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Karl Polanyi

TWELTH INTERNATIONAL KARL POLANYI CONFERENCE

Twelfth International Karl Polanyi Conference
Karl Polanyi and Latin America

National University General Sarmiento Los Polvorines­Buenos Aires, Argentina November 8­9, 2012
Co-organized by the Conurbano Institute, National University General Sarmiento, Argentina and the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy, Concordia University, Canada

CALL FOR PAPERS
At the present time, can nations and peoples defend their sovereignty and protect their societies from subordination to global capital and dependence on economic and political centers?

In Latin America, in particular, there is evidence of encouraging signs:
a) National-popular processes supported by new social movements that question the neoliberal economic rationale and in some cases propose new paradigms: socialism for the XXIst century, vivir bien/ buen vivir, that give priority to guaranteeing the livelihood of all citizens, respecting cultural diversity and harmony with nature.
b) Interstate forms of solidarity (UNASUR, CELAC)1 to resist North American hegemony that increases the capacity for greater autarchy and sovereignty to confront the economic, political, and cultural
domination of the neoliberal project and the continuous commodification of all aspects of life.
c) The search for new frameworks of social and political thought, particularly the so-called “decoloniality” that converges with important historical trends in the region. Others include the theology and pedagogy of liberation, dependency theory, new variants of socialism, the peasants’ movement, the worldview of indigenous peoples, the contemporary feminist struggle against patriarchy and the struggle for the rights of nature.

In Polanyi’s terms, are these processes temporary responses to the crisis of the world capitalist order, or true “counter-movements” that challenge neoconservative projects and the dominant neoliberal paradigm? If so, can they lead to the re-embedding of the economy into more just and democratic societies? Can this be a historic turning point that could spread to other societies that have experienced capitalist development and now confront problems of their own and of the planet, resulting in another “great transformation”, or an “another globalization”? Is there a risk that the latent global crisis will push democracy inLatin America and other regions of the world towards new forms of fascism?

Given the structural failure of the global market to provide workers with dignified wages – the erosion of the social foundations of life as foreseen by Marx and Polanyi – and inspired by the Union of South American Nations , Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, the World Social Forum’s slogan that “another world (and another economy) is possible”, civil society organizations and increasingly governments in Latin America, are developing initiatives to promote new forms of self-managed and associational work and to revitalize indigenous communal activities. What is the transformational potential of these tendencies? How can the popular masses protect themselves when the management of the global capital crisis is focused on the interests of core countries? Is it sufficient to promote associationalism and redistribution, or is it necessary to reinvent the State? In particular, should generalized cash income transfers to individuals or families that broaden redistribution, a concept central to Polanyi, become a new right of citizens to basic income, thereby reducing indigence and poverty? Could we thus achieve a just society without transforming the relationship between the state, the economy, and society as well as the socioeconomic models that today reinforce the concentration of economic power?

The ecological crisis – the erosion of the natural foundations of life also foreseen by Marx and Polanyi – has led to a multiplicity of local and global movements to defend the balance with nature lost to global market forces. Is it possible to include our long-term concern about the planet in the short-term agendas of governments oriented to legitimize themselves through elections or the struggle of popular social movements for survival? If the possibility of unlimited growth is ruled out (which was one of Polanyi’s concerns), can the new movements for responsible consumption contribute to building “another economy”?

Regardless of the nomenclature – social economy, solidarity economy, community economy, popular economy, social and solidarity economy, to name a few – new initiatives are emerging in both the North and in the South. Are they similar in scope and in scale in the center and in the periphery? What role does planning and restructuring of national or regional economies play in an era of globalization (greater autarchy, as in food sovereignty)? Can new forms of reciprocity and fair trade (truly non commoditized) be amplified at the international level? How plausible is the convergence and complementarities between these movements for another economy in the North and in the South?

The resonance of Karl Polanyi’s ideas on these issues is recognized by scholars across disciplines. Since the 2012 international conference is being held in Latin America, it will address other issues that are important for Polanyi scholars:

Why did Polanyi not include the colonization process of America and the co-constitution of America and Europe in his reconstruction of the process of evolution of the market and capitalism, that are at the core of decolonial thought today?

Why did Polanyi not show any interest in the issue of development, the paradigm for social transformation in this region that dominated the twentieth century?

What can we obtain by combining Marx’s approach to the modes of production, ever present in the social sciences and in the history of this region, with Polanyi’s patterns of integration?

Are there important and relevant differences between the liberalism to which Polanyi referred to and the neoliberalism of today?

How can we interpret Polanyi’s analysis of religion in terms of Latin American liberation theology?

Can we apply Polanyi’s analysis of corporatism to the present structure of Latin American societies?

How can we compare Polanyi’s analysis of the crisis of international capitalism with the contemporary global crisis and, in particular, with reference to governance and interstate relations?

As in all previous International Polanyi Conferences, papers on the life and work of Karl Polanyi are welcome as well as papers from academics and /or professionals on the contemporary relevance of Karl Polanyi’s thought.

Simultaneous interpretation (Spanish / English) will be available.
Abstracts (maximum 250 words) should be sent before March 15th, 2012 to: polanyi@alcor.concordia.ca

Conference Organizing Committee:
Honorary Chairperson: Kari Polanyi Levitt, Mc Gill University, Canada
José Luís Coraggio, National University General Sarmiento, Argentina
Margie Mendell, Concordia University, Canada
Jean­Louis Laville, Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (CNAM, Paris), France
Antonio David Cattani, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Registration Fees:
Non­Latin Americans:
Registration fee: $250 US – Meals: $50 US (Two lunches and coffee breaks)
Latin Americans:
Registration fees: $150 US – Meals: $50 (Two lunches and coffee break)
Students:
Registration Fee: $50 US – Meals: $50 (Two lunches and coffee break)

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Crisis Sublime

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE 2010 – REGISTRATION ON THE DOOR

PREREGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED FOR THE CONFERENCE. HOWEVER YOU CAN COME 
AND REGISTER ON THE DOOR, THURSDAY THROUGH TO SUNDAY

Registration desk is at SOAS, Thornhaugh Square, Russell Square Underground station.

Thursday at 12:00

Friday at 9.00

Saturday at 9.00

Sunday at 9.00

All those who cannot afford the suggested unwaged contribution rate, or who only wish to attend a few sessions, should come to registration to discuss a fair contribution.

‘Crisis and Critique’: Historical Materialism Annual London Conference 2010

Central London, Thursday 11th to Sunday 14th November

Provisional Programme Now Available online: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual7

Notwithstanding repeated invocations of the ‘green shoots of recovery’, the effects of the economic crisis that began in 2008 continue to be felt around the world. While some central tenets of the neoliberal project have been called into question, bank bailouts, cuts to public services and attacks on working people’s lives demonstrate that the ruling order remains capable of imposing its agenda. Many significant Marxist analyses have already been produced of the origins, forms and prospects of the crisis, and we look forward to furthering these debates at HM London 2010. We also aim to encourage dialogue between the critique of political economy and other modes of criticism – ideological, political, aesthetic, philosophical – central to the Marxist tradition.

In the 1930s, Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht projected a journal to be called ‘Crisis and Critique’. In very different times, but in a similar spirit, HM London 2010 aims to serve as a forum for dialogue, interaction and debate between different strands of critical-Marxist theory. Whether their focus is the study of the capitalist mode of production’s theoretical and practical foundations, the unmasking of its ideological forms of legitimation or its political negation, we are convinced that a renewed and politically effective Marxism will need to rely on all the resources of critique in the years ahead.

Crises produce periods of ideological and political uncertainty. They are moments that put into question established cognitive and disciplinary compartmentalisations, and require a recomposition at the level of both theory and practice. HM London 2010 hopes to contribute to a broader dialogue on the Left aimed at such a recomposition, one of whose prerequisites remains the young Marx’s call for the ‘ruthless criticism of all that exists’.

Themes discussed by the Conference include: Activism * Adorno: Philosophy, Aesthetics, Politics * Aesthetics of Crisis * Art and Activism * Althusser and the Aleatory Encounter I: Conceptual Aspects * Althusser and the Aleatory Encounter II: Philosophical Contrasts * Applying Value Theory * Approaching Passive Revolutions * Art in Neoliberalism * The Arts and Capitalist Triumphant: American Culture in the 1940s * Between Political Economy and Political Struggles *  Beyond What Is and Isn’t to Be Done: The Question of Organisation Today * Biocapitalism * Bolshevik History * Book Launch: Jairus Banaji’s Theory as History * Capital and the Crisis of Nature * Capitalism, Labour, Photography * Centenary of Hilferding’s Finance Capital * China: Internal Struggles and External Perceptions * Class, Gender, Crisis: The Attack on Public Services and Welfare * Class and Nation in the Middle East * Climate Change and Ecological Crisis: Law, Gender, Technology * Commodities, Labour and Space * Conjuncture, Contingency and Overdetermination * The Contemporary Global Economy (Marx and the ‘Global South’ 1) * Crisis and Accumulation in Asia * Crisis of Representation: Philosophy, Politics, Aesthetics * Crisis in Greece, Crisis in the Eurozone * The Crisis this Time * Commons and Commonwealths * Commons and Communism, Past and Present * Confronting the Right * Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism * Death and Utopia: Bloch and Benjamin * Dependency and Exploitation in Latin America * Dimensions of the Crisis: History, Finance, and the Labour Process * Energy and Crisis * The End of Old and New Labour: What’s Left? * Eurozone Crisis: Causes and Ways Out * Feminism and the Critique of Political Economy * Financial Capital Before and After the Crisis * Financialisation: Theory and Practice * Forgotten Space: Capitalism and the Sea * Forms of Working-Class Resistance * From Crisis To Crises: Marxist Perspectives On Latin America In The Global Economy * From Crisis of Capitalism to Crisis of the Public Sector * Gender, Labour and the Future of Feminism * Geographies of Crisis and Critique I * Geographies of Crisis and Critique II * German Crises * Georg Lukács and the Aspiration Towards Totality * Gramsci * Historical Materialism, Universal History, and East Asia * Histories of Workers’ Struggles * The Ideology of the ‘Big Society’ * Imperialism: History and Theory * Intellectuals, Public Discourse and Education * International Relations, Militarism and Modes of Foreign Relations * Japanese and Western Marxism * Korsch, Lefebvre and Hegelian Marxism * Labour and Migration * Labour Power and the Marxian Analytics of Crisis * Latin America, Resistance and Political Economy * Legacies of Bolshevism * Lenin, Luxemburg and the Russian Revolution * Limits of Citizenship and Democracy * Managing Crisis: Fair Trade, Cooperatives,  Degrowth * Marx Against Eurocentrism (Marx and the ‘Global South’ 2) * Marx and Critique * Marxian Investigations * Marxism and Geopolitics * Marxism and International Law * Marxism and Politics Today * Marxism and Theories of Politics * Marxist Theories of Finance and Risk * Marxist Theory and Cultural Politics * Marx for Our Times * Marx, Normativity, Justice * Marx’s Capital and the Development of Capitalism Today * Music and Resistance * Neoliberalism and World Cinema: A Double Take * Palestine and Global Justice: Current and Historic Challenges for the Left * Poetics, Painting, Politics * Political Ecology in a Time of Crisis * Political Economy and Value Theory * The Politics and Political Economy of the Media * The Politics of Housing * Profit and the Crisis * Radicalism in Contemporary Art and Literature * Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia * Rethinking the State * Rosa Luxemburg  and the Critique of Political Economy * Screening: Comuna Under Construction * Servicing the Crisis * Sex in Crisis * Slavery and American Capitalism * Stasis, Contradiction, Hostility * Strategies for Art Today I * Strategies for Art Today II * Theorising the Crisis I * Theorising the Crisis II * Theorising the Crisis III * The Transformation of Chinese Marxism * Ultra-Leftism, Insurrection, and the City * Useless But True: Economic Crisis and the Peculiarities of Economic Science * Value and Struggles in China * Varieties of Capitalism I * Varieties of Capitalism II * Violence and Non-Violence * Walter Benjamin and Anthropological Materialism * Walter Benjamin and the Critique of Violence * Whither Feminism? * Who Rules the World? Contemporary Views on Ruling and Capitalist Classes * Workers, the Union Movement and the Crisis * Workers’ Self-Management and Alternative Work Organisation I * Workers’ Self-Management and Alternative Work Organization II * The Working Class after Neoliberalism: From the World to the East End of Glasgow * The Work of Daniel Bensaid *

Speakers include: Greg Albo * Bueno Aldo * Görkem Akgöz * Idris Akkuzu * Donatella Alessandrini * Anne Alexander * Jamie Allinson * Elmar Altvater * Marko Ampuja * James Anderson * Kevin Anderson * Alex Anievas * Caroline Arscott * Sam Ashman * John Ashworth * Tara Atluri * Maurizio Atzeni * Antonio Azevedo * Dario Azzellini * Abigail Bakan * Jeff Bale * Jairus Banaji * Laurent Baronian * Luca Basso * Amita Baviskar * Wesley Baxter * Dave Beech * Riccardo Bellofiore * Aaron Benanav * Marc Berdet * Janis Berzins * Beverley Best * Brenna Bhandar * Alain Bihr * Cyrus Bina * Robin Blackburn * Paul Blackledge * Joost de Bloois * Iain Boal * Roland Boer * Armando Boito * Patrick Bond * Bill Bowring * Chris Boyd * Umut Bozkurt * Honor Brabazon * Craig Brandist * Pepijn Brandon * Lutz Brangsch * Colm Breathnach * Peter Brogan * Heather Brown * Sebastian Budgen * Jonah Butovsky * Alex Callinicos * Liam Campling * Bob Cannon * Thomas Carmichael * The Carrot Workers Collective * Warren Carter * Noel Castree * Aude de Caunes * Maria Elisa Cevasco * Giorgio Cesarale * Sharad Chari * Matthew Charles * François Chesnais * Danielle Child * Christopher Chitty * Joseph Choonara * John Clegg * Perci Coelho * Sheila Cohen * Alejandro Colás * Nathan Coombs * John Cooper * Luke Cooper * Gareth Dale * Neil Davidson * Chuck Davis * Tim Dayton * Shane Deckard * Radhika Desai * Li Dianlai * Katja Diefenbach * Angela Dimitrakaki * James Dunkerley * Bill Dunn * Cedric Durand * Nick Dyer-Witheford * Caroline Edwards * Steve Edwards * Evie Embrechts * Katsuhiko Endo * Theresa Enright * Adam Fabry * Mauro Farnesi Camellone * Sara Farris * David Featherstone * Romain Felli * Oliver Feltham * David Fernbach * Michele Filippini * Ben Fine * Eoin Flaherty * Paul Flenley * Keith Flett * Kirsten Forkert * Des Freedman * Alan Freeman * James Furner * Nicola Fusaro * Jin Gao * Lindsey German * M.A. Gonzalez * Sara Gonzalez * James Goodman * Jamie Gough * Nicolas Grinberg * Agon Hamza  * Adam Hanieh * Bue Rübner Hansen * Jane Hardy * Lea Haro * Barnaby Harran * Barbara Harriss-White * Johan Hartle * Dan Hartley * Mike Haynes * Amrit Heer * Paul Heideman * Christoph Hermann * Chris Hesketh * Andy Higginbottom * Jan Hoff * John Holloway * Charlie Hore * Nik Howard * Peter Hudis * Ian Hussey * Ursula Huws * Anthony Iles * Ozlem Ingun * Robert Jackson * Dhruv Jain * Sang-Hwan Jang * Anselm Jappe * Olivier Jelinski * Heesang Jeon * Seongjin Jeong * Jonny Jones * Jyotsna Kapur * Marina Kaneti * Ioannis Kaplanis * Elif Karacimen * Rebecca Karl * Ken Kawashima * Alexander Keller Hirsch * Mark Kelly * Anneleen Kenis * Paul Kellogg * Christiane Ketteler * Sami Khatib * Jim Kincaid * Don Kingsbury * Stathis Kouvelakis * Sam Knafo * Juha Koivisto * Stathis Kouvelakis * Michael R. Krätke * Clarice Kuhling * Alexi Kukuljevic * Anne E. Lacsamana * Mikko Lahtinen * Ishay Landa * Costas Lapavitsas * Amanda Latimer * Nick Lawrence * Philippe Lege * Emanuele Leonardi * Esther Leslie * Alex Levant * Les Levidow * Iren Levina * Norman Levine * Ben Lewis * Aiyun Liang * Lars Lih * Jacob Carlos Lima * Por-Yee Lin * Duncan Lindo * Nicola Livingstone * Alex Loftus * Domenico Losurdo * Nikos Lountos * David Mabb * Denis Mäder * Yahya Madra * F.T.C. Manning * Paula Marcelino * Fábio Marvulle *  Pierre Matari * Paul Mattick * Patricia McCafferty * Daniel McCarthy * Andrew McGettigan * David McNally * James Meadway * Eileen Meehan * Antigoni Memou * Zhang Meng * David Michalski * China Miéville * Owen Miller * Seamus Milne * Andrew Milner * Dimitris Milonakis * Gautam Mody * Simon Mohun * Kim Moody * Colin Mooers * Michael Moran * Vittorio Morfino * Adam David Morton * Avigail Moss * Sara Motta * Tadzio Mueller * Sara Murawski * Douglas Murphy * Mary Jo Nadeau * Yutaka Nagahara * Immanuel Ness * Susan Newman * Michael Niblett *  Stephen Norrie * Benjamin Noys * Sebnem Oguz * Francisco Ojeda * Chris O’Kane * Kosuke Oki * Ken Olende * Ozlem Onaran * Ahmet Öncü * Ozgur Orhangazi * Judith Orr * Reecia Orzeck * Ceren Ozselcuk * Leo Panitch * Giorgos Papafragkou * Rose Parfitt * Mark Paschal * Jody Patterson * Laurie Penny * He Ping * Simon Pirani * Charles Post * Nina Power * Gonzalo Pozo-Martin * Lucia Pradella * Tim Pringle * Toni Prug * Muriel Pucci * Besnik Pula * Thomas Purcell * Sam Putinja * Uri Ram * Gene Ray * Jason Read * John Rees * Oliver Ressler * Felicita Reuschling * Larry Reynolds * John Roberts * John Michael Roberts * William Roberts * Ed Rooksby * Sadi dal Rosso * Christina Rousseau * Giorgos Sagriotis * Spyros Sakellaropoulos * Gregory Schwartz * David Schwartzman * Ian J. Seda-Irizarry * Ben Selwyn * Richard Seymour * Greg Sharzer * Greg Shollette * Jan Sieber * Oishik Sircar * Murray E.G. Smith * John Smith * Jeffrey Sommers * Panagiotis Sotiris * Michalis Spourdalakis * Kerstin Stakemeier * Julian Stallabrass * Guido Starosta * Engelbert Stockhammer * Robert Stolz * Ted Stolze * Kendra Strauss * Bronislaw Szerszynski * Jeff Tan * Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor * Kampagiannis Thanassis * Tzuchien Tho * Martin Thomas * Peter Thomas * Peter Thompson * Hillel Herschel Ticktin * Vladimir Tikhonov * Oxana Timofeeva * Bruno Tinel * Tania Toffanin * Massimiliano Tomba * Stavros Tombazos * George Tomlinson * Samo Tomsic * Jan Toporowski * Alberto Toscano * Nicos Trimikliniotis * Ben Trott * Pei Kuei Tsai * Alan Tuckman * Deborah Tudor * Lori Turner * Alexej Ulbricht * Steve Vallance * Giovanna Vertova * Marina Vishmidt * Keith Wagner * Hilary Wainwright * Gavin Walker * Andrew Warstat * Ben Watson * Michael Watts * Mike Wayne * Alexis Wearmouth * Jeffery R. Webber * John Weeks * Brian Whitener * Evan Calder Williams * Frieder Otto Wolf * Xinwang Wu * Wu Xinwei * Galip Yalman * Faruk Yalvaç * Eddie Yuen * Rafeef  Ziadah * Mislav Zitko *

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Midnight

ECOLOGY AND SOCIALISM – MEETING IN NEW YORK

Ecology and Socialism featuring John Bellamy Foster and Chris Williams

Time
24 October · 16:00 – 18:00
Location
NYU Kimmel Center, rm 802
60 Washington Square
New York, NY

More info:
Around the world, consciousness of the threat to our environment is growing. The majority of solutions on offer, from using efficient light bulbs to biking to work, focus on individual lifestyle changes, yet the scale of the crisis requires far deeper adjustments. Time still remains to save humanity and the planet, but only by building social movements for environmental justice that can demand qualitative changes in our economy, workplaces, and infrastructure.

*** John Bellamy Foster’s most recent book, The Ecological Revolution:Making Peace with the Planet, is a collection focusing on the ecological crisis, and includes essays on global warming, peak oil, species extinction, world water shortages, global hunger, alternative energy sources, sustainable development, and environmental justice. Foster argues that we have reached a turning point in human relations with the earth, and that any attempt to solve our problems merely by technological, industrial or free market means, divorced from fundamental social relations, cannot succeed.

*** Chris Williams is a Long-time environmental activist and Vice President of the Union of Adjunct Faculty at Pace University, where he teaches course in energy and the environment, physics, and chemistry. He is also the chair of the science dept at Packer Collegiate Institute. His first book is Ecology and Socialism: Solutions to Capitalist Ecological Crisis.

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Harvesting

GREEN GONE WRONG

An event with Heather Rogers and Dr. James Hansen to launch 

Green Gone Wrong: How Our Economy is Undermining the Environmental Revolution

by Heather Rogers

Friday April 30th, 7pm

CUNY Graduate Center

Proshanky Auditorium

365 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY 10016

RSVP: jkhanduja@demos.org

Green Gone Wrong is published in the US by Scribner, and in the UK by Verso

Verso—Books with a Critical Edge

40 Years of Radical Publishing 1970—2010

Event sponsors: Demos, The Nation, The Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the CUNY Graduate Center, and the Investigative Fund

Co-sponsors: Brecht Forum, Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, Center for Humanities at CUNY Graduate Center, The Center for Sustainable Urban Development at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Bluestockings Bookstore, Haymarket and Verso.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

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Jaguar

SUSTAINABLE JOBS IN A GREEN ECONOMY

INSTITUTE OF EMPLOYMMENT RIGHTS (IER)

A Think Tank for the Labour Movement
 
Dear Colleague

Reminder from the Institute of Employment Rights:

Sustainable jobs in a green economy: The role of trade unions and collective bargaining

Tuesday 18th May 2010, London

I would be grateful if you could distribute this message to colleagues, activists, networks and members. The weblink where you can find out more and book places is here: http://www.ier.org.uk/node/461
 
If you have any queries concerning the seminar, please contact me at the details below.

Best wishes
Phelim

——————————–

Sustainable jobs in a green economy: The role of trade unions and collective bargaining

A seminar
Tuesday 18th May 2010, London
1:30m – 4:15pm
At NUT Hamilton House, Mabledon Place, London WC1H 9BD

Map here: http://www.hamilton-house.org.uk/contacts.htm

Organised by The Institute of Employment Rights

The Institute is honoured to have Victoria Lambropoulos, an academic at Deakin University, Australia present for this seminar. Victoria will bring expertise in the debates which have happened in Australia around what constructive role trade unions can take in collectively bargaining for a green economy. Victoria will be joined by Sian Jones from the CWU, and Sarah Pearce from the TUC’s Greenworkplaces project.

Climate change is an issue which affects all workers and one which trade unions have been strong in engaging their membership – this includes the increase in environmental audits and green workplace reps. So what role can unions play in creating and maintaining sustainable jobs? What way can unions engage in greening the economy?

Speakers: Sian Jones, CWU; Victoria Lambropoulos, Deakin University, Australia; Sarah Pearce, TUC.

Full programme here: http://www.ier.org.uk/node/461

Phelim MacCafferty
Projects and Events Officer
Institute of Employment Rights
179 Preston Road
Brighton East Sussex
BN1 6AG
t: 01273 330819
e: phelim@ier.org.uk
http://www.ier.org.uk

This year is IER’s 20th anniversary. We are proud of what we have achieved but recognise more needs to be done. Show your continued support by taking a subscription and joining our debate. Go to http://www.ier.org.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Crisis Theory

FINANCIALISATION AND ENVIRONMENT

 Hallsworth Conference on Financialisation and Environment 
The Implications for Environmental Governance of the Global Financial Crisis
15-16 April, 2010, University of Manchester
Board Room, Arthur Lewis Building, 2nd floor

Please register at: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/disciplines/politics/events/hallsworth/booking/

Program

Thursday, 15 April 2010

10:30: Welcome and Registration

11:00: Introduction – Erik Swyngedouw, University of Manchester

11:30: Debates on Economic Valuation and Payment for Environmental Services – Joan Martinez Allier, Autonomous University of Barcelona

12:30: Lunch

13:30 Carbon trading, new enclosures and eco-social contestation – Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban

14:30: The Financialisation of the ‘Good Environment’ and ‘Good Environmental Citizen’ – Samuel Randalls, University College London

15:30: Coffee

16:00: The Domination of Finance capital over Nature – Claude Serfati, University of Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines

17:00: Discussion 

17:30: Close
Friday, 16 April 2010

10:00: The Role of Finance in the Ambiguous Post-Neoliberalising of Nature: A Research Program for the Agro-fuels Project – Ulrich Brand, University of Vienna

11:00: Sugarcane in Brazil: Finance capital, Slave Labour and Deforestation – Leonardo Sakamoto, Brazilian Comission for the Eradication of Slave Labour and NGO Repórter Brasil

12:00: Carbon Markets and Climate Change – Larry Lohman, The Corner House

13:00: Lunch

13:30: Carbon Emissions as New Fields for (Finance) Capital – Christian Zeller, University of Salzburg

14:30:  Processes of Exchange in the Carbon Credit Industry – John Broderick, University of Manchester

15:30: Coffee

15.45: Round Table: Financialisation of the Environment: What Governance?

17:00: Close

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic 

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Karl Marx

CRISIS AND CRITIQUE: HISTORICAL MATERIALISM ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2010

Central London, Thursday 11th to Sunday 14th November*

Call for Papers

Submission and Abstract Deadline: 1 June 2010

Notwithstanding repeated invocations of the ‘green shoots of recovery’, the effects of the economic crisis that began in 2008 continue to be felt around the world. While some central tenets of the neoliberal project have been called into question, bank bailouts, cuts to public services and attacks on working people’s lives demonstrate that the ruling order remains capable of imposing its agenda. Many significant Marxist analyses have already been produced of the origins, forms and prospects of the crisis, and we look forward to furthering these debates at HM London 2010. We also aim to encourage dialogue between the critique of political economy and other modes of criticism – ideological, political, aesthetic, philosophical – central to the Marxist tradition.

In the 1930s, Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht projected a journal to be called ‘Crisis and Critique’. In very different times, but in a similar spirit, HM London 2010 aims to serve as a forum for dialogue, interaction and debate between different strands of critical-Marxist theory. Whether their focus is the study of the capitalist mode of production’s theoretical and practical foundations, the unmasking of its ideological forms of legitimation or its political negation, we are convinced that a renewed and politically effective Marxism will need to rely on all the resources of critique in the years ahead. Crises produce periods of ideological and political uncertainty. They are moments that put into question established cognitive and disciplinary compartmentalisations, and require a recomposition at the level of both theory and practice. HM London 2010 hopes to contribute to a broader dialogue on the Left aimed at such a recomposition, one of whose prerequisites remains the young Marx’s call for the ‘ruthless criticism of all that exists’.

We are seeking papers that respond to the current crisis from a range of Marxist perspectives, but also submissions that try to think about crisis and critique in their widest ramifications. HM will also consider proposals on themes and topics of interest to critical-Marxist theory not directly linked to the call for papers (we particularly welcome contributions on non-Western Marxism and on empirical enquiries employing Marxist methods).

While Historical Materialism is happy to receive proposals for panels, the editorial board reserves the right to change the composition of panels or to reject individual papers from panel proposals. We also expect all participants to attend the whole conference and not simply make ‘cameo’ appearances. We cannot accommodate special requests for specific slots or days, except in highly exceptional circumstances.

*Please note that, in order to allow for expected demand, this year the conference will be three and a half days’ long, starting on the Thursday afternoon.

Please submit a title and abstract of between 200 and 300 words by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual7/submit by 1 June 2010

Possible themes include:
        •       Crisis and left recomposition
        •       Critique and crisis in the global south
        •       Anti-racist critique
        •       Marxist and non-Marxist theories of crisis
        •       Capitalist and anti-capitalist uses of the crisis
        •       Global dimensions of the crisis
        •       Comparative and historical accounts of capitalist crisis
        •       Ecological and economic crisis
        •       Critical theory today
        •       Finance and the crisis
        •       Neoliberalism and legitimation crisis
        •       Negation and negativity
        •       Feminism and critique
        •       Political imaginaries of crisis and catastrophe
        •       The critique of everyday life (Lefebvre, the situationists etc.)
        •       The idea of critique in Marx, his predecessors and contemporaries
        •       Art criticism, political critique and the critique of political economy
        •       Geography and crisis, geography and the critique of political economy
        •       Right-wing movements and crisis
        •       Critiques of the concept of crisis
        •       New forms of critique in the social and human sciences
        •       Aesthetic critique
        •       Marxist literary and cultural criticism
        •       Reports on recent evolution of former USSR countries and China

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th MARCH 2010


EVENTS

BILL FLETCHER JR. – “OPERATING IN THE OBAMA MOMENT: CHALLENGES FOR PROGRESSIVES”

Public Forum: 2010 Phyllis Clarke memorial Lecture

7:00 PM
Wednesday March 10, 2010
Cara Commons/Lounge 7th floor, 1-148
Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto.

Bill Fletcher Jr. is a longtime labour and international activist and the former President and chief executive officer of TransAfrica Forum. He is the executive editor of The Black Commentator and founder of the Center for Labor Renewal. His latest book is Solidarity Divided.

Co-sponsored and supported by Ryerson’s CUPE Locals 233, 1281 and 3904 and the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University.

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ACCUMULATION CRISIS AS ECOLOGICAL CRISIS: THE END OF CHEAP FOOD, CHEAP ENERGY, AND CHEAP LABOUR

CIS Development Seminar Series
Speaker: Jason W. Moore (Department of Human Geography, Lund University)

Friday, March 19, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
108N – North House, Munk Centre for International Studies, U of T
1 Devonshire Place

Register online at: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8206

Sponsored by Centre for International Studies

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TRIBUNAL SAYS SPECIAL DIET PROGRAM DISCRIMINATES

Government considering scrapping the program in response

Discrimination. That’s the ruling of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario on the way the province’s Special Diet Allowance Program provides benefits to three people who made human rights complaints.

On February 17, the Tribunal issued its decision that the way the program is administered in these three cases violates the Human Rights Code. These three cases are lead cases in a Tribunal proceeding that involves human rights complaints from nearly 200 other people and Social Benefit Tribunal complaints from another 800 people, so the implications are large.

The Tribunal has ordered the government to increase the benefit amounts for these three people – and any other Special Diet recipients with the same medical conditions. And it set out the legal test that will help determine the outcome of the nearly 200 human rights complaints.

But the government seems to be thinking about scrapping the program altogether.

The Special Diet Allowance program is too important to lose. Take Action Now!

To read more: http://www.incomesecurity.org/specialdietdecision.htm

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CANADIAN COMMITTEE ON LABOUR HISTORY ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The Canadian Committee on Labour History will once again be holding their annual general meeting during Congress and your attendance will be much appreciated.

Please mark your calendars for the following:

Date:  Monday, May 31
Time: 12:30 – 2:00
Location:  LB-1042.03, 10th floor of the Library Building, Concordia University, Montreal

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NEWS & VIEWS

MURRAY DOBBINS’ BLOG: HARPER’S STRATEGIC ELECTION BUDGET

As one would expect from Stephen Harper, he has come down with a very strategic budget and a fairly smart one at that. As with his other strategic considerations this one is aimed at achieving the goal he is obsessed with: getting a majority in the next election.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2010/03/04/harpers-strategic-election-budget/

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THE CASE FOR KEEPING OUR HYDRO UTILITIES PUBLIC

By Paul Kahnert, Bullet No. 319, March 2 2010

Most people don’t pay much attention to electricity, except when the lights are out or when they get their bill. But, they soon will. The most valuable asset in virtually every Ontario municipality is its hydro utility. For 90 plus years, local municipal hydro utilities ran at cost and returned ‘profits’ to residents in the form of lower and stable rates. They were well run and virtually debt free.

Debts created by cost overruns at Ontario Hydro’s nuclear power stations were no worse than privately-owned nuclear power stations everywhere else. Yet the debt level of Ontario Hydro opened the door for the Harris Conservatives to ram through a plan to deregulate and privatize Ontario’s power system.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/319.php

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2010 FEDERAL BUDGET A “MAJOR DISAPPOINTMENT” FOR POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

OTTAWA, March 4 /CNW Telbec/ – The organization representing Canada’s university and college educators says today’s federal budget is a major disappointment for post-secondary education, leaving Canada’s researchers behind, providing no new support for universities and colleges to deal with increasing enrolments, and no relief for students grappling with high debt loads and tuition fees.

“The government was supposed to have taken time off to ‘recalibrate,’ but there’s been no change in direction when it comes to post-secondary education and funding for research,” said James Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

To read more: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2010/04/c7181.html

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JAMES LAXER’S BLOG: GEORGE SMITHERMAN, THE PRIVATIZER: NO THANKS

You learn a lot about a candidate for public office when he or she first stakes out a position on a key issue.

In this case, the candidate is George Smitherman, who recently left the Ontario Liberal cabinet, to run for mayor of Toronto. In an in-depth interview with the Toronto Star, Smitherman mused that he would consider privatizing garbage pick-up in Toronto and the privatization of some of the city’s public transit lines.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/blog.html

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ALTERNATIVE BUDGET 2010

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released the 2010 Alternative Federal Budget yesterday along with a six point jobs plan to confront the jobs crisis and tackle the fiscal deficit with less pain and more gain.

The alternative budget and jobs plan would bring unemployment back to pre-recession levels by the end of 2011 and demonstrate there is a better way to get out of deficit through smart investments and smart taxation.

To read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/alternative-federal-budget-2010
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RAISE MY TAXES, PLEASE! EVALUATING HOUSEHOLD SAVINGS FROM HIGH QUALITY PUBLIC TRANSIT

High quality public transit consists of service sufficiently convenient and comfortable to attract travel that would otherwise be by automobile. This paper uses data from U.S. cities to investigate the incremental costs and benefits of high quality transit service.

The analysis indicates that high quality public transit typically requires about $268 annually per capita in additional tax subsidy and $104 in additional fares, but provides vehicle, parking and road cost savings averaging $1,040 per capita, plus other benefits including congestion reductions, increased traffic safety, pollution reductions, improved mobility for non-drivers, improved fitness and health.

This indicates that residents should rationally support tax increases if needed to create high quality public transit systems in their communities. Current planning practices tend to overlook or undervalue many of these savings and benefits and so result in underinvestment in transit quality improvements.

To read more: http://www.vtpi.org/raisetaxes.pdf

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Research on social determinants and health: what sorts of data do we need?
Siegfried Geyer
Journal of Public Health, Volume 55 Number 1
http://www.springerlink.com/content/p81v501h560702n7/

* Get the lead out: Environmental politics in 1970s St. Louis
Robert Gioielli
Journal of Urban History published 5 March 2010, 10.1177/0096144210363070
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0096144210363070v1

* Book review: Jarvis, P. (2006). The lifelong learning and the learning society trilogy, Volumes 1-3.
Shibao Guo
Adult Education Quarterly 2010;60 207-211
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/60/2/207

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Sociology

HOW TO PUT ‘SOCIETY’ INTO CLIMATE CHANGE

British Sociological Association (BSA), Presidential Event

Monday 8th February 2010, 10.00am – 4.30pm

British Library Conference Centre, London

This one day conference will examine the methodological implications for social science of the processes of global climate change.

John Urry from Lancaster University will be taking a lead on this event along with John Brewer (BSA President). John Urry is currently editing a special issue of Theory, Culture and Society on global heating (2010) and preparing Climate Change and Society (Polity 2011). He is a former RAE Panel Chair and Editor of the International Library of Sociology.

John Brewer is Sixth Century Chair in Sociology at the University of Aberdeen. He is currently working on another of sociology’s ‘big issues’, with Polity Press about to publish his book on the sociology of peace processes.  The Leverhulme Trust are also funding a £1.26m research programme on compromise after conflict.

The conference programme includes:

* A welcome to the conference from BSA President, Professor John Brewer

* A welcome to the British Library by Jude England, Head of Social Sciences

* Professor John Urry, Lancaster University: ‘The importance of putting Society into Climate Change’

* Rt Hon. Malcolm Wicks MP ‘Climate Change: What is the Question?’

* Professor Elizabeth Shove, Lancaster University: ‘Transitions in practice – climate change and everyday life’

* Professor Tim Jackson, University of Surrey: ‘The social and structural dimensions of sustainable living’

* Professor Alan Warde, University of Manchester: ‘How sociological understandings of routine consumption might inform effective strategies for enhancing sustainability’

* Professor Brian Wynne, Lancaster University: ‘Climate Change Science’

Places for this event are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Lunch and refreshments are included. BSA Members can attend this event free of charge (your 2010 subscription must be paid in advance of registration). However, due to the costs incurred by the BSA, in the event of a no-show or cancellation of your booking after 5:00pm on Monday 12th January 2010, a fee of £10 will be charged. Non-Members of the BSA may also attend this event for a registration fee of £10.

Please visit the event website www.britsoc.co.uk/events/presidential to register and for further event details. For more details about joining the BSA please visit www.britsoc.co.uk/join

Please direct any enquiries to the BSA office at events@britsoc.org.uk 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Capitalism in Crisis

Capitalism in Crisis

TOWARDS A MARXIST ANALYSIS OF THE GLOBAL CRISIS

 

The International Institute for Research and Education: http://www.iire.org

Seminar: Towards A Marxist Analysis of the Global Crisis

On 2-4 October, the IIRE held its first international Economy Seminar on the Global Crisis. Thirty-six participants, economists and non-specialists, from Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America attended the three-day event which was open to activists from different tendencies of the radical left.

The objectives of the seminar were to analyse the nature, characteristics and consequences of the current global economic crisis, from perspectives relevant to social activists, and to fortify the global network of Marxist economists. All talks will be available at the IIRE podcast, which we expect to launch with the next newsletter. For now it is possible to download all the talks in one file (original languages, more than 500MB).

Three main questions guided the various sessions of the weekend. First, what is the nature or cause of the crisis? Second, what are the social, economic and political consequences? Finally, what are the links between the current economic crisis and the global ecological and food crises? A solid look at Keynesianism, Ernest Mandel’s contribution on long waves and economic cycles and a (self-) critical take on discourse and propaganda were activities that peppered the debates.

The seminar kicked off with a well-attended public meeting on the crisis with guest speakers Chris Harman of the SWP in Britain and IIRE fellows Michel Husson of the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies and Claudio Katz of the University of Buenos Aires.

François Chesnais (France) opened the seminar itself with an introduction on the role that the so-called financialisation of the economy had in the global crisis. He stated that the crisis cannot be labelled either financial or financialised. Rather, the current crisis has its roots deep in the process of capital accumulation, which, revealing its contradictions, should lead us to look at the dynamics of productivity, the rate of profit and its distribution. The discussion that followed generated a debate between over-accumulation versus under-consumption as explanations for understanding the crisis.

Ozlem Onaran (Turkey), Claudio Katz (Argentina) and Bruno Jetin (France) presented reports on the conditions of the European, Latin American and Asian economies. The debates paved the way for a deeper understanding on how the crisis is perceived and dealt with in the different regions. Participants concluded that an essential characteristic of the crisis is the lack of de-linking tendencies among countries and continents; on the contrary, the efforts to save capitalism have been concerted and almost unanimous.

Michel Husson (France) and Klaus Engert (Germany) analysed the crisis in the framework of the theory of long waves. According to this theory, elaborated by IIRE founder Ernest Mandel, it is possible to use important endogenous factors, i.e. related to the logic of capital and its internal contradictions, to explain the general fall in accumulation that began during the 1970s and has not yet concluded. This discussion left open the possibility of a new ascending wave of economic growth and capitalist accumulation dependent on such exogenous factors as a radical change of the relationship of forces between the classes. One of the conclusions, therefore, was that another wave of attacks on the working class is most likely on its way.

Eric Toussaint (Belgium) emphasised that there is no automatic link between the fact that the crisis is being paid for by workers and the popular masses, and an increase of social struggles. Political, ideological and organisational factors will also play a role in the development of the struggles.

Esther Vivas (Spain) and Daniel Tanuro (Belgium) brought in a fundamental analytical dimension with their introductions: the economic crisis cannot be observed in isolation from the global ecological and food crises. Vivas presented the causes and structure of the food crisis: the current model of agricultural and livestock production is in a large measure responsible for climate change. Tanuro demonstrated how the official, ruling class responses to climate change are insufficient, unreal, irrational and even put us in more danger. He argued that eco-socialists should push for and end to unnecessary production, the retraining of workers in affected sectors and the development of a new agricultural model instigated by radical anti-capitalist measures.

Overall, the analyses revealed that the crisis is systemic, that those who are paying for it are the popular and working classes, and that now, more then ever, it is necessary to build an emancipatory, global anti-capitalist and eco-socialist project.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Historical Materialism 6

Historical Materialism 6

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM SIXTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE – REGISTRATION

 

Sixth Historical Materialism Annual Conference
Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives
27–29 November 2008
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and Birkbeck College, London, WC1
In association with Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Committee

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!
http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm

The annual Historical Materialism conference is organised by the editorial board of Historical Materialism in association with the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee and the Socialist Register. The conference has become an important event on the Left, providing an annual forum to discuss recent developments on the agenda of historical-materialist research and has attracted an increasingly high attendance over the past four years. The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism welcomes attendance and active engagement in discussion with panellists from new as well as prior participants with an interest in critical-Marxist thought.

One of the principal objectives of the conference has been to build bridges among the various Marxist communities, including the breaking down some of the linguistic and intellectual barriers which continue to hamper the circulation and expansion of critical-Marxist thought. The sixth annual Historical Materialism Conference, under the banner of ‘Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives’, promises to continue and take forward this objective.

The conference is organised around three plenary sessions (the Deutscher lecture, the launch of the Socialist Register 2010, and Historical Materialism’s plenary) and a host of workshops dedicated to specific themes.

THE FULL TIMETABLE WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON

For more details, please contact: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Attendance is free, but participants must register in advance online (if this is not possible, please contact historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk). However, the conference is largely self-funded and we will depend on voluntary donations by attendants and participants to support the organisation and running of the event. The suggested advanced online donation is £40 for waged and £15 for unwaged: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm, , and the suggested donation on the door is £50 for waged and £20 for unwaged.

For logistical and other support, Historical Materialism would like to thank the School of Oriental and African Studies and the Centre for International Security and Diplomacy. For sponsorship, thanks to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS, SOAS Student Union, Brill Academic Publishers, the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee, Socialist Register, Journal of Agrarian Change, the International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy and Bookmarks.

The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism

THEMES FOR THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: A LEFT PROJECT: TRANSFORMING THE STATE? * AGENCY * AGRARIAN CHANGE IN CONTEMPORARY CAPITALISM: TECHNICAL DYNAMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL * TRAJECTORIES * ALTHUSSER AND PHILOSOPHY * APOCALYPSE MARXISM * ART AGAINST CAPITALISM * ART AND CRITIQUE IN GERMANY BETWEEN THE WARS * BOOK LAUNCH: ALEX CALLINICOS’S IMPERIALISM AND GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * BOOK LAUNCH: KARL MARX AND CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY * CAPITALISM, CITIZENSHIP AND CRISIS * CLASS AND CONFLICT IN ANCIENT GREECE * CLASS AND POLITICS IN THE ‘GLOBAL SOUTH’ * CLASS, CRISIS, DISTRIBUTION * COGNITIVE MAPPING, TOTALITY AND THE REALIST TURN * COMMODIFYING HEALTH CARE IN THE UK * CUBAN REVOLUTION AND CUBAN SOCIETY * DERIVATIVES * DEVELOPMENTALISM, THE STATE AND CLASS FORMATION * DIMENSIONS OF THE FOOD CRISIS * EASTERN CENTRAL EUROPE FROM TRANSITION TO EU ENLARGEMENT: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY IN THE GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * ECOLOGICAL CRISIS * EMPIRE AND IMPERIALISM * ENERGY AND GEOPOLITICS * ENERGY, WASTE AND CAPITALISM * EPISTEMOLOGY, DIALECTICS AND HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * EXTENDING THE MINERALS-ENERGY-COMPLEX * FEMINISM AND SOCIALIST STRATEGY * FINANCE, THE HOUSING QUESTION AND URBAN POLITICS * GLOBAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS: MARXIST REFLECTIONS * GRAMSCI RELOADED * GREEN CAPITALISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND LATE CAPITALIST DEVELOPMENT * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND SOCIAL RESEARCH * HISTORICISING HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH:  MIKKO LAHTINEN ON ALTHUSSER AND MACHIAVELLI * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH: PETER THOMAS’S THE GRAMSCIAN MOMENT * IN MEMORY OF PETER GOWAN * INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE CRISIS * INTERPRETATIONS OF THE CRISIS * ISAAC AND TAMARA DEUTSCHER MEMORIAL PRIZE LECTURE: KEES VAN DER PIJL, NOMADS, EMPIRES, STATES * KNOWLEDGE, NATURE, PROPERTY * LABOUR * LABOUR AND THE ECONOMIC SUBJECT IN CONTEMPORARY ART * LABOUR BEYOND THE FACTORY * LATIN AMERICAN WORKING CLASSES * LEARNING FROM PAST CRISES * LINEAGES OF NEOLIBERALISM * LISTEN TO VENEZUELA SCREENING AND DISCUSSION * MARXISM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY * MARXISM AND NATIONALISM TODAY * MARXISM AND POLITICAL VIOLENCE * MARXISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS * MARXISM AND TIME * MARXISM BETWEEN ETHICS AND UTOPIA * MARXISM, DEMOCRACY AND CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY * MIGRATION * MONEY * MORBID SYMPTOMS: HEALTH UNDER CAPITALISM * NEOLIBERALISM, AESTHETICS AND THE RECUPERATION OF DISSENT * ON THE OBJECTS OF COMMUNISM: A HACKING PANEL * PHILOSOPHY AND COMMUNISM IN THE EARLY MARX * PLANNING, LOCALISM AND THE LEFT * POSTNEOLIBERALISM * PRESENTATION OF THE JOURNAL CHTO DELAT/WHAT IS TO BE DONE? * RACE, NATION AND ORIENTALISM * RED PLANETS: MARXISM AND SCIENCE FICTION * RE-EMBEDDING MARXISM: COERCION AND POLITICAL ECONOMY * REGISTERING THE CRISIS: A SOCIALIST REGISTER ROUNDTABLE * RESEARCH ON MARX * RESTRUCTURING, OUTSOURCING, DISTRIBUTION: DIMENSIONS OF THE GLOBAL CRISIS * REVOLUTIONARY THEORY, AUTONOMIST MARXISM AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY * SLAVERY AND CAPITALISM IN THE US SOUTH * SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA: THE CURRENT CONJUNCTURE * STUDENT MOVEMENTS AND YOUTH REVOLTS * THE ARTS AND CAPITALIST CRISIS: THE NEW DEAL EXPERIENCE * THE CRITIQUE OF RELIGION AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * THE POLITICAL AESTHETICS OF REALISM * THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF WORK * THE POLITICS OF FINANCE * THE POLITICS OF THE WILL * THE POLITICS OF VALUE * THE RIGHT: RACE, NATION, IDENTITY * THE TURN TO ETHICS AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * ‘TURBULENCE: IDEAS FOR MOVEMENT’, NEW ISSUE LAUNCH * UNION STRUGGLES * UNOISM, ECOLOGY AND CRISIS * UTOPIAS, DYSTOPIAS AND SOCIALIST BIOPOLITICS * WEBLOGS AND THE OPPOSITIONAL PUBLIC SPHERE: A DISCUSSION * WHAT IS ABSTRACTION? * WORKERS AND STRUGGLE TODAY * ZIONISM, 
ANTISEMITISM AND THE LEFT – A DEBATE

SPEAKERS INCLUDE: Gilbert Achcar * Gregory Albo * Robert Albritton * Peter Alexander * Noaman Ali * Kevin B. Anderson * Ricardo Antunes * Caroline Arscott * Sam Ashman * John Ashworth * Ilker Atac * Jairus Banaji * Fletcher Baragar * Banu Bargu * Colin Barker * Tom Barnes * Luca Basso * Matthew Beaumont * Pinar Bedirhanoglu * John Bell * Aaron Benanav * Halil Berktay * Armin Beverungen * Robin Blackburn * Paul Blackledge * Max Blechman * Derek Boothman * Mark Bould * Bill Bowring * Ulrich Brand * Craig Brandist * Michael Brie * Wendy Brown * Dick Bryan * Adrian Budd * Verity Burgmann * Alex Callinicos * Mauro Farnesi Camellone * Bob Cannon * Thomas Carmichael * Warren Carter * Giorgio Cesarale * Maria Elisa Cevasco * Dae-op Chang * Vivek Chibber * Andrew 
Chitty * Christopher Chitty * Joseph Choonara * Sheila Cohen * Alex Colas * Tim Cooper * Stipe Curkovic * Steve Cushion * Gareth Dale * Neil Davidson * Gail Day * Tim Dayton * Kathryn Dean * Angela Dimitrakaki * Demet Dinler * Kevin Doogan * Elizabeth Dore * Nick Dyer-Witheford * Juliane Edler * Aram Eisenschitz * Hester Eisenstein * Fuat Ercan * Adam Fabry * Daniel Fairfax * Mariano Feliz * Ben Fine * Robert Fine * Mark Fisher * Peter Fleming * Gregory C. Flemming * Keith Flett * John Foran * Vassillis Fouskas * Carl Freedman * James Furner * Alexander Gallas * Andreia Galvao * Ferruccio Gambino * Earl Gammon * Mike Geddes * Lindsey German * Frantz Gheller * Lesley Gill * John Glenn * Jesse Goldstein * Maya Gonzalez * Jeff Goodwin * Jamie Gough * Nick Gray * Juan Grigera * Peter Hallward * Ayeesha Hameed * Carrie Hamilton * Bue Hansen * Jane Hardy * Chris Harman * Stefano Harney * Barnaby Harran * David Harvie * Owen Hatherley * Mike Haynes * Lesley Henderson * Christoph Henning * Rob Heynen * Andy Higginbottom * Sarah Hines * John Holloway *  John Holst * Patricia Howard * Peter Hudis * Liz Humphries * Robert Jackson * Dhruv Jain * Fredric Jameson * Elinor Jean * Seongjin Jeong * Bob Jessop * Bonn Juego * Anush Kapadia * Brian Kelly * Sami Khatib * Jeff Kinkle * Kelvin Knight * Meri Koivusalo * Ahmet Hasim Kose * Conor Kostick * Primoz Krasovec * Maria Kyriakidou * Xavier Lafrance * Mikko Lahtinen * Alex Levant * Les Levidow * Iren Levina * William Lewis * Nicola Livingstone * Jean-Guy Loranger * Monica Clua Losada * David Mabb * Andreas Malm * Gonzo Poso Martin * Randy Martin * Jonathan Martineau * Meade McCloughan * David McNally * Angela McRobbie * Simon Mohun * Peter P. Mollinga * Kim Moody * Colin Mooers * Jason W. Moore * Adam Morton * Sara Motta * Tadzio Müller * Vlad Mykhnenko * Ozgur Narin * Jonathan Neale * Mike Newman * Susan Newman * Benjamin Noys * Blair Ogden * Ozlem Onaran * Deidre O’Neill * Ebru Deniz Ozan * Melda Ozturk * Leo Panitch * Giorgos Papafragkou * David Parker * Jaime Pastor * Jody Patterson * Knox Peden * Alexei Penzin * Simon Pirani * Iain Pirie * Amedeo Policante * Nicolas Pons-Vignon * Charles Post * Moishe Postone * Nina Power * Gonzalo Pozo-Martin * Lucia Pradella * Toni Prug * Ozren Pupovac * Thomas Purcell * Hugo Radice * Ravi Raman * Akbar Rasulov * Gene Ray * John Rees * Tobias Reichardt * Paul Reynolds * Sébastien Rioux * John Roberts * Ed Rooksby * Ellen Rosen * Christina Rousseau * Sheila Rowbotham * Sally Ruane * Frank Ruda * Alfredo Saad-Filho * Spyros Sakellaropoulos * Birgit Sauer * Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt * Alan Sears * Thomas Sekine * Ben Selwyn * Greg Sharzer * Stuart Shields * Subir Sinha * Gary Slater * John Smith * Johan Soderberg * Clare Solomon * Panagiotis Sotiris * Dimitris Sotiropoulos * Susan Spronk * Kerstin Stakemeier * Julian Stallabrass * Engelbert Stockhammer * Adam Swain * Erik Swyngedouw * Lotta Takala-Greenish * Daniel Tanuro * Jean Baptiste Thomas * Peter Thomas * Hillel Ticktin * John Timberlake * Bruno Tinel * Massimiliano Tomba * Jonathon Tomlinson * Alberto Toscano * Ben Trott * Julian Tudor-Hart * Emily van der Meulen * Marco Vanzulli * Leandro Vergara-Camus * Zaira Rodrigues Vieira * Dmitry Vilensky * Marina Vishmidt * Andriana Vlachou * Hilary Wainwright * Mike Wayne * Xiaoping Wei * Duncan Wigan * Evan Calder Williams * Michael Wood * Phil Woodhouse * Galip Yalman * Karel Yon * Christian Zeller * Alexander Zevin * Mislav Zitko *

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Historical Materialism Sixth Annual Conference – Update

Due to overwhelming demand, the deadline for the Call for Papers and Panels for the 2009 HM Conference has been extended one FINAL time to 1st July 2009. There will be NO further extensions and all proposals must be registered here: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/confsubform.htm

Historical Materialism Sixth Annual Conference, 27-29 November 2009, Central London

Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives

Co-sponsored by Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Committee

The world economy is traversing a sweeping crisis whose outcomes are still uncertain, but whose scope is undeniable. The name of Marx is now occasionally, if nervously, invoked in the financial press. The neo-liberal project is being reconfigured, and some have even rushed to pronounce it dead. Imperial strategies are being redrawn, while ecological and food crises deepen on a global scale. This situation of instability and uncertainty unquestionably lends itself to incisive analyses drawing upon and critically innovating the traditions of historical materialism. Critical Marxist theorists have already shed considerable light on the mechanisms and tendencies underlying the current crises and emphasised the conflicts and contradictions that are emerging as they develop.

Following upon previous annual conferences which worked towards a recomposition of an international Marxist intellectual sphere, this year’s Historical Materialism conference hopes to serve as a forum for papers and debates that will gauge the capacity of contemporary Marxism to confront this critical conjuncture and its multiple facets, both analytically and politically. We hope that the conference will serve not only as a collective investigation into the numerous global scenarios of capitalist crisis, but also as the opportunity to inquire – drawing on the political and conceptual reservoir of many Marxist traditions – into the class formations, political forces and organisational forms capable of responding combatively and inventively to the current situation. While the hegemony of a one-dimensional neo-liberalism demanded the affirmation that other worlds were possible, the current crises require arguments to demonstrate how we might achieve the other world that is now more than ever necessary.

In keeping with the multi-disciplinary and exploratory character of the journal, we welcome abstracts on any matter of relevance to critical Marxist theory, but will especially welcome papers responding directly to the call, or dealing with some of the following issues:

    • Theories of crisis, and their history
    • Neo-liberalism in retreat?
    • Histories of class struggle, crisis, and revolution
    • Socialist Feminist Responses to Crisis
    • The future of the new imperialism
    • ‘Neo-Keynesian’ responses to the crisis
    • Environmental crisis and eco-socialism
    • Left interventions in the crisis
    • Utopian and non-utopian Marxisms
    • Political agency and subjectivity
    • Theories of political organisation
    • Political economy and labour in contemporary cultural theory
    • Class struggle and class composition today
    • The geography and urbanisation of contemporary capitalism
    • Non-Marxist traditions on the Left
    • Marxist perspectives on contemporary art and visual culture
    • Displacing crisis onto the Global South
    • War, militarism, insecurity, and violence
    • Immigration, migrant labour, and anti-racism
    • Socialism in the Twenty-First Century

Preference will be given to subscribers to the journal.

Please note also that participants are expected to attend the whole conference – special arrangements for speaking on certain days only cannot be made, except for very extreme circumstances.

Deadline for abstracts: 1 July 2009.

http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/confsubform.htm

Update 14th April 2010:

For details on the Historical Materialism Conference 2010, see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/03/30/crisis-and-critique-historical-materialism-annual-conference-2010/ 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com