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Alfred Russel Wallace

Alfred Russel Wallace

ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE: EXPLORER, EVOLUTIONIST, PUBLIC INTELLECTUAL

By Ted Benton

This new book is a contribution to the reassessment of Wallace’s legacy in the centenary year of his death. So far media coverage has focused on Wallace’s independent foundation of the theory of evolution by natural selection, and the attempts by the elite circle around Darwin to obscure Wallace’s achievement. Wallace is now fast achieving the credit that is due to him, but this book takes us much further. It shows that Wallace went on to make further major contributions to evolutionary theory and other aspects of the life sciences and, for more than half a century after the evolutionary breakthrough, became a prominent voice on the left.

From his early years he was inspired by the socialism of Robert Owen, and later was a leading campaigner for land nationalisation, Irish independence, women’s emancipation and for socialism. His thinking on all these topics was bold and original, and has much to offer for us today. It is likely that other contributions to the centenary celebrations will ignore most of this!

The book can be ordered from books@siriscientificpress.co.uk

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Revolt

REPETITION AND REVOLT

The Theory Reading Group at Cornell University invites submissions for its seventh annual interdisciplinary spring conference:

Repetition and Revolt

Featuring keynote speaker Rebecca Comay (University of Toronto)

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
April 14-16, 2011

Wavering between the occurrence of the novel and the recurrence of the routine, the concept of revolution often divides along a line suggested by its etymology.  Thus, even as Copernicus upset the world system of his time, he did so by describing an orbit, a stable circle.  Put simply, this legacy reminds us that every proposed overturning might yield nothing more than a mere return, a tendency that threatens to undermine radical upheavals in domains ranging from the political to the aesthetic to the scientific.  As Robert Frost suggests, it may well be in the nature of “total revolution” to put “the same class up on top.”

This critical ambiguity can emerge whenever we attempt to account for the possibility of change or difference.  Does this division reveal something essential about revolution, or does it indicate a fault in the ways in which we think about revolution?  In what ways has contemporary thought attempted to reckon with or reconcile the competing meanings of this term?  How do philosophical and theoretical discourses account for change and difference, not only in the realms of politics, literature, art, and science, but also within philosophy and theory themselves?  What forms of critique, resistance, or action can we find in contemporary thought, and what do these forms disclose about the potential or limits of the concept of revolution?

Suggested topics:

* Paradigm shifts and epistemic breaks

* Theories of literary innovation

* Copernican revolution or Ptolemaic counterrevolution

* Theories of the event

* Aesthetics and politics

* The figure of the genius

* Repetition and difference

* Revolution and globalization

* The finite and the infinite

* Secularization, the post-secular, the new atheism

* The future of critique

* Collapse, catastrophe, and crisis

* Evolution and Darwinism

* Eternal return

* Utopia and dystopia

* Revolutionary violence and messianism

* Law and exception

* Theories of transgression

* Ruptures critical and diacritical

* Revolutions in media/social mediation

* Turns: political, linguistic, ethical, (anti)social, comic

Please limit the length of abstracts to no more than 250 words.

The deadline for submission of 250-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations is February 15, 2011.

Please include your name, e-mail address, and phone number.  Abstracts should be e-mailed to repetitionrevolt@gmail.com

Notices of acceptance will be sent no later than February 25, 2011.

For more information about the Cornell Theory Reading Group, visit: http://www.arts.cornell.edu/trg  

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com