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Capitalist Schools in Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION – UPDATE, 27th AUGUST 2010

Critical Education has just published its latest issue at
http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/criticaled.

We invite you to read the following article:

“A Dialogic Pedagogy: Looking to Mikhail Bakhtin for Alternatives to Standards Period Teaching Practice”
Trevor Thomas Stewart

ABSTRACT
Instructional practices in American schools have become increasingly standardized over the last quarter century. This increase in standardization has resulted in a decrease in opportunities for teachers to engage in student-centered instructional practices. This article discusses how the theories of Mikhail Bakhtin can serve as the foundation for educators who are seeking alternatives to standards period teaching practices. A Bakhtinian view of language can be the basis for the creation of a dialogic pedagogy, which can help teachers and students navigate the complexities of teaching and learning in the secondary English classroom. More importantly, perhaps, Bakhtin’s theories can serve as a framework on which educators might build their arguments supporting the implementation of alternatives to standards period skill and drill instructional activities.

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Workplace

Workplace

WORKPLACE: A JOURNAL FOR ACADEMIC LABOR – ISSUE 16

 

The Editors of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor are pleased to announce the release of Workplace #16 on:

“Academic Knowledge, Labor, and Neoliberalism”

Check it out at: http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/issue/current

Table of Contents

Articles

Knowledge Production and the Superexploitation of Contingent Academic Labor – by Bruno Gulli

The Education Agenda is a War Agenda: Connecting Reason to Power and Power to Resistance – by Rich Gibson, E. Wayne Ross
   
The Rise of Venture Philanthropy and the Ongoing Neoliberal Assault on Public Education: The Eli and Edith Broad Foundation – by Kenneth Saltman

Feature Articles

Theses on College and University Administration: A Critical Perspective – by John F. Welsh
   
The Status Degradation Ceremony: The Phenomenology of Social Control in Higher Education – by John F. Welsh

Book Reviews

Review of ‘The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities’ (Desi Bradley)

Authentic Bona fide Democrats Must Go Beyond Liberalism, Capitalism, and Imperialism: A Review of Dewey’s Dream: Universities and  Democracies in an Age of Education Reform (Richard A. Brosio)

Review of Capitalizing on Disaster: Taking and Breaking Public Schools (Prentice Chandler)

Review of Pedagogy and Praxis in the Age of Empire: Towards a New Humanism (Abraham P. Deleon)

Review of Cary Nelson and the Struggle for the University: Poetry, Politics, and the Profession (Leah Schweitzer)

Review of Rhetoric and Resistance in the Corporate Academy (Lisa Tremain)

Read the Workplace Blog: http://blogs.ubc.ca/workplace/
Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=24374363807&ref=ts

E. Wayne Ross
Professor
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
University of British Columbia
2125 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
Canada
604-822-2830
wayne.ross@ubc.ca
http://www.ewayneross.net

Critical Education: http://www.criticaleducation.org
Cultural Logic: http://www.eserver.org/clogic
Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Class in Education

Class in Education

CLASS IN EDUCATION

 

I looked at a copy of Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine yesterday. This is an excellent book in my view, and I urge to buy it and/or get your library to stock it!

Glenn Rikowski

Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity

Edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine

Routledge, London & New York, 2010

ISBN 10: 0-415-45027-6 (hbk); ISBN 10: 0-203-87903-X (ebk)

CONTENTS:

Foreword: E. SAN JUAN JR.

Introduction: SHEILA MACRINE, DAVE HILL AND DEBORAH KELSH

1. Cultureclass – DEBORAH KELSH

2. Hypohumanities – TERESA L. EBERT AND MAS’UD ZAVARZADEH

3. Persistent inequities, obfuscating explanations: reinforcing the lost centrality of class in Indian education debates – RAVI KUMAR

4. Class, “race” and state in post-apartheid education – ENVER MOTALA AND SALIM VALLY

5. Racism and Islamophobia in post 7/7 Britain: Critical Race Theory, (xeno-)racialization, empire and education – a Marxist analysis – MIKE COLE AND ALPESH MAISURIA

6. Marxism, critical realism and class: implications for a socialist pedagogy – GRANT BANFIELD

7. Globalization, class, and the social studies curriculum – E. WAYNE ROSS AND GREG QUEEN

8. Class: the base of all reading – ROBERT FAIVRE

Afterword: the contradictions of class and the praxis of becoming – PETER McLAREN

Further details: http://www.routledge.com/books/Class-in-Education-isbn9780415450270

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION – CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

 

Critical Education is an international peer-reviewed journal, which seeks manuscripts that critically examine contemporary education contexts and practices. Critical Education is interested in theoretical and empirical research as well as articles that advance educational practices that challenge the existing state of affairs in society, schools, and informal education.

Critical Education is an open access journal, launching in early 2010. The journal home is http://www.critical education. org

Critical Education is hosted by the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy at the University of British Columbia and edited by Sandra Mathison (UBC), E. Wayne Ross (UBC) and Adam Renner (Bellarmine University) along with collective of 30 scholars in education that include:

Faith Ann Agostinone, Aurora University
Wayne Au, California State University, Fullerton
Marc Bousquet, Santa Clara University
Joe Cronin, Antioch University
Antonia Darder, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
George Dei, OISE/University of Toronto
Stephen C. Fleury, Le Moyne College
Kent den Heyer, University of Alberta
Nirmala Erevelles, University of Alabama
Michelle Fine, City University of New York
Gustavo Fischman, Arizona State University
Melissa Freeman, University of Georgia
David Gabbard, East Carolina University
Rich Gibson, San Diego State University
Dave Hill, University of Northampton
Nathalia E. Jaramillo, Purdue University
Saville Kushner, University of West England
Zeus Leonardo, University of California, Berkeley
Pauline Lipman, University of Illinois, Chicago
Lisa Loutzenheiser, University of British Columbia
Marvin Lynn, University of Illinois, Chicago
Sheila Macrine, Montclair State University
Perry M. Marker, Sonoma State University
Rebecca Martusewicz, Eastern Michigan University
Peter McLaren, University of California, Los Angeles
Stephen Petrina, University of British Columbia
Stuart R. Poyntz, Simon Fraser University
Patrick Shannon, Penn State University
Kevin D. Vinson, University of the West Indies
John F. Welsh, Louisville, KY

Online submission and author guidelines can be found here:
http://m1.cust. educ.ubc. ca/journal/ index.php/ criticaled/ about/submission s#onlineSubmissi ons

E. Wayne Ross
Professor
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
University of British Columbia
2125 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
Canada
604-822-2830
wayne.ross@ubc. ca
http://www.ewaynero ss.net

Critical Education: http://www.criticaleducation.org
Cultural Logic: http://www.eserver.org/clogic
Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

E. Wayne Ross
http://www.ewaynero ss.net
wayne.ross@mac. com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://theockress.com

Paulo Freire

Paulo Freire

CRITICAL EDUCATION

 

I am excited about the emergence of a new journal, Critical Education that is edited by Sandra Mathison and E. Wayne Ross, and hosted by the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy at the University of British Columbia. I wish this journal every success.

Glenn Rikowski 

Critical Education is an international peer-reviewed journal, which seeks manuscripts that critically examine contemporary education contexts and practices. Critical Education is interested in theoretical and empirical research as well as articles that advance educational practices that challenge the existing state of affairs in society, schools, and informal education.

Critical Education is at: http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/criticaled

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

UPDATE ON ‘WORKPLACE: A JOURNAL FOR ACADEMIC LABOR’

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

The Editorial Team of Workplace is proud to announce the journal’s new home, new outlook, and new publishing system!

We encourage you to browse the Workplace open journal system, submit a manuscript, or volunteer to review http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/index.

We also welcome proposals for Special Issues; if you have an idea or have assembled a group of scholars writing on higher education workplace activism and issues of academic labor, send us a proposal.

Current preprints include John Welsh’s “Theses on College and University Administration” and “The Status Degradation Ceremony.” As a whole, both feature articles challenge scholars to rethink the administration of higher education and how we frame research into this process http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/issue/current.

Thank you and please forward this invitation to colleagues and networks.

Stephen Petrina & E. Wayne Ross, Co-Editors

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
University of British Columbia
http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/index

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

The Education Agenda is a War Agenda: Connecting Reason to Power and Power to Resistance

 

Rich Gibson and Wayne E. Ross have written an excellent paper that links the US education agenda with its foreign policy and the current economic crisis.

 

You can view it at: http://www.zmag.org/znet/viewArticle/20965

 

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski  

Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions

 

Call for Papers

 

Special Issue for Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

(http://www.workplac e-gsc.com)

 

The neo-liberal restructuring of national education systems is a global phenomenon and represents a major threat to the possibility of a democratic, public education committed to meeting the needs of working class and oppressed groups.  Teacher unions, across the world, despite all the attacks on them, represent perhaps the most formidable obstacle to neo-liberal restructuring.  Teachers remain highly unionized and although they have suffered many setbacks in recent years, their collective organizations generally remain robust.

 

Despite the significance and importance of teacher unions they remain largely under-researched.  Mainstream academic literature on school sector education policy often ignores teacher unions, even in cases where scholars are critical of the market orientation of neo-liberal reforms.  Two recent exceptions to this tradition are the contributions of Compton and Weiner (2008) and Stevenson et al (2007).  The strength of Compton and Weiner’s excellent volume is the breadth of international perspectives. However, individual chapters are largely short ‘vignettes’, and the aim is to offer fairly brief and readable accounts, rather than detailed and scholarly analysis.  Stevenson et al offer a series of traditional scholarly articles, although the emphasis is largely on the Anglophone nations (UK, North America, Australasia) , and the collection fails to capture the full breadth required of an international perspective.  In both cases, and quite understandably, these contributions were not able to take account of the seismic developments in the world capitalist economy since Autumn 08 in particular. These developments have significant implications for the future of neo-liberalism, for the development of education policy in nation states and for the policies and practices of teacher unions. There is now a strong case for an analysis of teacher unionism that is detailed, scholarly, international and able to take account of current developments.

 

This special section of Workplace will focus on the ways in which teacher unions in the K-12 sector are challenging the neo-liberal restructuring of school education systems in a range of global contexts.  Neo-liberalism’ s reach is global. Its impact on the restructuring of public education systems shares many common characteristics wherever it manifests itself.  That said, it also plays out differently in different national and local contexts.  This collection of papers will seek to assess how teacher unions are challenging the trajectory of neo-liberal reform in a number of different national contexts.  By drawing on contributors from all the major world continents it will seek to highlight the points of contact and departure in the apparently different ways in which teacher unions interface with the neo-liberal agenda. It will also ensure that analyses seek to reflect recent developments in the global capitalist economy, and the extent to which this represents threat or opportunity for organized teacher movements.

 

Compton, M. and Weiner, L. (2008) The Global Assault on Teachers, Teaching and their Unions, London: Palgrave.

 

Stevenson, H. et al (2007) Changes in Teachers’ Work and the Challengs Facing Teacher Unions. International Electronic Journal of Leadership for Learning. Volume 11. http://www.ucalgary .ca/~iejll/

 

Submissions

Contributions to Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style.  If you are interested, please submit an abstract via Word attachment to Howard Stevenson (hstevenson@lincoln. ac.uk) by 31st July 2009. Completed articles will be due via email on 28th December 2009.  All papers will be blind peer-reviewed.

 

 

E. Wayne Ross

http://www.ewaynero ss.net

wayne.ross@mac. com

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education and Neoliberalism

 

Reviewers wanted

 

A message from E. Wayne Ross

 

 

I am looking for reviewers for the books listed below (from the Routledge Studies in Education and Neoliberalism series, edited by Dave Hill). 

 

 

Reviews would be for either Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor (http://www.cust.educ.ubc.ca/workplace/) or Cultural Logic (http://eserver.org/clogic/).

 

If you are interested please contact me via email – and we can discuss details:

 

 

(1) The Rich World and the Impoverishment of Education: Diminishing Democracy, Equity, and Workers’ Rights (Edited by Dave Hill)

 

 

(2) Global Neoliberalism and Education and its Consequences (Edited by Dave Hill and Ravi Kumar)

 

 

(3) The Developing World and State Education (Edited by Dave Hill and Ellen Rosskam).

 

(4) Contesting Neoliberal Education: Public Resistance and Collective Advance (Edited by Dave Hill)

 

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum Studies

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

 

http://www.ewaynero ss.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Rouge Forum Update – (January 2009)

 

An up front reminder: The Rouge Forum Conference is May 14 to 17, 2009, in Ypsilanti, Michigan, near Detroit. The call for proposals is here: http://web.mac.com/wayne.ross/Rouge_Forum_Conference_2009/Welcome.html

 

The deadline is February 15 for proposals. Why come?

What’s our current context? A stock market collapse. Massive racist unemployment nearly redoubling each month. Hundreds of thousands of foreclosures and evictions. Police terror (the Oakland murder the most recent example) and immigration raids. Calls for more taxes and cuts in public services met by bankster bailouts in the trillions. Declared US wars in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq; undeclared wars in Gaza via Israeli proxies, Colombia, and cold wars growing with Russia and China–much of that revolving around oil. In schools all over the world: regimentation of the curricula to promote nationalism, high-stakes exams eradicating freedom, and militarization.

How can this be described as other than class war, an international war of the rich on the poor?

Now comes Obama promising Hope! and Change!

Probably not. His appointees alone say otherwise, all of them beholden to nearly the same oil bosses, war-makers, and financiers who propelled Clinton and Bush. Arne Duncan, education czar, promises privatized charter schools and merit pay—more of the same, faster.

The last 40 years demonstrate the primary role of capitalist democracy, which Obama personifies: An executive committee of the rich where they iron out differences, then allow us to choose which of them will oppress us best–and their armed weapon. Currently, the main result of Obama’s demagoguery is to resurrect forms of nationalism that were becoming exposed by the Bush regimes’ harsh tactics. Now we get the velvet glove over the iron fist, Obamagogue.

Only the Rouge Forum, which includes many voices, has had room for this kind of analysis in the US. We’ve combined this reasoned critique with action: test boycotts, strikes, and backing for resisters. Our publications circulate world-wide. In addition, we created a community of thinking people who can join together in friendly debate, overcoming isolation.

Hope and change rest not in seeking some politician to save us, but through building a mass class conscious base of people willing to fight back, to sacrifice to rearrange the social relations that allow the few to rule the many through ruses like nationalism, racism, sexism, and religious irrationality. Absent that goal, all struggle is mere tactics, lurching from opposing one unrelated form of oppression to the next, never getting to the root of things.

The union executives are no help. Already they prepare to offer concessions (concessions don’t save jobs, they only make employers want more), and to attack other sectors of workers not paying them dues (the California Teachers Association supports a regressive sales tax hike to pay for schooling) and to consolidate their power (NEA President Dennis Van Roekel seeks, again, to merge NEA with the AFL-CIO, SEIU’s Andy Stern moving to take control of the AFL and Change to Win, etc). The very structures of unions divide people by job, race, industry. NEA and AFT spent millions of dollars and thousands of volunteer hours to elect Obama who demonstrated open contempt for educators throughout his campaign. With school workers the most unionized people in the US, the unions are unprepared to resist the attacks on every facet of education ahead.

That’s why it’s important to come to the Rouge Forum Conference and offer your own leadership to a movement for Equality and Freedom in schools and out. The them of the conference, Education, Empire, Economy and Ethics at the Crossroads, offers a wide field for discussion and presentations.

You can add your own voice, right now, to the Rouge Forum blog established by Community Coordinator Adam Renner at:
http://www.therougeforum.blogspot.com/

The Rouge Forum News deadline is February 15. Send articles, cartoons, art, etc., to Adam Renner (arenner@bellarmine.edu )

Thanks to Katy and Greg, Kerry, Mary, Paul, Gina and Adam, Amber, Wayne, Tommie, Donavan, Sally, Lisa, Sharon A. David, Marty, Gil G, Perry, Marc, Kevin, Shelly, Chris, Candace, Lacy, Anne, Donna, Alan S, Sherry, Tally A, Kim, Sue, Laura C, Lynn S, Stephanie, Colleen, Kelly, and Sarah.

All the best in the New Year

Down the banks and
Up the Rebels!

Rich Gibson

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Neoliberalism and Education Reform

 

 

 

Neoliberalism and Education Reform edited by E. Wayne Ross and Rich Gibson (2007, Hampton Press) won a 2008 Critics’ Choice Book Award from American Educational Studies Association (AERA). 

 

 

See:

http://www.hamptonpress.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=1-57273-677-1&Category_Code=Q307 

 

 

My article in the book, Schools and the GATS Enigma is an extended version of the article I have in the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies. See:

http://www.jceps.com/index.php?pageID=article&articleID=8

 

 

 

The award was announced at the AESA annual meeting which is taking place this weekend in Savannah, Georgia.

 

 

 

Here is a full listing of the books receiving Critics’ Choice Awards this year:

 

 

Biesta, Gert (2006). Beyond Learning: Democratic Education for a Human Future. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

 

 

Dillard, C.B. (2006). On Spiritual Strivings: Transforming an African American Woman’s Academic Life. Albany, NY: SUNY.

 

 

Gabbard, D. (2008). Knowledge and Power in the Global Economy: The Effects of School Reform in a Neoliberal/Neoconservative Age. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishing.

 

 

Giroux, Henry, A. (2007). The University in Chains: Confronting the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex. Boulder, CO: Paradigm.

 

 

Hare, William, and John P. Portelli (Eds.), (2007). Key Questions for Educators. San Francisco: Caddo Gap Press.

 

 

Hyslop-Margison, Emery and M. Ayaz Naseem (2007). Scientism and Education: Empirical Research as Neo-Liberal Ideology. Springer.

 

 

Joshee, R. and L. Johnson (Eds.), (2007). Multicultural Education Policies in Canada and the United States. Vancouver, BC: The University of British Columbia Press.

 

 

Kellner, Douglas (2008). Guys and Guns Amok: Domestic Terrorism and School Shootings from the Oklahoma City Bombing to the Virginia Tech Massacre. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

 

 

Lather, Patti (2007). Getting Lost: Feminist Efforts Toward a Double(d) Science. Albany, New York: SUNY.

 

 

Mayo, Cris (2007). Disputing the Subject of Sex: Sexuality and Public School Controversies. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

 

 

Noguera, Pedro (2008). The Trouble with Black Boys. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

 

Robbins, Christopher, (2008). Expelling Hope: The Assault on Youth and the Militarization of Schooling. Albany, NY: SUNY.

 

 

Ross, E. W., & Gibson, R. (Eds.). (2007). Neoliberalism and Education Reform. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

 

 

Salvio, Paula (2007). Anne Sexton: Teacher of Weird Abundance. State University of New York Press.

 

 

Saltman, Kenneth (2007). Capitalizing on Disaster: Taking and Breaking Public School. Boulder, CO: Paradigm.

 

 

Schultz, Brian (2008). Spectacular Things Happen Along the Way: Lessons from an Urban Classroom. Columbia, NY: Teachers College.

 

 

Solomon, R. P. and D. N. Sekayi (Eds.), (2007). Urban Teacher Education and Teaching: Innovative Practices for Diversity and Social Justice. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

 

 

Yosso, Tara (2006). Critical Race Counterstories along the Chicana/Chicano Educational Pipeline. Routledge.

 

 

Villegas, Malia, Neugebauer, Sabina Rak and Kerry R. Venegas (Eds.), (2008). Indigenous Knowledge and Education: Sites of Struggle, Strength, and Survivance. Harvard.

 

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk