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Tag Archives: Education and Capitalism

Dialectics of Class Struggle in the Global Economy

THIRD CONFERENCE OF THE IESE

*Call for Papers for the 3rd Conference of IESE*
*”Mozambique: Accumulation and Transformation in a Context of International Crisis”*
*Maputo, 4-5 September 2012*

IESE (Instituto de Estudos Sociais e Económicos) hereby announces that it will hold a conference on the theme:

*“Mozambique: Accumulation and Transformation in a Context of International Crisiss”, in Maputo, on 4-5 September 2012.*

Nowadays the international crisis is an omnipresent theme in news items, in analyses and in debates on public policies, options and priorities, and on corporate strategies, modes of production, appropriation, distribution and use of surplus, but also on the implications of climate change, the possibility and meaning of the Development State, and the sustainability of the Welfare State. Economies with noteworthy economic growth (such as that of Mozambique and of several other countries in sub-Saharan Africa) have been rather ineffective at reducing poverty, vulnerability and real inequality, in modifying productive structures, in reallocating income between social groups, and in reducing patterns of dependency and instability. At the same time, we witness the emergence of new forms of political organisation and new dynamics of demonstrations and expressions of social struggle outside of the formal institutional framework, related with waves of unemployment and social frustration, particularly among young people. Are we looking at a crisis caused by “failings of the State” reflected in lack of fiscal discipline, failure of the social protection model, and/or by deregulation of finance capital? Or is this a crisis of the social mode of accumulation and capitalist reproduction which, naturally, is of a political nature and has political implications and also affects models and options of the State and of representation, affirmation and political struggle?

Through this conference, IESE intends to introduce new perspectives and approaches, based on a political economy analysis, with relevance forMozambique.

Without prejudicing other relevant questions, the papers proposed should seek to develop problematics related with the following interrogations:
– How are the various dimensions of the crisis characterised, how do they relate to each other and reinforce each other, and what impact do they   have on the options for social, economic and political transformation and  transition? To what extent the crisis is one of financialization of global   capitalist patterns of accumulation and what are the implications for transition and transformation?
– To what extent does emerging from the crisis require fundamental changes in the political and economic patterns of production, accumulation, reproduction and redistribution of wealth, in what directions could such changes occur, and through what political processes could such a transition develop?
– What are the relevance, tendencies and dynamics of foreign investment and its relationship with natural resources and domestic processes of capital accumulation, and what are the implications for transition and transformation? What is the role of emerging economies in this process and what are the challenges and opportunities that they represent in the process of change?
– What role can education play in the dynamics of crisis and change?
– What challenges and pressures for employment and urbanisation emerge from these processes of crisis and change, and what implications do they have for options of social and economic transformation?
– How are the crisis of social security models and the social inequalities that this crisis reveals (with regard to the control, appropriation and redistribution of surplus) characterised, and how do they
  tend to develop? What economic, social and political implications can flow from them? Is this a demographic crisis or a crisis of the mode of accumulation (or both)?
– How can social and economic pressures affect these mass social movements, and what impact can such movements have on future options? How to characterise these movements in Europe, the USA, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa? What do they have in common and in what ways are they different? And what lessons are emerging from these processes?
– How do climate change, and the social pressures resulting from it, contribute to and how are they affected by the other dimensions of the crisis, and what impact do they have on the options for political, economic and social transformation?

***
Researchers interested in presenting papers at the conference are invited to send a summary of their themes (in Portuguese or English), in no more than 750 words to conferencia.crise@iese.ac.mz. The summary should indicate the theme, the problematic, the methodology and the basic sources of information, as well as information on the institutional position of the candidate and his/her contact details. The proposals may be individual or collective. All proposals will be considered and submitted to a jury for selection.

The themes should be relevant forMozambique, although they can have generic theoretical or methodological foci, or may be based on case studies from other countries. In addition to their presentation at the conference, the approved papers will be published by IESE in its series of “conference papers” and later some of them will be selected for publication in a book.

IESE may bear the transport and accommodation expenses for some participants.

For any further information, please contact IESE at the address conferencia.crise@iese.ac.mz.
Important deadlines to bear in mind:
– Summaries of the proposed papers should be submitted to IESE by 10 April 2012.
– IESE will inform the candidates as to whether their proposals have been approved by 15 May 2012.
– The definitive texts of the papers approved for the conference should be delivered to IESE by 5 August 2012.

The Director of IESE

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education and Capitalism

CRITICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION – CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS
Please circulate within your networks

CRITICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION
An international peer-reviewed journal
3 issues per annum
ISSN 1750-8487 (print)   1750-8495 (online)
Published by Routledge

Critical Studies in Education is one of the few international journals solely devoted to a critical sociology of education. Two questions frame the journal’s critical approach to research: (1) whose interests are served by current social arrangements in education and, (2) from the standpoint of the least advantaged, what can be done about inequitable arrangements? Informed by this approach, articles published in the journal draw on post-structural, feminist, postcolonial and other critical orientations to critique education systems and to identify alternatives for education policy, practice and research.

The journal welcomes submissions of the highest quality and importance, which make original theoretical and/or empirical contributions, and are aimed at moving the field forward. Submissions may be focused on education policy and/or practice (including pedagogy) across formal education contexts (e.g. schooling, vocational and further education, higher education) as well as informal settings (e.g. television, communities, the internet). Submissions typically focus on power relations associated with gender, class (/poverty), ethnicity and the reproduction of disadvantage.

CALL FOR PAPERS
While submissions that meet this general brief are most welcome, we are also seeking papers in line with the following theme:

CRITICAL VISIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION
Increasingly, education is being reduced to what can be measured, often in quantitative terms that do not adequately capture all there is to education and which are then used to compare students, institutions and nations. At the same time, we live in a world that is becoming increasingly complex where these accounting systems do not seem adequate. In this context, how can we create spaces for different imaginations for education? How can we create opportunities for education to be different?

Articles addressing the following topics are especially welcome:
•       How can education researchers contribute to what counts as evidence in contexts of policy and practice?
•       What kind of education research do we need to respond to the pressing issues of our times, such as climate change, terror and financial crises?

Manuscripts can be submitted to Critical Studies in Education online by visiting http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rcse

For more information and a sample copy of the journal, please visit our website at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcse20/current

Sincerely
Professor Trevor Gale | Editor in Chief
Critical Studies in Education Editorial Office

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

End the Damage

AN INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION: EXPOSING AND RESISTING THE NEOLIBERAL AGENDA – JCEPS SPECIAL ISSUE + CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies
Special Issue: Spring 2012
An International Examination of Teacher Education: Exposing and Resisting the Neoliberal Agenda
Chief Editor: Professor Dave Hill, Chief/Managing Editor and Founding Editor, Professor Dave Hill, Professor Peter L. McLaren Editor, North America, Professor Pablo Gentili Editor, Latin America

Guest Editors: Dr. Brad Porfilio, Lewis University & Dr. Julie Gorlewski, SUNY at New Paltz

In recent decades, the transnational capitalist class has wielded power and influence to gain control over elements of social life that were once considered vital domains to fostering the social welfare of global citizens. Affected public domains include natural resources, health care, prisons, transportation, post-catastrophe restoration, and education. The chief linchpin in the elite’s corporatization over social affairs is its effective propaganda campaign to inculcate the global community to believe that neoliberal capitalism ameliorates rather than devastates humanity. According to political pundits, free-market academics, and corporate leaders, economic prosperity and improvements in the social world emanate from “unregulated or free markets, the withering away of the state as government’s role in regulating businesses and funding social services are either eliminated or privatized, and encouraging individuals to become self-interested entrepreneurs” (Hursh, 2011).

Since neoliberalism is a term rarely uttered is most dominant (mainstream) media outlets, most citizens are not cognizant of how it is linked to many deleterious economic and social developments at today’s historical juncture, such as massive unemployment, the swelling of home foreclosures, homelessness, militarism, school closings, maldistribution of wealth, and environmental degradation (Hill, 2008; Hursh, 2011; McLaren, 2007; Ross & Gibson, 2007; Scipes, 2009). Equally important, many global citizens fail to recognize how the transnational elite have spawned a McCarthy-like witch hunt to eliminate academics, policies, and programs that have the potential to engage citizens in a critical examination of what is responsible for today’s increasingly stark social world – as well as what steps are necessary to radically transform it.

In this special issue of The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies, we call on progressive scholars from across the globe to provide empirical research, conceptual analysis, and theoretical insights in relation to how corporate policies, practices, and imperatives are structuring life in schools of education.

Since the impact of neoliberal capitalism on programs, policies, relationships, and pedagogies in schools of education is not uniform, as local histories and politics structure how macro-forces come to impact people in local contexts (Gruenwell 2003), the issue will be integral in understanding and confronting the social actors and constitute forces gutting the humanizing nature of education. Additionally, we call on critical scholars and pedagogues who have found emancipatory fissures amid corporatized schools of education to share policies, pedagogies, and cultural work that have the potency promote critical forms of education, democratic relationships, and peace, equity and social justice across the globe.

Manuscripts are due by December 1, 2011 and should be submitted as email attachments to porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu.

Papers submitted for publication should be between 5,000 and 8000 words long. While we would hope that papers would be submitted in accordance with the Harvard Referencing Style, we do accept those written in any commonly accepted academic style, as long as the style is consistent throughout the paper.

Please direct all inquires about this special issue to the guest editors at Porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Bonuses for Some

A USER’S GUIDE TO (DEMANDING) THE IMPOSSIBLE

New booklet on art and activism…

A Users Guide to (Demanding) the Impossible: Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination

This guide is not a road map or instruction manual. It’s a match struck in the dark, a homemade multi-tool to help you carve out your own path through the ruins of the present, warmed by the stories and strategies of those who took Bertolt Brecht’s words to heart: “Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it.”

It was written in a whirlwind of three days in December 2010, between the first and second days of action by UK students against the government cuts, and intended to reflect on the possibility of new creative forms of action in the current movements.

“Art is useless, so they tell us, as soon as it truly affects the world it loses its status as art. (You never know, it might slide down the slippery slope, becoming instrumental, propaganda, or even worse craft!). The strange thing is that those who tell us this are often the same people who put art to the crudest instrumental use – the art market. Maybe what they mean is that – art is useless when it’s not ultimately used to make a profit. Perhaps it’s the same logic as that which argues that education has no use outside slotting us into the mutilated world of work and consumption. This guide is for those of us who suspect that art has other uses and who are prepared to seek them.”

PDF available freely online (http://www.minorcompositions.info/usersguide.html), and discounts for ordering multiple copies.

64 pages, A6 size (4.134 x 5.827)

To be released June 1st, 2011

Released by Minor Compositions,London /New York / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info |info@minorcompositions.info

— 
Stevphen Shukaitis
Autonomedia Editorial Collective
http://www.autonomedia.org
http://www.minorcompositions.info

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education and Capitalism

EDUCATION AND CAPITALISM: STRUGGLES FOR LEARNING AND LIBERATION

EDITED BY JEFF BALE AND SARAH KNOPP

Forthcoming Fall 2011

“This book is a breath of fresh air! The chapters take on central issues in education with a clear vision of what could be. Class, race, language and culture become not just educational ‘problems,’ but tools with which to rethink the future. A stellar addition to books in our field” —Jean Anyon, author of Marx and Education

“At a time when the capitalist class and their corporate allies in the media have waged an all-out assault on teachers, students, and public education, Education and Capitalism responds by speaking truth to power.…Drawing from the lived experiences of the editors and their students, and informed by cutting edge socio-political critique, Education and Capitalism clears the path for a new understanding of the current assault on public schooling and points towards important directions if we are to save it.” —Peter McLaren, author of Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of  Revolution 

In the first decade of the twenty-first century, a conservative, bipartisan consensus dominates about what’s wrong with our schools and how to fix them. In each case, those solutions scapegoat teachers, vilify our unions, and promise more private control and market mentality as the answer. In each case, students lose—especially students of color and the children of the working class and the poor.

This book, written by teacher activists, speaks back to that elite consensus. It draws on the ideas and experiences of social justice educators concerned with fighting against racism and for equality, and those of activists oriented on recapturing the radical roots of the labor movement. Informed by a revolutionary vision of pedagogy, schools, and education, it paints a radical critique of education in Corporate America, past and present, and contributes to a vision of alternatives for education andliberation. Inside are essays that trace Marxist theories of education under capitalism; outline the historical educational experiences of emergent bilingual and African American students; recap the history of teachers’ unions; analyze the neoliberal attack on public schools under Obama; critically appraise Paolo Freire’s legacy; and make the historical link between social revolution and struggles for literacy.

With contributions from:
Rose Aguilar
Megan Behrent
Bill Bigelow
Michele Bollinger
John T. Green
Jesse Hagopian
Adrienne Johnstone
Brian Jones
Jessie Muldoon
Gillian Russom
Adam Sanchez
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Elizabeth Terzakis
Dan Trocolli

Sarah Knopp is a public high school teacher inLos Angeles and an activist with United Teachers Los Angeles.

Jeff Bale is assistant professor of second language education at Michigan State University. Their work has appeared in Rethinking Schools, International Socialist Review, and CounterPunch

Available Fall 2011 |Trade paper | $17.00 | 220 pages | ISBN: 9781608461646 | Published by Haymarket Books | http://www.haymarketbooks.org | info@haymarketbooks.org | 773-583-7884

For review or desk copies, contact Sarah Macaraeg, sarah@haymarketbooks.org

Book details at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/52611703/EDUCATION-AND-CAPITALISM-STRUGGLES-FOR-LEARNING-AND-LIBERATION

For more information, visit:
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Education-and-Capitalism

or link to the book’s Facebook page:
http://www.facebook.com/educationandcapitalism

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Capitorg

CAPITORG: EDUCATION AND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE HUMAN IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY – GLENN RIKOWSKI

The Praxis and Pedagogy Group of GradCAM present:

Glenn Rikowski

“Capitorg: Education and the Constitution of the Human in Contemporary Society”

Wednesday May 25th 2011

6.00 – 8.00pm

Henry Clarke Room, NCAD, 100 Thomas Street, Dublin

Our lives are increasingly constrained by the social relations that capital coordinates. The educational discourse of neoliberalism; promoting literacy for job opportunities, economic advancement, and individual success are of paramount importance to producing human capital rather than human beings. Neoliberal literacy includes training students and workers to accept “a new work discipline” and conditioning their will to maximise the accumulation of capital and wealth. As students increase their marketability, they are “always already shaped by the labyrinthine circuits of capitalist desire” (Peter McLaren and Ramin Farahmandpur, 2002)

We not just learning, teaching, and living in neoliberal capitalist societies, but are becoming “a new life-form: human-capital” through “the capitalization of humanity” (Glenn Rikowski, 2002).

Flyer for the event: http://www.gradcam.ie/glenn_rikowski.pdf

The Capitorg: http://www.ccfi.educ.ubc.ca/publication/insights/v10n02/html/kim/kim.html (Many thanks to Soowook Kim: Glenn)

Dr. Glenn Rikowski is a Senior Lecturer in Education Studies in the School of Education at the University of Northampton

Now is the time to ask questions.

Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin: http://www.gradcam.ie

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Marx and Education - Jean Anyon

MARX AND EDUCATION – JEAN ANYON

There was only one Karl Marx, but there have been a multitude of Marxisms. This concise, introductory book by internationally renowned scholar Jean Anyon centers on the ideas of Marx that have been used in education studies as a guide to theory, analysis, research, and practice.

Marx and Education begins with a brief overview of basic Marxist ideas and terms and then traces some of the main points scholars in education have been articulating since the late 1970s. Following this trajectory, Anyon details how social class analysis has developed in research and theory, how understanding the roles of education in society is influenced by a Marxian lens, how the failures of urban school reform can be understood through the lens of political economy, and how cultural analysis has laid the foundation for critical pedagogy in US classrooms. She assesses ways neo-Marxist thought can contribute to our understanding of issues that have arisen more recently and how a Marxist analysis can be important to an adequate understanding and transformation of the future of education and the economy.

By exemplifying what is relevant in Marx, and replacing that which has been outdone by historical events, Marx and Education aims to restore the utility of Marxism as a theoretical and practical tool for educators.

Selected Table of Contents

Series Editor Introduction

Introduction

1. Neo-Marxism in Education, 1970s – 1980s

2. Neo-Marxism in Education, 1990 – 2005

3. Current Issues: Economic Problems, Education Policies

4. Extending Marxist Theory and Practice

March 2011 | 120 pages | Paperback: 978-0-415-80330-4

Routledge

Series: Routledge Key Ideas in Education

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415803304/

At amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marx-Education-Routledge-Ideas-Educati/dp/0415803306

At amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marx-Education-Routledge-Ideas-Educati/dp/0415803306/ref=sr_1_5_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1301434167&sr=1-5

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski

LABOUR, CAPITALISM AND RADICAL CRITIQUE

Dr. Peter Thomas (Brunel University – Historical Materialism) gives a lecture in University of Tampere (Finland) 28 January 2011 (at 14-16, Linna Building K110, Kalevantie 5)

Themes:

Labour-Power (Arbeitskraft)

Die Organisationsfrage as regulative idea?

Wellcome!

Information: Mikko Lahtinen, kevattuuli@kopteri.net

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Some of my online articles on Labour Power:

Rikowski, G. (1990) The Recruitment Process and Labour Power, unpublished manuscript, Division of Humanities & Modern Languages, Epping Forest College, Loughton, Essex, July. Online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Recruitment%20and%20Labour%20Power

Rikowski, G. (1996) Apprenticeship and the Use-value Aspect of Labour Power, First Paper prepared for the ESRC Seminar Series on ‘Apprenticeship in Work and Education’, Nene Research Centre, Nene College of Higher Education, Northampton, 31st May, at The Flow of Ideas web site: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Apprenticeship%20and%20the%20Use-value%20Aspect%20of%20Labour%20Power

Rikowski, G. (2000) That Other Great Class of Commodities: Repositioning Marxist Educational Theory, BERA Conference Paper, Cardiff University, 7-10 September. Available from Education-line: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00001624.htm

McLaren, P. & Rikowski, G. (2001) Pedagogy for Revolution against Education for Capital: An E-Dialogue on Education in Capitalism Today, Cultural Logic: An Electronic Journal of Marxist Theory and Practice, Vol.4 No.1: http://clogic.eserver.org/4-1/mclaren%26rikowski.html

Rikowski, G. (2005) Distillation: Education in Karl Marx’s Social Universe, Lunchtime Seminar, School of Education, University of East London, Barking Campus, 14th February: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Distillation

Rikowski, G. (2006) Education and the Politics of Human Resistance, Information for Social Change, Issue No.23 (Summer): http://libr.org/isc/issues/ISC23/B3%20Glenn%20Rikowski.pdf

Athens, The Academy

NEW DATE FOR ‘THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY’ – MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

NEW DATE for ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’, Philosophy Department, Middlesex University

The Middlesex workshop on the Humanities will now take place on TUESDAY 7 DECEMBER 2010, 11am-6pm, Saloon (M004), Ground Floor, Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ.

Schedule:

11am
Christian Kerslake
Introduction: Philosophy, the Humanities and the University

11.30
Andrew McGettigan
How will Willett’s ‘New Providers’ affect the Arts and Humanities? Independents, For-Profits and External Degrees in the Proposals for Higher Education

12.00
Dave Hill
Education and Resistance in/under Capitalism

12.30
Discussion

1.00
Break for Lunch

2.00
Johann Hoiby, Alfie Meadows, Maria-Louise Rosbech
Student Reflections

2.45
Andrew Goffey
Stupidity and the University

3.15
Matthew Charles
Philanthropy and the Image of the University

3.45
Discussion & Coffee

4.30
Mark Kelly
Resisting the Bureaucratisation of the University

5.00 
Marina Vishmidt
The Humanities and the Location of Value in the University

5.30
Discussion

* * * 
THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY

What are the Humanities, and what are they for? What is a university, and what is it for? Is it possible to stipulate that Humanities education is an essential component of what a university does, or should be doing? How can the links be reinforced between Humanities education and principles of universality and equality?

In her recent book Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities (Princeton, 2010), Martha Nussbaum argues that “thirsty for national profit, nations, and their systems of education, are heedlessly discarding skills that are needed to keep democracies alive. If this trend continues, nations all over the world will soon be producing generations of useful machines, rather than complete citizens who can think for themselves”. She presents a case that Humanities education is essential to the cultivation of critical thinking, reflection and empathy with others. 

How, then, to effectively defend Humanities education? At this current juncture, is it possible to effectively defend the Humanities and higher education without also calling for an overall reform of the economy? 

In the past five years Middlesex University has abandoned teaching and research in two key Humanities subjects, History (closed in 2006) and Philosophy (admissions stopped in 2010). It appears to be on course to reduce all of its Humanities provision. This workshop will be a forum for lecturers and students to discuss the future of the Humanities at Middlesex and in the UK in general.

The workshop is co-organised by Andrew Goffey (a.goffey@mdx.ac.uk) and Christian Kerslake (c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk).

Attendance is free, but please register at mdxhumanities@yahoo.co.uk.

Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Peter McLaren

ACADEMIC REPRESSION

http://www.akpress.org/2010/items/academicrepression

Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic Industrial Complex

Peter McLaren (Editor), Steven Best (Editor), and Anthony J. Nocella II (Editor)

The extreme repressive attacks on Churchill, Finklstein, Fontan, Best, Massad, the “Dirty Thirty,” and many others represented in this book demonstrate the repressive logic of “US democracy,” whereby political elites, the mass media, and the education system establish and police the parameters of acceptable discourse. Churchill became America’s own Salman Rushdie terrorized by the fatwa of the right. Unprecedented for the media coverage given to a professor (in a mass media culture that virtually ignores substantive ideas in favor of spectacle and sensationalism) the Churchill affair was, however, just one of many cases of attacks on academic freedom that eerily evoke the tyranny of the McCarthy era where actors were blacklisted and professors were fired for having even liberal views or showing dissent against state repression. While there has been much research on political repression carried out by the Bush administration, FBI, and various law enforcement agencies, there has been little discussion on political 
repression in academia and how the shockwaves of 9/11 have reverberated throughout academia. This anthology brings together prominent academics who contribute original essays commissioned for this volume. The writers are known and respected figures in their respective fields, and many have experienced academic repression first-hand.

This volume aims to be a cogent intervention in debates over free speech, culture wars, and academic freedom. Given that the importance of free speech to academic life, and the crucial role universities play in the intellectual life of cultures as a whole, a volume addressing the political environment of universities in the current period promises to make a significant contribution.

Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic Industrial Complex (AK Press), is a much needed book on a topic that has seen little attention. Since 9/11 the Bush Administration has ventured to every campus influencing and forcing change by administration to handover faculty, staff, and student work to be flagged as possible signs of threatening behavior. While there have been numerous books on academic freedom, that topic is outdated and something that arguably does not exist on U.S. campus soil anymore. This volume addresses not only overt attacks on critical or radical thinking, it also – following socioeconomic trends unfolding for decades – engages the broad structural determinants of academic culture. Slowly but surely, the university is being transformed from a space for free thinking, experimentation, and philosophical education in the broadest sense into a narrow, restrictive, utilitarian institution that serves the technical needs of corporations, government, science and technology, and the military. Thus, as emphasized by numerous contributors, the ultimate cause of repression is not the academy itself, but contemporary capitalist society as a whole, which strongly shapes the structure, function, and priorities of higher education. This volume shows that while universities are crucial sites of socialization in capitalist ideologies and utilitarian performance, they are not monolithic citadels or homogeneous systems of thought that grind out in assembly-line fashion each and every student into the service of capitalism. For just as universities can train tomorrow’s FBI and CIA agents, so they can breed the next generation of radicals, resisters, saboteurs, and revolutionaries.

The university is a contested political space for three reasons. First, it is home to a diversity of viewpoints, ranging from far-right to far-left, from Christian to Muslim, from white to black, Indian, or Chicano/a, from speciesist to animal liberationist, and from heterosexual to gay/lesbian. Second, despite broad and growing trends of repression, there are varying degrees of tolerance for the discussion of non-mainstream or radical ideas in classrooms and campus life. Third, however uncritical, conditioned, and conformist some students might be, they have the potential (often actualized) to discuss, debate, and think critically about issues such as US colonialism, slavery, sexism, and speciesism, and professors, staff, and students – consciously or unconsciously – cannot socialize all of them into their own worldviews and politics.

— Nocella, Best, and McLaren

About the Editors:
Anthony J. Nocella, II is completing his doctoral work at Syracuse University. He is a Visiting Scholar of SUNY Cortland’s Center for Ethics, Peace and Social Justice (CEPS) and is teaching classes in Sociology and Criminology at Le Moyne College.

Steven Best is Associate Professor of Humanities and Philosophy at the University of Texas, El Paso.

Peter McLaren is Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT THE BOOK:

This courageous and chilling book reminds us that the Academy is always a context for intellectual exchange and political struggle. Don’t miss it! — Cornel West, Princeton University

This book takes us into the Corporate University, and it’s not a pretty sight. From firing critical thinkers to putting students in debt, the system is failing America. Time to take it back by fighting for free higher education. — Jim Hightower, populist speaker and editor of the “Hightower Lowdown”

The university should be a place of freedom not a battlefield where the military industrial complex is launching its most violent attack yet on the future of education. Nocella, Best, and McLaren shows us that education must be protected if we want peace and social justice for the world. Read now! — Cindy Sheehan, Peace Activist and Founder of “Gold Star Families for Peace”

To the litany of claims by academics that the university is a safe haven for intellectual and political dissent, this book offers a convincing counter-argument. Academic Repression is a long overdue collective study of the long and sorry history of violations of academic freedom, iconoclastic thought and political dissent in US institutions of higher education. The editors have assembled an impressive group of scholars who, often through personal experience as much as analytic acuity, have supplied us with commentary as much as documentation of the central thesis of the book. This book should be required reading in all of the social sciences, humanities and education courses. —
Stanley Aronowitz, author of “The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning”

Absolutely and utterly indispensible as we chart a way forward and attempt to finally turn the page on an era best left in the dustbin of history. It’s a first round knock out. — Dave Zirin, author APHOS

For over half a century, matters of knowledge and education have been central to the political struggles shaping our world, and the university has been a primary battleground. This collection is a chilling and powerful survey of contemporary battles, their stakes and possibilities. We should all be scared, and we should all concerned enough to take a stand. — Dr. Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Using the tired canards of anti-semitism, terrorism and radicalism, rightwing zealots are carrying out a merciless campaign of ideological cleansing on American campuses, often with the shameful complicity of university administrators. Academic Repression takes you to the frontlines of this fierce battle for the mind, telling stories of
purges, institutional cowardice and resistance. Here at last is a strategic plan for how to fight back against the New McCarthyites. Read it twice and then throw the book at them. — Jeffrey St. Clair, author Born Under a Bad Sky, co-editor of CounterPunch

Freedom of speech in the academy is a cornerstone of democracy — fascism always creeps closely behind intellectual repression, and we are not immune from the virus. If you want to understand how rocky our freedoms are today, pick up this book, read it, and join the fight to end censorship in all of its imperialist forms. — Joshua Frank, co-author with Jeffrey St. Clair of the forthcoming Green Scare: The Government’s New War on Environmentalism

The powers-that-be are uncomfortable with academic freedom because when one investigates any political, social, economic or even scientific issue thoroughly, a leftwing analysis will tend to emerge. Thinking is dangerous for them. This book is full of the stories and observations of some of the greatest thinkers alive today. — David Rovics, Singer-Songwriter

The editors have drawn together a diverse and competent group of scholars to assess critically the climate of academic repression. This is an essential book for anyone with a deep concern for the future of the academy. It will help raise awareness of crucial issues that face the universities. We ignore this challenge at our peril. — Dr. Andrew Fitz-Gibbon, Director, Center for Ethics, Peace and Social Justice, SUNY Cortland

As the editors and contributors of this valuable collection make clear, American academia has long been a combat zone, and never more than today. Eternal vigilance, and constant struggle, remain the watchwords if the free expression of thought upon which a good society depends is to be realized. — Joel Kovel, author of “Overcoming Zionism: Creating a Single Democratic State in Israel/Palestine”

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CONTRIBUTORS TO THE BOOK:

William Armaline

John Asimakopoulos

Bill Ayers

Liat Ben-Moshe

Michael Bérubé

Carl Boggs

Marc Bousquet

A. Peter Castro

Ward Churchill

Dana Cloud

Sumi E. Colligan

Maria E. Cotera

Christian Davenport

Victoria Fontan

Takis Fotopoulos

Henry Giroux

Adam Habib

Joy James

Robert Jensen

Richard Kahn

Caroline Kaltefleiter

Doug Kellner

Mark LeVine

Bill Martin

Peter McLaren

Micere M. Githae Mugo

Mechthild Nagel

Cary Nelson

Michael Parenti

Emma Perez

Mark Rupert

Rik Scarce

Deric Shannon

Stephen Sheehi

Amory Starr

Gregory Tropea

Ali Zaidi

Howard Zinn

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