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KRISIS

KRISIS

CRISIS TO INSURRECTION: NOTES ON THE ONGOING COLLAPSE

A new book from Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen on ongoing crises and insurrections…
Crisis to Insurrection: Notes on the ongoing collapse
Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen
The crisis runs deep. The economies of the US and Europe are in profound crisis and the developing economies are also beginning to feel its effects. Everywhere it is workers who are paying the price. The crisis is being socialized and austerity is the order of the day; the crisis is used as a pretext for further savings and cuts. In other words, capital has intensified the class war. But the proletariat has started moving. The revolts in North Africa and the Middle East have challenged the neoliberal world order and its division of the world, and the ‘movement of the squares’ in Southern Europe and Occupy in the US have picked up the baton and joined the new protest cycle. Even though dictators have been toppled in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, the protests continue. This is also the case in Greece, Spain and Portugal where people reject the austerity programs. There are protests in Bulgaria and Bosnia. In Syria the civil war is raging. In China the number of strikes continue to rise. In Turkey the youth reject Erdogan’s neoliberal ‘success’ and urban restructuring and in Brazil ‘the dangerous classes’ have taken to the streets. There are a variety of protests going on – the ones in the West are defensive, the ones in the rest of the world offensive and reformist – but together they are knocking a hole in the neoliberal world order. The old mole is back.

Bio: Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen is Associate Professor at the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen.
PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=678
Released by Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe / Brooklyn / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.
Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info | minorcompositions@gmail.com

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Inca

Inca

RADICAL AMERICAS SYMPOSIUM 2015

“Washing one’s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral” – Paulo Freire

We are delighted to announce a Call for Papers and Panels for our Third Symposium to be held at the UCL Institute of the Americas, London, on the 14-15 September 2015.

The aim of the event is to bring a range of disciplinary and geographical perspectives to bear on radicalism throughout the Americas. Our definition of “radicalism” is a broad one, encompassing both political radicalism as an object of study, and radical analytical approaches to the societies and cultures of the Americas.

We welcome proposals that deal with any aspect of radicalism, from the democratic and republican radicalisms of the nineteenth century; to the socialist, anarchist, communist, and populist radicalisms of the twentieth century; as well as contemporary identity politics, social movements, and twenty-first century radicalisms.

When arranging panels we will encourage conversation between people working on specific national topics as well as those who follow comparative o r transnational approaches.

We would especially encourage proposals on the following topics, though any subject within our broad remit is welcome:

* Radical theory/approaches
* Intersectional radicalism
* Political violence
* Radical memory and commemoration
* Cultural radicalism
* Political economy/ecology

The symposium seeks to develop the global community of scholars, researchers and activists who have been part of the Radical Americas Network since its creation in 2011. Past events have attracted people at various stages of academic and non-academic life who have presented work from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, politics, history, international relations and cultural studies.

The symposium also marks the launch of the eagerly anticipated Radical Americas journal. The first issue of the e-journal will be availab le in September and will include peer-reviewed articles (some based on work presented at previous network events) as well as interviews and book reviews. We would like to encourage participants at the symposium to submit work to the journal, which is designed to showcase cutting-edge research on radicalisms throughout the Americas.

Guidelines for symposium paper and panel submission
[All communication to radicalamericas@gmail.com]

1. Papers
Please send a proposal of no more than 300 words along with a short bibliographic note to the contact details below. Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes in duration depending on the final panel size.
Deadline: 20 June 2015

2. Closed panels
Please list the three or four speakers, provide the titles and abstracts of the individual papers and indicate whether a chair will be required.
Deadline: 30 June 2015

3. Open panels
Please reply with a title and panel abstract which we will then forward to our members and contacts. Please also stipulate whether a chair will be required.
Deadline:  01 June 2015

Conference Website: http://www.community-languages.org.uk/radical-americas/conference.html

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-radical-americas-symposium-2015

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The Failure of Capitalism

The Failure of Capitalism

CYBER-PROLETARIAT: GLOBAL LABOUR IN THE DIGITAL VORTEX

NEW FROM PLUTO PRESS:

Cyber-Proletariat: Global Labour in the Digital Vortex

By Nick Dyer-Witheford

http://bit.ly/1AeNq5z

—————–

Praise for CYBER-PROLETARIAT:

‘Cyber-Proletariat tracks the eddies and flows of the perfect storm that is contemporary capitalism. This panoramic work reveals the relentless force of material destruction and brutal violence concealed by the sleek surfaces of digital culture’ – Benjamin Noys, Professor of Critical Theory, University of Chichester and author of Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism

—————–

Coltan mines in the Congo; electronics factories in China; devastated neighbourhoods in Detroit. Cyber-Proletariat shows us the dark-side of the information revolution; an unsparing analysis of class power and computerisation.

Nick Dyer-Witheford reveals how technology facilitates growing polarisation between wealthy elites and precarious workers. He reveals the class domination behind everything from expanding online surveillance to intensifying robotisation. At the same time he looks at possibilities for information technology within radical movements; contemporary struggles are cast in the blue glow of the computer screen.

Cyber-Proletariat brings heterodox Marxist analysis to bear on modern technological developments. The result will be indispensable to social theorists and hacktivists alike and essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how Silicon Valley shapes the way we live today.

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ON THE PLUTO BLOG: http://bit.ly/1HsH55Z

READ THE BOOK ONLINE: http://bit.ly/1K0fr0B

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Want an inspection copy for your course? Visit www.plutobooks.com/lecturers.asp for more details.

Want a book for review? Email our publicity team at publicity@plutobooks.com.

Sign up to our newsletter for special offers, news and events: www.plutobooks.com/subscribe.asp.

Follow us online:

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Paperback | 9780745334738 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
Hardback | 9780745334745 | £60 / $100 / €75

Kindle | 9781783712830 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
EPUB | 9781783712823 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
PDF | 9781783712816 | £60 / $99

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Celestial Dome Inverted

Celestial Dome Inverted

EMBRACING THE RANDOM: ESSAYS ON THE MUSIC OF TOOL, ESOTERICISM AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION

REMINDER – CALL FOR PAPERS

Essays are invited which examine themes of the esoteric in the interconnected areas of popular culture which include the musical projects of Maynard James Keenan, visionary artwork (especially that inspired by N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT or N,N-DMT)), and spiritual worldviews. This is a collection that proposes to explore these creative forms of expression, with a focus on how they manifest in contemporary Western contexts. Such scholarly analyses of this area of popular culture will add new perspectives and insights into subcultures and lifestyles as well as into the specific art and music scenes.

 

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

 Occult and mystical symbology in the music of Tool

 Essays on Maynard James Keenan’s other bands, A Perfect Circle and Puscifer

 Dreams, visions, and DMT

 Visionary art and spirituality (in Western contexts)

 Entheogens and artistic expression (in indigenous Amazonian Amerindian cultural contexts)

 Judeo-Christianity and the lyrics of Tool

 Mathematics, sacred geometry, the physical universe, cosmology, and the music of Tool

 Analysis of the artwork of Alex Grey

 Lachrymology and pseudo-religions

 Esotericism, altered states of consciousness, and music subcultures

New Materialism

New Materialism

 

Essays are invited from scholars in the disciplines of ethnomusicology, music studies, cultural studies, study of religions, art history, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. Cross-disciplinary analysis is welcome. Proposals should take the form of an approximately 300-500 word abstract, a provisional title, as well as a short biography (50-100 words).

All proposals must be received via email by June 15, 2015. Please send all proposals and questions to the editor, Dr Jenny Butler at j.butler@ucc.ie and cc. to butler.jennifer@gmail.com

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

TOOL

TOOL

Social Class

Social Class

SOCIAL CLASS IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

AMSTERDAM RESEARCH CENTER GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Conference: ‘Social Class in the 21st Century’

October 22-23, 2015

See: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/social-class-conference.html

Theme

Intersections between class, gender and sexuality revisited

The question of social class has re-emerged as a central concern for the analysis and politics of gender and sexuality in the public sphere in many societies worldwide. The ascent and subsequent crisis of global neoliberalism have been deeply implicated in growing inequalities, which have affected the shape of gender and sexual meanings and relations in fundamental ways.

Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor Cecilia Ridgeway and Professor Anoop Nayak + Roundtable by Professor Gloria Wekker

  • Whereas some women have emerged as highly successful agents in the new global economy, their ascent to wealth and power is almost always contingent upon the labor and ongoing exclusion of other – the working classes, the poor, migrants, and/or women of colour.
  • Similarly, with the introduction of some openly lesbian women and gay men into the cosmopolitan-managerial and so-called ‘creative’ global classes, very particular articulations of LGBTQ identity and culture – mostly middle-class and ‘homonormative’ – have become more visible.
  • At the same time alternative and marginalized expressions of LGBTQ identity have increasingly disappeared from public view. Among other factors, social class has played a key role in these dynamics. While institutional sexism and homophobia have perhaps lessened for social upper classes, the social exclusion of others has increased as the result of growing inequality and precarity.
  • These dynamics call for greater attention to the interconnections between social class, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality.

Focus on Class

Contemporary global developments exemplify what has long been seen as a central topic of scholarly inquiry: class and other social and cultural divisions have affected lived experiences and have had an impact on people’s abilities and opportunities, as well as on their constructions of gender and sexual identities, categories, and politics. A focus on ‘inclusion’, equal rights and democratic citizenship runs the danger of obscuring growing structural inequalities. Inside and outside of the academy, intersectional and other new forms of critical analysis have gone a long way in accounting for such inequalities, as well as for the divergent social positioning of actors. Nonetheless, these new approaches have not been productive on all levels of social relations and dynamics. Partly as the result of the crisis of Marxism and the theoretical problems associated with overtly reductive class analyses, the effects of class on gender and sexuality remain under-theorized and have suffered from insufficient empirical investigation.

The dominance of white, middle-class, homonormative, and cisgender LGBTQ cultures and identities in scholarly debates conceals class differences and the dominance of a particular ontology. A focus on class and its interconnection with race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality enables scholars to take seriously the complexities of contemporary gender and sexual dynamics in a global world. Class analysis not only unveils inequality but brings to light difference, distinction and dissent, both between and within social groups. Such an analysis questions the dominance of particular identities, but does not satisfy itself with explanations attributing alternative experiences to essentialized or depoliticized notions of cultural difference.

Dominance of global Western ontologies

A major question that needs to be addressed is the dominance of global Western ontologies in the study of social class. North–south comparisons (as well as comparisons unsettling this binary) will bring fresh insights into the way in which global dynamics have reconfigured relations between classes or the concept of class itself.

For instance, class identification in many parts of the world is a matter of how well connected one is transnationally, resulting in specific forms of gender inequality. Transnational migration also reveals class dynamics in configuration with sexuality, from exploitation and labour rights in migrant sex work to examples of successful transgender migration patterns. Neo-liberalisation is often and rightly so critiqued for creating (more) inequalities, but for some groups in the global South it also implies new opportunities. Recent studies on the global middle classes, for instance, have also emphasized the symbolic meaning of class. Eventually, such studies point out the necessity of questioning how the material and cultural dimensions are dialectically intertwined in the generation of gendered class subjectivities and relations. Exploring the class dynamics of gender and sexuality in and from the global South thus brings new understandings.

Interconnected developments 

Four interconnected developments background our call for a focus on class:

  • Gender and sexuality are often largely absent from class analysis.
  • Class since the 1980s has increasingly been abandoned as a theoretical tool in feminist theory, even though Marxism had informed feminist theory and practice until the 1980s.
  • The central role that queer approaches to social and cultural analysis attributes to choice, change, and the destabilization of categories comes at a cost, namely the lack of attention to more enduring power relations and inequalities.
  • Taking a transnational standpoint will help further theorise the questions of social classes in the 21st century.

Unpacking the concept of class – aim of this conference

The way forward, we suggest, is to start unpacking the concept of class. Interestingly, while most of us recognise immediately the notion of class, definitions of it remain elusive and differ tremendously in their reach and implications.

During this conference we intend to explore various routes to unpack the formulation of class through the prism of gender and sexuality:

  • The first question is the matter of scale: from day-to-day interaction, via various levels to the state, and the transnational level: when does class matter?
  • Hence, what makes class matter?
  • What are the material and/or symbolic characteristics of class and how do they matter?
  • Which social, political or cultural ideas, practices and institutions ‘form’ social class?
  • Last but not least, how can class analysis shed light on gender and sexual relations, and how does gender and sexuality analysis shed light on class?

We invite papers from the wide range of social sciences, including social history, to take up these questions and engage in an interdisciplinary debate.

Call for Papers

We invite papers from the wide range of social sciences, including social history, to take up these questions and engage in an interdisciplinary debate.

Please send:

  • Name of panel for which you are submitting
  • Author name and email address
  • Title
  • Abstract (up to 250 words)

Online form 

Please use the online form below to submit paper proposals for the conference Social Class in the 21st Century. Submission is open from April 15, 2015 until May 29, 2015 Authors will be notified of the decision by mid-June 2015.

Submission of Papers: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/cpitem-2/link/papers.html

Registration and Fees: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/registration/registration.html

images (1)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

download (1)

Raymond Williams

Raymond Williams

POLITICS AND LETTERS: INTERVIEWS WITH ‘NEW LEFT REVIEW’

OUT NOW, WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION:

Politics and Letters: Interviews with New Left Review

BY RAYMOND WILLIAMS

INTRODUCTION BY GEOFF DYER

The celebrated literary critic Raymond Williams, in his own words

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1832-politics-and-letters

————

Raymond Williams made a central contribution to the intellectual culture of the Left in the English-speaking world. He was also one of the key figures in the foundation of cultural studies in Britain, which turned critical skills honed on textual analysis to the examination of structures and forms of resistance apparent in everyday life. Politics and Letters is a volume of interviews with Williams, conducted by New Left Review, designed to bring into clear focus the major theoretical and political issues posed by his work. Introduced by writer Geoff Dyer, Politics and Letters ranges across Williams’s biographical development, the evolution of his cultural theory and literary criticism, his work on dramatic forms and his fiction, and an exploration of British and international politics.

RAYMOND WILLIAMS (1921–1988) was for many years Professor of Drama at the University of Cambridge. Among his many books are Culture and Society, Culture and Materialism, Politics and Letters, Problems in Materialism and Culture, and several novels.——-

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“Effectively a new kind of book … an outstanding feat of composition … a remarkable human achievement.” – Guardian

“For anybody interested in the relationship between literature and society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries this book is essential reading.” – Financial Times

“An absolutely riveting piece of work.” – New Society

“This is, quite simply, one of the most magnificent books I have read.” – Philip Corrigan, Media, Culture and Society

“Raymond Williams has made a more persistent attempt to grasp the nature of this relation [between politics and letters] than any living British writer.” – London Review of Books

————

PAPERBACK: APRIL 2015 / 464 pages / ISBN: 9781784780159 / £14.99 / $26.95 / $32 (Canada)

POLITICS AND LETTERS is available at a 40% discount (paperback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1832-politics-and-letters

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list: https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

 

Follow us online:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/politics-and-letters-interviews-with-new-left-review-by-raymond-williams-out-now

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

downloadRETHINKING HEGEMONY AND DOMINATION IN TRANSLATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Rethinking Hegemony and Domination in Translation

Special Issue of: Target – International Journal of Translation Studies

Guest edited by Stefan Baumgarten and Yan Ying (Bangor University, Wales, UK),

and Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (Glasgow University)

 

Rationale

While there is no doubt that the ‘ideological’ and ‘power turn’ have reshaped the discipline of Translation Studies, much work still needs to be done in order to fully understand the ontological and epistemological underpinnings of the impact of ideology and power on the theory and practice of translation. The rapidly changing technological and corporate landscape in which translation theorists and practitioners find themselves immersed makes it necessary to keep exploring issues of power through sustained interdisciplinary engagement with other fields, such as the social sciences, critical philosophy or political science. Despite an increasing awareness of the impossibility of value-free research or practice, there appears to be a certain lack of self-reflection on our own entanglement within contemporary power structures. Structures which, in the apparent absence of an alternative to the current global capitalist orthodoxy, are largely driven by financial, economic and technological forces. With a view to opening a new debate on questions of hegemony and domination in relation to translation, this special issue aims to gather cutting-edge and cross-disciplinary research. By encouraging contributors to rethink the impact of power and ideology on the theory and practice of translation as well as on their own critical reflections, we welcome proposals dealing with contemporary political, sociocultural, (eco)linguistic, financial-economic and technological aspects of translation. The main aim of this special issue is to explore translation as a phenomenon caught in the conflicting forces of individual subjectivities, cross-cultural asymmetries, hegemonic values and the tensions between market-driven and customer-centric approaches.

 

Papers could focus on any of the following themes and aspects:

Towards a (critical) theory of ideology and power relations in translation

  • The legacy of the ‘cultural’ and ‘power’ turns
  • New critical insights into the concepts of power and ideology and their relevance to translation theory
  • Technoscience and posthumanism: a new turn in Translation Studies?

Power and ideology in the translation industry

  • Ideological effects of technological change on translation theory and practice
  • The social and ideological impact of translation technology
  • Neoliberalism and technological rationalization

Politics, policy making and translation

  • (Neo)imperialism after postcolonialism
  • Symbolic violence, heteroglossia and (linguistic) imperialism
  • Translation (technology) as a tool for activism and resistance

 

Deadlines

Submission of 1-2 page proposal by 30 April 2015

Notification of acceptance of proposals by 31 May 2015

Submission of completed papers by 31 December 2015

Submission of revised papers by 31 August 2016

Publication date: March 2017

 

Submission

Articles will be 6000-8000 words in length in English. Paper proposals of 400-500 words as well as the first completed and final versions of papers should be sent directly by email to all the guest editors. Detailed guidelines for papers are available at: https://benjamins.com/#catalog/journals/target/guidelines

Contacts

All inquiries should be sent to all the guest editors: Stefan Baumgarten (s.baumgarten@bangor.ac.uk); Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (jordi.cornella@glasgow.ac.uk); Yan Ying (y.ying@bangor.ac.uk).

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

THE POLITICS OF POST-STRUCTURALISM TODAY WORKSHOP

TheoryLab

School of Politics & International Relations

Queen Mary, University of London

Arts One, Room 1.28

10 am – 6 pm, Friday 17 April 2015

It is generally accepted that the various strands of thought associated with ‘post-structuralism’ have had an extensive impact on the study of politics in the UK and the United States over the past 30 years. However, it is also clear from a number of recent publications that there is renewed interest in the vexed questions of how to define post-structuralism and how to evaluate its overall significance. Indeed, it would be fair to say that some half-century after the publication of seminal texts such as Michel Foucault’s Madness and Civilization, Gilles Deleuze’s Nietzsche and Philosophy and Jacques Derrida’s Of Grammatology, ‘post-structuralism’ remains an essentially contested concept. Both supporters and critics alike remain divided on whether or not post-structuralism represents a distinct tradition, and on the extent to which post-structuralist theory can enhance the study of politics.

We will use this workshop to take stock of the state of the art in post-structuralist political theory, while also identifying the key debates and issues that will shape the field in the future. The workshop brings together leading scholars from across the UK to address these questions, in order to provide a conceptual map of the politics of post-structuralism today. We expect the discussion to show how scholars diverge on several key points, while converging in common conviction that post-structuralism represents a distinct mode of theorizing, and one that remains crucially important for the study of political movements, practices and institutions.

 

Key themes and questions

The workshop engages substantive debates within the subfield. However, the presentations and discussions will also serve to introduce colleagues working across the disciplines of political science and international relations to a range of themes and questions about the status of post-structuralism today. These include:

 

Definitional questions:

What is post-structuralism and how does it relate to other major currents in continental philosophy such as structuralism, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, existentialism and post-modernism?

How, and to what extent, does post-structuralism form part of the wider linguistic turn in 20th century philosophy?

 

Questions about distinct schools and traditions:

What have been the major contributions of (for example) the Foucauldian analysis of governmentality and disciplinary power, of the Essex School of ‘discourse theory’, of Žižek’s account of ideology, and of contemporary theories of rhetoric?

What is the significance of the recent critiques of semiotics and of discourse theory put forward by the ‘new materialist’ approaches and the ‘speculative realists’?

How, and to what extent, does post-structuralist theory overlap with and impact upon related approaches within the disciplines of political science and international relations, such as (post-)Marxism, Feminism, constructivism and the new institutionalism.

 

Conceptual questions:

How do post-structuralists address some of the major issues in the philosophy of the social sciences, such as the nature and scope of the political, the question of the construction of interest and identities, of agency and structure, and of the role of ontology and epistemology?

What are the meaning and significance of terms such ‘anti-essentialism’ and ‘post-foundationalism’?

 

Normative questions:

Can post-structuralism or post-foundationalism sustain a coherent normative theory of politics without falling into a performative contradiction?

What is the significance of the main normative approaches to emerge from post-structuralism, for example the tradition of ‘agonistic democracy’ and the revived interest in the idea of communism?

 

PROGRAMME

9.30-10.00 Registration and welcome

10.00-12.30 Session 1

Benoît Dillet (University of Loughborough): The Right to Problems: Post-Structuralism, Ontology and Politics

Gulshan Khan (University of Nottingham): Post-Structuralism, Ontology and the Political

Lasse Thomassen (Queen Mary): Post-Structuralism and Representation

Chair: Mark Wenman (University of Nottingham)

 

12.30-13.30 Lunch

 

13.30-15.30 Session 2

Iain MacKenzie (University of Kent) and Robert Porter (University of Ulster): From Occupy to Activate: Or, the (Re-)Politicization of Post-Structuralism in Everyday Life

Mark Wenman (University of Nottingham): Rethinking Freedom: Political Agency after Post-Structuralism

Chair: Lasse Thomassen (Queen Mary)

 

15.30-16.00 Tea/coffee

 

16.00-18.00 Roundtable: Poststructuralism and Political Theory Today

Simon Choat (Kingston)

Eric Heinze (Queen Mary)

Kim Hutchings (Queen Mary)

Caroline Williams (Queen Mary)

Chair: Mark Wenman

 

Register here

 

Places are limited, and registration is necessary. PSA members will be able to attend for free; non-PSA members will pay a small fee (£30/employed; £15 unemployed/students), which includes tea/coffee and lunch.

Funded by the School of Politics and International Relations

and the Political Thought Specialist Group of the PSA

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Dr Lasse Thomassen
School of Politics & International Relations
Queen Mary, University of London
327 Mile End Road
London E14NS
United Kingdom
Tel: 0207 882 2848
http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/staff/thomassenlasse.html

Contemporary Political Theory Annual Prize winner: ‘Political theory in the square: Protest, representation and subjectification

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

A free adaptation of Zamyatin’s prospective novel “We”, this concept album will take you in the wake of D–503 and I–330, two freedom-and-passion loving people.

A Dystopia tinged with Revolutionary Romanticism, first of its kind.

Album available from January 15th 2015

 

Rémi Orts

Brave New World, 1984, The Wall, Equilibrium and more recently The Hunger Games, modern culture is haunted by the spectre of extremely well-organized societies whose apparent perfection conceals dark dictatorial worlds.

If this formal exercise is known to all, what is the intimate origin, the true source of its inspiration?
In fact, everything comes from a small Russian sci-fi novel published in 1920 by Yevgeny Zamyatin, “We “.

Rémi Orts Project and Alan B wish to pay tribute to this counter-utopia, first of its kind, by revisiting it in their concept album, “The Glass Fortress”.

Let yourself be taken in the wake of Daniel and Iris, two human beings opposed in every way, that nonetheless will rejoin in the same destiny, the choice of Life, even at their own peril…

Adapted from this album, a short film, innovative and moving, will be released in April 2015 with the collaboration of the talented photographer, Fanny Storck.

Lyrics : Alan B
Music : Rémi Orts
Photos : Fanny Storck
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPuAwNUSLI8&list=PL5KtMvKvWwKDcTibMWVLeKg5YoHuCsZZ-&index=1

See: http://www.remiorts.com/index.php/albums-remiorts/41-remi-project/96-the-glass-fortress

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Social Movments

Social Movments

CULTURAL DIFFERENCE AND SOCIAL SOLIDARITY NETWORK: 4TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
“New Directions in Reconciling Solidarity and Difference in Contemporary Societies”
Website: http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org
Hosted by Middle East Technical University – Northern Cyprus Campus
June 30th – July 3rd 2015

Strategies for addressing problems of social solidarity in states and communities in a contemporary globalized world while respecting difference and diversity within the boundaries of those communities have become more important than ever with the problematization – and some would say decline – of multiculturalist solutions. In the last decades there has been a rise in moral panics about immigration and right-wing nationalist responses, whilst the emergence of new globalized labor flows and diasporic identities have given rise to cultural conflicts as well as mutual enrichment within urban settings. There has also been a sharper and more prejudicial relationship between western states and Islamic peoples, with a rise in Islamophobia mirroring an apparent hardening of faith-based positions on both sides, intersecting with legitimate concerns about the contradictions and conflicts between traditional faith-based positions and contemporary human rights discourse. The political enterprise of multiculturalism appears limited and presumptive in its solutions and where multiculturalism has been embraced it has been criticized in respect of class divisions, deficiencies in recognitions and redistributions and the amelioration of tensions and conflicts through rhetoric and temporary solutions to symptoms and not causes.

This conference seeks to explore the fertile grounds within and between idealistic, cosmopolitan and ‘radical’ strategies to the more pragmatic attempts to provide solutions to particular, immanent and conjunctural problems of building solidarity with difference, and to explore the intersections between different political approaches to posing solidarity with difference and the practices that constitute everyday experience for communities of difference seeking terms of solidarity.

This conference provides a space for scholars to take stock of the present context and share knowledge – specific or general, empirical or theoretical, with a view to develop and explore the possible ways forward to minimizing violence, discrimination, exclusion and oppression as the means by which difference is managed by political structures. It is hoped that the conference will facilitate the development of more constructive, democratic, participative and inclusive means of promoting solidarity without negating difference and diversity. The conference is intended to be interdisciplinary and welcomes papers from scholars whose research crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Papers and panels are sought for presentation at parallel sessions where each paper will have a strict maximum of 20 minutes presentation time on panels of 2 papers with 25 minutes per paper discussion time.

The main themes for which papers are sought are:
•    Applying and critiquing theories of difference
•    Dissembling and re-presenting gender: constructions of difference and/or solidarity
•    Making solidarities in the context of difference
•    Refugees, difference, law and media representations
•    Culture and politics in representations of identity and difference
•    Digital media and the making/dissembling of social movements
•    Representing multilingualism in the linguistic landscape
•    States, sectional interests and regulatory regimes: managing difference
•    Culture, art, literature, film and the performance of difference
•    The role of technologies in making representations of difference and solidarity
•    Representations of difference or re-presentations of difference: The problem of representation
•    Language hierarchies in social space
•    Cultural products and the reinforcement or dissolution of differences – the problem of consumption
•    Difference and the construction and deterioration of communities
•    Difference and technology: the changing representation of identity and difference

These themes are not exhaustive and the organizers will consider other papers relevant to the conference subject. We expect to publish a post-conference edited book, derived from the papers presented and organized around themes that reveal themselves during the conference.

There will be two keynote plenary sessions with speakers to be announced. Reflecting the conference theme in the context of the conference venue, one of these sessions will focus on aspects of these themes in Cyprus.

•    Deadline for submission of Abstracts by: March 31, 2015
•    Notification of abstract acceptances and rejections is on a rolling basis (within 3 weeks of submission)
•    Online conference registration open from March 15, 2015 to May 15, 2015
•    Conference Fees to be paid by May 15, 2015

The conference language is English and all papers and presentations should be in English.

The conference fee is 395 Euros (295 Euros for students and non-participants).
This includes:
•    Registration
•    Transport to and from Ercan Airport in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus to METU-NCC Campus
•    4 nights at Campus Guest House with breakfast
•    4 lunches
•    2 Sunset Dinners (all drinks included)
•    1 Dinner Banquet (non-alcoholic drinks included)
•    Guided Historic/Cultural Excursion

Abstracts of no more than 350 words may be submitted online only at:  http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org
For any questions or concerns please see our website, including the FAQ page, or contact the conference organizers at the email address below.

Conference Organisers:
Scott H. Boyd: Middle East Technical University – Northern Cyprus Campus
Paul Reynolds: Edge Hill University
info@differenceandsolidarity.org

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Some Additions to Academia: February 2015: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/some-additions-to-academia-february-2015/

Mors Mystica

Mors Mystica

STUDYING ANCIENT MAGIC

Categorisation – Comparison – Materiality

10th-11th June 2015

MF Norwegian School of Theology

Oslo

 

PROGRAMME

 

Wednesday 10th June

Workshop

08.30 Coffee and welcome, Nils H. Korsvoll and Liv Ingeborg Lied

09.00-09.40 Nils H. Korsvoll (MF)

Cruciform Motifs in Syriac Incantation Bowls

09.40-10.20 Victor Ghica (MF)

Voces Magicae and Nomina Barbara in Egyptian Gnostic and Magical Texts: Dynamics of Development

10.30-11.30 Short papers

12.00 Lunch

Lectures

13.00-14.00 David Frankfurter (Boston University)

From Magic to Materiality: Refining an Exotic Discipline

14.00-15.00 Marco Moriggi (Università di Catania)

Jewish Divorce Formulae in Syriac Incantation Bowls

 

Thursday 11th June

Workshop

08.30 Coffee

09.00-09.45 Marco Moriggi

The Relationship between Magic and ‘Official Religion’ in Sasanian Mesopotamia

09.45-10.30 David Frankfurter

Magical Charms from Late Antique Egypt

10.45-11.45 Short papers

12.00 Lunch

13.00-15.00 Excursion: Oslo University Papyri Collection

 

CALL FOR SHORT PAPERS

We invite proposals for short papers (15 mins + 15 mins Q&A) on the workshop theme from PhD-students and Post-docs.

Please send proposals to nils.h.korsvoll@mf.no by May 1st 2015.

 

PARTICIPANTS

David Frankfurter (Boston University)

Frankfurter’s particular interests revolve around theoretical issues addressing the place of magic in religion, the relationship of religion and violence, the nature of Christianisation, and the representation of evil in culture. He teaches on Christian apocalyptic literature, and the documents of early Christianity, including extra-canonical sources, magical texts, and saints’ lives.

Marco Moriggi (Università di Catania)

Moriggi has published extensively on Syriac amulets, as well as Aramaic philology and epigraphy more generally. He also works with Semitics and linguistic theory, and has recently produced a corpus of Syriac incantation bowls.

Victor Ghica (MF Norwegian School of Theology)

Ghica is a trained archaeologist and philologist and works on Christian archaeology, coptology, papyrology and epigraphy. He is a member of the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology and has published on gnostic texts and Coptic and Manichean epigraphy.

The workshop is organised by Liv Ingeborg Lied and Nils H. Korsvoll

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Some Additions to Academia: February 2015: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/some-additions-to-academia-february-2015/

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

INAUGURAL CONFERENCE ON CULTURAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: PUTTING CULTURE IN ITS PLACE IN POLITICAL ECONOMY

The Cultural Political Economy Research Centre (CPERC) http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/cperc/ in Lancaster University will be holding its Inaugural Conference between 1-2 September 2015. We are putting out a ‘Call for Papers’ and further information is available via http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/cperc-conf/.

Call for Papers

Title: Inaugural Conference on Cultural Political Economy: Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Date: 1-2 September 2015

Place: Lancaster University

Plenary Speakers: Bob Jessop and Ngai-Ling Sum, Lancaster University

Cultural Political Economy (CPE) is an emerging and still developing trans-disciplinary approach oriented to post-disciplinary horizons. It engages with ‘cultural turns’ in the study of political economy to enhance its interpretive and explanatory power. Intellectually CPE originated in a synthesis of critical discourse analysis, critical political economy, neo-Gramscian state theory, neo-Gramscian International Political Economy, the regulation approach, feminism, postcolonialism, governmentality and governance studies. This two-day post-disciplinary conference will give researchers and post-graduate students an opportunity to examine and debate the philosophical and methodological foundations of CPE and to explore its substantive implications for research.

It invites discussion at the interface of ‘cultural turns’, critical realism, critical discourse analysis and political economy. Specifically, it focuses on the cultural (and semiotic) dimensi ons of political economy considered both as a field of inquiry and as an ensemble of social relations. In the light of multiple crises at many sites and scales in the global economic, political, and social order, the organizers invite papers that address theoretical or substantive aspects of the changing nature and dynamic of contemporary social formations and identities.

Potential topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:

  • Cultural Turns and Critical Realism
  • Critical Discourse Analysis and Political Economy
  • Intersectionalism and Political Economy
  • Marx, Gramsci and Foucault
  • Social Relations, Everyday Life and Subjectivities
  • State, Governance and Governmentality
  • Discourse, Power and Space
  • Global Capitalism, Crises and Imagined Recovery
  • Globalization of Production, Retail and Finance
  • Finance, Austerity and Debt
  • Work, Employment, Body and Embodiment
  • Competition, Competitiveness and Resilience
  • Globalization, Education and Societies
  • Sustainability and Green Capitalism
  • Inequalities of Wealth and Income
  • Subalternity, Social Movements and Resistance

Abstracts of 200-250 words should be sent to n.sum@lancaster.ac.uk by 5pm on 29th June 2015.

 

Ngai-Ling Sum

Reader in Cultural Political Economy

Politics, Philosophy and Religion Department Lancaster University Lancaster LA1 4YL http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/cperc/

Bob Jessop

Distinguished Professor in Sociology

Sociology Department

Lancaster University

Lancaster LA1 4YN

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/profiles/bob-jessop

Only A Banker

Only A Banker

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/inaugural-conference-on-cultural-political-economy-1-2-september-2015-in-lancaster-university

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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