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Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

MARX AND EDUCATION: MISLEADING TITLE AND CONFUSING NARRATIVE

April 13th 2011

By m310See all my reviews (on Amazon.com)

Review at Amazon.com: Marx and Education (Routledge Key Ideas in Education) (Paperback)

This had the potential to be a book that shed important light on the Marxist educational tradition; however, I was confused by the narrative. The title misled me into believing that I was in for a discussion of Marxist educators. Originally, I was interested in the book because I hoped it would augment the writings of U.S. Marxists, such as Ramin Farahmandpur, Rich Gibson, E. Wayne Ross, and a few others. Yet the book is dedicated to neo-Marxists, and while she gives attention to McLaren as a progressive educator (mid-1980s), she provides scant attention to his Marxist writings. Those who have read any of McLaren’s writings since 1995 know that he is a Marxist-Humanist; he is clearly not a neo-Marxist. Anyone following Marxism in education in the USwould be hard pressed to find a more prominent and influential exponent than McLaren.

Furthermore, the significant contributions made upon U.S. Marxists by British Marxists such as Glenn Rikowski, Paula Allman, Dave Hill, and Mike Cole, are not highlighted. Why were there no significant discussions of Valerie Scatamburlo D’Annibale and Deb Kelsh? The narrative in this book is not so much about Marxist educators but rather progressive and neo-Marxist educators. Where were discussions of contributions of John Holst and Himani Bannerji? The book, Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory – a milestone in the debates over Marxism and education – was not even mentioned. This truly was a narrow reading of a very small field and as a result has shortchanged its readers. Mike Cole’s work in England is far superior.

Anyon has done good work on urban education, but needs to be more aware of what is happening in the Marxist arena as far as education is concerned. I like her basic summary of Marxist analysis but wanted to find out more about U.S.-based Marxist educators, especially since there are so few of them.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Turbulence

TURBULENCE 5

OUT NOW!

TURBULENCE 5

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT?

Until recently, anyone who suggested nationalising the banks would have been derided as a ‘quack’ and a ‘crank’, as lacking the most basic understanding of the functioning of a ‘complex, globalised world’. The grip of ‘orthodoxy’ disqualified the idea, and many more, without the need even to offer a counter-argument.

And yet, in this time of intersecting crises, when it seems like everything could, and should, have changed, it paradoxically feels as though very little has. Individuals and companies have hunkered down to try and ride out the crisis. Nationalisations and government spending have been used to prevent change, not initiate it. Anger and protest have erupted around different aspects of the crises, but no common or consistent reaction has seemed able to cohere. We appear unable to move on.

For many years, social movements could meet and recognise one another on the *common ground* of rejecting neoliberalism, society’s old *middle ground* — those discourses and practices that defined the centre of the political field. The crisis of the middle has meant a crumbling of the common.

And what now? Will neoliberalism continue to stumble on without direction, zombie-like? Or, is it time for something completely different?

CONTENTS:

Turbulence: ‘Life in limbo?’

Gifford Hartman, ‘California in Crisis: Everything touched by capital turns toxic’

Bini Adamczak and Anna Dost, ‘What would it mean to lose? On the history of actually-existing failure’

Frieder Otto Wolf and Tadzio Mueller, ‘Green New Deal: Dead end or pathway beyond capitalism?’

p.m., ‘It’s all about potatoes and computers: Recipes for the cook-shops of the future’

Colectivo Situaciones, ‘Disquiet in the impasse’

George Caffentzis, ‘‘Everything must change so that everything can stay the same’: Notes on Obama’s Energy Plan’

Walter Mignolo, ‘The communal and the decolonial’

Massimo De Angelis, ‘The tragedy of the capitalist commons’

Rebecca Solnit, ‘Falling Together’

Rodrigo Nunes, ‘What were you wrong about ten years ago?’

ALSO FEATURING…

…a collection of texts, ten years after the protests against the World Trade Organisation in Seattle, asking people from across the global movement, ‘What were you wrong about ten years ago?’, at t-10.

Contributors to the feature are: David Solnit, Gustavo Esteva, Emir Sader, Phil McLeish, Rubia Salgado, João Pedro Stédile, A CrimethInc ex-Worker, Precarias a la Deriva, Trevor Ngwane, Marcela and Oscar Olivera, Heloisa Primavera, Chris Carlsson, The Free Association, David Bleakney, Olivier de Marcellus, Go Hirasawa and Sabu Kohso, John Clarke, Guy Taylor, Thomas Seibert, Dr Simon Lewis, Amador Fernández-Savater.

The Issue is illustrated by the photo series ‘Flat Horizon’ by Marcos Vilas Boas.

Turbulence: Ideas for Movement are: David Harvie, Keir Milburn, Tadzio Mueller, Rodrigo Nunes, Michal Osterweil, Kay Summer, Ben Trott.

http://www.turbulence.org.uk

ORDER A COPY

Copies can be ordered from editors@turbulence.org.uk

Turbulence is free, but we ask that you make a donation towards postage: http://turbulence.org.uk/donate/ (any additional donations greatly appreciated!)

All texts are also freely available via our website as of today.

HELP OUT

A collection of resources to help publicise the issue (posters, flyers, web-banners, etc…) can be found here:
http://turbulence.org.uk/turbulence-5/turbulence-5-resources/

Get in touch if you can help out translating any of the articles in this issue: editors@turbulence.org.uk

Order a bundle of the magazine to distribute in your part of the world.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
www.turbulence.org.uk // www.myspace.com/turbulence_ideas4movement //
www.twitter.com/turbulence_mag // editors@turbulence.org.uk

Turbulence’s Facebook Page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Turbulence-Ideas-for-Movement/171769885530

To stay informed about future ‘Turbulence’ publications and projects, subscribe to our (very!) low-traffic e-newsletter here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/turbulenceannouncementslist

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Historical Materialism

Historical Materialism

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM VOLUME 17 ISSUE 3 (2009)

 

http://www.brill.nl/hima

To subscribe, write to: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Historical Materialism
Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 3
2009

CONTENTS:

Articles

Massimo de Angelis and David Harvie
‘Cognitive Capitalism’ and the Rat-Race: How Capital Measures Immaterial Labour in British Universities

Iain Pirie
The Political Economy of Academic Publishing

Maria Turchetto
Althusser and Monod: A ‘New Alliance’?

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’ (contd.)

Vittorio Morfino
The Syntax of Violence. Between Hegel and Marx

Archive
David Fernbach
Editorial Introduction to Paul Levi’s Our Path: Against Putschism and What Is the Crime: The March Action or Criticising It?

Paul Levi
Our Path: Against Putschism

Paul Levi
What Is the Crime: The March Action or Criticising It?

Interventions

Alberto Toscano
Partisan Thought

Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho
Twixt Ricardo and Rubin: Debating Kincaid Once More

Jim Kincaid
The Logical Construction of Value Theory: More on Fine and
Saad-Filho

Review Articles

Christian Høgsbjerg
on Frank Rosengarten’s Urbane Revolutionary: C.L.R. James and the Struggle for a New Society and Brett St Louis’s Rethinking Race, Politics, and Poetics: C.L.R. James’ Critique of Modernity

Robert T. Tally Jr
on Loren Goldner’s Herman Melville: Between Charlemagne and the Antemosaic Cosmic Man: Race, Class, and the Crisis of Bourgeois Ideology in the American Renaissance Writer

Seongjin Jeong
on Iain Pirie’s The Korean Developmental State: From Dirigisme to Neo-Liberalism

Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism
Peter Thomas
Catharsis

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education, Indoctrination and Witch Hunting

 

 

It seems that Critical Pedagogy and radical educators are causing quite a stir in Australia, according to ABC News. There are the usual stories about ‘indoctrination’ of students by left-wing professors, the ‘evils’ of Critical Pedagogy and nonsense about the ‘neutrality’ of the classroom, of course. All this is to be expected – and we have seen this before (e.g. the Gould Report in the UK in the early 1980s, the ‘Dirty Thirty’ campaign in the US, Thatcher’s determination to end Marxist influence over teacher training at the University of Brighton and periodic digs at Marxist professors from the media in many countries over the last 40 years).

 

 

In these times of capitalist crises, the stakes are a bit higher than usual. What is also noteworthy is the extent and intensity of the debate that the ABC News item has generated. The right are not getting it all their own way, and spirited defences of Critical Pedagogy, radical educators and radical education can be found in the debate ensuing in the ‘Comments’.

 

 

See: http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/10/17/2393795.htm

 

 

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk