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Tag Archives: Decolonization

CLR James

GRASSROOTS POLITICS IN THE POSTCOLONY

Call for Papers
Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts (Indiana University Press)
Volume 6, Number 3 (Spring 2013)
Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony

Franco Barchiesi (Ohio State University), Guest Editor

Submissions are invited to explore the politics of contention and social movements in the postcolonial world (Africa, Asia, and Latin America), with particular regard to the ways in which race and ethnicity relate to identities and claims revolving around class, gender, nationality, and religion. Comparative discussions of social contestation in different societies are welcome.

Guest Editor Franco Barchiesi, Associate Professor in the Department of African American and African Studies at the Ohio State University, and the editorial staff of Race/Ethnicity invite submissions for Volume 6, Number 3, entitled “Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony”. We welcome submissions from activists, advocates and practitioners working on relevant issues, as well as from scholars in the social sciences and the humanities. In this issue, we look to engage the  following questions:

* How are racial and ethnic identities implicated in collective mobilization (including rural, labor, women, youth, indigenous, and religious movements) in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the “global South”?
* Is the concept of “social movement” useful to understand contemporary forms of social contention and grassroots politics?
* How do racial inequalities shape local contentious politics and everyday forms of social contestation?
* How do claims for racial and ethnic justice relate to grassroots politics in realities of economic liberalization and privatization?
* In which ways do intersections of race and ethnicity with current social conflicts interrogate the legacies of nationalism and decolonization?
* Do processes of migration and diaspora internationalize postcolonial political identities?
* How do grassroots identities, and their elaborations of race and ethnicity, interrogate political institutions and ideas of citizenship and civil society?
* How have postcolonial social movements responded to the global economic crisis and its impact on racial and ethnic dynamics?

Contributions can include, but are not limited to, case studies, theoretical discussions, and experience-based reflections.

Papers must be received by September 15, 2012 to be considered for publication in this issue.
Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website at http://www.raceethnicity.org/coverart.html for submission guidelines.

Please send manuscript publications to the managing editor: Leslie Shortlidge shortlidge.2@osu.edu

See Style Guidelines at http://www.raceethnicity.org  

Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website for submission guidelines.

Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts encourages and welcomes contributions by scholars, researchers, grassroots activists, policy advocates, and organizations.

 

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The Island

DECOLONIZATION IN THE THIRD WORLD: CHALLENGES, HOPES AND LIMITATIONS

International Conference
Lucienne-Cnockaert Chair and the Department of History, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)
17-18 November 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS
_______________

In Africa, Latin America and Asia, the end of European colonial domination is a period of particular interest as it leads, almost invariably, to a new era characterized by uncertainty and the unknown. Upon achieving independence, previously colonized countries are often confronted with unprecedented cultural, ideological and political upheaval. This is usually indicative of an effort to exorcise the country’s colonial heritage, to rebuild the nation, and to look for ways and means of renewing the culture and social and economic development. The management of independence in the new Third World countries deals not only with which ideological model is best for the development of the nation, but also with establishing proactive socio-cultural, educational and economic policies. These policies are meant to build or re-build societies and nation-states, and to re-establish national identity, as well as combat the inequality and economic under-development inherent to colonialism. However, it would seem that despite important changes and significant results, postcolonial policies must contend with a number of limitations due, in part, to the persistence of prior dependence, to the nature of the political regimes in place and to new forms of economic dependence.

In consideration of the fiftieth anniversary of the decolonization of several African countries, the Lucienne-Cnockaert Research Chair in Modern History of European and Africa will be holding a conference entitled “Decolonization in the Third World: Challenges, Hopes and Limitations” on 17-18 November 2011. This conference will be an opportunity to study the magnitude and complexity of the responsibilities and challenges, and the various administrative paths chosen by the post-colonial societies of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The aim of this conference is first and foremost to examine the objectives and challenges of cultural, educational and economic reforms in the Third World after attaining independence. Researchers will be invited to examine the nature of interracial and inter-religious relations, as well as the role of minority groups and demographically diverse populations (women, youth, ethnic groups, descendents of colonizers, regional groups, etc.) in the process of identity-building and socio-economic development within the new nation-states. A critical evaluation of the various reforms undertaken in postcolonial societies will allow researchers to take note of their limitations and their success, however limited the latter may appear to be. Finally, particular attention will be given to the various types of relations established between Third World countries and the Western world as a whole, and with international organizations and institutions such as UNESCO, the UN, the IMF, the Francophonie and the Commonwealth.

We welcome conference proposals touching upon the following themes:
– Cultural and economic aspects of colonialism
– Discourses and intellectual trajectories of the leaders of  independence movements
– The meaning of national symbols: national anthems, mottos and flags
– The nature of the postcolonial State and the ideologies of independence
– Cultural policies established in order to restore a national identity
– Relationships between native populations and the descendents of colonizers
– Policies respecting women and/or minorities
– Studies of particular concepts or ideologies (pan-Africanism, pan-Asianism, non-alignment, post- colonialism, socialism, etc.)
– Management of regional, ethnic and religious diversity
– Economic planning and development
– Neo-colonialism and international relationships between North and South
– International relationships amongst the South
– Interventions of the IMF and the World Bank: challenges and results
– Memories of independence

Researchers, professors and students interested in participating in this conference are invited to send proposals approximately 300 words in length before 1st March 2011.

Registration fees for this conference are $150 CAD. Travel and accommodation expenses may be reimbursed depending on funding received from granting agencies.

Please send proposals along with a brief CV by email to Professor Patrick Dramé: patrick.drame@usherbrooke.ca
http://www.pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/

The conference will take place at the Université de Sherbrooke on 17-18 November 2011. Papers and presentations may be in either French or English.

Program Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Departments, Université de Sherbrooke and Bishop’s University
Élikia M’BOKOLO, École des Hautes Études en Sciences sociales, Paris
Samir SAUL, History Department, Université de Montréal
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Ibrahima THIOUB, History Department, Université de Dakar
Christopher GOSCHA, History Department, Université du Québec à Montréal
Maurice DEMERS, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Jean-Bruno MUKANYA KANINDA-MUANA, History Department, Université de Montréal

Organizing Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Pascal SCALLON-CHOUINARD, Ph.D. candidate, Université de Sherbrooke
Maxime LANDRY-VALLÉE, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke
Alexander MAJOR, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke

Contact:
Pascal Scallon-Chouinard
Université de Sherbrooke
Email: Pascal.Scallon-Chouinard@USherbrooke.ca
Web: http://pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/index.php?id=2

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Evo Morales

BOLIVIA UNDER MORALES

Dear Reader,

Latin American Perspectives is pleased to announce the upcoming release of a dual special issue,

“Bolivia Under Morales”

ISSUE EDITORS: BENJAMIN KOHL & ROSALIND BRESNAHAN

Part 1 Available May 1, 2010
CONSOLIDATING POWER, INITIATING DECOLONIZATION

Part 2 Available July 1, 2010
NATIONAL AGENDA, REGIONAL CHALLENGES, AND THE STRUGGLE FOR HEGEMONY

The 2005 election of Evo Morales as the first indigenous President of Bolivia was a watershed not only for Bolivia but for the all of the Americas. The breadth of the political, economic, social, and cultural changes envisioned in the “decolonization” advocated by the MAS (Movement toward Socialism) movement headed by Morales places Bolivia at the forefront of social change in Latin America. As Morales begins his second term, Latin American Perspectives presents a broad-ranging collection of articles from leading Bolivian, U.S. and other international theorists and scholars that offer multiple perspectives on the rise of the MAS, its program for the decolonization of Bolivia, and the conflicts engendered by this struggle for social transformation.

May 2010 – Part 1 – Table of Contents

“CONSOLIDATING POWER, INITIATING DECOLONIZATION”

INTRODUCTION

Bolivia under Morales: Consolidating Power, Initiating Decolonization

BENJAMIN KOHL AND ROSALIND BRESNAHAN

ARTICLES

Morales’s MAS Government: Building Indigenous Popular Hegemony in Bolivia

NANCY POSTERO

Political Processes and the Reconfiguration of the State in Bolivia

PABLO REGALSKY

Carlos Mesa, Evo Morales, and a Divided Bolivia (2003-2005)

JEFFERY R. WEBBER

Confounding Cultural Citizenship and Constitutional Reform in Bolivia

ROBERT ALBRO

Evo Morales and the Altiplano: Notes for an Electoral Geography of the Movimiento al Socialismo, 2002-2008

FERNANDO OVIEDO OBARRIO

Bolivia under Morales: A Work in Progress

BENJAMIN KOHL

A Neoliberal Nationalization? The Constraints on Natural-Gas-Led Development in Bolivia

BRENT Z. KAUP

Decolonization and Its Paradoxes: The (Re)envisioning of Health Policy in Bolivia

BRIAN B. JOHNSON

The Localism of Bolivian Science: Tradition, Policy, and Projects

KATHERINE MCGURN CENTELLAS

Language, Signs, and the Performance of Power: The Discursive Struggle over Decolonization in the Bolivia of Evo Morales

ROSALEEN HOWARD

COMMENTARY
Beyond the Earthquake: A Wake-Up Call for Haiti

ALEX DUPUY

July 2010 – Part 2 – Table of Contents

“NATIONAL AGENDA, REGIONAL CHALLENGES, AND THE STRUGGLE FOR HEGEMONY”

INTRODUCTION

Bolivia under Morales: National Agenda, Regional Challenges, and the Struggle for Hegemony

BENJAMIN KOHL AND ROSALIND BRESNAHAN

ARTICLES

Taking the High Road: On the Campaign Trail with Evo Morales

JAMES LERAGER

Controlling State Power: An Interview with Vice President Álvaro García Linera

LINDA FARTHING

The State in Transition: Power Block and Point of Bifurcation

ÁLVARO GARCÍA LINERA

When States Act Like Movements: Dismantling Local Power and Seating Sovereignty in Post-Neoliberal Bolivia

BRET GUSTAFSON

Agrarian Capitalism and Struggles over Hegemony in the Bolivian Lowlands

GABRIELA VALDIVIA

Between the Romance of Collectivism and the Reality of Individualism: Ayllu Rhetoric in Bolivia’s Landless Peasant Movement

NICOLE FABRICANT

Migrants’ Voices: Negotiating Autonomy in Santa Cruz

JOSHUA KIRSHNER

A Distinguished People: Autonomist Populism in Santa Cruz

CLAUDIA PEÑA

Anatomy of a Regional Conflict: Tarija and Resource Grievances in Morales’s Bolivia

DENISE HUMPHREYS BEBBINGTON AND ANTHONY BEBBINGTON

Savina Cuéllar and Bolivia’s New Regionalism

MIGUEL CENTELLAS

Approaches and Limits of the National Development Plan as a Political Economic Strategy in Evo Morales’s Bolivia

CLAYTON MENDONÇA CUNHA FILHO AND RODRIGO SANTAELLA GONÇALVES

Social Control: Bolivia’s New Approach to Coca Reduction

LINDA FARTHING AND BENJAMIN KOHL

Women’s Voices on the Executive Council: Popular Organizations and Resource Battles in Bolivia and Ecuador

PAUL DOSH AND NICOLE KLIGERMAN, with photographs by JAMES LERAGER

Ideal for Classroom Use

Individual articles are available for purchase online. Individual and bulk print issues can be purchased by contacting the SAGE Journals Customer Service department journals@sagepub.com / 1-800-818-7243.

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Jean-Paul Sartre

UNFINISHED PROJECTS: DECOLONIZATION AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF JEAN-PAUL SARTRE
By
Paige Arthur

A major rereading of the life and work of Jean-Paul Sartre, published on the 30th anniversary of his death (April 15, 1980)

Sartre’s anticolonialism proves, in Paige Arthur’s sophisticated rendition, far richer and more complex than snide dismissals of his ‘totalitarian’ impulses have allowed.” –— Samuel Moyn, Columbia University

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In this major rereading of Sartre’s life and work, Paige Arthur traces the relationship between the philosopher’s decades-long commitment to decolonization and his intellectual thought. Where other commentators have focused on the tensions between Sartre’s Marxism and his account of existential freedom—usually to denigrate one in favor of the other—Arthur shows that Sartre’s political engagement with global liberation movements and his philosophical framework were inextricably intertwined.

Closely following the postwar movements for decolonization, and then supporting the war of independence in Algeria, Sartre proposed an influential and uncompromising view of imperialism. Analyzing the Western attitude to the “subhuman” colonial subject, he offered an account of the social constraints applying to both ruler and ruled, and came to argue that political violence—on both sides—was a systematic consequence of the colonial order. Arthur’s rich and nuanced book locates Sartre within the political discussions of his time, while also looking forward to contemporary debates about new forms of imperialism and resistance.

“Since the late 1970s, anti-totalitarian discourse has reduced Sartre to an unwitting casualty of the Cold War split. Now, Paige Arthur counters the hysteria and moralizing of the last thirty years with a carefully reasoned and erudite study that reveals Sartre for what he was: a profound and consistent thinker of liberation and decolonization.”—Kristin Ross, author of May’68 and its Afterlives

“Overcoming today’s amnesia about Sartre as a founding spirit of ‘postcolonialism,’ Paige Arthur shows his relevance for our own encounters with ‘globalization.’”—Ronald Aronson, author of Sartre’s Second Critique and Camus and Sartre

Paige Arthur is Deputy Director of Research at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She has taught at both UC Berkeley and the New School University.

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FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES PLEASE CONTACT CLARA HEYWORTH: clara@versobooks.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Clara Heyworth
Publication: 15th April, 2010 clara@versobooks.com
ISBN: 978-1-84467-399-5 Tel. 718-246-8160
20 Jay Street, Suite 1010
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel: +1 (718) 246 8160
Fax: +1 (718) 246 8165
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