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Tag Archives: Education and Social Class

Education and Capitalism

CRITICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION – CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS
Please circulate within your networks

CRITICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION
An international peer-reviewed journal
3 issues per annum
ISSN 1750-8487 (print)   1750-8495 (online)
Published by Routledge

Critical Studies in Education is one of the few international journals solely devoted to a critical sociology of education. Two questions frame the journal’s critical approach to research: (1) whose interests are served by current social arrangements in education and, (2) from the standpoint of the least advantaged, what can be done about inequitable arrangements? Informed by this approach, articles published in the journal draw on post-structural, feminist, postcolonial and other critical orientations to critique education systems and to identify alternatives for education policy, practice and research.

The journal welcomes submissions of the highest quality and importance, which make original theoretical and/or empirical contributions, and are aimed at moving the field forward. Submissions may be focused on education policy and/or practice (including pedagogy) across formal education contexts (e.g. schooling, vocational and further education, higher education) as well as informal settings (e.g. television, communities, the internet). Submissions typically focus on power relations associated with gender, class (/poverty), ethnicity and the reproduction of disadvantage.

CALL FOR PAPERS
While submissions that meet this general brief are most welcome, we are also seeking papers in line with the following theme:

CRITICAL VISIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION
Increasingly, education is being reduced to what can be measured, often in quantitative terms that do not adequately capture all there is to education and which are then used to compare students, institutions and nations. At the same time, we live in a world that is becoming increasingly complex where these accounting systems do not seem adequate. In this context, how can we create spaces for different imaginations for education? How can we create opportunities for education to be different?

Articles addressing the following topics are especially welcome:
•       How can education researchers contribute to what counts as evidence in contexts of policy and practice?
•       What kind of education research do we need to respond to the pressing issues of our times, such as climate change, terror and financial crises?

Manuscripts can be submitted to Critical Studies in Education online by visiting http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rcse

For more information and a sample copy of the journal, please visit our website at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcse20/current

Sincerely
Professor Trevor Gale | Editor in Chief
Critical Studies in Education Editorial Office

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Class Struggle

HOW CLASS WORKS – 2012: UPDATE 22nd SEPTEMBER 2011

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS
A Conference at SUNY Stony Brook June 7-9, 2012

The Center for Study of Working Class Life is pleased to announce the How Class Works – 2012 Conference, to be held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, June 7-9, 2012.   Proposals for papers, presentations, and sessions are welcome until December 12, 2011 according to the guidelines below.  For more information, visit our Web site at: http://www.workingclass.sunysb.edu.

Purpose and orientation: The conference seeks to explore ways in which an explicit recognition of class helps to understand the social world in which we live, and ways in which analysis of society can deepen our understanding of class as a social relationship. Presentations should take as their point of reference the lived experience of class; proposed theoretical contributions should be rooted in and illuminate social realities. Presentations are welcome from people outside academic life when they sum up social experience in a way that contributes to the themes of the conference.  Formal papers will be welcome but are not required. All presentations should be accessible to an interdisciplinary audience.

Conference themes: The conference welcomes proposals for presentations that advance our understanding of any of the following themes:

The mosaic of class, race, and gender. To explore how class shapes racial, gender, and ethnic experience and how different racial, gender, and ethnic experiences within various classes shape the meaning of class.
Class, power, and social structure. To explore the social content of working, middle, and capitalist classes in terms of various aspects of power; to explore ways in which class and structures of power 
interact, at the workplace and in the broader society.
Class and community. To explore ways in which class operates outside the workplace in the communities where people of various classes live.
Class in a global economy. To explore how class identity and class dynamics are influenced by globalization, including experience of cross-border organizing, capitalist class dynamics, international 
labor standards.
Middle class? Working class? What’s the difference and why does it matter? To explore the claim that the U.S. is a middle class society and contrast it with the notion that the working class is the majority; to explore the relationships between the middle class and the working class, and between the middle class and the capitalist class.

 

Class, public policy, and electoral politics. To explore how class affects public policy, with special 
attention to health care, the criminal justice system, labor law, poverty, tax and other economic policy, housing, and education; to explore the place of electoral politics in the arrangement of class 
forces on policy matters.
Class and culture: To explore ways in which culture transmits and transforms class dynamics.
Pedagogy of class. To explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class, at K-12 levels, in college and university courses, and in labor studies and adult education courses.

How to submit proposals for How Class Works – 2012 Conference

Proposals for presentations must include the following information: a) title; b) which of the eight conference themes will be addressed; c) a maximum 250 word summary of the main points, methodology, and slice of experience that will be summed up; d) relevant personal information 
indicating institutional affiliation (if any) and what training or experience the presenter brings to the proposal; e) presenter’s name, address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address. A person may present in at most two conference sessions. To allow time for discussion, sessions will be limited to three twenty-minute or four fifteen-minute principal presentations. Sessions will not include official discussants. 

 

Proposals for poster sessions are welcome. Presentations may be assigned to a poster session.

 

Proposals for sessions are welcome. A single session proposal must include proposal information for all presentations expected to be part of it, as detailed above, with some indication of willingness to participate from each proposed session member.

 

Submit proposals as an e-mail attachment to: michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu or as hard copy by mail to the How Class Works – 2012 Conference, Center for Study of Working Class Life, Department of Economics, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384.

Timetable:  Proposals must be received by December 12, 2012. After review by the program committee, notifications will be mailed on January 17, 2012. The conference will be at SUNY Stony Brook June 7-9, 2012.  Conference registration and housing reservations will be possible after February 20, 2012. Details and updates will be posted at http://www.workingclass.sunysb.edu.

Conference coordinator:
Michael Zweig
Director, Center for Study of Working Class Life
Department of Economics
State University of New York Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384
631.632.7536
michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu 
 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Lost Generation

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE CAN’T GET THE JOBS THEY WANT AND WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT IT

By Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley

The current generation of young people are the most qualified but the most underemployed generation ever. Meanwhile, a third of men and a fifth of women between the ages of 20-34 still live with their parents – in most cases because they cannot afford otherwise.

This e-booklet explains why so many young people are unable of get the jobs and the lives that they want. It challenges claims about the growth of the ‘knowledge economy’ and questions the legitimacy of education programmes designed to ‘raise standards’. With the new Coalition government and most policy makers offering almost nothing, save ‘apprenticeships without jobs’ for the masses and ‘internships’ for ‘the squeezed middle’, the pamphlet offers some preliminary proposals to start addressing the problem.

Available as free download from Radicaled: Rethinking education, economy and society: http://radicaled.wordpress.com/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Social Class

HOW CLASS WORKS 2012

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS
A Conference at SUNY Stony Brook June 7-9, 2012

The Center for Study of Working Class Life is pleased to announce the How Class Works – 2012Conference, to be held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, June 7-9, 2012. Proposals for papers, presentations, and sessions are welcome until December 12, 2011 according to the guidelines below.

For more information, visit our Web site at: http://www.workingclass.sunysb.edu  

Purpose and orientation: The conference seeks to explore ways in which an explicit recognition of class helps to understand the social world in which we live, and ways in which analysis of society can deepen our understanding of class as a social relationship. Presentations should take as their point of reference the lived experience of class; proposed theoretical contributions should be rooted in and illuminate social realities. Presentations are welcome from people outside academic life when they sum up social experience in a way that contributes to the themes of the conference. Formal papers will be welcome but are not required. All presentations should be accessible to an interdisciplinary audience.

Conference themes: The conference welcomes proposals for presentations that advance our understanding of any of the following themes:

* The mosaic of class, race, and gender. To explore how class shapes racial, gender, and ethnic experience and how different racial, gender, and ethnic experiences within various classes shape the meaning of class.
* Class, power, and social structure. To explore the social content of working, middle, and capitalist classes in terms of various aspects of power; to explore ways in which class and structures of power interact, at the workplace and in the broader society.
* Class and community. To explore ways in which class operates outside the workplace in the communities where people of various classes live.
* Class in a global economy. To explore how class identity and class dynamics are influenced by globalization, including experience of cross-border organizing, capitalist class dynamics, international labor standards.
* Middle class? Working class? What’s the difference and why does it matter? To explore the claim that the U.S. is a middle class society and contrast it with the notion that the working class is the majority; to explore the relationships between the middle class and the working class, and between the middle class and the capitalist class.
* Class, public policy, and electoral politics. To explore how class affects public policy, with special attention to health care, the criminal justice system, labor law, poverty, tax and other economic policy, housing, and education; to explore the place of electoral politics in the arrangement of class forces on policy matters.
* Class and culture: To explore ways in which culture transmits and transforms class dynamics.
* Pedagogy of class. To explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class, at K-12 levels, in college and university courses, and in labor studies and adult education courses.

How to submit proposals for How Class Works – 2012 Conference

Proposals for presentations must include the following information: a) title; b) which of the eight conference themes will be addressed; c) a maximum 250 word summary of the main points, methodology, and slice of experience that will be summed up; d) relevant personal information indicating institutional affiliation (if any) and what training or experience the presenter brings to the proposal; e) presenter’s name, address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address. A person may present in at most two conference sessions. To allow time for discussion, sessions will be limited to three twenty-minute or four fifteen-minute principal presentations. Sessions will not include official discussants. Proposals for poster sessions are welcome. Presentations may be assigned to a poster session. Proposals for sessions are welcome. A single session proposal must include proposal information for all presentations expected to be part of it, as detailed above, with some indication of willingness to participate from each proposed session member. Submit proposals as an e-mail attachment to michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu or as hard copy by mail to the How Class Works – 2012 Conference, Center for Study of Working Class Life, Department of Economics, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384.

Timetable: Proposals must be received by December 12, 2011. After review by the program committee, notifications will be mailed on January 17, 2012. The conference will be at SUNY Stony Brook June 7-9, 2012. Conference registration and housing reservations will be possible after February 20, 2012. Details and updates will be posted at http://www.workingclass.sunysb.edu  

Conference coordinator:
Michael Zweig
Director, Center for Study of Working Class Life
Department of Economics
State University of New York Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384
631.632.7536
michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski
The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk
MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski
The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com
Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski
Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalist Schools in Crisis

TOWARD A NATIONWIDE SCHOOL STRIKE, OCTOBER 7th 2010

A message from Rich Gibson, The Rouge Forum

Dear Friends,

Growing from the March 4th Actions, the M4 Committees have called for a nationwide school strike on October 7th, to be followed by state conferences on October 23 and 24. Shut them down and open Freedom Schools where educators, parents, students, and community people can gain and test knowledge in a reasonably free atmosphere, seeking to learn why things are as they are–and what to do.

Rescue Education from the Ruling Classes!

The Rouge Forum helped lead March 4th. Join Us!

More information on schools and society is here, at the Rouge Forum Blog: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

Good luck to us, every one.
Rich Gibson

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Class in Education

Class in Education

CLASS IN EDUCATION

 

I looked at a copy of Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine yesterday. This is an excellent book in my view, and I urge to buy it and/or get your library to stock it!

Glenn Rikowski

Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity

Edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine

Routledge, London & New York, 2010

ISBN 10: 0-415-45027-6 (hbk); ISBN 10: 0-203-87903-X (ebk)

CONTENTS:

Foreword: E. SAN JUAN JR.

Introduction: SHEILA MACRINE, DAVE HILL AND DEBORAH KELSH

1. Cultureclass – DEBORAH KELSH

2. Hypohumanities – TERESA L. EBERT AND MAS’UD ZAVARZADEH

3. Persistent inequities, obfuscating explanations: reinforcing the lost centrality of class in Indian education debates – RAVI KUMAR

4. Class, “race” and state in post-apartheid education – ENVER MOTALA AND SALIM VALLY

5. Racism and Islamophobia in post 7/7 Britain: Critical Race Theory, (xeno-)racialization, empire and education – a Marxist analysis – MIKE COLE AND ALPESH MAISURIA

6. Marxism, critical realism and class: implications for a socialist pedagogy – GRANT BANFIELD

7. Globalization, class, and the social studies curriculum – E. WAYNE ROSS AND GREG QUEEN

8. Class: the base of all reading – ROBERT FAIVRE

Afterword: the contradictions of class and the praxis of becoming – PETER McLAREN

Further details: http://www.routledge.com/books/Class-in-Education-isbn9780415450270

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk