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Tag Archives: Economics of Education

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

THE FALLING RATE OF LEARNING AND THE NEOLIBERAL ENDGAME

By David J. Blacker

Zero Books

Paperback £15.99 || $26.95

Dec 13, 2013. 978-1-78099-578-6.

See: http://www.zero-books.net/books/falling-rate-learning-neoliberal-endgame

BUY | AMAZON US | AMAZON UK

eBook £6.99 || $9.99

Dec 13, 2013. 978-1-78099-579-3.

BUY | AMAZON US | AMAZON UK

 

Outline

The current neoliberal mutation of capitalism has evolved beyond the days when the wholesale exploitation of labor underwrote the world system’s expansion. While “normal” business profits plummet and theft-by-finance rises, capitalism now shifts into a mode of elimination that targets most of us—along with our environment—as waste products awaiting managed disposal.
The education system is caught in the throes of this eliminationism across a number of fronts: crushing student debt, impatience with student expression, the looting of vestigial public institutions and, finally, as coup de grâce, an abandonment of the historic ideal of universal education. “Education reform” is powerless against eliminationism and is at best a mirage that diverts oppositional energies. The very idea of education activism becomes a comforting fiction.
Educational institutions are strapped into the eliminationist project—the neoliberal endgame—in a way that admits no escape, even despite the heroic gestures of a few. The school systems that capitalism has built and directed over the last two centuries are fated to go down with the ship. It is rational therefore for educators to cultivate a certain pessimism. Should we despair? Why, yes, we should—but cheerfully, as confronting elimination, mortality, is after all our common fate. There is nothing and everything to do in order to prepare.

Endorsements

“While it is no surprise that casino capitalism is in crisis and is spurring protests all over the world, few theorists connect the dots and analyze how this crisis moves through and is affected by a range of institutions. David Blacker has written a superb book in which matters of education, agency, economic justice and collective struggle come alive in both a language of critique and possibility. There will be no endgame to neoliberalism without critically thinking subjects who fight back collectively. This is the book that should be read to create the formative culture that makes such a struggle possible.” ~ Henry A. Giroux, author, America’s Education Deficit and the War on Youth, Professor of Communication Studies, McMasterUniversity

“David Blacker provides a mordantly clear-eyed assessment of our predicament. He asks hard questions, in the tradition of our best gadflies, and reveals even harder truths, doing us and our ‘democracy’ (such as it is) a great potential service. Read rightly, Blacker’s book, far from making you want to bury your head in the sand even deeper, will inspire you to shake yourself out of your slumber and do your part to arrest this pernicious development. We ignore his important work at our own peril.” ~ Christopher Phillips, author, Socrates Cafe: A Fresh Taste of Philosophy, Senior Writing Fellow, University of Pennsylvania

“Invigorating pessimism.” ~ Mark Fisher, author, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?, Department of Visual Cultures, Goldsmiths, University of London

“David Blacker’s book should be required reading for everyone marching circles in schools and universities.” ~ Douglas Lain, author, Billy Moon: 1968 and host of the Diet Soap Podcast

“The notion that widespread educational attainment is the key to widespread prosperity has long been a pillar of the dominant ideology. David Blacker’s central—and centrally important—insight is that the Great Recession has made this notion (which was always dubious) hopelessly anachronistic. When so many people have become superfluous to the capitalist system–mass joblessness persists four years after the recession officially ended–what have also become superfluous are these people’s skills, the schools that educate them, and the spending that funds the schools. And a capitalism mired in crisis just isn’t a capitalism that can afford to pay for what it doesn’t need. But isn’t this only a temporary situation? Drawing on Karl Marx’s falling-rate-of-profit theory and his associated theory of relative surplus (superfluous) population, Blacker warns that it may well be permanent and he urges us to face this prospect soberly and respond accordingly.” ~ Andrew Kliman, author, The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the Great Recession, Professor of Economics, PaceUniversity

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PUBLIC GOOD: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

SRHE Higher Education Theory Group Seminar

Higher Education as a Public Good: Critical Perspectives

Monday 4 July –Tuesday 5 July 2011

New College, Oxford

The Society for Research into Higher Education Theory Group invites you to participate in a 2-day symposium examining issues underlying the concept of higher education as a public good. This is a topic much discussed in the light of recent policy developments in the UK and in many other countries. The seminar will explore its theoretical underpinnings from several disciplinary perspectives. There will be inputs from keynote speakers and participative discussions on the issues raised. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings.

Keynote Speakers:

Nick Barr: Professor of Public Economics. LSE London

Bob Cowen: Emeritus Professor of Education. IOE London

David Dill: Emeritus Professor of Public Policy. University of North Carolina

Jon Nixon: Honorary Professor.University of Sheffield

Paul Standish: Professor of Philosophy of Education. IOE London

Registration

This symposium will take place at New College Oxford and the fee of £125 (£155 for non members of SRHE) covers the cost of accommodation for one night in ensuite rooms and all meals, including dinner in the College on Monday evening. Rooms at the College are limited so delegates are advised to make an early registration to attend this symposium.

The closing date for bookings is 4 June 2011.

To attend this event please e-mail: Nicola Manches (nmanches@srhe.ac.uk) to reserve your place and arrange payment. Please address all enquiries about this or other SRHE events to Nicola Manches at the SRHE Offices.

Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel +44 (0) 20 7447 2525, Fax +44 (0) 20 7447 2526, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Higher Education

REIMAGINE THE UNIVERSITY

How could we transform the university, how could students and lecturers learn differently through more creative, critical and empowering processes, is it even possible to transform the university, or do we need to create an entirely different system?

We invite you to be a part of exploring and demonstrating an alternative educational system over three days. Be it a workshop, a lecture a discussion a film an event, we are calling… on students, lecturers and staff and others to come together and show another university is possible.

***
For a long time the university has been undergoing a process of privatisation.

Universities are now run as businesses, with students as consumers and lecturers as creators of products – knowledge has become a commodity that can be bought and sold. The sole purpose of university has become to train docile workers to perform functions within a capitalist system, to contribute to the enrichment of the few rather than the collective social improvement of all.

The recent Browne Report, written by former executive of BP, takes this process to a whole new level- proposing a removal on the cap on fees which will create an even more hierarchical education system, reducing research funding and rising fees to an estimated £10,000 a year. All this results in students taking on more debt for the same education, with lecturers being forced to carry out ‘economies exercises’ and staff working longer hours and harder for less money.

It is clear that the university system is becoming bankrupt and in need of profound change, but no-one can see an alternative, a solution, a way out.

As workers and students at different places within the university system, we can see a different way forward, we don’t have all the answers, but we have many ideas and are sure there are many more out there. We are putting on a three-day event across the university to facilitate the process of re-imagining the higher education system. We would like to explore how universities can become a place where creative and critical thought is fostered, where participants teach what inspires them, learn what they are passionate about, where people share and develop their skills and knowledge in order to create a more equitable and sustainable world, not simply for jobs and profit.

To be held at University of Leeds & Leeds Metropolitican University 24th -26th November

Precise locations and workshops to be announced on our website: http://www.reallyopenuniversity.org

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Michael Neary

MARKETISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE STUDENT AS CONSUMER

Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer, jointly edited by Mike Molesworth, Lizzie Nixon and Richard Scullion and was published by Routledge in October 2010.

The Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer was launched at the House of Commons on 28th October. The launch was hosted by Baroness Estelle Morris in the Thatcher Room in Portcullis House.

About the Book:

Until recently government policy in the UK has encouraged an expansion of Higher Education to increase participation and with an express aim of creating a more educated workforce. This expansion has led to competition between Higher Education institutions, with students increasingly positioned as consumers and institutions working to improve the extent to which they meet ‘consumer demands’.

Especially given the latest government funding cuts, the most prevalent outlook in Higher Education today is one of business, forcing institutions to reassess the way they are managed and promoted to ensure maximum efficiency, sales and ‘profits’. Students view the opportunity to gain a degree as a right, and a service which they have paid for, demanding a greater choice and a return on their investment. Changes in higher education have been rapid, and there has been little critical research into the implications. This volume brings together internationally comparative academic perspectives, critical accounts and empirical research to explore fully the issues and experiences of education as a commodity, examining:

The international and financial context of marketisation

The new purposes of universities

The implications of university branding and promotion

League tables and student surveys vs. quality of education

The higher education market and distance learning

Students as ‘active consumers’ in the co-creation of value

Changing student experiences, demands and focus

With contributions from many of the leading names involved in Higher Education including Ron Barnett, Frank Furedi, Lewis Elton, Roger Brown and also Laurie Taylor in his journalistic guise as an academic at the University of Poppleton, this book will be essential reading for many.

About the Authors

Mike Molesworth is Senior Lecturer in Online Marketing and Consumer Behaviour at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Richard Scullion is Senior Lecturer in Marketing Communications and Political Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Elizabeth Nixon is Lecturer in Marketing Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

The book can be bought from:

Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415584470/

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775427&sr=1-1

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775597&sr=1-1

A pre-print version of a chapter in the book by Michael Neary and Andy Hagyard, Pedagogy of Excess: An alternative political economy of student life can be viewed here: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/files/2010/10/Pedagogy-of-Excess-preprint.pdf  

Michael Neary and Joss Winn’s chapter 10 in the book, Student as Producer: reinventing the student experience in higher education can be found at: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/1675/1/Future_of_HE_-_Chapter_10.pdf

See also:

Neary, M. (2010) Student as Producer: A Pedagogy for the Avant-Garde; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach? Learning Exchange, Vol.1 No.1, online at: http://learningexchange.westminster.ac.uk/index.php/lej/article/viewFile/15/13

Student as Producer blog, is at: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/blog/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Marketisation of Higher Education

Education

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL – VOLUME 9 NUMBER 3 2010

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL
Volume 9 Number 3  2010   ISSN 1474-9041

Just published at: http://www.wwwords.eu/eerj/content/pdfs/9/issue9_3.asp

SPECIAL ISSUE
MAPPING THE EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH SPACE: policy, governance and cultures
Guest Editors: LISBETH LUNDAHL, STEFAN HOPPMAN, MAARTEN SIMONS & MARTIN LAWN

PART 1

Pia Cort. Stating the Obvious: the European Qualifications Framework is not a neutral evidence-based policy tool

Francesca Caena & Umberto Margiotta. European Teacher Education: a fractal perspective tackling complexity

Mariana Gaio Alves, Claudia Neves & Elisabete Xavier Gomes. Lifelong Learning: conceptualizations in European educational policy documents

Nafsika Alexiadou, Danica Fink-Hafner & Bettina Lange. Education Policy Convergence through the Open Method of Co-ordination (OMC): theoretical reflections and implementation in ‘old’ and ‘new’ national contexts

Peter Jones. The Politics of the Economics of Education in the European Union

David Rutkowski & Laura C. Engel. Soft Power and Hard Measures: large-scale assessment, citizenship and the European Union

Sotiria Grek. International Organisations and the Shared Construction of Policy ‘Problems’: problematisation and change in education governance in Europe

Romuald Normand. Expertise, Networks and Indicators: the construction of the European strategy in education

Johanna Ringarp & Martin Rothland. Is the grass always greener…? The Effect of the PISA Results on Education Debates in Sweden and Germany

REVIEW ESSAY

Maroussia Raveaud. Becoming an Adult in Europe: a socially determined experience

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to all numbers of the 2010 volume (this includes full access to ALL back numbers) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.eu/subscribeEERJ.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.eu/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Martin Lawn (m.lawn@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Books

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION VOLUME 8 NUMBER 2 (2010)

Policy Futures in Education
Volume 8 Number 2, 2010

ISSN 1478-2103

SPECIAL ISSUE
THE UNIVERSITY IN TRANSITION

Guest Editor: GARETT GIETZEN

Garett Gietzen. Introduction. Challenges and Possibilities for Today’s University

Michael A. Peters. Re-imagining the University in the Global Era

Garett Gietzen. Jean-François Lyotard and the Question of Disciplinary Legitimacy

Stephanie Mackler. From the Positivist to the Hermeneutic University: restoring the place of meaning and liberal learning in higher education

Casey E. George-Jackson. The Cosmopolitan University: the medium toward global citizenship and justice

Rodrigo Britez & Michael A. Peters. Internationalization and the Cosmopolitical University

Daniel Araya. Cultural Democracy: universities in the creative economy

BOOK EXCERPT

Henry A. Giroux. Challenging the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex after 9/11. Introduction to University in Chains: confronting the military-industrial-academic complex (Paradigm Publishers, 2007)

REVIEW ESSAY

Eugenie A. Samier. The Evolution of the Modern University: from scholarship to disenchanted economic handmaiden

OBAMA’S AMERICA

Michael A. Peters. Economics Trumps Politics; Market Trumps Democracy: the US Supreme Court’s decision on campaign financing

BOOK REVIEWS

Higher Learning, Greater Good: the private and social benefits of higher education (Walter W. McMahon), reviewed by Jennifer A. Delaney & Patricia Yu

Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy (George Fallis), reviewed by David J. Ondercin

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/8/issue8_2.asp
Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access). Subscription to the 2010 issues (i.e. full access to the articles in Volume 8, Numbers 1-6) is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. Personal subscriptions also include automatic free access to ALL PAST ISSUES. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact Professor Michael A. Peters (mpet001@illinois.edu).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These are:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski