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Global Capitalism

Global Capitalism

THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES

 

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’

2014-2015

Organised by the Department of Development Studies

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

 
WORKERS IN A JUST-IN-TIME WORLD: HOW CAPITALISM IS FORGING A GLOBAL SUPPLY-CHAIN-GANG

Workers across the world are producing more goods, services, and wealth than ever, but receiving less and less of their value in return. Neoliberal polices are the enablers of this extortion, but beneath the privatisation, deregulation, and tax breaks, lies the largely hidden theft of time.  Capital today is forging a worldwide network of digitally-driven, accelerating just-in-time supply chains that push wages down and effort up for the vast majority. Trade unions have been weakened and traditional ‘collective bargaining’ undermined. Yet, resistance is on the rise and capital’s interdependent global networks more vulnerable to disruption than ever.

KIM MOODY

Long-time trade union activist, author of Workers in a Lean World and In Solidarity: Essays on Working Class Organization in the United States

Monday 27 October, 6:30pm

SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

Free entrance, first come first seated

Kim Moody is the author of several books on labour and social issues including Workers in a Lean World (1997), US Labor in Trouble and Transition(2007), and In Solidarity: Essays on Working-Class Organization in the United States (2014). He has been a trade union activist and a founder and director of the publication Labor Notes in the United States. Until recently he was a senior research fellow in industrial relations at the University of Hertfordshire.

 

Next Lectures in the series (with day corrected for 2nd March):

 

Monday 1st December, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

GLOBALIZATION SINCE BHOPAL: THREE DECADES OF ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER

VANDANA SHIVA

Leading member of the International Forum on Globalisation and prominent figure of the alter-globalisation movement

RAVI RAJAN

Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

CO-ORGANISED WITH THE BHOPAL MEDICAL APPEAL

 

Monday 26 January, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND THE ARAB UPRISINGS

AHLEM BELHADJ, MD

Professor of Child Psychiatry at the University of Tunis, former chair of the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women (ATFD)

 

Monday 2 March, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

DEVELOPMENT AND THE METABOLIC RIFT: REACTIONS TO THE CONTRADICTION

BARBARA HARRISS-WHITE

Emeritus Professor of Development Studies, Oxford University, Co-ordinator, South Asia Research Cluster, Wolfson College, Oxford
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/soas-globalisation-lectures-27-october-workers-in-a-just-in-time-world-capitalism-and-the-supply-chain-gang

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE FUTURE OF NGOs – CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers: The Future of NGOs: incorporation, reinvention, critique?

Special issue of Critical Sociology

 

Special Issue Editors:

Sangeeta Kamat, Associate Professor, International Education, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Feyzi Ismail, Teaching Fellow, Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

The last three decades have seen a range of critical studies on NGOs, and in particular a growing body of theoretical work on the links between NGOs, the neoliberal state and social movements (Kamat 2004; Hearn 2007; Fernando 2011; Choudry and Kapoor 2013; Dauvergne and LeBaron 2014). These studies have contributed to our understanding of ‘NGOisation’ as a vital aspect of global capitalism and its crucial function in stabilising the neoliberal order. In this special issue we seek to build upon these critiques towards a theorisation that illuminates the present conjuncture of the new aid architecture – now unfolding in the context of the global financial crisis – that has further subordinated NGOs to global capital but which is also confronted by a deepening crisis of the neoliberal state (Harvey 2010; Duménil and Lévy 2011; Saad Filho 2011).

Critical Sociology (http://crs.sagepub.com/ ) invites contributions analysing the role of NGOs at this conjuncture, how they are responding to critiques and struggles against neoliberalism and whether they seek to articulate a new politics.

Since the late 1990s visible and widespread challenges to neoliberalism have taken the form of the anti-globalisation and anti-war movements, including the popular movements in Latin America and the World Social Forums, the vast mobilisations against the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Occupy movement, the Arab uprisings and demonstrations against austerity. In some cases the movements have led to mass strikes in workplaces and the mobilisation of trade unions. NGOs have often had an ambivalent relation to these oppositional movements, either participating on the fringes of these movements or seeking new kinds of alliances with Left or progressive politics. At the same time, the aid regime of the new millennium has undergone significant changes, with corporate entities playing a leading role in the development sector and partnering with states to enforce new rules of compliance for NGOs. In other words, NGOs today straddle both the imperialist and neoliberal ambitions of the aid regime and the popular mobilisations, which at times dominate the political landscape.

In this special issue we seek to analyse how NGOs mediate these struggles toward particular ends. How are NGOs being repositioned within contemporary capitalism, and how is the relationship between NGOs, the state and the private sector evolving? In what ways are NGOs being further co-opted by corporate power? As the neoliberal state becomes increasingly privatised on the one hand – and challenged on the other – how have NGOs analysed these times of crisis and flux? Is the general critique of neoliberalism that many NGOs also espouse leading to a new kind of politics and new political understandings within the sector? What are the factors that determine the political direction that NGOs take? Are there examples of NGOs reinventing themselves to maintain or pursue radical politics, and are they adopting new ideas and new ideologies? What kinds of new organisational alliances or strategic partnerships are being made, for example, with the political Left?

Our contention is that the existence of an organised Left makes a difference, shaping both political history and the political space that is occupied by NGOs. Where left-wing political parties have had a strong legacy, we wish to investigate the historical relationship between NGOs and the Left in order to understand the politics of NGOs in that particular context. Where NGOs have taken on traditional roles, and have been funded and professionalised, we seek to understand not only the political compulsions that influence NGOs but what kind of political alternatives are possible. The focus here is on the factors that influence one tendency or the other, with the aim of drawing general conclusions on how the work of NGOs is being reshaped both at national and global levels.

We are seeking manuscripts (8,000 words maximum) on the following themes (though not limited to these), and encourage interdisciplinary approaches:

Neoliberalism and the co-option of NGOs;

The relationship between NGOs and left-wing political parties in power;

Conflict and collaboration between NGOs and social movements;

Class, class struggle and the role of NGOs;

Questions of strategy and democracy amongst NGOs and within the sector;

Ways that NGOs are reinventing themselves and envisioning new forms of political engagement;

The role of NGOs and the global financial crisis;

Labour NGOs and trade union organising;

Development NGOs in the present aid architecture and the implications for Left politics.

 

Within this broad thematic we are interested in case studies from Latin America (e.g. Venezuela and Bolivia), where left-wing governments have been in power; South Asia (e.g. India, Nepal and Bangladesh), where Left parties and social movements have a strong presence inside and outside of government; Eastern Europe (e.g. Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo), where previous democratic transitions meant compromise between communist parties and NGOs; South East Asia (e.g. Cambodia, Thailand and the Philippines), where there have been significant and sustained popular movements and workers’ strikes; and the Middle East (e.g. Egypt, Syria and Palestine), which has experienced colossal political upheaval and polarisation during and since the uprisings in 2011. In addition, we are interested in case studies documenting the work of labour NGOs and their relationship with trade union activity (e.g. China, Qatar and Saudi Arabia), and the role of NGOs in the Arab uprisings.

To submit your proposal, email the title, abstract (300 words maximum), and contact information for the primary author to Sangeeta Kamat <skamat@educ.umass.edu> and Feyzi Ismail <fi2@soas.ac.uk>, with the subject line “ATTN: SPECIAL ISSUE PROPOSAL”. All papers are subject to the standard review process at Critical Sociology.

 

Submission of abstracts: 31 May

Solicitation of full papers: 15 June

Draft paper submissions due to editors: 31 August

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-future-of-ngos-incorporation-reinvention-critique-special-issue-of-critical-sociology

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Samir Amin

Samir Amin

SAMIR AMIN: SIX DECADES OF DEVELOPMENT DEBATE

Seminars with the renowned Egyptian economist Samir Amin, which took place on 25 and 26 April at SOAS, University of London, are now available online.

The seminars (with links to the film) include:

The Deployment of the Bandung Project (1955 – 1970)

Neoliberalism and the Decline of the Bandung Project (1975 – 2000)

The Second Wave of the Rise of the South; the Emerging Countries (as of 2000)

Professor Samir Amin is Director of the Third World Forum (Dakar, Senegal). He is one of the most prominent theorists of the political economy of development and global accumulation as well as one of the best-known analysts of Arab and African economies.

Organiser Professor Gilbert Achcar commented: “The Department of Development Studies at SOAS was delighted to host these three lectures by Professor Samir Amin, one of the best-known names in the field, a thinker who emerged since the 1960s as a major and most prominent contributor to the study of development and to the debates on North-South relations.”

To view the seminars please click on the individual links above.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/samir-amin-six-decades-of-development-debate

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Time

GLOBALISATION IN TIME

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’

2012-2013

Organised by the Department of Development Studies

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

GLOBALISATION IN TIME: BETWEEN THE CAMERA AND THE CLOCK

(A video and slides will be shown during the lecture.)

MARCUS VERHAGEN

Art historian and critic, Sotheby’s Institute of Art and Goldsmiths College, University of London

Wednesday 31 October, 6:30pm

SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

Free entrance, no booking required, first come first seated

MARCUS VERHAGEN is an art historian and critic who has taught at universities in the USA and the UK. In the years since 2002, when he started to work on contemporary art, he has written over 60 articles and reviews for art magazines such as Art Monthly, Frieze and Art Review. He has also published in several journals, including Representations, Third Text, New Left Review and Afterall. He currently teaches at Sotheby’s Institute of Art and Goldsmiths College.

 

Published first  in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/globalisation-in-time-between-the-camera-and-the-clock-with-marcus-verhagen-soas-31-october

 

***END***

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Clive Harber

EDUCATION, DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

Education, Democracy and Development: Does education contribute to democratisation in developing countries?

A new book by CLIVE HARBER & VUSI MNCUBE

Symposium Books

2012 paperback 190 pages US$48.00
ISBN 978-1-873927-71-7

 
DUE IN STOCK OCTOBER 22  

Click here to view further information and to order this book

Education is often seen as the key agency in international development and poverty reduction. Frequently the emphasis is on the economic and social role of education in development. This book, on the other hand, is unusual in explicitly examining the political role of education in development. In particular, it sets out the theories, evidence and arguments concerning the potential and actual relationships between education and democracy and critically explores the contradictory role of formal education in both supporting and hindering democratic political development. A key theme of the book is the importance of considering the type and nature of the education actually provided and experienced – what goes on inside the ‘black box’ of education? Currently in developing countries and elsewhere this is often at odds with democratic principles but the book also provides many examples of successful democratic practice in schools in developing countries as well as discussing a detailed case study of South Africa where democratic change in education is a key aspect of the policy agenda.  

Contents

Preface

CHAPTER 1 Politics, Democracy and Political Development
Politics and Democracy; The Idea of Development; Political Development Theory; Democracy as Development; Conclusion

CHAPTER 2 Education, Democracy and Political Development
Education and Politics; Education and Democracy; Education and Democracy: is there any evidence?; Conclusion

CHAPTER 3 Education for Democracy?
Introduction; What Does a Democratic School Look Like?; India: Neel Bagh School and Sumavanam School; Ecuador: the Pestalozzi School; UNICEF Child Friendly Schools; Education Policy; Leadership, Management and Pupil Voice in Decision-Making in Schools; Curriculum, Learning and Teaching; Teacher Education and Professional Identity; Initial Teacher Education; In-service Teacher Education; Action Research and Reflective Practice in In-service Teacher Education; Taught Programmes in Education for Democratic Citizenship; Assessment; School Inspection: a case study; Conclusion

CHAPTER 4 Obstacles to Greater Democracy in Education
Introduction; The Bureaucratic Legacy in Schools in Developing Countries; The Authoritarian Legacy; Whole School Organisation, Ethos and Culture; School Discipline and Corporal Punishment; Classroom Methods and Assessment; Teacher Education; Politics, Resources and Culture; Conclusion

CHAPTER 5 The Roles of Education in Relation to Political Development: South Africa as a case study
Introduction: development goals for education in post-apartheid South Africa; Modernisation or Disorganisation?; Democracy and Peace or Authoritarianism and Violence?; A Democratic Curriculum?; Democratic Structures: school governing bodies; Continuing Non-Democratic Features of South African Education; Contradictions and Tensions in Post-apartheid Education and Development; Conclusion

CHAPTER 6 Democratic Educational Change?

References; Notes on the authors

 

Related titles

Languages and Education in Africa: a comparative and transdisciplinary analysis BIRGIT BROCK-UTNE & INGSE SKATTUM

Research and Evaluation for Educational Development: learning from the PRISM experience in Kenya MICHAEL CROSSLEY, ANDREW HERRIOT, JUDITH WAUDO, MIRIAM MWIROTSI, KEITH HOLMES & MAGDALLEN JUMA

Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: closer perspectives ROSARII GRIFFIN

State of Transition: post-apartheid educational reform in South Africa CLIVE HARBER

The Changing Landscape of Education in Africa: quality, equality and democracy DAVID JOHNSON

Globalisation, Enterprise and Knowledge: education, training and development in Africa KENNETH KING & SIMON McGRATH

Developing Schools for Democracy in Europe: an example of trans-European co-operation in education JOHN SAYER

Learning Democracy and Citizenship: international experiences MICHELE SCHWEISFURTH & LYNN DAVIES, CLIVE HARBER

Teachers, Democratisation and Educational Reform in Russia and South Africa MICHELE SCHWEISFURTH

Political and Citizenship Education: international perspectives STEPHANIE WILDE

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Peace

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN PEACE, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT – AUGUST 2012 ISSUE

Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (Formerly, Journal of Peace, Gender and Development Studies JPGDS) http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD

Introducing ‘Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD) (ISSN: 2251-0036).

I am pleased to inform you that the August  2012  issue of the Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development is out. You can view this issue with the link below: http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/Contents/2012%20Contents/August.htm

The Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that is published monthly by International Research Journals (http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/index.htm/). JRPGD is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.

Editors and reviewers

JRPGD is seeking energetic, qualified and high profile researchers to join its editorial team as editors, subeditors or reviewers. Kindly send your resume to: jrpgd@interesjournals.org

Call for Research Articles

JRPGD will cover all areas of the subject. The journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence, and will publish:

•    Original articles in basic and applied research
•    Case studies
•    Critical reviews, surveys, opinions, commentaries and essays

We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to: jrpgd@interesjournals.org for publication. Our objective is to inform authors of the decision on their manuscript(s) within four weeks of submission. Following acceptance, a paper will normally be published in the next issue. Guide to authors and other details are available on our website; http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/index.htm

JRPGD IS AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL

One key request of researchers across the world is unrestricted access to research publications. Open access gives a worldwide audience larger than that of any subscription-based journal and thus increases the visibility and impact of published works. It also enhances indexing, retrieval power and eliminates the need for permissions to reproduce and distribute content. JRPGD is fully committed to the Open Access Initiative and will provide free access to all articles as soon as they are published.

Best regards,
Eghele Akwavbiokpene
Editorial Assistant,
Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD)
E-mail: jrpgds@interesjournals.org or jrpgd@interesjournals.org
http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

MSc IN LABOUR, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT

MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development

SOAS, University of London

This new programme is concerned with labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the Global South.

 It is the first MSc programme of its kind in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. Students will have the opportunity to experience policy-making and labour campaigns in practice. They will participate in our interactive sessions to devise policies; and design and implement regional, national and international labour campaigns.

The MSc draws on the expertise of staff in the Department of Development Studies, specialising in Latin America, Africa and Asia. It benefits from our contacts within the field, including with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc degree will focus on:

  • Labour process and organisations in the South
  • A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such asChina,Korea,India,South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East
  • The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South 
  • Informalisation of labour, casualisation and precarious work
  • Feminisation of labour
  • Forced labour and child labour 
  • Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones
  • Household and reproductive labour
  • The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning
  • Theories and practices of local, national and international labour campaigns

For further information please visit the following link: http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Marital Bedroom

HISHAM MATAR: MEN WHO TIPTOE INTO THEIR MARITAL BEDROOM

HISHAM MATAR was born in New York City to Libyan parents and spent his childhood first in Tripoliand then in Cairo.  His first novel, In the Country of Men, was published in 2006 and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the Guardian First Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award in the U.S.It won six international literary awards, including the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Best First Book award for Europe and South Asia, the Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Prize and the inaugural Arab American Book Award. It has been translated into twenty-eight languages. Hisham Matar lives in London.

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’
Winter 2012
Organised by the Department of Development Studies
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)
University of London
Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

MEN WHO TIPTOE INTO THEIR MARITAL BEDROOMS: THE NOVELIST AND DICTATORSHIP

HISHAM MATAR
Libyan novelist, author of In the Country of Men and Anatomy of a Disappearance

Monday 5 March, 6:30pm
SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre
Free entrance, registration requested (link on the SOAS front page), first come first seated

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Brazil

WORKERS, STATE AND DEVELOPMENT IN BRAZIL

A book launch of Ben Selwyn’s ‘Workers, State and Development in North East Brazil: Powers of Labour, Chains of Value’ (Manchester University Press, 2012)

8 March 2012, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4418, London
5:15 PM – 7:00 PM

Within the field of development studies, the importance of class relations is usually relegated to lesser status than the roles of states and markets in generating and allocating resources. This book argues that processes of class formation, struggle, and crucially, the changing balance of class forces between capital and labour constitute a key determinant of different patterns of capitalist development. Workers, state and development in Brazil illuminates these key issues in political economy through a detailed empirical investigation of the nexus between class dynamics and developmental processes and outcomes in North East Brazil’s São Francisco valley. It details how workers in the valley’s export grape sector have utilized their structural and associational power to win concessions from employers, contributing to a progressive pattern of regional capitalist development. Based on a stimulating engagement with and critique of World Systems Theory and the Global Commodity Chains approach, this book will be of wide-ranging interest to those interested in understanding how global dynamics impact on local development. It will appeal to students and researchers interested in processes of capitalist development, class formation and dynamics, North East Brazilian political economy and International Political Economy.

Ben Selwyn is Senior Lecturer in International Relations and Development Studies in the Department of International Relations, University of Sussex

Contents
Introduction.
1. Global commodity chains, labour history and capitalist development.
2. Emergence of export grape production in North East Brazil.
3. Grape workers: structural power and associational power.
4. Women workers.
5. Managing labour.
6. Class compromise.
7. Conclusions.
Bibliography.

234x156mm 256pp
HB 978-0-7190-8531-4 £65.00
4 line illustrations, 1 map, 19 tables

Manchester University Press
Oxford Road
ManchesterM13 9NR

**END**

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Panopticon

THEORY AS HISTORY: ESSAYS ON MODES OF PRODUCTION AND EXPLOITATION – BY JAIRUS BANAJI 

THEORY AS HISTORY

ESSAYS ON MODES OF PRODUCTION AND EXPLOITATION

JAIRUS BANAJI

AVAILABLE NOW

———————————–

WINNER OF THE 2011 ISAAC AND TAMARA DEUTSCHER MEMORIAL PRIZE
AVAILABLE AT A SPECIAL 30% DISCOUNT

In celebration of the fact that Theory as History, a title from the Historical Materialism Book Series (http://www.haymarketbooks.org/category/hm-series), has been awarded the prestigious Deutscher Prize, Haymaket Books is offering a 30% discount of all copies sold through our website. Simply enter the coupon code “THEORY30” at checkout to receive the discount.

———————————–

The essays collected here straddle four decades of work in both historiography and Marxist theory, combining source-based historical work in a wide range of languages with sophisticated discussions of Marx’s notion of ‘modes of production.’ From the emergence of medieval relations of production; the origins of capitalism; the dichotomy between free and unfree labour; and essays in agrarian history that range widely from Byzantine Egypt to 19th -century colonialism. The essays demonstrate the importance of reintegrating theory with history and of bringing history back into historical materialism.

———————————–

PRAISE FOR THEORY AS HISTORY

“The great merit of this volume is that it establishes an approach for [the debates about the nature and origin of capitalism] that is deeply theoretical, but at the same time refreshingly unhampered by the kind of doctrinaire attachment to a perceived (and often misread) orthodoxy that plagued so much of “historical materialism” for the past century. It is scholarly, without being purely academic … Banaji’s book deserves to be read and debated as one of the starting points for a new wave of Marxist historiography, still in the process of liberating itself from the ghost of its formalist past.”
—PEPIJNBRANDON, International Socialism

“Banaji’s seemingly idiosyncratic but in fact highly sophisticated and original approach to historical analysis provides not only a welcome stimulus and a challenge for scholars today, but also will give them plenty to think about for many years to come”
—MARCEL van der LINDEN, research director of the International Institute of Social History

“Theory as History is a book written at the summit of a lifetime’s engagement with issues of Marxist theory and practice … Banaji’s work demonstrates that no aspect of human history is irrelevant to the present. His scholarship shows immense skill, depth and range … [proving] it is not the Marxist method that has been at fault, but the dominance of non-Marxist theory and method in the minds of Marxist .” —Counterfire

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JAIRUS BANAJI spent most of his academic life atOxford. He has been a Research Associate in the Department of Development Studies, SOAS,University ofLondon, for the past several years. He is the author of Agrarian Change in Late Antiquity (Oxford, 2007).

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ISBN: 978-1-60846-1431 / $28 / Paperback / 408 pages

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For more information or to buy the book visit: www.haymarketbooks.org; to request review or examination copies write to john@haymarketbooks.org 

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‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Egypt

EXPLOITATION, DEBT AND AID IN EGYPT AND TUNISIA

MONDAY JANUARY 23rdExploitation, Debt & Aid in Egypt and Tunisia: What Direction for the Revolutions? with Dr Adam Hanieh

At The Gallery, Farringdon, London
70/77 Cowcross Street, London, EC1M 6EJ. (near Farringdon Tube station)
note new start time at 6.45 p.m. to 8.45 p.m.

We suggest you arrive 15 minutes beforehand in order to settle in with your glass of wine.
Entrance fee: £3 (£2 concessions)

In the wake of the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, international financial institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, in partnership with the Gulf Arab States, have rushed to offer loans and investment packages to the new transitional regimes. The possible conditionalities attached to these aid packages have provoked widespread concern from the region’s political movements, and need to be seen in the context of ongoing struggles to achieve the social and economic demands that underpinned the uprisings.

Dr. Adam Hanieh will examine the logic of financial aid in the Middle East, locating the discussion within the political economy of the uprisings and the neoliberal transformation of the region over the past two decades. Dr. Hanieh is a Lecturer in Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), and is author of the recently published Capitalism and Class in the Gulf Arab States (Palgrave-MacMillan 2011).

Friends of Le Monde Diplomatique is a UK-based affiliate of the Les Amis Le Monde Diplomatique which supports the writings and tradition which has evolved over 50 years of publication of the Le Monde Diplomatique Newspaper. Our “Cafe Diplo” meetings at The Gallery at Farringdon, in the City of London on selected Monday evenings, are presented (in English) in the context of our global anti neo-conservative-liberal tradition, and give an opportunity for lively debate between speakers and audience.

See: http://mondediplofriends.org.uk/calendar.htm

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Utopia

DEVELOPMENT WITHIN OR AGAINST CAPITALISM

Development Within or Against Capitalism: A Critical Engagement with Amartya Sen’s ‘Development as Freedom’.

Ben Selwyn (University of Sussex)

Date: 29 November 2011,

Time: 5:00 PM

Venue: School of Oriental and African Studies, Russell Square: Room: G50
University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square,
London WC1H 0XG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7637 2388

Ben Selwyn is the author of ‘Liberty Limited? A Sympathetic Re-Engagement with Amartya Sen’s Development as Freedom’. In Economic and Political Weekly. September 10, 2011 Vol.xlvI No.37

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com