.

ROU: http://reallyopenuniversity.wordpress.com/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas : http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Heraclitus

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 9 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/9/issue9_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 9 Number 1 2011 

ISSN 1478-2103
SPECIAL ISSUE
The Council of Europe’s White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue
Editors: TINA BESLEY, MICHAEL A. PETERS & JIANG XAIOPING

ARTICLES 

Tina Besley & Michael A. Peters. Introduction. Interculturalism, Ethnocentrism and Dialogue

Michalinos Zembylas & Vivienne Bozalek. The Council of Europe’s White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue: an analysis using the ethic of care

Peter Murphy. The Paradox of Dialogue

J. Gregory Keller. Dialogue as Moral Paradigm: paths toward intercultural transformation

Francesca Gobbo. Ethnographic Research in Multicultural Educational Contexts as a Contribution to Intercultural Dialogue

Naomi Hodgson. Dialogue and Its Conditions: the construction of European citizenship

John Igbino. Intercultural Dialogue: cultural dialogues of equals or cultural dialogues of unequals?

Evelin G. Lindner, Linda M. Hartling & Ulrich Spalthoff. Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: a global network advancing dignity through dialogue

James Arthur. Intercultural versus Interreligious Dialogue in a Pluralist Europe

Driss Habti. Reason and Revelation for an Averroist Pursuit of Convivencia and Intercultural Dialogue

Monica E. Mincu, Maurizio Allasia & Francesca Pia. Uneven Equity and Italian Interculturalism(s)

Danielle Zay. A Cooperative School Model to Promote Intercultural Dialogue between Citizens-to-Be

Nina L. Dulabaum. A Pedagogy for Global Understanding – intercultural dialogue: from theory to practice

Roxana Enache. Possible Orientations of the European Dimension in Romanian Educational Policy

Ineta Luka. Fostering Intercultural Dialogue in Tourism Studies

Robert K. Shaw. The Nature of Democratic Decision Making and the Democratic Panacea

Julie Allan. Responsibly Competent: teaching, ethics and diversity

Inna Semetsky. Becoming-Other: developing the ethics of integration
Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

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Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These are:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Red

ROUGE FORUM UPDATE – 5th MARCH 2011

Dear Friends,

The Rouge Forum Update including the Best and Worst Things in the History of the World, heaps of Spy vs Spy stuff, and some material about the school resistance to boot, is here: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

Don’t forget the Rouge Forum Conference, May 20-22 in ChicagoLand at Lewis University. The tentatively scheduled presenters include Peter McLaren, Dennis Carlson, and George Schmidt, editor of Substance News.

The Call for Proposals and details are linked here: http://www.rougeforumconference.org/

Good luck to us, every one.
Rich Gibson

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Equality

HOW FAIR IS BRITAIN? REFLECTIONS ON EQUALITY OVER THE PAST 12 YEARS – FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

 

Saturday 19th March 2011

10.00 – 4.00pm

Park Campus

University of Northampton

Northampton NN2 7AL

Registration:

Full fee: £35 (early payment by March 1st £30)

Non-waged / Students: £10

SPEAKERS:

Anna Henry (Head of Social Analysis & Foresight, Equality & Human Rights Commission)

Professor Andy Pilkington (Professor of Sociology at the University of Northampton)

Lystra Hagley-Dickinson (Senior Lecturer in Criminology, University of Northampton)

Manny Barot (Ex-Police Officer with Leicestershire Police. Researcher into equality and human rights within the criminal justicesystem)

Dr. Fionna Warner-Gale (Senior Visiting Fellow. Children, Young People and Mental Health. University of Lincoln)

Surinder Sharma (Director for Equality and Human Rights with the Department for Health)

Dave Coppock (Director, AimHigher Nottinghamshire)

Dr. Jane Callaghan (Senior Lecturer, Psychology, University of Northampton. Course Leader for Child and Adolescent Mental Health)

Martin Pratt (Corporate Director, Children & Learning, Luton Borough Council)

Floyd Douglas (Children’s Services, Northamptonshire County Council)

Dr. Daniel Burdsey (Senior Lecture in the Sociology of Sport at Brighton University)

Cyrille Regis MBE (Ex-professional footballer and England International)

Ben Cohen (Ex-England and Northamptonshire Saints rugby player. Now playing for Sale. Campaigns against homophobia in sport)

How Fair is Britain?

This is the question posed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission in its 700-page anatomy of disadvantage in the 21st century published in 2010. In the context of the new Equality Act 2010, and also the Government’s proposals around the “Big Society” and the future for public services in particular, this conference could not be more timely. The aim of this conference is to engage with these issue by drawing together academics and professionals/practitioners to look at challenges, and outline solutions, to make Britain fairer, based on how far we have come over the past 12 years.

Conference Themes:

  • Fairness and the Criminal Justice System
  • Fairness and Education
  • Fairness in Social Care / Local Government
  • Fairness in Health
  • Fairness in Sport

 

For further information about the conference, please email: equality@northampton.ac.uk

Visit the website at: http://www.northampton.ac.uk/equality

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Medieval University

WHAT IS A UNIVERSITY?

What is a University? Explaining the Rise of Universities in Medieval Europe

This is an essay by Amy Leach, a first year Education Studies student in the School of Education at the University of Northampton. It was written in December 2009.

It has been published on ‘The Flow of Ideas’ web site.

You can view Amy’s essay at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=contributions&sub=Universities%20-%20Amy%20Leach

Referenced as:

Leach, A. (2009) What is a University? Explaining the Rise of Universities in Medieval Europe, 10th December, Education Studies, School of Education, University of Northampton, online at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=contributions&sub=Universities%20-%20Amy%20Leach

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Education

WHY STUDY EDUCATION STUDIES?

Why Study Education Studies?

This is an essay by Louise Jemmett, a first year Education Studies student at the University of Northampton. It was written in November 2009.

It has been published on ‘The Flow of Ideas’ web site.

You can view Louise’s essay at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/index.php?page=contributions&sub=Education%20Studies%20-%20Louise%20Jemmett

Referenced as:

Jemmett, L. (2009) Why Study Education Studies? 2nd November, Education Studies, University of Northampton, online at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/index.php?page=contributions&sub=Education%20Studies%20-%20Louise%20Jemmett

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Professor Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES: VOL.7 NO.2

The new edition of The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies -JCEPS 7(2) is now published online at: http://www.jceps.com

The contents are:

1.Dave Hill (University of Northampton, England, and Middlesex University, London, England): Race and Class in Britain: a Critique of the statistical basis for Critical Race Theory in Britain

2.Tom G. Griffiths (University of Newcastle, Australia), Jo Williams (Victoria University, Australia): Mass schooling for socialist transformation in Cuba and Venezuela

3.Peter McLaren (University of California, Los Angeles, USA): Guided by a Red Star: the Cuban literacy campaign and the challenge of history

4.M. Wangeci Gatimu (Western Oregon University, Monmouth, Oregon, USA): Rationale for Critical Pedagogy of Decolonization: Kenya as a Unit of Analysis

5.Jennifer A. Sandlin (Arizona State University, USA), Richard Kahn (University of North Dakota, USA), David Darts (New York University, USA) and Kevin Tavin, (The Ohio State University, USA): To Find the Cost of Freedom: Theorizing and Practicing a Critical Pedagogy of Consumption

6.Brian Lack (Georgia State University, USA): No Excuses: A Critique of the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) within Charter Schools in the USA

7. Sondra Cuban and Nelly Stromquist (Lancaster University, UK and University of Maryland, USA): It Is Difficult To Be A Woman With A Dream Of An Education: Challenging U.S. Adult Basic Education Policies to Support Women Immigrants’ Self-Determination

8.Bill Templer (University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia): A Two-Tier Model for a More Simplified and Sustainable English as an International Language

9.Prentice Chandler (Athens State University, United States) and Douglas McKnight (The University of Alabama, United States): The Failure of Social Education in the United States: A Critique of Teaching the National Story from “White” Colourblind Eyes

10.Seçkin Özsoy (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey): A Utopian Educator from Turkey:Ýsmail Hakký Tonguç (1893-1960)

11.Domingos Leite Lima Filho (Federal Technological University of Paraná UTFPR, Brazil): Educational Policies and Globalization: elements for some criticism on the international organizations’ proposals for Latin America and the Caribbean Islands Countries

12.Andrea Beckmann (University of Lincoln, UK), Charlie Cooper (University of Hull, UK) and Dave Hill (University of Northampton, and Middlesex University, UK): Neoliberalization and managerialization of ‘education’ in England and Wales – a case for reconstructing education

13.Jane-Frances Lobnibe (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA): International Students and the Politics of Difference in US Higher Education

14.Magnus Dahlstedt (University of Linkoping, Sweden): Democratic Governmentality: National Imaginations, Popular Movements and Governing the Citizen

15.Torie L. Weiston-Serdan (Claremont Graduate University, California, USA): A Radical Redistribution of Capital

16.Brad Porfilio (Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, USA) and Greg Dimitriadis (University of Buffalo, New York, USA): Book Review: Marc Pruyn and Luis Huerta-Charles Eds. Teaching Peter McLaren: Paths of Dissent (New York: Peter Lang)

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and DAVE6@mdx.ac.uk.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk