Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Cultural Capital

Annihilate Creativity!

Annihilate Creativity!

CULTURAL CAPITAL: THE RISE AND FALL OF CREATIVE BRITAIN

BY ROBERT HEWISON

OUT NOW

“Hewison’s analysis of how a golden age turned to lead is highly authoritative, well argued & conceptually robust.” Guardian

See: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

————

Britain began the twenty-first century convinced of its creativity. Throughout the New Labour era, the visual and performing arts, museums and galleries, were ceaselessly promoted as a stimulus to national economic revival, a post-industrial revolution where spending on culture would solve everything, from national decline to crime. Tony Blair heralded it a “golden age.” Yet despite huge investment, the audience for the arts remained a privileged minority. So what went wrong?

In Cultural Capital, leading historian Robert Hewison gives an in-depth account of how creative Britain lost its way. From Cool Britannia and the Millennium Dome to the Olympics and beyond, he shows how culture became a commodity, and how target-obsessed managerialism stifled creativity. In response to the failures of New Labour and the austerity measures of the Coalition government, Hewison argues for a new relationship between politics and the arts.

————

ROBERT HEWISON is a historian of contemporary British culture. Beginning in 1939 with Under Siege, his series of books presents a portrait of Britain that runs from the perils of wartime to the counterrevolution of Thatcherism in The Heritage Industry. He is an internationally recognized authority on the work of John Ruskin, and has held chairs at Oxford, Lancaster and City Universities. He is an Associate of the think tank Demos, and has written on the arts for the Sunday Times since 1981. He has been a consultant to the Clore Duffield Foundation, the Gulbenkian Foundation, the Arts Council, the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Royal Shakespeare Company, and is on the editorial advisory board of the journal Cultural Trends.

————

“A brilliant analysis of the way that the intrinsic value of art was undermined by a Blair-led government’s attempts to control creative production and turn it into an instrument of social engineering. It is a timely warning about the dangers of political interference and a rallying cry for art to both be publicly supported and maintain a hard won independence. Art needs this independence from power in order to show us to ourselves in ways that the media and politics never do and never can.” – Antony Gormley

“Long Britain’s best chronicler of culture and political policy, Robert Hewison turns his unflinching gaze on the New Labour era, a time of targets, access and excellence for all, complete with the National Lottery, Cool Britannia, the Millennium Dome and the 2012 Olympics. It’s not a pretty sight, and his findings of folly, incompetence and vanity will entertain and disturb readers in equal measure. They should also embarrass any politicians and arts administrators who retain a degree of self-awareness.” – Alwyn Turner, author of A Classless Society

“This is essential reading for anyone who has the slightest interest in the funding of the arts in this country.” – Richard Eyre

————

PAPERBACK: NOVEMBER 2014 / 288 pages / ISBN: 9781781685914 / £14.99 / $24.95 / $28.95 (Canada)

CULTURAL CAPITAL is available at a 40% discount (paperback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here:http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list:

https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

Follow us online:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

​First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cultural-capital-by-robert-hewison-out-now

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

MUSIC, POLITICS AND AGENCY

A one-day conference presented by:
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
Faculty of Social Sciences, Open University
Media Industries Research Centre, University of Leeds

May 20th 2011
11:00 – 18:00
University of East London
Docklands Campus
Room EB.2.43
Permalink: http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=694

Can music change anything, or does its potency lie merely in its exemplary status as an organised human activity? What are the effects of power relations on music and to what extent is music itself a site at which power relations can be reinforced, challenged or subverted? What are the economic, affective, corporeal or ideological mechanisms through which these processes occur? Has the age of  recorded music as a potent social force now passed, a relic of the twentieth century; or with the music industry in crisis, is music culture in fact the first post-capitalist sector of the cultural economy, only now emerging from the long shadow of the culture industry? What historical or contemporary examples can we draw on to address some or all of these questions?

This conference is programmed by Jeremy Gilbert (Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London), David Hesmondhalgh (Media Industries Research Centre, Institute of Communications Studies) and Jason Toynbee (Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change, Open University).

The conference is free to attend, but pre-registration is recommended.
To register email j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk with the subject “Music, Politics and Agency Registration”
For any further information, email j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk

UEL Docklands Campus is best reached via Cyprus DLR (Docklands Light Railway) station, which is literally located at the campus.
For information about the campus, see http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands.htm

Room EB.2.43 is on the second floor of the main building (‘East Building’) which is to the left of the main square upon entering from the square from Cyprus DLR .
See http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk/user/XSLT_TRIP_REQUEST2?language=en to plan your journey.

Speakers and Papers

Anne Danielsen
Power, mediation, and aesthetics in the music of Public Enemy

Anne Danielsen is Professor and Head of Research in the Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo. Her publications include Pleasure and Presence: the Funk Grooves of James Brown and Parliament (2006) and Musical Rhythm in the Age of Digital Reproduction (2010).

Barry Shank
The political agency of music

Barry Shank teaches popular music, American studies and cultural theory in the department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University.  He is the author ofDissonant Identities: The Rock’n’Roll Scene in Austin, Texas and A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture.  He is currently completing a book for Duke University Press entitled Silence, Noise, Beauty: The Political Agency of Music.

David Hesmondhalgh
Music and human flourishing

David Hesmondhalgh teaches and researches at the University of Leeds. His books include Creative Labour: Media Work in Three Cultural Industries (2011), co-written with Sarah Baker, and Western Music and its Others: Difference, Appropriation and Representation in Music (with Georgina Born, 2000).

Helen Reddington
The sound of women musicians in the punk era

Helen Reddington lectures in songwriting and production on the University of East London’s Music Cultures BA. Her research interests include the punk subculture and women’s engagement with music technology. Her book The Lost Women of Rock Music will appear revised in paperback in January 2012 and a double CD of archive material by her punk-pop band is due to be released by the label Damaged Goods later this year.

Jeremy Gilbert
Music after capitalism? Culture, creativity and markets

Jeremy Gilbert is Reader in Cultural Studies at the University of East London. His publications include (with Ewan Pearson) Discographies: Dance Music Culture and the Politics of Sound (Routledge 1999) and Anticapitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics  (Berg 2008). He is co-director of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research, editor of new formations and a founder member of Lucky Cloud Sound System.

John Street
Music as political thought and action: the arguments and the evidence

John Street is a professor of politics at the University of East Anglia. His latest book is Music and Politics, which is due to be published by Polity later this year. He is a member of the editorial group of the journal Popular Music.

Martin Stokes
Scale, agency and music in religious movements

Martin Stokes is University Lecturer in Ethnomusicology and Tutorial Fellow at St. John’s College, University of Oxford. Martin is an ethnomusicologist with a particular interest in social and cultural theory. His most recent book The Republic of Love: Cultural Intimacy in Turkish Popular Music, has just been published by the University of Chicago Press (2010).

Tim Lawrence
Rhizomatic musicianship: Arthur Russell and after

Tim Lawrence is a Reader in Cultural Studies at the University of East London and the programme leader of the Music Culture: Theory and Production degree. He is the author of Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-79 (Duke University Press, 2003) and Hold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-92 (Duke University Press, 2009). He is a founding member of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research and Lucky Cloud Sound System.

Tuulikki Pietilä
Body politic: youth musics in the “New South Africa”

Tuulikki Pietilä is a social anthropologist and a research fellow in the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. She has published a monograph and a number of articles on trade and gender in Kilimanjaro and the post-colonial Africa more broadly. Currently she is studying South African music and music industry.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Money

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010: Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

219 pp., 24.90€, ISBN 978-3-643-10949-1 threadstiching, softcover with flaps Lit Verlag | Berlin – Münster – London – Wien – Zurich

CONTENTS:

DAVID ROEDIGER: ACCOUNTING FOR THE WAGES OF WHITENESS: U.S MARXISM AND THE CRITICAL HISTORY OF RACE. 

ANJA WEISS: RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL: A BOURDIEUIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF RACISM. 

WULF D. HUND: NEGATIVE SOCIETALISATION, RACISM AND THE CONSTITUTION OF RACE.

STEFANIE AFFELDT: A PAROXYSM OF WHITENESS: WHITE LABOUR, WHITE NATION 
AND WHITE SUGAR IN AUSTRALIA.

JEREMY KRIKLER: RE-THINKING RACE AND CLASS IN SOUTH AFRICA: SOME WAYS FORWARD. 

DAGMAR ENGELKEN: A WHITE MAN’S COUNTRY? THE CHINESE LABOUR CONTROVERSY IN THE TRANSVAAL.

ELIZABETH ESCH: RACIALIZING TRANSNATIONALISM: THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY AND WHITE SUPREMACY FROM DETROIT TO SOUTH AFRICA.

The essays assembled in this volume shed light on the complex of class and race from which W.E.B. Du Bois saw originating “a sort of public and psychological wage” of whiteness. David Roediger (University of Illinois) preliminarily addresses the evolution of whiteness as a category of critical social analysis. Anja Weib (Universität Duisburg-Essen) explains that the perspective of whiteness studies can be expanded by a modification of Bourdieu’s category of symbolic capital. Wulf D. Hund (Universität Hamburg) pleads for the generalisation of this concept and for its application to an analysis of racism as negative societalisation. Stefanie Affeldt (Universitat Hamburg) specifies the analytic dimensions of the categories ‘racist symbolic capital’ and ‘wages of whiteness’ using the example of the white sugar campaign in Australia. Jeremy Krikler (University of Essex) explores some missing dimensions in the study of race and class in South Africa. Dagmar Engelken (University of Essex) investigates the Chinese Labour Question in South Africa. Elizabeth Esch (Columbia University) examines the ways in which corporate initiatives of the Ford Motor Company in the U.S. and South Africa imagined the assembly line worker as a white citizen and consumer.

Racism Analysis is a research series that explores racial discrimination in all its varying historical, ideological and cultural patterns. It examines the invention of race, the dimensions of modern racism and inquires into racism avant la lettre. The series brings together scholars from various disciplines and schools of thought. A key aim is to contribute to the conceptualisation of racism and to identify the practices of dehumanisation intrinsic to it.

The Racism Analysis Studies will publish monographs as well as anthologies, proceedings and textbooks, thereby assembling contributions committed to various perspectives of a critical research into society. The contributions will delve into examples of racist inclusion and exclusion, or outline specific aspects of the different fields of research into racism.

The Racism Analysis Yearbook will be issued by varying teams of special editors. Each volume will deal with key topics in the debates over racism and will focus on illuminating such topics through the investigation of particular subjects and will refer to the state of scholarly discussion on them.

Check out the book at Lit Verlag’s site: (http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-643-10949-1)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Culture

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

(Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010) Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

The Man in Black

MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS
A Special Issue on MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

The journal Power and Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER) is publishing a special issue on Migration and Education. Papers should address the role education can and should play in the context of migration and/or what migration reveals and conceals about power and education. Migration should be considered as means of empowerment as well as disempowerment. Papers are welcome from all educational disciplines.

The International Organization for Migration estimates that nearly 200 million people across the world are currently living outside their place of birth and that about 3% of the global population are therefore migrants. The mass movement of people in the 21st Century has significant implications for education – from the need to meet legal obligations to educate the children of migrants to the internationalisation of the academic marketplace. Moreover, the legacies of historic migrations continue to impact on education – from the subjugation (and the occasional post-colonial resurrection) of indigenous practices and knowledges to the ethnic lines that still fracture the socio-economic structures of education. If migration presents ‘problems’ then education has a part to play in their resolution – education is widely recognised as a key element of social integration and whilst intolerance can be learned tolerance and mutual respect can be taught.

Power runs through all these issues. It can also be discerned in the on-going debate between multiculturalism and assimilation and the question of whether migrants should be taught the culture of their host countries. Other questions saturated with power include: What histories of migration should be taught? How is the commercialisation of education in an increasingly globalised world driving migration? What is the proper and just approach to the distribution of (typically limited) educational resources to migrants? To what extent can migration be harnessed to empower intercultural education and education for global citizenship?

This special issue of Power and Education will address the complexities of migration from a range of educational disciplines and theoretical frameworks. Contributions are invited that engage with all aspects of migration, including voluntary and forced migration and intra-country migration (e.g. from rural to urban areas) as they impact on children and/or adults and on students and/or teachers. Historical perspectives on the educational legacies of previous migrations are welcome as are considerations of the transition from immigration to integration. Education should be considered in its broadest terms to include all stages of formal education, lifelong learning and informal education. Contributions should specifically address issues of power and/in education and the journal will consider papers engaging with all power paradigms.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
• the Bologna Process
• the ‘brain drain’ and its consequences
• children and language learning
• cultural capital and countries of origin
• displaced children and the inclusion agenda
• global citizenship
• immigration and integration
• refugee academics
• social constructions and interpretations of migration
• teaching and learning diversity in schools

Papers should be no longer than 7000 words and should be submitted by 31 July 2011. Reviews of relevant books are also encouraged. Information on how to submit papers can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER/howtocontribute.asp

Questions about this special issue and the journal should be sent to the editor, Michael F. Watts, via the journal’s website.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Manufacturing Happiness

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Manufacturing Happiness: Investigating Subjectivity, Transformation, and Cultural Capital

The Graduate Students of George Mason University invite paper proposals for our 4th Annual Cultural Studies Conference. The Conference will take place on Saturday, September 19, 2009 at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia

This conference considers practices, institutions, and products that promise happiness, in a sense of inducing “the good life,” typically expressed as self-realization or finding one’s purpose-borrowing Agamben’s term, subjective technologies that have a specific relationship to social and political forces. How do practices designed or claimed for such diverse purposes as personal stress management, recovering from colonization, parenting, global conglomeration, and corporate development work? What kinds of transformations do they bring, in terms of personality, power, and communitas? And what becomes of the living cultural traditions from which these practices are abstracted, as in the care of the psychotherapeutic practice of “western Buddhism,” which Zizek claims is the “hegemonic ideology par excellance of late capitalism?” From the transmission of packaged idealisms and practices with a putative relationship to traditional sources to the commodified transactions for services and goods, the conference organizers seeks papers that investigate the growing cultural industries, both global and local, devoted to manufacturing happiness.

The wide-ranging contexts for our investigation include, but are not limited to: the social positions within the family, home, workplace, community, or nation-state; geographical and global considerations of institutional development and affiliation; the political economy of corporate training models; cultural capital and legitimation; media and mediation (print, television, DVD, Internet, radio, etc.); religious connections and origins; the confirmation and construction of identities (gender, physical, class, spiritual, national, sexual, and race) in social or political realms; and the rise and intensity of ecological subjectivities.

Examples:
* Integral Institute, Integral Naked, and Ken Wilber
* Est Training
* Shambhala Training
* Eckhardt Tolle and Oprah’s Book Club
* Weight loss and Constructing Beauty
* The “Human Potential” Movement
* The Zen Alarm Clock
* The Secret
* Hollywood Kabballah Centre
* Transpersonal Psychology
* The “Self-Help” Industry
* Magazines such as What Is Enlightenment?

Please e-mail a 500-word abstract of your presentation along with a short CV to Michael Lecker (mlecker@gmu.edu) no later than June 15, 2009.

 

Additional information:

http://www.allconferences.com/conferences/2009/20090427183905/

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=168118

http://culturalstudies.gmu.edu/happiness/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer Resurrection Nine

 

 

The Volumizer was Glenn Rikowski’s AOL blog. It was started up on 29th September 2005. On 30th September 2008, AOL announced that all of its Hometown products, including its blogs and newsletters, would be closed down on 31st October 2008. Glenn’s articles, many of which were written for his students at the Volumizer, will be preserved at The Flow of Ideas. Work has begun on this project, and the latest articles to be included are now available, as listed below:

 

 

2008

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2008) Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Cultural Capital, 6th January, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Bourdieu%20on%20Cultural%20Capital

 

 

 

2007

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Capital, 18th December, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Bourdieu%20on%20Capital

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) After the Hillcole Group of Radical Left Educators, 8th August, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=After%20the%20Hillcole%20Group

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) PowerPointlessness in Higher Education, 17th June, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=PowerPointlessness%20in%20Higher%20Education

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Learning Investments: New Private Schools and New Labour Dilemmas in Educational Services Exports, 14th June, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Learning%20Investments 

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Robotic Ethics, 20th June, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Robotic%20Ethics

 

 

 

 

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Profile is at: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski