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SOCIAL POLICY, RISK AND EDUCATION – CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Social Policy, Risk, and Education

This special issue of the journal Policy Futures in Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE) takes the broad lens of risk as its point of departure and invites empirical and theoretical papers which focus on the ways in which risk is enacted through and within education. Risk has become a central discourse – a cultural mindset – in modern societies which frames identities and organizes the governance of individuals and populations. The neoliberal, deregulated state, which emphasizes market-based solutions to the distribution of social goods, has collapsed economic and social policy: the paramount reality is competition and risk. Risk in multifarious settings now dominates social, political and economic discourse.

In a world where uncertainty and harm are governed through risk assessment and risk management, it is no surprise that educational policy similarly aligns loss, injury, and disadvantage with educational management strategies. American education, largely associated with formal schooling, has long embraced the concept of risk (e.g. ‘at-risk children’ and ‘a nation at risk’) as the basis for securing the nation’s economic future competitiveness. Public program initiatives such as Head Start are fashioned upon the perception of a perilous future, and attempt to assess and manage negative risks to children and society, as do the policies of many private intervention programs. Similarly, school-age children, from kindergarten through high school, are systematically identified as ‘at risk’ and targeted for academic and social intervention. While the US Department of Education’s ‘A Nation At Risk’ predated Beck’s risk society, the ‘at risk’ child can only be imagined within a risk society. Conversely, both official and unofficial educational sites are also governed by risk, but individual identities are frequently portrayed as ‘risk takers’. Here, risk is aligned with well-being and the enterprising self. Learning to skydive or rock climb, taking a challenging class, ‘having a go’ at spelling a new word, or returning to college to transition a career indicates a life worth living.

The purpose of this themed issue is to bring together international and critical perspectives on risk theory and education in both formal and informal settings.

All papers submitted will be evaluated using the journal’s normal peer review process.

Please also see the journal’s information for authors: www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/howtocontribute.asp

Publication for the special issue is planned for 2013. Deadline for submissions is August 1, 2013. Papers should be sent as an email attachment to the Guest Editor, Policy Futures in Education, Professor Steve Bialostok, College of Education, University of Wyoming: smb@uwy.edu

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blobspot.com

 

A Crisis of Capital

THE ECONOMIC CRISIS READER

The Economic Crisis Reader
Edition:1st
Date of publication: November 2009
ISBN:978-1-878585-85-1
Pages:301
Price:$34.95
http://www.dollarsandsense.org/bookstore/crisis_toc.html

    • Introduction
    • 1. General Explanations
        • 1.1    Inequality, Power, and Ideology Arthur MacEwan
        • 1.3    Recession, Depression, Repression: What’s in a Name? John Miller
        • 1.3    That ’70s Crisis Alejandro Reuss
        • 1.4    Crisis and Neoliberal Capitalism David Kotz
        • 1.5    Capitalism Hits the Fan Richard D. Wolff
        • 1.6    We’re All Minskyites Now Robert Pollin
        • 1.7 The “Credit Tsunami” Steve Keen
        • 1.8 Profits, the Business Cycle, and the Current Crisis Paul Mattick
        • 1.9    The Greed Fallacy Arthur MacEwan
    • 2. Warning Signs
        • 2.1 Bubble Trouble Dean Baker
        • 2.2 A House of Cards Tamara Draut and Adria Scharf
        • 2.3    (Mis)Understanding a Banking Industry in Transition William K. Black
        • 2.4    America’s Growing Fringe Economy Howard Karger
        • 2.5    Financialization: A Primer Ramaa Vasudevan
        • 2.6    Private Equity Exposed Orlando Segura, Jr.
        • 2.7    Hedge Funds Arthur MacEwan
        • 2.8    The Fed and America’s Distorted Expansion Thomas I. Palley
        • 2.9    Who Cares If Bear Stearns Fails? Arthur MacEwan
        • 2.10 Can the Fed Handle a Systemic Crisis? Maybe.Jane D’Arista
    • 3. The Housing Crisis
        • 3.1    The Homeownership Myth Howard Karger
        • 3.2    Confidence Trick John Miller
        • 3.3    Renters in the Crosshairs Daniel Fireside
        • 3.4    How to Stop the Foreclosures? Fred Moseley
        • 3.5    The Fannie/Freddie Bailout Fred Moseley
        • 3.6    Who Gets Those Trillions? Arthur MacEwan
    • 4. The Financial Crisis
        • 4.1    From Tulips to Mortgage-Backed Securities Gerald Friedman
        • 4.2    Ponzi Schemes and Speculative Bubbles Arthur MacEwan
        • 4.3    Derivatives and Deregulation Marty Wolfson
        • 4.4    Dealing with a Rotten Tooth Arthur MacEwan
        • 4.5    Time for Permanent Nationalization! Fred Moseley
        • 4.6    Trust Your Gut William Greider
    • 5. Monetary Policy
        • 5.1    Pushing on Strings Gerald Friedman
        • 5.2    Bernanke’s Bad Teachers Gerald Friedman
        • 5.3    The Bailouts Revisited Marty Wolfson
        • 5.4    Focus on the Fed William Greider
        • 5.5    Keynes and the Limits of Monetary Policy Alejandro Reuss
    • 6. Fiscal Policy
        • 6.1 Stimulus Whining John Miller
        • 6.2    How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Deficit John Miller
        • 6.3    Responding to Revisionism Gerald Friedman
        • 6.4    Fiscal Policy and “Crowding Out” Alejandro Reuss
        • 6.5    Why Are Things Getting Worse and worse? Arthur MacEwan
        • 6.6    The Economic Crisis in the Sates Gerald Friedman
        • 6.7    State Budget Blues Marianne Hill
        • 6.8    Bail Out the Safety Net Randy Albelda
        • 6.9    Saving Energy Creates Jobs Heidi Garrett-Peltier
        • 6.10 A New WPA? Ryan A. Dodd
        • 6.11 Rebuilding the Auto Industry from the Wheels Up Alejandro Reuss
    • 7. The International crisis
        • 7.1    Putting the “Global” in the Global Economic Crisis Smriti Rao
        • 7.2    (Economic) Freedom’s Just Another Word for…Crisis-Prone John Miller
        • 7.3    The Specter of Capital Flight Marie Duggan
        • 7.4    Tax Havens and the Financial Crisis Rachel Keeler
        • 7.5    Beyond the World Creditors’ Cartel Dariush Sokolov
        • 7.6 No Bailout for AIDS Mara Kardas-Nelson
        • 7.7 Beijing Statement on the Global Economic Crisis
        • 7.8 Caracas Statement on the Global Economic Crisis

    • 8. Workers and the Crisis
        • 8.1    The Global Crisis and the World Labor Movement Dan LaBotz
        • 8.2    The Real Audacity of Hope Kari Lyderson and James Tracy
        • 8.3    Corporate America’s Counter-Stimulus Strategy Roger Bybee
        • 8.4    Worker Direct Action Grows in Wake of Financial Meltdown Immanuel Ness and Stacy Warner Maddern
        • 8.5    Gender and the Recession Heather Boushey
        • 8.6    The Real Unemployment Rate Hits a 68-Year High John Miller
        • 8.7    Unemployment Insurance: A Broken System Marianne Hill
        • 8.7    Should We Be Talking About Living Wages Now? Jeannette Wicks-Lim
    • Contributors

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk