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Philosophy

Philosophy

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE 2015

 

5 4 3 2 1… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9CAPrEG5sM

Friday 16 – Saturday 17 January 2015,

Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin

 

Acceleration & the new … Animalities … Artistic strike … On organization … Pedagogization … Philosophy of the essay-film … Queer theory & geopolitics … Secrecy & surveillance

 

Annual conference of the “Radical Philosophy” journal
Discussions, panels (in English)
2015, Jan 16, Fri — 2015, Jan 17, Sat
Opening: Jan 16, Fri, 2 pm
In English

For the first time, the Radical Philosophy Conference takes places in Germany and discusses topics such as Acceleration & the New, Animalities, Artistic Strike, the Essay-Film, Organization, Pedagogization, Queer Theory & Geopolitics, and Secrecy & Surveillance.

Is the current acceleration of social life in capitalist societies qualitatively different from the futuristic ‘speed’ of modernity? Does the ‘art strike’ still represent a viable political response to art’s affirmative complicity with the market? What are the effects of the new forms of surveillance on our political condition? Is queer theory ‘merely cultural’? Is today’s ‘pedagogical turn’ a capitulation to a generalized ‘pedagogization’ or a site of a potential resistance? How does the film-essay work to communicate philosophy? What happens when biopolitics takes human-animal relations as its focus? What alternatives are there in matters of collective empowerment to the political forms of the 20th century? These topics and questions are discussed in a sequence of panels, bringing together international speakers from diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

With
Fahim Amir (Kunstuniversität Linz), Claudia Aradau (King’s University of London), David Blacker (University of Delaware), Christa Blümlinger (University of Paris 8, Saint-Denis), Victoria Browne (Oxford Brookes University), Gregoire Chamayou (CNRS, Paris / ENS, Lyon), Matthew Charles (Westminster University, London), ‘Claire Fontaine’ (artists, Paris), David Cunningham (Westminster University, London), Antke Engel (Institut für Queer Theory, Berlin), Frank Engster (author, Berlin), Arianna Ferrari (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (ITAS)), Peter Hallward (Kingston University London), Gertrud Koch (Freie Universität Berlin), Esther Leslie (University of London), Stewart Martin (Middlesex University, London), Mark Neocleous (Brunel University, London), Peter Osborne (Kingston University London), Silvia Posocco (University of London), Nina Power (Roehampton University, London), Rahul Rao (SOAS, University of London), Frank Ruda (Freie Universität Berlin), Nora Sternfeld (Aalto University, Helsinki), Hito Steyerl (artist, Berlin), Chris Wilbert (Anglia Ruskin University), Burkhardt Wolf (Humboldt-Universität Berlin), Alenka Zupančič (Slovenian Academy of Sciences)

The Radical Philosophy Conference 2015 is a project by Radical Philosophy and Haus der Kulturen Welt.

Website: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com/events

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISES IN EDUCATION, CRISES OF EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Scholar, Department of Education, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014.

 

INTRODUCTION

The capitalist crisis of 2007-09 cast a grim shadow over social existence in developed Western nations. The fallout from the banking crash of September 2008 post-Lehman cascaded over welfare, health, social services and education provision in the form of austerity measures, the drive to cut sovereign debt levels, the erosion of workers’ living standards and vicious service cuts and taxes aimed at the poor and disadvantaged (e.g. the bedroom tax in the UK).

On the back of this maelstrom, the Journal of Education Policy (JEP) celebrated its 25th anniversary by running a special issue on ‘Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis’ in 2010[1]. The JEP is to be congratulated on unveiling articles addressing relationships between the crisis of 2007-09 and education: it was unusual for a mainstream education journal to dedicate a whole issue to this topic. However, with the possible exception of Clarke and Newman’s (2010) contribution[2] it could be concluded that little progress has been made in understanding relations between capitalist crises and education since Madan Sarup’s classic Education, State and Crisis: A Marxist Perspective of 1982. Furthermore, there seemed to be a coy elision regarding the constitution of crisis within or of education itself. The crisis of 2007-09 was basically ‘economic’ in nature, it appears, with various spill-over effects for education: e.g. cuts in expenditure, deepening educational inequalities and rationing of access to higher education (Jones, 2010). Thus: education crisis was derivative of, and consequential upon, economic crisis. Furthermore, the economy, or the ‘economic’ system (for structuralists) is the starting point for analysis of education crisis.

The notion that an ‘education crisis’ can only ever be derivative of a capitalist economic one begs the question as to whether all crises can only ever be basically economic in nature; only ‘economic’ crises fundamentally put either the whole capitalist economy and society at risk, or, are the foundation for crises in other parts of the social system but still basically ‘economic’ in nature; thereby generating spectres of reductionism, economic determinism and crude renditions of historical materialism. On the other hand, references to ‘crisis’ litter media reports and academic outputs in relation to all kinds of topics – and there is nearly always some kind of ‘education crisis’ foregrounded by the print media. In terms of everyday usage the concept appears to have extensive legitimacy, though Gamble notes that ‘the term crisis [is] being thrown around fairly indiscriminately in everyday discourse’ (2009, p.7).[3]

It should be borne in mind that the concept of crisis can be traced back to the writings of Hippocrates (c. 460 – c. 370 B.C.) in ancient Greece, where it was used in relation to medicine, specifically indicating the turning point in the course of a disease or medical condition. In such writings as Epidemics, Book 1, Hippocrates used the concept of crisis to denote the point (the turning point) at which a patient either began to make a recovery from illness, or the disease won out and death resulted (Hippocrates, 1983). Furthermore, reading the ground-breaking work on crisis by Janet Roitman (2011 and 2014), which built on the classic text on the topic by Reinhart Koselleck (1988), indicated that an exploration of the concept of crisis beyond the economic sphere could be a worthwhile project. Maybe there could be essentially ‘education crises’ after all, and with this in view, this paper is structured into three parts, as follows.

Part 1 begins with a rudimentary outline of the concept of crisis. Madan Sarup’s (1982) classical theory of education crisis is then explored, coupled with some evidence showing that Sarup’s approach still has relevance for today (with contemporary examples drawn from the United States, Australia and England). It is demonstrated how contemporary accounts of the 2007-09 economic crisis could supplement and deepen Sarup’s account, whilst also avoiding the issue of the possibility of definitive education crises. This is followed by a brief outline and review of some work by Vincent Carpentier (2003, 2006a-b and 2009), which, although manifesting more sophistication (and much better data) as compared with Sarup’s classic work, nevertheless falls prey to subsuming education crises under economic developments. In the same context, David Blacker’s work on The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame (2013) is examined. This is an attempt to apply Marx’s notion of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall (TRPF) (via the work of Kliman, 2012) to developments in education in the United States (primarily). Blacker stamps the TRPF on contemporary education and thereby develops an original account of education crisis. Yet nevertheless, his rendering of education crisis is still derivative of economic crisis. Blacker also fails to pin down what a falling rate of learning actually is. He prefers to focus on a fall in the mass of learning and the elimination of learning, instead. These developments rest on economic, but also environmental, crisis. This first part of the paper ends with a brief critique of Crisis Fundamentalism: the notion that real, bona fide crises can only be economic ones. This is what the concept of crisis in education is concerned with.

Part 2 takes another tack: a different starting point, an alternative methodological approach. Rather than viewing education crises as flowing from economic ones, it explores the concept of education and what it is to be an ‘educated person’, and then seeks out possibilities for education crises within educational phenomena, institutions, processes and ethics. Such crises are crises of education, it is argued. The work of R.S. Peters (via Robin Barrow, 2011) is the focus here. There is an attempt to work through what an ‘education crisis’ might be on the basis of Barrow’s rendition of what he (Barrow) takes to be the four key components of Peters’ conception of the educated person. The discussion of some of the consequences of this approach is deepened through bringing the work of Janet Roitman (2011, 2014) to the keyboard. Rather than providing a history of the concept of crisis, as in Koselleck (1988), or providing a new (and improved) concept of crisis, Roitman shows the various ways in which the concept has been, and can be, put to work. Hence, Roitman’s approach to crisis is ‘put to work’ on R.S. Peters’ work on the educated person, pace Barrow. The last base in Part 2 examines the notion of ‘education for its own sake’ and what I call ‘island pedagogy’, flowing from the work of Furedi (2004a and 2009) and his followers. The argument here is that this approach to education crisis falls either into an ethics of blame or conjures up an education Colossus; a kind of Nietzschean figure with a monumental drive to learn and teach, unsullied by material interests and motivations. This approach is also basically idealist, transhistorical and sociologically naïve. It is also the flipside of Crisis Fundamentalism (education crises derive from economic ones – crises in education): quintessentially education crises can only arise within the educational sphere itself – leading to a kind of Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education).

The Conclusion argues that we need to think about crisis in relation to education and economy in a new way: such crises are not essentially ‘education’ or ‘economic’ in nature. An anti- (rather than post-) structuralist perspective rooted in class struggle is advanced as a way forward, and neither Crisis Fundamentalism (crises in education) nor Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education) will do. It also discusses the question of whether, and why, exploring the issue of crisis and education is a worthwhile pursuit for critical educators and theorists and for those who wish to move beyond capitalist education and society.

 

The whole paper can be downloaded at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

[1] Journal of Education Policy, Vol.25 No.6, November, edited by Stephen Ball, Meg Maguire and Ivor Goodson. A book based on this special 25th Anniversary was produced by the same three editors, also called Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis, in 2012 (Ball et al, 2012) – but with some additional articles.

[2] Clarke and Newman (2010) explore the notion that crises are ‘socially constructed’ and the roles discourse and social power play in these constructions.

[3] See also: ‘Crisis is much overused in everyday discourse. 24-hour news lives by manufacturing crisis. Most of them are entirely ephemeral. Any event that is in any way out of the ordinary or where there appears to be conflict and the outcome is uncertain becomes labelled a crisis’ (Gamble, 2010, p.704).

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

SYMPOSIUM ON EDUCATIONAL ELIMINATIONISM AND CULTURAL COLONIZATION

A HEAT (Higher Education & Theory) Symposium, with John Beck and Matthew Cornford (The Art School and the Culture Shed), David J. Blacker (The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame), and Nina Power (One-Dimensional Woman).

Friday 7th November
2pm – 6pm (followed by drinks reception)
Westminster Forum (5th Floor, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street)

Co-hosted by Institute for Modern & Contemporary Culture (IMCC) and the Higher Education Research Centre (HERC) at the University of Westminster.

David J. Blacker defines educational eliminationism as a state of affairs in which elites no longer find it necessary to utilize mass schooling as a first link in the long chain of the process of the extraction of workers’ surplus labour value but instead cut their losses and abandon public schooling altogether. John Beck and Matthew Cornford have charted the decline of local art schools and concordant rise of the ‘destination’ art gallery, and asked what this tells us about the changing relationship between the function of education and art in the new creative economy. Nina Power argues that current attacks on the education system are part and parcel of a broader war on cognitive and immaterial labour, upon which the art world provides a peculiarly privileged vantage point.

Drawing on the etymological and political association between culture and colonization, this symposium seeks to investigate the currently shifting relationship between education and culture through the themes of eliminationism and colonization.

John Beck is Professor in English Literature at the University of Westminster, director of the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture (IMCC), and author of Dirty wars: landscape, power, and waste in Western American literature and (with Matthew Cornford) The Art School and the Culture Shed.

David J. Blacker is a Professor of Philosophy of Education and Legal Studies at the University of Delaware, editor of Education Review, edrev.info., and author of The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame andDemocratic Education Stretched thin: How Complexity Challenges a Democratic Ideal.

Matthew Cornford is Professor of Fine Art at the University of Brighton, has a longstanding collaborative art practice with David Cross, and author (with John Beck) of The Art School and the Culture Shed.

Nina Power is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University, regularly writes for the Guardian and New Humanist, co-editor of Alain Badiou’s On Beckett and author of One-Dimensional Woman.

Rsvp to the organizer: M.Charles1@westminster.ac.uk

Poster Link: http://instituteformodern.co.uk/2014/educational-eliminationism-cultural-colonization-nov-7th

See: http://benjaminpedagogy.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/symposium-on-educational-eliminationism-and-cultural-colonization/ and http://hetheory.wordpress.com/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

MARXISM AND EDUCATION: RENEWING DIALOGUES XXII – AND A PROFESSORSHIP IN EDUCATION

The 22nd MARXISM AND EDUCATION: RENEWING DIALOGUES (MERD) SEMINAR presents:

David J. Blacker, Professor of Philosophy, University of Delaware

The Race to Nowhere: Abandoning the Promise of Universal Education

Universal education is beloved as an ideal while its reality is being extinguished. Heralded as expansions of access where we “race to the top” and “leave no child behind,” initiatives involving marketization, austerity, privatization and student debt combine to eliminate and expel growing segments of the rising generation.

Why is this happening?  And why now?  David J. Blacker outlines a coherent framework for understanding the current onslaught against all levels of public education. It all comes down to deep and troubling changes in the economy that “education reform” cannot touch and that nobody wants to talk about.

Wednesday November 12th 2014, 5–6pm

University of East London, Stratford Campus, CASS School of Education, Room: ED2.04

Convener: Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London)

***

Employment Opportunity:

PROFESSORSHIP IN EDUCATION

CASS School of Education, University in East London.

Details on the UEL website: http://jobs.uel.ac.uk/vacancies.aspx?cat=234

Closing date 5th October 2014.

If anybody would like an informal conversation about the post, please contact Alpesh Maisuria: worthers21@hotmail.com or A.Maisuria@uel.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Work & Days

Work & Days

EDUCATION FOR REVOLUTION

“Education for Revolution,” is a special issue collaboration of the journals Works & Days and Cultural Logic that has just been launched. 

Works & Days, published by the English Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, explores problems of cultural studies, pedagogy, and institutional critique, especially as they are impacted by the global economic crisis (http://www.worksanddays.net).

Cultural Logic has been online since 1997 and is a non-profit, peer-reviewed, open access, interdisciplinary journal publishing essays, interviews, poetry, and reviews by writers working within the Marxist tradition (http://clogic.eserver.org).

This is the second collaboration between the two journals. 

Cultural Logic will be publishing an expanded, open access, version of this issue in the coming months. The expanded edition of the issue will include new articles addressing education for revolution in Greece, Turkey, and India. 

Read Works & Days editor David B. Downing’s “Foreword to the Revolution” here:

http://blogs.ubc.ca/ross/files/2013/12/WD-Front-pages.pdf

 

Works & Days + Cultural Logic

Education for Revolution

E. Wayne Ross & Rich Gibson (Editors)

 

Table of Contents

 

Barbarism Rising: Detroit, Michigan, and the International War of the Rich on the Poor

Rich Gibson, San DiegoStateUniversity

 

Resisting Neoliberal Education Reform: Insurrectionist Pedagogies and the Pursuit of Dangerous Citizenship [Available online: http://goo.gl/lm2PIl ]

E. Wayne Ross, University of British Columbia

Kevin D. Vinson, University of The West Indies

 

Reimaging Solidarity: Hip-Hop as Revolutionary Pedagogy

Julie Gorlewski, State University of New York, New Paltz

Brad Porfilio, LewisUniversity

 

Learning to be Fast Capitalists on a Flat World

Timothy Patrick Shannon, The OhioStateUniversity

Patrick Shannon, PennStateUniversity 

 

Contesting Production: Youth Participatory Action Research in the Struggle to Produce Knowledge

Brian Lozenski, Zachary A. Casey, Shannon K. McManimon, University of Minnesota

 

Schooling for Capitalism or Education for Twenty-First Century Socialism?

Mike Cole, University of East London

 

Class Consciousness and Teacher Education: The Socialist Challenge and The Historical Context

Curry Stephenson Malott, West ChesterUniversity of Pennsylvania

 

The Pedagogy of Excess

Deborah P. Kelsh, The College of Saint Rose 

 

Undermining Capitalist Pedagogy: Takiji Kobayashi’s Tōseikatsusha and the Ideology of the World Literature Paradigm

John Maerhofer, RogerWilliamsUniversity

 

Marxist Sociology of Education and the Problem of Naturalism: An Historical Sketch

Grant Banfield, FlindersUniversity of South Australia

 

The Illegitimacy of Student Debt

David Blacker, University of Delaware

 

Hacking Away at the Corporate Octopus

Alan J. Singer, HofstraUniversity

 

A Tale of Two Cities — and States

Richard Brosio, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

 

SDS, The 1960s, and Education for Revolution

Alan J. Spector, PurdueUniversity, Calumet

 

E. Wayne Ross, PhD
Professor
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
University of British Columbia
2125 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
Canada
604-822-2830
wayne.ross@ubc.ca
http://www.ewayneross.net

Critical Educationwww.criticaleducation.org
Cultural Logicwww.eserver.org/clogic
Workplace: A Journal for Academic Laborwww.workplace-gsc.com

 

**END**

 Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

THE FALLING RATE OF LEARNING AND THE NEOLIBERAL ENDGAME

By David J. Blacker

Zero Books

Paperback £15.99 || $26.95

Dec 13, 2013. 978-1-78099-578-6.

See: http://www.zero-books.net/books/falling-rate-learning-neoliberal-endgame

BUY | AMAZON US | AMAZON UK

eBook £6.99 || $9.99

Dec 13, 2013. 978-1-78099-579-3.

BUY | AMAZON US | AMAZON UK

 

Outline

The current neoliberal mutation of capitalism has evolved beyond the days when the wholesale exploitation of labor underwrote the world system’s expansion. While “normal” business profits plummet and theft-by-finance rises, capitalism now shifts into a mode of elimination that targets most of us—along with our environment—as waste products awaiting managed disposal.
The education system is caught in the throes of this eliminationism across a number of fronts: crushing student debt, impatience with student expression, the looting of vestigial public institutions and, finally, as coup de grâce, an abandonment of the historic ideal of universal education. “Education reform” is powerless against eliminationism and is at best a mirage that diverts oppositional energies. The very idea of education activism becomes a comforting fiction.
Educational institutions are strapped into the eliminationist project—the neoliberal endgame—in a way that admits no escape, even despite the heroic gestures of a few. The school systems that capitalism has built and directed over the last two centuries are fated to go down with the ship. It is rational therefore for educators to cultivate a certain pessimism. Should we despair? Why, yes, we should—but cheerfully, as confronting elimination, mortality, is after all our common fate. There is nothing and everything to do in order to prepare.

Endorsements

“While it is no surprise that casino capitalism is in crisis and is spurring protests all over the world, few theorists connect the dots and analyze how this crisis moves through and is affected by a range of institutions. David Blacker has written a superb book in which matters of education, agency, economic justice and collective struggle come alive in both a language of critique and possibility. There will be no endgame to neoliberalism without critically thinking subjects who fight back collectively. This is the book that should be read to create the formative culture that makes such a struggle possible.” ~ Henry A. Giroux, author, America’s Education Deficit and the War on Youth, Professor of Communication Studies, McMasterUniversity

“David Blacker provides a mordantly clear-eyed assessment of our predicament. He asks hard questions, in the tradition of our best gadflies, and reveals even harder truths, doing us and our ‘democracy’ (such as it is) a great potential service. Read rightly, Blacker’s book, far from making you want to bury your head in the sand even deeper, will inspire you to shake yourself out of your slumber and do your part to arrest this pernicious development. We ignore his important work at our own peril.” ~ Christopher Phillips, author, Socrates Cafe: A Fresh Taste of Philosophy, Senior Writing Fellow, University of Pennsylvania

“Invigorating pessimism.” ~ Mark Fisher, author, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?, Department of Visual Cultures, Goldsmiths, University of London

“David Blacker’s book should be required reading for everyone marching circles in schools and universities.” ~ Douglas Lain, author, Billy Moon: 1968 and host of the Diet Soap Podcast

“The notion that widespread educational attainment is the key to widespread prosperity has long been a pillar of the dominant ideology. David Blacker’s central—and centrally important—insight is that the Great Recession has made this notion (which was always dubious) hopelessly anachronistic. When so many people have become superfluous to the capitalist system–mass joblessness persists four years after the recession officially ended–what have also become superfluous are these people’s skills, the schools that educate them, and the spending that funds the schools. And a capitalism mired in crisis just isn’t a capitalism that can afford to pay for what it doesn’t need. But isn’t this only a temporary situation? Drawing on Karl Marx’s falling-rate-of-profit theory and his associated theory of relative surplus (superfluous) population, Blacker warns that it may well be permanent and he urges us to face this prospect soberly and respond accordingly.” ~ Andrew Kliman, author, The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the Great Recession, Professor of Economics, PaceUniversity

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski