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Karl & Jenny Marx

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM – VOLUME 23 NUMBER 3

Now Out: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/1569206x/20/3

 

CONTENTS:

 

Economics and Political Economy Today: Introduction to the Symposium on Fine and Milonakis

Author:  Sam Ashman

pp. 3–8 (6)

 

From Fetishism to ‘Shocked Disbelief ’: Economics, Dialectics and Value Theory

Author:  David McNally

pp. 9–23 (15)

 

Political Economy: History with the Politics Left Out?

Author:  Roger Backhouse

pp. 24–38 (15)

 

Sixteen Questions for Fine and Milonakis

Author:  J.E. King

pp. 39–60 (22)

 

‘From Political Economy to Economics’ and Beyond

Author:  Steve Fleetwood

pp. 61–80 (20)

 

From Freakonomics to Political Economy

Authors:  Ben Fine; Dimitris Milonakis

pp. 81–96 (16)

 

Why We Need to Understand Derivatives in Relation to Money: A Reply to Tony Norfield

Authors:  Dick Bryan; Michael Rafferty

pp. 97–109 (13)

 

David Craven (1951–2012): Marxist Historian of Art from las Américas *

Author:  Steve Edwards

pp. 111–112 (2)

 

David Craven – In Memoriam

Author:  Stephen F. Eisenman

pp. 113–115 (3)

 

Marxism, Art and the Histories of Latin America: An Interview with David Craven*

Author:  Angela Dimitrakaki

pp. 116–134 (19)

 

David Craven: A Select Bibliography

pp. 135–136 (2)

 

Dialectical Passions: Negation in Postwar Art Theory, Gail Day, New York: Columbia University Press, 2010

Author: Benjamin Noys

pp. 137–144 (8)

 

Bolivia’s Radical Tradition: Permanent Revolution in the Andes, S. Sándor John, Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2009 ‘I Sweat the Flavor of Tin’: Labor Activism in Early Twentieth-Century Bolivia, Robert L. Smale, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2010

Author:  Joseph Choonara

pp. 145–158 (14)

 

Zionism: The Real Enemy of the Jews, Volume 1: The False Messiah, Alan Hart, Atlanta: Clarity Press, 2009; Zionism: The Real Enemy of the Jews, Volume 2: David Becomes Goliath, Alan Hart, Atlanta: Clarity Press, 2009; Zionism: The Real Enemy of the Jews, Volume 3: Conflict Without End, Alan Hart, Atlanta: Clarity Press, 2010

Author:  Max Ajl

pp. 159–180 (22)

 

Islam’s Marriage with Neoliberalism: State Transformation in Turkey, Yıldız Atasoy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009

Author:  Eren Duzgun

pp. 181–200 (20)

 

Everyday Life and the State, Peter Bratsis, Boulder: Paradigm Publishers, 2006

Author:  Elmar Flatschart

pp. 201–212 (12)

 

Empiricism

pp. 213–218 (6)

 

Notes on Contributors

pp. 219–222 (4)

 

Back Issues

pp. 223–224 (2)

 

Originally published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-historical-materialism-20.3

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

 

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Crisis

THE FINANCIALIZED IMAGINATION AND BEYOND

Call for Papers—The Financialized Imagination and Beyond
Special issue of TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, Fall 2013
Proposals due: September 14, 2012

Link to PDF version of the CFP: http://t.co/xcuw44bq

Edited by Max Haiven (New York University/Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University) and Jody Berland (York University)

Narrowly defined as the so-called “FIRE” industries (high finance, insurance and real estate), finance has gained tremendous power over the global economy in recent years. Critics describe “financialization” as a profound and far-reaching social and cultural shift. Advances in financial modelling, computing and communications technology have changed the nature and power of financial speculation, but the vast expansion of new forms of debt, credit and everyday financial services have also had dramatic impacts on daily life. From credit cards to sub-prime mortgages, from student debt to the privatization of pensions, from pay-day loans to online stock trading, financial practices have become mainstream cultural issues. Films, biographies, novels, television shows and web-texts about finance and financiers (lionized or demonized) are more popular than ever. Logics of finance inform and shape public policy and social institutions, from hospitals and schools to science and cultural production, with “risk management,” “return on investment,” and “market efficiency” as key weapons of the neoliberal lexicon. Driven in part by immaterial, speculative, leveraged wealth, capitalism normalizes precarious labour and life in both material and immaterial forms, and each of us is expected to manage our risk portfolios and embrace a life of endless speculation. While the politics of debt, predatory lending and speculative capital have long shaped geopolitical realities, especially in the developing world, the unapologetic “age of austerity” threatens a new intensity of inequality and exploitation, with dramatic human and ecological consequences.

Facing continuous global financial crises and new social movements emerging to contest this “age of austerity,” cultural studies has important questions to ask about the financialized imagination. How is “finance” represented in fiction, film, journalism and art? How is finance itself a form of “representation” as well as a cultural phenomenon driven by beliefs, narratives and technologies? How do representational technologies contribute to the production of wealth? How do we explain the charisma of the speculator, the valorization of “risk management” and the fetishization of “financial literacy” under hyper-neoliberalism? What are finance’s effects on cultural production and the political economy of culture? How is the rise of digitized financial power related to the global play of material and immaterial economics, labour and culture? How is financialization connected to and expressed through race, class, gender, sexuality, colonialism, imperialism and ablism? What are the geopolitical and affective consequences of financialization? How do we historicize and “periodize” financialization, and what is at stake in analyzing what Marx called “fictitious capital”? What are the effects of financialization on everyday culture? How is debt linked to politics of precarity, disposability or borders? Are there ecologies of financialization? How does finance’s tremendous power to commodify potential futures as present-day “risk” affect how we imagine the future? What are the contours and limits of the “financialized imagination”? Have we moved from a society of the spectacle to a society of speculation? What lies beyond?

Social movements such as the Occupy movement and, more broadly, anti-austerity struggles from Athens to Chile, Nigeria to India, Korea to Montreal have been waging cultural struggles over the meaning of debt, the uses and abuses of banking, and the nature of economic power. Critical films, fiction, blogs and other genres seek to probe finance, financialization and the financial crisis, with varying degrees of success.

TOPIA invites contributors to propose academic articles, shorter “offerings,” reviews and review essays for a special issue on the “financialized imagination and beyond.” Themes and topics include (but are not limited to):

 

*Cultural representations of finance, financialization, financiers and the financial crisis in and across media

* The cultural politics of debt and credit in everyday life: government spending, ecological debt and debt as a paradigm of social discipline

* Finance as representation of space, time, knowledge, culture, materiality or immateriality

* Calculation and the new common sense: the fate of futurity, the cultural idiom of speculation and the practices of “risk management”

* Finance capital(ism) and the politics and economics of cultural production: the financing of culture

*The cultural politics of crisis

*The interplay of oppressions (gender, sexuality, race, class, ability, citizenship) and finance, from racialized predatory sub-prime lending to women-focused microcredit schemes, from the “Wall Street Man” to the legacies of debt-bondage and slavery

* The roots and legacies of colonialism and imperialism in finance (and vice versa)

* The financialization of daily life and social institutions

* The cultural and affective dimensions of finance, financial labour and financial speculation: how are cultures of speculation built and reproduced? What does financial wealth represent? What kinds of affects and sensations are produced by wealth through speculation, display, or loss?

* Tension and interplay between material and immaterial capital, labour and culture, money and power

* Historical precedents and patterns of finance and financialization: narrating events from Tulip Mania to the collapse of the Asian Tigers; from the speculative value of enslaved Africans to the predatory sub-prime mortgage industry that thrived on inner-city poverty 

* Struggles against finance, financialization and austerity, and their spaces, strategies, narratives, potentials and limits

* Horizons beyond the crisis
Prospective authors should submit a 300-word proposal, accompanied by a brief biographical note, to the editors by September 14, 2012. Selected authors will be invited to prepare articles by February 15, 2013, with publication dependent on the peer-review process. The issue will be published in Fall 2013.

More information can be found at TOPIA’s website, http://www.yorku.ca/topia.

Please direct proposals and queries to Max Haiven at maxhaiven@nyu.edu, and to Jody Berland at jberland@yorku.ca.

Originally published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-the-financialized-imagination-and-beyond  

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Human Nature

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM – VOLUME 20 NUMBER 1 (2012)

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/hm/2012/00000020/00000001;jsessionid=8btadtun80atn.alice

www.brill.nl/hima

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory

Volume 20 Issue 1
2012

CONTENTS

Articles

Kim Moody
Contextualising Organised Labour in Expansion and Crisis: The Case of the US

Gail Day
Manfredo Tafuri, Fredric Jameson and the Contestations of Political Memory

Richard Seaford
Monetisation and the Genesis of the Western Subject

Tony Norfield
Derivatives and Capitalist Markets: The Speculative Heart of Capital

Jairus Banaji
Fascism as a Mass Movement: Translator’s Introduction of Arthur Rosenberg’s Fascism as a Mass Movement

Intervention

Mario Vegetti
Editorial Introduction to Plato’s The Republic, Book XI

Review Articles

Jason Read
on Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s Commonwealth

Ed Rooksby
on Mark Fisher’s Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?

Paul Stasi
on Pranav Jani’s Decentering Rushdie: Cosmopolitanism and the Indian Novel in English

Henry Heller
on Jefff Horn’s The Path Not Taken: French Industrialization in the Age of Revolution, 1750-1830

Ingo Schmidt
on Ricardo Bellofiore’s Rosa Luxemburg and the Critique of Political Economy

Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism

Juha Koivisto and Mikko Lahtinen
Conjuncture, politico-historical

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Economic Crisis

ECONOMISTS OF TOMORROW

13th Conference of the Association for Heterodox Economics

Call for Papers

6-9 July 2011
University of Trent Nottingham, UK

The Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Association for Heterodox Economics (AHE) will be held at Nottingham Trent University, UK from 6-9 July 2011.

In more than ten years the AHE has established a reputation as a major national and international forum for the discussion of alternatives to mainstream economics, and for the interdisciplinary and pluralistic nature of its discussions. It is also plays an ongoing role in strengthening the community of heterodox economists, and to the development of heterodox economic theories on various themes through the dissemination of ideas and arguments.

The esteem of the economics profession has reached an all-time low, in the wake of the global financial crisis that most economists failed to predict. In this context we have a particularly important role to play as heterodox economists, many of whom were well aware that the crisis was imminent and who also have a range of proposals for new stable and sustainable economic and social structures.

For 2011 the AHE Conference theme is Economists of Tomorrow. This reflects the fact that, the world over, we are focused on challenging the hegemonic domination of our profession by just one approach embedded in mainstream economics, the neoclassical approach. The clear failure of neoclassical economics to predict, explain or find solutions to the global financial and economic crises makes it vulnerable. It is our intention is to use this opportunity to further expand and strengthen the case for pluralism within the economics profession.

Particular topics of interest under this over-arching theme include: addressing the power structures of the profession such as the Research Excellence Framework, the Royal Economic Society and the ABS ranking of economics journals; pluralism in research and teaching; research evaluation; openness to innovation and creativity; and the relationships between economists and decision-makers. The 2011 Conference will have both refereed and non-refereed papers. All paper proposals should indicate whether the paper is intended to be refereed or not.

A feature of the AHE is as a pluralist forum for dialogue. 
Consequently, the conference will also provide a broad pluralistic and interdisciplinary forum to discuss issues that members of the AHE and others feel are important. To gain an idea of the sorts of topics and issues that may be of interest to participants please see the details of the AHE conference 2010 at http://eitherwww.hetecon.org or http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/hetecon/conference/2010/

The international character of the conference has been a vital factor in its growing success. Scholars requiring documentation in support of visa or funding applications should indicate this at the time of submitting an abstract or panel proposal. Conference registration fees, all transportation and accommodation costs are at the expense of participants. Nevertheless, the AHE Conference Steering Committee is able to allocate some limited funding to assist participants from outside the US and European Union whose proposal is accepted. If you wish to apply for help with your conference costs please contact the organising committee (AHEConference@ntu.ac.uk).

The conference language is English.

Details regarding submission and registration

The conference invites submissions for single papers, panels and sessions of relevance to the over-arching conference theme or address topics or issues of importance to heterodox economics from standpoints which differ from, or critically examine, mainstream economics.

To facilitate dialogue and timetabling, participants whose papers are accepted must register by Sunday 12 June 2011. All participants will be expected to take part in at least two full days of the conference, in order to be included in the final programme. Participants should also be prepared to serve as discussants and/or session chairs. 

Further registration details will be announced later.

Single papers
All participants including those proposed for sessions and themes must submit an abstract to the conference website at http://www.hetecon.org. The abstract, which must be no longer than one page, should include a brief informative title, a clear statement of the issue the proposed paper will address, its main points, and its argument. Your abstract must state if you wish your paper to be considered for a theme and if you require it to be refereed. You must provide contact and affiliation details for all authors. If your paper is submitted in the name of more than one author, please indicate who will receive correspondence. The authors of successful abstracts will be notified and must provide a complete paper, unless the proposal is to be taken in a poster session, by the deadline for papers (see below). Both papers and abstracts must either be in Word or PDF format.

Complete sessions
The AHE welcomes proposals for complete single sessions and encourages those which address a single topic or issue from a variety of viewpoints or disciplines. Session proposals should be sent to AHEconference@ntu.net and should include:
* A short title (no more than 5 words),
* A description of the session which should be no more than one page
* The names of the proposed participants in the session
* An abstract for each paper to be included in the session
* The name and email address of the session organiser.

Themes
We encourage proposals for themes which address a single topic or issue from a variety of viewpoints or disciplines. The conference committee will work with theme organisers, when constructing the conference programme, to construct a coherent list of sessions for the theme, and schedule these so that participants can follow the theme. 

Theme proposals should be sent to AHEConference@ntu.net and should include:
* A short title (no more than 5 words),
* A short description of the type of paper that would be suitable for inclusion in the theme, and
* The name and email address(es) of the theme organiser(s).

Themes, once agreed by the conference committee, will be posted on the website along with contact details for theme organisers up until the closing date for papers. When submitting paper proposals, authors will be invited to indicate for which theme, if any, they consider it suitable. Theme organisers will be asked to consider all such submissions for inclusion.

Poster sessions
Poster sessions are intended to encourage new work by postgraduate or postdoctoral students, will depend on the number of submissions, and will be announced nearer the date of conference. If you wish your paper to be presented in a poster session, you need not provide a complete paper.

Deadlines

Proposal for panels are to be submitted by Sunday 14 November 2011.
Proposals for sessions are to be submitted by Sunday 30 January 2011.
Abstracts for all papers—to be included in a panel, theme or general conference session, and poster sessions—are to be submitted by Sunday 30 January 2011.

The AHE Committee will consider all proposals and abstracts and will notify you of the acceptance or rejection of your proposal.

Panel proposals will be notified by Monday 29 November 2011.
Session proposals will be notified by Monday 14 February 2011.
Paper proposals will be notified by Monday 14 February 2011.

Refereed papers are to be submitted by Sunday 15 May 2011.
Non-refereed papers are to be submitted by Sunday 29 May 2011.

Those submitting refereed and non-refereed papers must register, for a minimum of two days of the conference, by Sunday 12th June 2011. 
Registration details will be announced later.

All proposals, abstracts and papers are to be submitted via the AHE website: http://www.hetecon.org

All queries relating to the conference, but not concerning the submission of proposals or papers, should be addressed to: Bruce Philp (AHEConference@ntu.ac.uk).

To keep up to date with the 2011 conference and other AHE activities, subscribe to the AHE-ANNOUNCE mailing list (http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=AHE-ANNOUNCE) and visit http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/hetecon/conference/2010/ or http://www.hetecon.org. Earlier conferences can also be found at http://www.hetecon.com
 
END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Marx and Philosophy Society – 2009 Conference Abstracts

Abstracts of papers for the Annual Conference of the Marx and Philosophy Society are now available at: http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk

To reserve a place at the conference in advance, please email: martin.mcivor@ alumni.lse. ac.uk

Andrew Chitty

Marx and Philosophy Society
Sixth Annual Conference
Saturday 6th June 2009, 9.30am – 6.00pm
Room 642, Institute of Education, University of London, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1

PROGRAMME:

 

Nicole Pepperell (RMIT, Melbourne)
Beyond Telos and Totality: Immanent Critique as Selective Inheritance

Geoffrey Kay
Derivatives: ‘Metaphysical Subtleties and Theological Niceties’

Nick Dyer-Witheford (University of Western Ontario)
Twenty-First Century Species-Being

Graduate panel:

Jeremy Cohan (NYU)
What Marx really thought about class

David Marjoribanks (Kent)
Marxism and morality: out of the ‘moral wilderness’?

Caleb Basnett (York University, Toronto)
Re-inventing the subject: Marx and ethics


£10 waged, £5 unwaged, payable at the door
(provides annual membership of the society and entrance)

To reserve a place in advance please email: martin.mcivor@ alumni.lse. ac.uk
Travel directions: http://www.ioe. ac.uk/sitehelp/ 1072.html
Further details at: http://www.marxandp hilosophy. org.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski