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APOCALYPSE NOW

APOCALYPSE NOW

APOCALYPSE NOW: NEOLIBERALISM AND APOCALYPTIC NARRATIVES

 

Apocalypse Now: Neoliberalism and Apocalyptic Narratives

Conference website: http://www.unil.ch/aponow

Graduate colloquium

English Department, University of Lausanne

22-23 June, 2015 – Lausanne, Switzerland

With the participation of the University of York, and the University of Utrecht

 

Keynote Speakers:

Christian Arnsperger, University of Lausanne

Adam Kelly, University of York

Organizer: Anas Sareen (Anas.Sareen@unil.ch)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Western culture has a long-standing investment in the apocalyptic. Events such as 9/11, global warming, or the financial crisis of 2008 have directly impacted the way we perceive the world, and the ways in which we conceive of social structures. The recent events in Paris exemplify these apocalyptic interruptions in Western society, which bring issues of freedom of speech and democratic ideals to the fore, and reveal unresolved questions of race, religion, and ethnicity. Similar dynamics exist between the U.S. and North-Korea. After cyber terrorists hacked Sony Pictures in retaliation against the release of the film The Interview, public debates on race, satire, and cyber-terrorism have reanimated tensions between the two countries. The highly publicized hacker group Anonymous demonstrates yet another case of Internet-born geopolitics, though the ambivalence the group evokes does raise questions about our public sentiments towards the placelessness of virtual security. Evidently, the apocalyptic abounds today, and urges us to re-think issues of national identity, economy, and ethics in light of shifting geopolitical configurations. Immersed in such geopolitical shifts, neoliberal capitalism is the silent victor of many an apocalypse.

As established by David Harvey among others, the elusive object that capitalism is resurges with a renewed ideological agenda during the 1970s, particularly under the governments of Thatcher in Britain, and Reagan in the U.S., coalescing into what we now term ‘neoliberalism’ or ‘neoliberal capital’. Evidently, the apocalyptic urges us to consider the geopolitical configurations of national identity, economy, ethics. Neoliberal capitalism and the apocalyptic recently converged in the 2008 financial crisis, a circumstance of speculative excess pushed over the brink and salvaged by American and European government bailouts. Given these ties between neoliberalism and the nation, what might we mean today when we speak of the apocalyptic?

The ambivalence of the term ‘apocalypse’ may be the starting point of this reflection. If the ‘apocalypse’ means both the ‘end of the world’, and a ‘revelation’, then what does the apocalyptic reveal?

This colloquium aims to explore the ways in which the apocalyptic destabilizes social or narrative structures and, in doing so, reveals the constructed nature of both inclusionary and exclusionary modes of being/living. What are the dynamics behind ‘the end’ and behind renewal? What remains? What disappears? How long does an apocalypse last? Questions of temporality invite articulations around issues of questions of gender, sexuality, race, subjectivity, politics, and ethics among many others.

Therefore, we seek contributions that address such critical categories from a number of different locations, objects, and orientations. We invite innovative papers of 20 minutes (followed by 10 min discussion), which explore the apocalyptic/and neoliberal capitalism by engaging in contemporary cultural products.

Topics may include (but are not restricted to) the following:

  • Architecture and dystopia in contemporary film and literature
  • Apocalypse and the nation in contemporary film and literature
  • Apocalypse and the everyday
  • Apocalypse, capitalism, and seriality (TV series, comics)
  • Civil disobedience and/or “epistemic disobedience” (see Walter Mignolo, 2009)
  • Dancing on the edge: dance and capitalism/dance and the apocalyptic
  • De-colonial perspectives on capitalism/the apocalyptic
  • Hi-stories of apocalyptic capitalism from the Global South
  • Interrupted flows: music, capitalism, and the apocalyptic
  • Nuclear families, and alternative modes of belonging, kinship (queer theory, for example Lee Edelman’s No Future, Judith Butler’s Antigone’s Claim)
  • Posthumanism and capitalism (zombies, cyborgs, animals)
  • ‘Revealing race’ and the geopolitics of the apocalyptic
  • Staging apocalyptic capitalism
  • Social mouvements, and countering neoliberalism (new forms of political activism)
  • Subjectivity and affect under neoliberalism (for example Lauren Berlant’s Cruel Optimism)
  • The narrative architecture of the apocalyptic (the immediate and the aftermath)
  • The political capital of (cyber-) terrorism

 

Please send abstracts of 300 words, including an author’s bionote,

to aponow@gmail.com by 21 March 2015. Notification of acceptance on 1 Apri l 2015.

Scientific committee:

Catherine Chen (Columbia University), Anna Iatsenko (University of Geneva), and Anas Sareen

(University of Lausanne)

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

THE POLITICS OF COMMON GROUND

Seminar: The Politics of Common Ground

Tuesday April 29th @ 3-5PM, Room LTB B

University of Essex, Colchester Campus

For this seminar Professor Jeremy Gilbert will discuss his new book: Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in an Age of Individualism.

Common Ground explores the philosophical relationship between collectivity, individuality, affect and agency in the neoliberal era. Jeremy Gilbert argues that individualism is forced upon us by neoliberal culture, fatally limiting our capacity to escape the current crisis of democratic politics.

The book asks how forces and ideas opposed to neoliberal hegemony, and to the individualist tradition in Western thought, might serve to protect some form of communality, and how far we must accept assumptions about the nature of individuality and collectivity which are the legacy of an elitist tradition. Along the way it examines different ideas and practices of collectivity, from conservative notions of hierarchical and patriarchal communities to the politics of ‘horizontality’ and ‘the commons’ which are at the heart of radical movements today.

Exploring this fundamental fault line in contemporary political struggle, Common Ground proposes a radically non-individualist mode of imagining social life, collective creativity and democratic possibility.

Professor Jeremy Gilbert is a writer, researcher and activist whose work has appeared in various British, continental, American and Australian publications and has been translated into French, Spanish and German. His most recent book is Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in an Age of Individualism (Pluto 2013) and he has co-authored books on the philosophy of dance music and the relationship between culture and politics in Blair’s Britain as well as publishing numerous articles on cultural theory, politics and music.

Sponsored by the Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

This seminar is part of an ongoing workshop series on artist collectives.

For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis: sshuka@essex.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Aesthetics

PERFORMANCE AND LABOUR SYMPOSIUM

Performance and Labour Symposium

9.30 – 18.00, Saturday 3rd November 2012

Sir Ambrose Fleming Lecture Theatre, Roberts Building, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE

This symposium is an interdisciplinary event that will address performance in an expanded sense as a form of labour. Performance will be considered as an activity and a practice that takes place both within and outside the realm of art. The symposium will interrogate the physical and intellectual experiences of viewing and producing performances. These questions will be raised across the fields of art history, philosophy, performance studies, political economy, theatre and dance. Addressed in this expanded way, the aim of the symposium is to investigate the histories of mass performances and social choreographies in political contexts, to situate performance as a form of praxis and to interrogate the language of performance as a managerial strategy within late capitalism.

This symposium is organised by Larne Abse Gogarty and Josefine Wikström with support from the

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University London, and the Centre for the Study of Contemporary Art, History of Art Department, University College London.

For full details of the programme please visit http://www.ucl.ac.uk/art-history/events/performance-and-labour

The symposium is free, but registration is required.

To register: email performanceandlabour@gmail.com by October 27th

Keynote Lecture

Professor Randy Martin (TischSchool of the Arts, New YorkUniversity)

From the Derivative to Dance and Back: Economies of Performance

Panels

Performance, the Commodity Form and Management Cultures

Marina Vishmidt, A Dysmorphia of Assets: Performative Logics in Labour and in Art

David Hodge and Dick Higgins, Performance and Art in the Age of its Real Subsumption

Gavin Grindon Trip Without a Ticket: The Digger Free Store and the re-composition of collective performance in contemporary art

Performance and Labour-Power

Olive McKeon: Performance, Labour-Power and the Value-Form: The Performer as Worker

Rose Anne Gush: Contemporary Service/ Work in Tino Sehgal’s ‘These Associations’

Theron Schmidt: Troublesome Professionals

Rhythm and Collectivity

Bojana Cvejic: When Social Choreography Begins to Falter

Jenny Nachtigall: Rhythm and Labour: The Performance Principle from Dada Zurich to Berlin

Marina Gerber: The Production of Collective Actions

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/performance-and-labour-symposium-ucl-3-november

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Ballroom Dancing

SOCIAL DANCING AT THE GUILDHALL

A message from Ruth Rikowski

Guildhall Catholic Church, High Road, Ilford,London

Nearest station: Ilford (overground).
10 mins walk from station, or catch 86 bus which stops right outside.

Every Thursday, 8.00pm – 11pm

£4 entry

Raffle (£1). Drinks from the bar.

Ballroom and sequence dancing, with a little bit of disco and line dancing

Very friendly group of people

Everyone welcome

Party night with free nibbles on the last Thursday of every month

Come and join in the fun!

Great variety of dances, nice and interesting people to talk to, good atmosphere, lovely music, wonderful for your health. Beginners welcome. What more can I say.

Life is for living, and all that!

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

I have also been, and it is great fun! The dancing improved my fitness! It gets me off this damned computer!

Glenn

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 16th APRIL 2011

EVENTS

WORKING CLASS STUDIES ASSOCIATION 2011 CONFERENCE: WORKING-CLASS ORGANIZATION AND POWER

June 22-25
University of Illinois Conference Center
750 S. Halsted Street
Chicago, Illinois, USA

Opening Wednesday afternoon with registration, followed by a reception and keynote event, the 2011 WCSA conference will feature more than 70 panels and workshops, more than 200 presenters, as well as after-lunch plenaries, a banquet, and special events. Though planning continues for plenaries and other activities, dates of panels and workshops will not be changed without appropriate permissions.

More info: http://www.ler.illinois.edu/labor/wcsaconference.html

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ANNUAL FUNDRAISING DINNER FOR CANADIAN DIMENSION MAGAZINE

Saturday, April 30
Plant Recreation Centre
930 Somerset St. West, Ottawa

Drinks 6:00 pm; Dinner 7:30 pm

“Influencing Local Decisions” – with guest speakers Suzanne Doerge (City for All Women Initiative) and Steven Shrybman (Friends of Lansdowne Park)

Tickets are $50/person and include a new one-year subscription to Canadian Dimension magazine. For tickets, call Jane/Geoff at 613-234-6933 or Peter at 613-728-7980.

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CU EXPO 2011: COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS

May 10-14, 2011
Waterloo, Ontario

In Waterloo Region about 600 community and university activists locally, nationally and internationally will be showcasing, networking and debating on community based research, on Community / University Partnerships and eight UN Millennium Developmental goals.

CU Expo 2011 will showcase the exemplars in community-university partnerships worldwide, and explore and introduce creative ways of strengthening our local communities.

The CU Expo movement began in Canada as a response to individuals involved community-university partnerships needing a forum to share experiences, strategies and ideas. CU Expo 2011 will address the conference objectives, themes and streams through a variety of session offerings and opportunities for dialogue.

Please visit our website http://www.cuexpo2011.ca to learn about the conference, and follow us on twitter @cuexpo2011.

This conference will provide inspiration, cutting edge knowledge, actions and many opportunities to connect with people alike.

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SOUNDS OF SOLIDARITY: A NIGHT OF LATIN MUSIC AND DANCE

Thursday April 21, 2011
JJR Macleod Auditorium, University of Toronto
1 Kings College Circle
6:30 PM

Come out and support UFCW Canada and the Organization of Latin American Students as they fundraise. All funds raised will be used to purchase health & safety equipment, bicycles and other necessities for migrant workers.

The show will consist of food, music, poetry, and dance performances, raffles and a silent auction. Doors will open at 6:30 with the show starting at 7:00 pm. The night promises to be an eventful evening with plenty of raffles and prizes being given away all night long.

Raffle prizes include:
– Tickets to Toronto FC game(s)
– Tickets to Toronto Blue Jays game(s)
– Tickets to see Grammy Award Winner Luis Enrique
– Gift-cards from HBC, Subway and other great prizes
– Jewellery and food vouchers

Tickets are only $14 for students and $18 for non-students.

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55TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION SOCIETY (CIES)

May 1-5, 2011
Fairmont Queen Elizabeth Hotel
900 Rene Levesque Blvd. West
Montreal, Quebec

Noteworthy highlights in this year’s program, two lecture series—”Canadian Education in Perspective” and “A Tribute to Jackie Kirk”—will take place on Monday, May 2 and Wednesday, May 4, respectively. Other special events during the week-long conference include a plenary session on the conference theme; three invited panels focusing on current developments in education and around the world; an opportunity to visit two remarkable schools in the Montréal area; and the premiere of Carlos Alberto Torres’ theatrical piece, “Schooling of the oppressor or of the oppressed?,” influenced by the work of Paulo Freire.

More info: http://cies2011.mcgill.ca/CIES_2011_Montreal/CIES_2011_Montreal.html
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NEWS & VIEWS

PROGRESSIVE MEDIA SUFFER LOSSES IN THE FIGHT AGAINST THE RIGHT-WING MEDIA MACHINE

Major progressive media stars have recently lost their platforms, while the Huffington Post eschews progressivism — both worrying developments in the media war with the right.

Read more: http://www.alternet.org/story/150548/progressive_media_suffers_losses_in_the_fight_against_the_right-wing_media_machine?page=1

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REBUILDING THE LEFT IN A TIME OF CRISIS

Leo Panitch is a political economist and theorist based at York University, Toronto, and is co-editor of Socialist Register. His most recent book is In and Out of Crisis: The Global Financial Meltdown and Left Alternatives (with Greg Albo and Sam Gindin). Leo spoke to New Left Project’s Edward Lewis about the long crisis of the left and his ideas for a reinvigorated anti-capitalist strategy. The discussion focuses on the labour movement, class and identity politics, proposal for a new kind of political party as well as some of the immediate questions faced by the left at the present juncture.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/492.php

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WHY THE UNITED STATES IS DESTROYING ITS EDUCATION SYSTEM

We spurn real teachers—those with the capacity to inspire—and replace them with instructors who teach to narrow, standardized tests. These instructors obey. They teach children to obey. And that is the point.

Read more: http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/why_the_united_states_is_destroying_her_education_system_20110410/

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CHANGING THE LONG-FORM CENSUS-ITS IMPACT ON WOMEN’S EQUALITY IN CANADA

Report of the Standing Committee on the Status of Women

“The Committee heard about three possible impacts: the undercounting of vulnerable women and girls, the lack of data to conduct adequate gender-based analysis (GBA) of programs and policies, and the lack of data to evaluate programs and policies and to make strategic investments with respect to advancing the status of women.”

View the report here: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/parl/XC71-403-1-1-05-eng.pdf

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‘BEYOND CAPITALISM’?: QUÉBEC SOLIDAIRE LAUNCHES DEBATE ON ITS PROGRAM FOR SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION

By Richard Fidler, The Bullet

At a convention held in Montreal on March 25-27, Québec solidaire (QS) concluded the second round in the process of adopting its program. More than 350 delegates from party associations across the province debated and adopted the party’s stance on issues in relation to the economy, ecology and labour. And they reaffirmed their determination to build the party as an independent political alternative, rejecting proposals by QS leaders to seek “tactical agreements” with the capitalist Parti québécois and/or the Parti vert (Greens) that would have allowed reciprocal support of the other party’s candidate in selected ridings.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/491.php

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th FEBRUARY 2011

EVENTS

SPECIAL MEETING: PENSIONS & RETIREMENT SECURITY, EYEWITNESS REPORT FROM WI

Thursday, March 3
7:30pm – 9:30pm
OFL Building Auditorium
15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

Sponsored by Toronto & York Region Labour Council

We’re fighting back! Help us take on corporations like U.S. Steel and Nortel that attack the pension rights of both current workers and retirees. Learn about the next phase of Labour’s pension campaign to expand CPP and win retirement security for all.

With a special eyewitness report from Wisconsin where public workers continue their fight against Republican union busting

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A CELEBRATION OF WOMEN – AN EVENING OF INTERNATIONAL MUSIC AND FOOD

Wednesday, March 9
7:00pm – 9:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham Street, Toronto

Celebrate International Women’s Day with Canadian Voice of Women for Peace.
A fun evening of delicious treats and music.

Hear the beautiful sounds of jazz duo Brenda Lewis and Margaret Stowe, an acclaimed Canadian folk singer-songwriter Marianne Girard, soulful sounds of Nadia Edward, Oriental/Egyptian dance with Kara Culp, and African dance with Agha Norba.

Suggested donation $10-$20 or pay what you can.

*****

WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY SEVENTH COFFEEHOUSE: REFLECTIONS ON THE RECLAMATION OF
DOUGLAS CREEK ESTATES

Friday, March 4
7:00pm – 10:00pm
Regal Beagle Pub
335 Bloor St West, Toronto

The reclamation of the “Douglas Creek Estates” by the Six Nations [Haudenosaunee] people of the Grand River Territory [near Brantford-Caledonia] has been one of the most significant flash points of indigenous struggle in Ontario in the last several decades. Faced with the construction of a subdivision on historically contested lands abutting their reserve, members of the community peacefully occupied the subdivision on February 28, 2006. Their struggle reached national and international attention on April 20, 2006 when some 200 police officers from the Ontario Provincial Police raided the reclamation site to enforce an injunction demanding the removal of the occupiers. The police raid failed, and the reclamation site became an important place for the articulation of Six Nations’ political interests and for alliance building with non-native activists.

Please join us for an evening of discussion and reflection with three Six Nations women who played important roles in the reclamation:

– Cheyenne Williams: one of the three women who originally conceived of and planned the reclamation of the so-called “Douglas Creek Estates.”
– Hazel Hill: one of the main spokespeople at the reclamation site and who has been since working closely with the traditional Confederacy Chiefs in the Negotiations with the Crown and in the creation and management of the Haudenosaunee Development Institute.
– Ruby Monture: one of the main cooks at the site and a leading figure in trying to halt developments on Six Nations land in Brantford. She has currently been charged under the Brantford injunction for blocking developments in Brantford.

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THE SEVENTH ANNUAL ISRAELI APARTHEID WEEK TORONTO 2011: INSTITUTIONAL COMPLICITY AND CAMPUS RESISTANCE

March 7 – 13, 2011
University of Toronto, York University, Ryerson University

We are very proud to announce our preliminary list of confirmed speakers along with the specific themes of each evening for IAW 2011. Mark your calendars with the different topics for each evening and speakers.

A complete list of speakers and events is available at: http://www.toronto.apartheidweek.org

*****

PEDLAR PRESS BOOK LAUNCH – MARROW, WILLOW BY MAUREEN HYNES

Tuesday April 5
7:30pm
The Supermarket
268 Augusta Avenue
Toronto, ON
(416) 840-0501

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FREE SCREENING OF “CONSUMING KIDS”

March 4, 2011
7:15pm – 9:30pm
Centre of Gravity
1300 Gerrard St. East, Toronto

Everyone is invited to a free screening of Consuming Kids, a documentary film that is critical of corporate advertising to children. After the film viewing, a discussion about it will be led by Sheila Cary-Meagher, Trustee for the Toronto District School Board.

Drawing on the insights of health care professionals, children’s advocates, and industry insiders, the film focuses on the explosive growth of child marketing in the wake of deregulation, showing how youth marketers have used the latest advances in psychology, anthropology, and neuroscience to transform American children into one of the most powerful and profitable consumer demographics in the world.

Consuming Kids pushes back against the wholesale commercialization of childhood, raising urgent questions about the ethics of children’s marketing and its impact on the health and well-being of kids.

For more info: http://www.centreofgravity.ca/

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NEWS & VIEWS

ONLY THE WEALTHIEST AMERICANS FAVOR STRIPPING WORKERS’ COLLECTIVE BARGAINING RIGHTS

A poll conducted by Gallup earlier this week found that Americans opposed stripping public employees’ of their right to negotiate with their employers by a margin of 2 to 1. It got a lot of play (as did Fox News reversing the results and reporting that 61 percent of the public favored the GOP’s union-busting).  

Read more: http://www.alternet.org/newsandviews/article/486368/only_the_wealthiest_americans_favor_stripping_workers%27_collective_bargaining_rights/

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NO MONEY LEFT? YOU’RE LOOKING IN THE WRONG PLACES

By Paul Krehbiel, Labor Notes

The U.S. government budget deficit is now $1.5 trillion, and political leaders in most states are wringing their hands and crying in unison: “There’s just no money.”

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/2011/02/no-money-left-you%E2%80%99re-looking-wrong-places

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VIDEO – DEVELOPING A POLITICAL FIGHTBACK: LESSONS FROM HARRIS TO FORD

The fightback against Mike Harris and Mel Lastman consisted of community mobilizations, large strikes and impressive Days of Action. How were they successful and how did they fail?

Moderated by Élise Thorburn. Panelists:
– Michaela Murphy was a rank-n-file union activist during the Harris years in Ontario and currently a member of ETFO.
– John Clarke is an anti-poverty organizer since 1983 with the London Union of Unemployed Workers and an organizer with OCAP since 1990.
–  Herman Rosenfeld is a member of the GTWA Coordinating Committee and former CAW staff member.

Recorded at the 6th general assembly meeting of the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA), Feb. 19, 2011.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls92.php

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IT WAS FLINT YESTERDAY, IT’S US AND WISCONSIN TODAY, AND TOMORROW IT’S GOING TO BE EVERYONE

By Niki Ashton, Manitoba MP

It came as a shock.

Vale, the Brazilian world mining giant that had taken over Canadian-owned Inco in 2006 announced it was closing the smelter and refinery in Thompson, Manitoba, Canada — our hometown.

Since 1956, Thompson has had a fully integrated mining operation, the first of its kind in the world. It combines nickel mining with value-added smelting and refining jobs. The announced closure would eliminate nearly 600 jobs, eliminating all of these value-added jobs.

Read more: http://www.michaelmoore.com/words/mike-friends-blog/it-was-flint-yesterday-its-us-wisconsin-today

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PROTESTS, DEBATES & GRACE UNDER PRESSURE IN MADISON, WI

By Kris Olds, Inside Higher Ed

It is not very common to see marches of tens of thousands of people in small cities like my hometown of Madison, Wisconsin (with a population of approximately 235,000 people). The issue that drew about 13,000 into the State Capital area on 15 February, 10-20,000 people on 16 February, 25,000 people on 17 February, 35-40,000 people on 18 February, 60-100,000 people on 19 February, and tens of thousands every subsequent day to the present moment, relates to the decision of the recently elected Republican Governor of Wisconsin (Scott Walker) to unilaterally remove the right of public sector unions to collectively bargain about employment-related benefits.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/globalhighered/protests_debates_grace_under_pressure_in_madison_wi

(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com