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Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd MAY 2010

EVENTS 

PEOPLE’S SUMMIT FUNDRAISING DINNER AND PROGRAM LAUNCH!

Steelworker’s Hall
25 Cecil Street, Toronto
Monday, May 10, 2010
6:00 pm
Cost: $25/person
Contact Marya at 647.702.7914 or coordinator@peoplessummit2010.ca

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HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE

May 13-16
York University, Toronto

The conference will take place against the backdrop of a profound destabilization of global capitalism alongside significant challenges for labour and social movements. Imperialist wars abound and culture has been drawn into the service of empire. Robust theorizations and critical innovations are needed.

Read more: http://www.yorku.ca/hmyork/index.html

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CIDEC (COMPARATIVE, INTERNATIONAL AND DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION CENTRE) SEMINAR

Guatemala: Human Rights Through Education
A talk with Guillermo Chen, Director of the New Hope Foundation

Thursday, May 13
12:30 – 2:00 pm
OISE
252 Bloor Street West
CIDE Room (7-105)

Since 1998, the New Hope Foundation has been providing education opportunities to Maya youth whose families were directly affected by the genocide of the 1980’s. In 2003, the focus changed from providing scholarships for public high schools to providing its own form of high school education.  The Foundation focuses on Maya cultural strengthening, human rights, critical thinking, and grassroots community development. The program is based on a popular education curriculum currently being adapted to also reflect local Maya knowledge.

To  RSVP or schedule a one-on-one meeting with Guillermo, contact Olimpia Boido at: moboido@yahoo.com

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COCHABAMBA REPORT BACK

Report by participants in the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth

May 7 2010
7:00pm
Steelworkers Hall Toronto
25 Cecil Street (east of Spadina, south of College)

Principal speakers:

– Robert Lovelace, a leader of Ardoch Algonquin First Nation
– Ben Powless, Mohawk from Six Nations in Ontario, member of the Indigenous Environmental Network.
– Kimia Ghomeshi, Campaign Director, Canadian Youth Climate Coalition
– Danny Beaton: 2010 recipient of the National Aboriginal Achievement Award (NAAA) for Environment and Natural Resources
– Delegation from Toronto Bolivia Solidarity

More than 15,000 social-movement and government representatives have confirmed attendance in Cochabamba to plan building a people’s movement to save the planet and us all. Join us on May 7 to learn of and be part of this initiative.

Plus:

– Messages from supporters and sponsors
– Bolivian dance troupe and First Nations indigenous drumming.
– Bolivian food and beverages

Donation $5 or pay what you can.

More info: torontoboliviasolidarity@gmail.com

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25 IN 5 PROVINCIAL LEADERSHIP ASSEMBLY

On May 17 and 18, the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction is hosting a Provincial Leadership Assembly with representatives from across Ontario to mark the first anniversary of the Poverty Reduction Act and to plan our next steps to tackle poverty in Ontario.

We will be taking stock of progress on and challenges to poverty reduction, learning from the successes of local poverty reduction initiatives, and identifying our short and long term priorities – including for the upcoming municipal and provincial elections.

If you’re involved in poverty reduction work in your community, we hope you will join us to contribute to the next phase in 25 in 5’s work!

Please send us an e-mail at: info@25in5.ca if you would like more information or are interested in attending the Leadership Forum.

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NEWS & VIEWS

WORKPLACE SAFETY SYSTEM REVIEW PANEL NAMED

An expert advisory panel has been appointed to conduct a comprehensive review of Ontario’s occupational health and safety system.

The panel will report back to the Minister of Labour in Fall 2010 with recommendations and options for operational, policy and structural improvements to the province’s workplace safety system.

For more details visit: http://bit.ly/9DmZeG

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UNIONS’ TOP-HEAVY SALARIES DRAG ON ORGANIZING

According to data filed under the U.S. Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, the number of union officials and staff earning high salaries has exploded in recent years. Those earning more than $100,000 a year tripled between 2000 and 2008, the latest year with complete data, and the number earning more than $150,000 also tripled. Union salaries are out of step with most members’ pay, and they siphon scarce resources away from new organizing.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2743

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MAKERCULTURE: EDUPUNKS OF THE WORLD UNITE!

We shouldn’t rely on paperwork to back up someone’s qualifications. Here is how some people are developing a new, radical approach to education.

Read more: http://www.rabble.ca/news/2010/03/makerculture-edupunks-world-unite

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AUSTERITY IS THE WRONG MOVE

The Harper government’s economic policy, as enunciated in the Throne Speech and the Budget, is properly described by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty as “stay the course” or business-as-usual (that is, what business wants business gets). That is, we are offered more of the same old neo-liberalism and globalization with wealth for the few and austerity for the many — with only a brief panic-stricken Keynesian moment — that got us into the messes we’re in.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/austerity-wrong-move

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FOUR BOOKS TO FAN THE FLAMES OF DISCONTENT

From the heroic class struggles of late nineteenth century America, to an environmentally toxic, tyrannical, all too possible near future, here are some readings likely to stimulate your dissidence.

Unsurprisingly, the fiasco of the climate change summit in Copenhagen led me to Margaret Atwood’s latest eco-disaster novel “Year of the Flood” (McClelland and Stewart, Toronto, 2009, 431 pages). Not a watery deluge, but a dry killer tide of disease (like an H1N1 on steroids) wipes out most of humanity.

The first great U.S. mass radicalization against deadly work conditions and miserable exploitation produced a generation of proletarian rebels. “Eugene V. Debs, A Biography”, by Ray Ginger (Collier Books, New York, N.Y., 1962, 543 pages), is the story of the leading voice and most resilient symbol of that late 19th century generation.

“The Sweetest Dream – Love, Lies, & Assassination – A Novel of the Thirties”, by Lillian Pollak, (iUniverse, Inc., New York, 2009, 370) is a charming account of the friendship of two young women who were part of the next wave of rebellion. For those yearning to know what it was like to be active participants on the radical left in Manhattan during the Great Depression, this story of the conflicting relations between the young Trotskyists and Stalinists of the time is the ticket.

The fourth book in this short survey transports us to the post-WW2 capitalist boom. “Marxism in Our Time”, by Isaac Deutscher (Ramparts Press, San Francisco, 1973, 312 pages) is an anthology of speeches, articles and interviews that document one remarkable person’s struggle to keep revolutionary theory alive and potent in a period of working class political retreat.

Read more: http://socialistaction-canada.blogspot.com/2010/02/four-books-to-fan-flames-of-discontent.html

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

Learning climate and work group skills in care work
Kristina Westerberg, Esther Hauer
Journal of Workplace Learning, Volume 21, Issue 8
http://bit.ly/blDb22

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Engaging the city: Civic participation and teaching urban history
Amy L. Howard
Journal of Urban History 2010;36 42-55
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/1/42

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A cross-cultural examination of student volunteering: Is it all about résumé building?
Femida Handy, Lesley Hustinx, Ram A. Canaan, and Chulhee Kang
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009344353v2

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Book review: Labor and the environmental movement, Brian Obach (MIT 2004)
Richard Leitch
Review of Radical Political Economics 2010;42 115-117
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/42/1/115

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Re-thinking the “thing”: Sociomaterial approaches to understanding and researching learning in work
Tara Fenwick
Journal of Workplace Learning, Volume 12, Issue ½
http://bit.ly/955Frx

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The apprenticeship framework in England: A new beginning or a continuing sham? 
Michaela Brockmann; Linda Clarke; Christopher Winch
Journal of Education and Work, Volume 23, Issue 2  
http://bit.ly/aoHgIa

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th MARCH 2010

NEWS & VIEWS

2010 FEDERAL BUDGET QUIZ – CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES

How much do you know about the 2010 Federal Budget and the state of Canada’s finances? Take this quiz written by the CCPA’s Senior Economist Armine Yalnizyan and Alternative Federal Budget Coordinator David Macdonald: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/multimedia/test-quiz

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FAST-TRACKING CANADA-COLOMBIA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT A BETRAYAL OF COMMITMENTS – CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS

The Canada-Colombia Free Trade Agreement appears to be moving toward reality in this session of Parliament unless Canadians speak out loudly and contact their Member of Parliament.

Read more: http://bit.ly/c0SHpM

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DRIVING THE POOR DEEPER INTO POVERTY – THE BULLET

Social assistance rates in Ontario today have a spending power that is a full 55% below what it was in the early 1990s. A single person on Ontario Works (OW) would need to get an increase of $300 a month to be back at 1993 levels…Food bank use is setting new records and far more people are experiencing economic evictions than during the days of Mike Harris. For the poor, the Common Sense Revolution of Harris has not ended or simply been consolidated. Dalton McGuinty has intensified it.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/329.php

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WHY UNIONS STILL MATTER – MONTHLY REVIEW

Michael D. Yates is Associate Editor of Monthly Review. His many publications include Cheap Motels and a Hotplate: An Economist’s Travelogue (2007), Naming the System: Inequality and Work in the Global Economy (2003), and Why Unions Matter (2009), all published by Monthly Review Press.

Read more: http://www.monthlyreview.org/090209yates.php

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WHAT PROGRESSIVES MUST LEARN FROM THE ACORN DEBACLE – COLORLINES

If we do our work well, we should expect similar attacks and know that long track records won’t protect us.

Read more: http://www.colorlines.com/article.php?ID=698&p=1

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SLAUGHTERHOUSE ’10: THE GUTTING OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT – THE HUFFINGTON POST

If we could just get over our blinding hatred of unions and public sector workers, we might see that we do in fact have the money we need to rebuild our infrastructure and create a new green economy.

Read more: http://huff.to/9s9wwm

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BUDGET WILL HIT LOW-WAGE WOMEN HARD – OPSEU

TORONTO, March 25 /CNW/ – Plans by the McGuinty government to freeze public-sector wages in Ontario will hit women workers the most, including many who already work in low-paid jobs, the president of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union says.

“The large majority of workers in the public sector are women, and scores of thousands of them work in service jobs at the low-end of the wage spectrum,” Warren (Smokey) Thomas said today after Finance Minister Dwight Duncan unveiled his 2010-11 Ontario budget.

Read more: http://bit.ly/bdCapF

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO, RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM – AUDIO CLIPS

Social Planning Toronto’s March 2009 Research & Policy Forum focused on issues relating to immigrant homeless and health & labour market outcomes for immigrants. Presenters include Dr. Stephen Hwang from St. Michael’s Hospital/ University of Toronto who presented findings from the report entitled “The Health of Homeless Immigrants” & Dr. John Shields from Ryerson University who presented findings from the latest publications released by the Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI).

Listen to the clips here: http://bit.ly/aQHLLN

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CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND POLICY RESEARCH (CEPR): UNIONIZATION SUBSTANTIALLY IMPROVES THE PAY AND BENEFITS OF IMMIGRANT WORKERS

A new report by the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) documents a large wage and benefit advantage for immigrant workers in unions relative to their non-union counterparts.

The report, “Unions and Upward Mobility for Immigrant Workers,” found that unionized immigrant workers earned, on average, 17 percent more than their non-union peers. In addition, immigrant workers in unions were much more likely to have health insurance benefits and a pension plan.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2010/03/25

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – ENHANCING LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

December 2-3, 2010
Hong Kong

As an inaugural conference on teaching and learning in higher education hosted by the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, HKU, the theme of the conference as suggested by its title is “Enhancing Learning Experiences in Higher Education”.  Submission of abstracts is invited which should embrace the conference theme and sub-themes of the following –

1. Transition and the first year experience
2. Literacy across the curriculum
3. Experiential learning and co-curricular
4. Outcomes-based approaches to student learning (OBASL)
5. Assessment and feedback
6. Diversity and multicultural experience
7. Enhancing learning through technology
8. Learning communities
9. Continuing education and professional development
10. Problem based learning (PBL)
11. Postgraduate student experiences
12. Generic skills in higher education

The deadline for abstract submission is on 31 May 2010.

For more information, visit: http://www.cetl.hku.hk/conference2010/

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MOVE TO CORPORATE UTILITY WOULD HURT PUBLIC INTEREST – PARKLAND INSTITUTE

The City of Winnipeg is currently poised to move forward with a plan which would severely hurt the interests of Winnipeggers, and potentially those of people in other communities, for the sake of making their bottom line look a little better.

Read more: http://bit.ly/9cx8bL

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th MARCH 2010


EVENTS

BILL FLETCHER JR. – “OPERATING IN THE OBAMA MOMENT: CHALLENGES FOR PROGRESSIVES”

Public Forum: 2010 Phyllis Clarke memorial Lecture

7:00 PM
Wednesday March 10, 2010
Cara Commons/Lounge 7th floor, 1-148
Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto.

Bill Fletcher Jr. is a longtime labour and international activist and the former President and chief executive officer of TransAfrica Forum. He is the executive editor of The Black Commentator and founder of the Center for Labor Renewal. His latest book is Solidarity Divided.

Co-sponsored and supported by Ryerson’s CUPE Locals 233, 1281 and 3904 and the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University.

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ACCUMULATION CRISIS AS ECOLOGICAL CRISIS: THE END OF CHEAP FOOD, CHEAP ENERGY, AND CHEAP LABOUR

CIS Development Seminar Series
Speaker: Jason W. Moore (Department of Human Geography, Lund University)

Friday, March 19, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
108N – North House, Munk Centre for International Studies, U of T
1 Devonshire Place

Register online at: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8206

Sponsored by Centre for International Studies

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TRIBUNAL SAYS SPECIAL DIET PROGRAM DISCRIMINATES

Government considering scrapping the program in response

Discrimination. That’s the ruling of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario on the way the province’s Special Diet Allowance Program provides benefits to three people who made human rights complaints.

On February 17, the Tribunal issued its decision that the way the program is administered in these three cases violates the Human Rights Code. These three cases are lead cases in a Tribunal proceeding that involves human rights complaints from nearly 200 other people and Social Benefit Tribunal complaints from another 800 people, so the implications are large.

The Tribunal has ordered the government to increase the benefit amounts for these three people – and any other Special Diet recipients with the same medical conditions. And it set out the legal test that will help determine the outcome of the nearly 200 human rights complaints.

But the government seems to be thinking about scrapping the program altogether.

The Special Diet Allowance program is too important to lose. Take Action Now!

To read more: http://www.incomesecurity.org/specialdietdecision.htm

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CANADIAN COMMITTEE ON LABOUR HISTORY ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The Canadian Committee on Labour History will once again be holding their annual general meeting during Congress and your attendance will be much appreciated.

Please mark your calendars for the following:

Date:  Monday, May 31
Time: 12:30 – 2:00
Location:  LB-1042.03, 10th floor of the Library Building, Concordia University, Montreal

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NEWS & VIEWS

MURRAY DOBBINS’ BLOG: HARPER’S STRATEGIC ELECTION BUDGET

As one would expect from Stephen Harper, he has come down with a very strategic budget and a fairly smart one at that. As with his other strategic considerations this one is aimed at achieving the goal he is obsessed with: getting a majority in the next election.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2010/03/04/harpers-strategic-election-budget/

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THE CASE FOR KEEPING OUR HYDRO UTILITIES PUBLIC

By Paul Kahnert, Bullet No. 319, March 2 2010

Most people don’t pay much attention to electricity, except when the lights are out or when they get their bill. But, they soon will. The most valuable asset in virtually every Ontario municipality is its hydro utility. For 90 plus years, local municipal hydro utilities ran at cost and returned ‘profits’ to residents in the form of lower and stable rates. They were well run and virtually debt free.

Debts created by cost overruns at Ontario Hydro’s nuclear power stations were no worse than privately-owned nuclear power stations everywhere else. Yet the debt level of Ontario Hydro opened the door for the Harris Conservatives to ram through a plan to deregulate and privatize Ontario’s power system.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/319.php

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2010 FEDERAL BUDGET A “MAJOR DISAPPOINTMENT” FOR POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

OTTAWA, March 4 /CNW Telbec/ – The organization representing Canada’s university and college educators says today’s federal budget is a major disappointment for post-secondary education, leaving Canada’s researchers behind, providing no new support for universities and colleges to deal with increasing enrolments, and no relief for students grappling with high debt loads and tuition fees.

“The government was supposed to have taken time off to ‘recalibrate,’ but there’s been no change in direction when it comes to post-secondary education and funding for research,” said James Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

To read more: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2010/04/c7181.html

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JAMES LAXER’S BLOG: GEORGE SMITHERMAN, THE PRIVATIZER: NO THANKS

You learn a lot about a candidate for public office when he or she first stakes out a position on a key issue.

In this case, the candidate is George Smitherman, who recently left the Ontario Liberal cabinet, to run for mayor of Toronto. In an in-depth interview with the Toronto Star, Smitherman mused that he would consider privatizing garbage pick-up in Toronto and the privatization of some of the city’s public transit lines.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/blog.html

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ALTERNATIVE BUDGET 2010

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released the 2010 Alternative Federal Budget yesterday along with a six point jobs plan to confront the jobs crisis and tackle the fiscal deficit with less pain and more gain.

The alternative budget and jobs plan would bring unemployment back to pre-recession levels by the end of 2011 and demonstrate there is a better way to get out of deficit through smart investments and smart taxation.

To read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/alternative-federal-budget-2010
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RAISE MY TAXES, PLEASE! EVALUATING HOUSEHOLD SAVINGS FROM HIGH QUALITY PUBLIC TRANSIT

High quality public transit consists of service sufficiently convenient and comfortable to attract travel that would otherwise be by automobile. This paper uses data from U.S. cities to investigate the incremental costs and benefits of high quality transit service.

The analysis indicates that high quality public transit typically requires about $268 annually per capita in additional tax subsidy and $104 in additional fares, but provides vehicle, parking and road cost savings averaging $1,040 per capita, plus other benefits including congestion reductions, increased traffic safety, pollution reductions, improved mobility for non-drivers, improved fitness and health.

This indicates that residents should rationally support tax increases if needed to create high quality public transit systems in their communities. Current planning practices tend to overlook or undervalue many of these savings and benefits and so result in underinvestment in transit quality improvements.

To read more: http://www.vtpi.org/raisetaxes.pdf

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Research on social determinants and health: what sorts of data do we need?
Siegfried Geyer
Journal of Public Health, Volume 55 Number 1
http://www.springerlink.com/content/p81v501h560702n7/

* Get the lead out: Environmental politics in 1970s St. Louis
Robert Gioielli
Journal of Urban History published 5 March 2010, 10.1177/0096144210363070
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0096144210363070v1

* Book review: Jarvis, P. (2006). The lifelong learning and the learning society trilogy, Volumes 1-3.
Shibao Guo
Adult Education Quarterly 2010;60 207-211
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/60/2/207

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th FEBRUARY 2010

EVENTS

HEALTH FOR ALL: FIXING A BROKEN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM FOR IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES, TORONTO

March 4th, 2010
6:30 PM
Bahen Centre, Room 1180
40 St. George Street

Speakers:
– Dr. Meb Rashid, Family Physician
– Jackie Esmonde, Immigration Lawyer
– Manavi Handa, Registered Midwife, WestEnd Midwifery Collective

The cost of healthcare has been established as a barrier for under and uninsured migrant communities in accessing healthcare for decades. Despite the talk, few affordable healthcare options have been made available to these communities.

In recent years, the midwifery model of care in Ontario has proved to be a cost effective, accessible option for uninsured populations in Ontario to access maternity care. Community Health Centres are another point of access to primary healthcare for underinsured populations in Ontario. Interdisciplinary staffing and coordination of care, with alternative payment structure arrangements from the Ministry of Health, seek to ensure that uninsured populations have access to primary care.  

This evening will look at the opportunities and barriers to ensuring health for all! The panelists will discuss the successes of these two models of care, and the victories won by various professionals and communities in providing healthcare for the uninsured.

For more information, please email healthforalltoronto@gmail.com

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM

March 1st, 2010
9:00am-12:00pm
Social Planning Toronto
2 Carlton Suite, # 1001 (Carlton & Yonge)

Social Planning Toronto invites you to attend our March Research & Policy Forum. This month we will be looking at issues around immigrant homelessness and health & labour market outcomes for immigrants.

Presenters include:
– Dr. Stephen Hwang, St. Michael’s Hospital/ University of Toronto
– Dr. John Shields, Ryerson University/ Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI)

A light breakfast will be provided

To register for this event, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/social-planning-toronto-research-policy-forum-registration/

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RESOURCES FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH (RFR) BOOK SALE

March 8, 2010
Centre for Women’s Studies in Education
Rm. 2-227, OISE
252 Bloor St West, St. George Subway
Toronto,

Proceeds to RFR’s Legal Defense Fund (details at the sale)

For more info: Zoe Newman, email: znewman@yorku.ca

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THE CITY IS A SWEATSHOP

March 19-21
Toronto

No One Is Illegal-Toronto is organizing days of education, community building and idea sharing.

Look out for more details on the events coming soon: http://www.toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/422

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THE POWER OF US: A CELEBRATION OF WOMEN

Monday, March 8, 2010
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
Metro-Central YMCA
20 Grosvenor Street, Toronto
(East of Bay Street, north of College Street)

This year, on International Women’s Day, we’re celebrating: Women’s resilience and resistance. Women’s achievements and progress. Women’s voices and women’s spirit.

Join renowned youth activist Jessica Yee and celebrated Canadian artist and performer d’bi young for a special evening to celebrate International Women’s Day 2010.

Jessica Yee – youth activist indigenous hip-hop feminist, author of two books, founder and executive director of the Native Youth Sexual Network, recipient of the 2009 YWCA Young Woman of Distinction Award – and 24 years old.

d’bi young – musician, dub poet, actor, teacher and storyteller – and one of Canada’s most celebrated artists. She is currently playwright-in-residence at CanStage Theatre, author of two dub poetry collections and two plays, producer of five albums, and recipient of countless arts awards.

Tickets are $17.50 through UofTtix
416-978-8849
http://www.uofttix.ca/view.php?id=612

Tickets are also available at
Women’s College Hospital, Ankh Gift Shop for $15 (cash and pickup only).

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NEWS & VIEWS

NEW BOOK FROM THE CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK (CSEW)

“Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work: Reflections on Policy and Practice”

Edited by: Peter Sawchuk, University of Toronto, Canada and Alison Taylor, University of Alberta, Canada

In the past two decades, advanced capitalist countries have seen sustained growth in labour market participation along with a growth in the number of jobs workers tend to have in their working lives. Over a slightly longer period we also see that participation in both formal educational attainment and a range of non-compulsory learning/training has grown. However, labour market discrimination based on gender, age, disability and race/ethnicity remains a serious issue in virtually all OECD countries.

“Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work” presents a critical and expansive exploration of learning and work transitions within this context. These transitions are challenging for those enmeshed in them and need to be actively challenged through the critical research reported. The impetus for this volume, its conceptual framing, and much of the research emerges from the team of Canadian researchers who together completed case study and survey projects within the ‘Work and Lifelong Learning’ (WALL) network. The authors include leading scholars with established international reputations as well as emerging researchers with fresh perspectives. This volume will appeal to researchers and policy-makers internationally with an interest in educational studies and industrial sociology.

The Knowledge Economy and Education volume 2
ISBN 978-90-8790-887-4 paperback US$49 / €45
ISBN 978-90-8790-888-1 hardback US$99 / €90
February 2010, 340 pages
SensePublishers (http://www.sensepublishers.com)

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VIDEO: CRASH! OCAP VISITS LIBERAL PARTY FUNDRAISER

2010 Heritage Dinner
with special guest the Hon. Dalton McGuinty, MPP

The Liberals talk about ‘poverty reduction’ but the reality is that, well into their second term of office, people on social assistance live on incomes that have lost 55% of their spending power since 1995. We are even poorer today than we were under Mike Harris.

The one handhold that poor people have been able to use to limit their poverty, is a program known as the Special Diet. This provides up to $250 a month if a medical provider considers it necessary. In the last number of years, more and more poor people have become aware of the Special Diet. The misery and suffering that is being inflicted on those losing the Special Diet is enormous and OCAP is here to challenge it.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls40.php

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CANADIAN WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN DECLINE, REPORT SAYS

Canada won’t be winning many medals next month when the United Nations takes stock of women’s equality around the world, according to a new report that charts “systematic erosion” in the status of Canadian women since 2004.

You can view this story at: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/769954–canadian-women-s-rights-in-decline-report-says

You can download the whole Canadian Labour Congress report here: http://www.canadianlabour.ca/sites/default/files/2010-02-22-Canada-Beijing15-NGO-Report-EN.pdf

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CANADA’S MIGRATION POLICIES: FOR CHEAP LABOUR, AGAINST HUMAN FREEDOM

York University professor disputes the positive assessment of Canada’s migration policies in the UN Human Development Report 2009.

To read more: http://www.nupge.ca/node/2959

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HARPER’S ‘BUY AMERICAN’ PLAN BAD DEAL FOR CANADIANS

Last week the Council of Canadians, along with the Canadian Union of Public Employees, leaked a copy of the Canada-U.S. Agreement on government procurement (the “Buy American” deal) to the media. It was the first time the wide-sweeping deal, which will permanently constrain provincial spending options in many areas, had been put forward for public scrutiny.

To read more: http://www.canadians.org/trade/issues/NAFTA/buy_American.html

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POST-STRIKE MUSINGS: ASSESSING THE OUTCOME OF THE MUSEUM WORKERS’ STRUGGLE

by Priscillia Lefebvre, The Bullet

On December 15th, after a strike lasting 86-days, PSAC workers voted to accept the tentative agreement reached between Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) Local 70396’s bargaining unit and the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (CMCC). The strike occurred after weeks of stalled negotiations resulted in an offer deemed unacceptable by 92% of the voting membership. According to a communiqué released by the CMCC’s chief communications office, the agreement reached by them and the PSAC workers reflect its “commitment to face-to-face discussions, compromise and mutual understanding.” Looking back at their enduring struggle for job security and fair wages throughout negotiations, employees may greet this statement with a difference of opinion. The strike ended in what many consider as a relative victory with gains in the protection of employees against the contracting out of positions; however, the road to success was a long and arduous
one.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/317.php

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JOB POSTINGS

* Executive Director

Organization: The Deepwater Experiential Education Project (DEEP)

Position Type: Part-time time contract (20 hours a week) with potential for full-time based on performance.

Job Region: Based in Toronto with potential need for fundraising- associated travel

Responsibilities:

We are a non-profit that provides scholarships based on need and merit for youth to attend experiential education wilderness programs. We are seeking a self-directed individual with an accomplished background in administration and fundraising for the position of Executive Director. This is an opportunity to take a leadership role in a small organization and operate with considerable discretion and flexibility.

To read more: http://www.deepwaterproject.org

(from Canada’s Green Job Site, http://www.GoodWorkCanada.ca)

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* Intake Support Worker, Working Skills Centre, Toronto

Key Responsibilities:

-Provide career assessment support to applicants for certificate and diploma skills training programs at Working Skills Centre, a non-profit community agency serving immigrants, primarily women.
-Conduct weekly information sessions (training will be provided)
-Provide support for students once enrolled, responding to inquires and helping to find solutions to settlement, family, housing, and workload concerns
-Work with the Graduate Services Coordinator to monitor internal volunteer placement opportunities and match candidates to these opportunities
-Mark assessment tests, provide information on results to clients, help clients to determine career paths based on competencies
-Assist WSC staff to monitor Essential Skills Portfolios with students enrolled in training programs

Qualifications:
-A keen interest in providing assistance to immigrants and helping them understand the Canadian labour market
-University or college degree or equivalent community work experience helping individuals in some HR capacity
-Strong computer skills (MS Office and Internet Search)
-Past experience using an Access Database an asset
-Ability to problem solve and work independently if needed

Position Details:
-Wage rate: $14.10/hr, 30/hr/wk (FTE $27,500/year)
-Start date: immediately
-Contact position for 11 months (46 weeks)
-Individual must meet Investing in Neighbourhoods criteria:
-Unemployed, client, spouse, dependent adult on Ontario Works
-Family in receipt of NCBS or OCB

How to Apply:
Send a resume to: Honey Crossley by email: mailto: hcrossley@workingskillscentre.com

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca  To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 31st JANUARY 2010

EVENTS

FORUM ON NEWCOMER POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS TO OVERCOME POVERTY

A forum will be held on Saturday, March 27, to discuss how to improve access to employment for newcomers and how to build communities where immigrants and refugees participate fully in civic life.

For more info: http://www.cleonet.ca/events/1202

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RESEARCH CONFERENCE: HEALTHCARE FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED AND UNINSURED, TORONTO

Friday, February 12
9 am to 4 pm
155 College Street, Suite 610, Toronto

Systems, policies, practices and their consequences presented by:
– Women’s College Hospital’s Network on Uninsured Clients
– Wellesley Institute
– Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto
– York Institute for Health Research (YIHR), York University

This event is free but space is limited. Refreshment breaks and lunch will be provided.

Download the registration form in Microsoft Word here: http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/events/?event_id=15

Send a completed form to linda.gardner@wchospital.ca

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REDISTRIBUTION OF WEALTH: ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE FROM INDIGENOUS AND FAITH PERSPECTIVES

March 5-7, 2010
Maritime Labour Centre
1880 Triumph St, Vancouver (Coast Salish Territory)
British Columbia, Canada

A conference which draws on faith traditions to present alternatives in the context of the global economic crisis.

For more info: http://www.interfaithjustpeace.org/program.php

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REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR CITY BUDGET PROCESS 101 EVENT

Social Planning Toronto & Toronto Open Budget Present: City Budget Process 101

Wednesday, February 3
6-9 PM
North York Memorial Community Hall,
5150 Yonge Street at North York Centre subway

Every year, Toronto City Council passes capital and operating budgets that identify priorities and guide the City’s spending for the year. How does it all work and how can we make it work better?

Join us for this informative and interactive workshop to:

– Learn how the City of Toronto budget process works
– Find out how you can get involved
– Share your ideas for how we can make the process more open and inclusive

Please register by going to: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/city-budget-process-101-event-registration
or by calling Mary Micallef at (416) 351-0095 x251.

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NEWS & VIEWS

GOVERNMENTS TURNING THEIR BACKS ON PENSION CRISIS

Canada’s finance ministers are doing Canadians a grave disservice by pretending that no real crisis exists within our failing pension system.

To read more: http://www.nupge.ca/node/2854

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HELP STOP THE ELIMINATION OF NURSES FROM BLOOD DONOR SCREENING

18 Jan 10 — In February 2009, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) announced that it is proposing changes to the way blood donors are screened. CBS wants to eliminate nurses from initial donor screening and replace them with ‘multi-skilled workers’ (MSWs).

CBS wants nurses to be involved in donor screening only if MSWs or other staff request that nurses assess a client for eligibility. But MSWs will lack the necessary medical background to know which donors need a nursing assessment and which do not.

Nurses’ unions across Canada have already written to the minister of health, Leona Aglukkaq, asking her to reject the CBS’s request, and the media has taken notice.

Today, we’re broadening our efforts to protect Canada’s blood supply by asking everyone who is concerned to contact Minister Aglukkaq.

This morning the Canadian Federation of Nurses’ Unions (CFNU) launched http://www.SafeBlood.ca. The new website provides an easy to use, online ‘Take Action’ tool. Please take two minutes to send your message to Minister Aglukkaq today at: http://www.safeblood.ca/take-action.htm

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COMM-ORG INVITES PAPERS FOR ITS 2010 PAPERS COLLECTION

Are you writing a paper on:
– Community organizing?
– Community development?
– Community planning?
– Community-based research?
– A related area?

COMM-ORG: The On-line Conference on Community Organizing is looking for papers to post on the COMM-ORG Papers page. All papers are posted on the COMM-ORG website and announced on its accompanying list-serve, which reaches over 1000 people across more than a dozen nations. We welcome discussion of all papers on the list-serve and encourage our members to also send comments directly to authors.

To submit a paper, contact the editor, Randy Stoecker, at rstoecker@wisc.edu Authors retain complete control over their work.

For more info: http://comm-org.wisc.edu

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LESSONS LEARNED: ASSESSING THE 2009 CITY OF TORONTO STRIKE

by Julia Barnett & Carlo Fanelli, The Bullet

When word came that the 39-day strike by CUPE Locals 79 and 416 had come to an end, the immediate question on most members’ minds was “Did we win?” The information gap between rank and file members and the union executive was so large that many strikers were unaware of why exactly they were on strike in the first place and were dependent on media reports to find out where both sides stood during collective bargaining. Much of the information that picketing workers did receive was inconsistent, late or completely empty of any substantive information, leaving strikers frustrated and angry.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/298.php

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CALL FOR PAPERS: SOCIAL ECONOMY STUDENT NETWORK (SESN) STUDENT CONFERENCE ON THE SOCIAL ECONOMY

Exploring the role of the Social Economy in a changing world
June 1, 2010

Research and shared perspectives on the Social Economy play an important role in informing the way we imagine social life in Canada as well as shaping the way in which the economy, individuals, and the environment will co-exist in the future. Since it is recognized that each individual embodies a unique perspective on the Social Economy and that it is a community of these diverse perspectives which dictates the manner in which Social Economy movement will move forward – we are pleased to create a space where students and those with interest in the Social Economy may share their perspectives.

This one-day Social Economy Student Network conference will be held at Concordia University in Montréal June 1st, 2010 (with a social event for presenters, organizers and attendees to follow). The Deadline for abstract submissions is March 1st, 2010.  We invite anybody who has had experience working with and researching various aspects of the Social Economy to submit an abstract.

For more info: http://www.anser-ares.ca/

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NEW VOICES JOURNAL – VOICES OF NEWCOMERS

The second issue of New Voices, produced by the Mennonite New Life Centre of Toronto, includes photos and profiles articles written by internationally trained journalists living in Canada, all exploring themes such as employment equity, legislative change and opportunities for newcomers.

The publication also highlights an upcoming community forum entitled Refusing to settle for less: Newcomer policy recommendations to overcome poverty, which is taking place on Saturday, March 27, 9:30 am – 4:30 pm.

The forum will bring together newcomer communities, the community service sector, organized labour, business, and government. Please contact Adriana Salazar at asalazar@mnlct.org or 416-699-4527 ext. 229 for registration or for more details.

Download the issue at:  http://mnlct.org/story/newsletter/NewVoices09winter.pdf

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ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Studies in Social Justice
Vol 3, No 2 (2009): Special Issue: Work, Insecurity, and Social Justice
Table of Contents
http://ojs.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/SSJ/issue/view/345

Journal of Education and Work, Volume 23 Issue 1 2010
New partnerships for learning: meeting professional information needs
Pat Gannon-Leary; James Carr
Pages 65 – 77
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a918778653

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 2010;39 10-28
Neoliberal restructuring, activism/participation, and social unionism in the nonprofit social services
Donna Baines
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/39/1/10

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

The Incident

The Incident

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

October Speakers’ Panel – Student Co-operatives

When:  Wednesday, October 21, 2009, noon – 1:30 pm
Where:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

* Marisa Charland will give an overview of Ontario Student Co-operative Association, the federation that unites all Ontario student co-operatives.
* Debbie McKay will present the development of, and services provided by the Guelph Campus Co-operative enterprise at University of Guelph.
* Andrew Haydon will discuss the challenges in developing the newest student housing co-operative in Ontario, located in Cambridge.

* Sonja Carrière, Education Manager of On Co-op, will moderate this panel.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca, or visit our website at http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

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PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Register now to attend on Saturday November 7, 2009!

Amazing speakers and workshop leaders are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you.

* Meet other parents, principals, school and school board staff from around the province.
* Come and share ideas, raise concerns, find solutions and learn a lot!
* Connect with others who care passionately about our schools.

When: Nov. 7th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m

Where: York University, Toronto, ON

Cost: $50 and you can save $10 by becoming a member of People for Education (costs $25 but gets you lots of other privileges too!)

To view the registration form, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/registration09 (Fill it out, save to your computer, then email back to jan@peopleforeducation.com)

To view the conference flyer, click here (share this by email – bring a friend or someone from your school): http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conferenceflyer09

To view the agenda and session descriptions, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conference09/sessionsupdate

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URGENT ACTION: STOP THE U OF T ATTACKS ON ACCESS & EQUITY

October 19 & 21

Students who face barriers to access education are about to be hit even harder. The Transitional Year Program (TYP), a 40 year old access program, is about to face drastic changes that will inevitably destroy it. These changes include taking away TYP’s autonomy by putting it under Woodsworth College, taking away TYP’s independent space, reducing teaching and support staff, and slashing the TYP budget.

We need your support on Monday October 19 and Wednesday October 21. On these dates university bodies will be voting to decide the fate of the program. We need a mass turnout of people to stop these committees from rubber-stamping these heinous changes:

Monday October 19, 3-5pm
Faculty of Arts and Science Council
Munk Centre, Campbell Conference Centre,
1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire and Hoskin)

Wednesday October 2,1 4:30-6pm
Woodsworth College Council
Woodsworth Residence, Waters Lounge
321 Bloor Street (Bloor and St. George)

The University has told students that they are not closing TYP. However, TYP will be unable to serve its mandate and support its students under the proposed move to Woodsworth. Reducing staff, faculty and funding limits the ability of the program to meet the needs of its students. Taking away our space by moving us into a few rooms at Woodsworth further marginalizes us by removing the supportive environment that our home at 49 St. George provides.

The University and TYP administration have been repeatedly asked to consult students through this process. After a battle, the TYP administration began meeting with the Transitional Year Program Preservation Alliance, sharing limited information and calling it consultation. Never have students or the communities TYP serves been allowed input into the process.

The future of these marginalized students is in your hands. Please join us in asking the University of Toronto to reconsider shutting the doors on this essential program.

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THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

“Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action”
November 18-20, 2009

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009. The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Day 1: Intensive training sessions geared to your stage of planning, development or growth.

Days 2 and 3: Working sessions with fellow practitioners, funders, government officials, network organizations, and supporters designed to create a national policy agenda and action plan for social enterprise in Canada.

The Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is an initiative of the Social Enterprise Council of Canada. For more information on the conference, please email: info@torontoenterprisefund.ca or visit http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil#CCSE

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WHAT’S WRONG WITH CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM?

A Migrant Justice Assembly with Salimah Valiani, Amina Sherazee, Himani Bannerji and David McNally

Friday, October 23
6:00pm
245 Church Street
Room ENG-LG11

* Did you know that in 2008 more temporary workers entered the workforce than permanent residents in to Canada?
* Did you know that Canada has cut its refugee acceptance rate in half over the last 20 years?
* Did you know that there are over half a million people in the country without status, over half in the GTA?

Come and hear about how the broken immigration system is being shattered. Share your own stories. Build relationships. Develop ideas for the way ahead. Come prepared to talk back!

Registration and Refreshments at 6:00; Event starts at 6:30pm sharp.

Read more: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/336

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NOTES ON NO: ABSTINENCE AND THE PROBLEM OF THINKING IN SEX EDUCATION

CUHI (Centre for Urban Health Initiatives) Youth Sexual Health RIG Seminar Series

With Jen Gilbert, Ph.D., Faculty of Education, York University

Wednesday October 28th, 2009, 1:30-3:00 pm
York University, Room 280N, York Lanes
For Directions: http://www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/maps/keele.htm
Free, all are welcome, please RSVP to adrian.guta@utoronto.ca

This paper explores the problem of prohibition in sex education. Drawing on a two-year study of the language of abstinence in the United States, Dr. Gilbert considers many of the different ways that adults and youth use “no” in sex education. Feminists and other have critiqued the use of “no” as a restrictive and punitive gesture, containing sexuality’s potential in the lives of youth, particularly girls, youth of color, and LGBT youth. While she recognizes the importance of these critiques, she takes a detour through psychoanalytic theories of negation and considers the ways “no” can, often unwittingly, make room for thinking and thoughtfulness.

Please see our website for upcoming seminar summaries and other events: http://www.cuhi.utoronto.ca

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CREATIVE PLACES + SPACES CONFERENCE    
        
Oct. 28-30, 2009

Creative Places + Spaces is a multi-media, interactive, art-infused experience designed to inspire, empower, and connect thinkers, policymakers and practitioners working to build vibrant, dynamic, sustainable and creative places. The conference runs from October 28 – 30, 2009 and is hosted by Artscape.

During Creative Places + Spaces:  The Collaborative City, delegates and speakers together will have the opportunity to hear, see, exchange and practice global perspectives on collaboration and connect them to local opportunities for change. If you are interested in building bridges across boundaries in order to solve problems, generate new ideas, and foster transformation, check out the conference schedule and register today for a crash-course in the global groundswell around collaboration.

To find out more: http://www.creativeplacesandspaces.ca/conference

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THE MAYTREE FOUNDATION: REGISTER FOR THE FIVE GOOD IDEAS FALL 2009 PROGRAM

* Creating an Automatic Marketing Culture

with Donnie Claudino

Thursday, October 22, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Are you one of those people who rarely forward emails? Yet on that rare occasion, something strikes you as special–and you are inspired to ‘pass-it-on.’ Something about it clicked with you. Perhaps you can’t even explain it; a certain … je ne sais quoi. That ‘something’ is often described by marketers as “stickiness.” Stickiness is typically associated with “Viral Marketing.” But who wants to spread a virus? When we connect with a message, a video, a website–we automatically engage with it, and want to share it. We don’t have to be asked, because it’s automatic. Attend this Lunch & Learn to discover 5 things your organization can do to grow an automatic marketing culture–and have your messages exponentially spread by your constituents.

*Managing Volunteers

with Gail Nyberg, Executive Director, Daily Bread Food Bank

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Most non-profit organizations rely on volunteers to not only enhance their programming, but run day-to-day operations. At Daily Bread Food Bank the job of distributing over 15 million pounds or food to over 200 food programs would not get done without the hard work of volunteers. Volunteers help to sort food, participate in events, provide information to the public and run community food banks. Last year, 15,521 volunteers helped Daily Bread with over 107,259 hours of work. Our volunteers do great work, and we are constantly looking at ways to improve our programs and our volunteer opportunities. Come and find out more about what we’ve learned over the years (and are still learning) about how to run a successful volunteer program.

Location for both sessions:

St. Michael’s College – Elmsley Hall, Charbonnel Lounge
81 St. Mary Street
At St. Mary and Bay Streets, two blocks south of Bloor, closest subway access from Bay and Wellesley stations.

Please note that though the sessions are free, registration is required. Brown bag lunches are provided on a first come, first served basis.

Please RSVP to: kvukobratovic@maytree.com

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ECHO AND OWHN WANT TO HEAR YOUR VOICE ON OCTOBER 21, TORONTO

Please join Echo and the Ontario Women’s Health Network and share your views on: The Minister of Health’s 10-Year Mental Health and Addictions Strategy

Date: Wednesday October 21, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place: Chestnut Conference Centre
89 Chestnut Street, Toronto
(east of University/south of Dundas )

Together we will:

1)   discuss the Minister’s report called Every Door is the Right Door;
2)   prepare comments that will be shared in a report to the Minister of Health;
3)   enjoy a women-friendly day of sharing and conversation to ensure your voices are heard
4)   share a healthy breakfast, lunch and snacks.  

This is an event for community women, service providers & community planners.

Please register by contacting OWHN at 416-408-4840 or by email at: owhn@owhn.on.ca

Please ask about support for childcare and local transportation.

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REPORT LAUNCH: WHY DON’T WE WANT THE POOR TO OWN ANYTHING?

The Metcalf Foundation invites you to the launch of a new report by Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton:

Why don’t we want the poor to own anything? Our relentless social policy journey toward destitution for the 900,000 poorest people in Ontario

When: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm
Where: St. Christopher House – Community Hall
248 Ossington Avenue (Dundas at Ossington), Toronto

This new report explores the issue of the very low levels of savings and assets allowed for people on welfare and some other social security programs. It makes recommendations for reform to rules that are impoverishing people and almost guaranteeing they will grow old in poverty.

Low-income community members may qualify for assistance to attend this event. Please call Rick Eagan at St. Christopher House at (416) 532-4828 ext. 238 for details.

Please RSVP to Heather Dunford at hdunford@metcalffoundation.com or (416) 926- 0366 ext. 33

To view launch details: http://fpyn.ca/system/files/Launch%20invite.pdf

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ORDER NOW! OUR TIMES MAGAZINE SPECIAL FALL ISSUE ON CLIMATE CHANGE

“The division between labour movements and social justice movements is an artificial one that serves to impede our ability to make progressive and sustained change.”
Angela Robertson, Social Justice Activist
“What Binds Us Together”

Here we go again! Our Times’ special fall issue on climate change (Vol. 28 No.5) will be heading to the printer shortly. If you’d like extra copies (more than 20), please let us know as soon as possible.

In this issue we’re featuring the efforts of workers and unions to go green and create long-term sustainable jobs. We’re bringing you a fantastic photostory by B.C. photographer Joshua Berson about the firefighters who fought the massive fires this year in Kelowna. And you’ll hear about the joint efforts of the Highlander Center in Tennessee and Toronto’s Labour Education Centre to build a cross-border, cross-movement dialogue. Of course, we’ll also have great new instalments of our regular columns, including WebWork and the Our Times Tally.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by Monday, October 19 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

Either way, I hope you enjoy the issue and find it of use. Thank you for your support for Our Times.

In Solidarity,
Lorraine Endicott
Editor, Our Times
http://www.ourtimes.ca

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CANADIAN JOURNALISM FOUNDATION FORUM – DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: A CASE STUDY

In an effort to bring lessons learned about diversity and programming to a wider audience, CJF Forums presents Joan Melanson, executive producer at CBC Radio, Toronto; and Nick Davis, producer of Metro Morning, in a discussion on reaching out to diverse audiences. Suanne Kelman, a professor at Ryerson’s School of Journalism, will interview the panel.

Date:
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM (ET)

Location:
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J5

After the discussion there will be a Q&A with the audience, followed by a cocktail reception.

The event is free, but guests are encouraged to make a $15 contribution to help support CJF programs upon registration.

To register:  http://www.eventbrite.com/contact-organizer?eid=451282799

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BOOK LAUNCH (TORONTO) – HARVEST PILGRIMS: MEXICAN AND CARIBBEAN MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN CANADA

Between the Lines and the Stephen Bulger Gallery invite you to celebrate the launch of Vincenzo Pietropaolo’s new book of photography. Harvest Pilgrims tells the little-known story of Canada’s migrant workers. The photographs in the “Harvest Pilgrims” collection have been highly acclaimed internationally through many publications and exhibitions, including a travelling show curated by the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography that opened in Mexico City. Pietropaolo will present a slideshow of his work on the subject, and talk about the project, which has been 20 years in the making.

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Stephen Bulger Gallery
1026 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON

For more information, contact Between the Lines, 1.800.718.7201or email: info@btlbooks.com

About the Book:
Harvest Pilgrims: Mexican and Caribbean Migrant Farm Workers in Canada
Vincenzo Pietropaolo
144 pp | paper | 80 + duotone photos
ISBN 978-1-897071-54-0 | $49.95 | October 2009

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OISE/UT DISABILITY STUDIES SPEAKERS SERIES – “DISABILITY IN DANGEROUS TIMES”

With Dr. Catherine Frazee

Thursday, November 5
3:30 pm
OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON (above St. George Subway stop)

All Welcome, ASL provided

Catherine Frazee, D.Litt., LLD.
Professor of Distinction
Co-director, Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research & Education

Catherine Frazee has been involved in the equality rights movement for many years, most notably during her term as Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission from 1989 to 1992. Her current work as a writer, educator and researcher focuses upon the rights, identity, experience and well-being of persons with disabilities. Catherine is a committed activist who has lectured and published extensively in Canada and abroad on issues related to disability rights, disability culture and the disability experience. She is currently a member of DAWN Canada’s Equality Rights Committee and serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Association for Community Living, where she chairs the Association’s Task Force on Values and Ethics. Catherine was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of New Brunswick in October 2002.

For more info, contact Tanya Titchkosky, 416-978-0451 or email: tanyatitchkosky@oise.utoronto.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 WORKSHOP SERIES

October 30: Board-Management Relations
with Vic Murray (Schulich School of Business, York University; School of Public Administration, University of Victoria)

For years, books, articles, websites and consultants have been offering all kinds of advice on how boards ought to operate and relate to the organizations they govern. Yet many boards have a very difficult time living up to these ideals or choose not to even try. Why is this? Is it the fault of the boards and managers? Or is it possible that the advice itself is not always what is needed?

Join us in this workshop to:

* Explore the gaps between the ideal and reality in board governance
* Learn how to develop ways of bringing the ideal and reality closer together
* Learn how to use contingency-based analysis and tailored board development approaches

Date:  Friday, October 30, 2009 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Cost: $140 + GST; Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available. Refreshments, coffee & tea served, but lunch not provided.

To Register: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/workshops.php or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@oise.utoronto.ca, 416-978-0022

Location:  Social Economy Centre of the University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W. (5th floor), Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, (St. George Subway Station)

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TELELEARNING SESSION 15: POVERTY REDUCTION IN CANADA

1. What are some public policy trends and instruments supporting poverty reduction in Canada?
2. What are some community-based approaches to poverty reduction in Canada?

If you want to know the answers to these questions and more, please join:

Jean Marc Fontan, Professor at UQÀM/Co-director of the Social Economy Community-University Research Alliance in Quebec; and Shauna McKinnon, Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy in an engaging telelearning session hosted by Jessica Notwell, Manager of the Women’s Economic Council.

Call Logistics:

* Session Date: Wednesday October 21st, 2009
* Call begins at 12:00 pm Eastern time, 9:00 am Pacific time
* Call in information will be given upon registration
* Register before October 20 to obtain dial in information and background papers
* This session is in English.

Session Format: 1 Hour
Welcome: 5 min
Presentations: 10 min by each speaker
Discussion: 35 minutes

Registration:
Register by phoning 250-472-4976, or e-mailing sekm@uvic.ca with your name, location, and work or volunteer position.

Limited number of spaces available – Register soon!
(This session is only available to Canadian Residents)

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AUDITOR’S REPORT REINFORCES NEED FOR GREATER PUBLIC CONTROL; LESS PRIVATIZATION: OPSEU

The findings by the Auditor General that greater public oversight would have prevented the spending scandal at eHealth was strongly embraced by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

“Let’s hope the Premier and his government learned a valuable lesson today: the more you hand over control of a vital public service like health care to the private sector, the more costs are going to skyrocket at the expense of the tax-paying public,” said OPSEU president Warren (Smokey) Thomas.

“We couldn’t agree more with Auditor General McCarter. The private consultants behind the eHealth spending scandal weren’t able to contain themselves from pinching the public purse for every last dime. That simply wouldn’t happen under a genuine public system with built-in checks, oversight and accountability.”

In his report, the Auditor General specifically pointed to the fact that “there was a heavy, and in some cases almost total, reliance on (private) consultants. By 2008, the Ministry’s eHealth Program Branch had fewer than 30 full-time employees, but was engaging more than 300 consultants …”

Thomas said watching the eHealth scandal unfold was like reading a familiar old story.

He cited the Auditor’s report from 2008 which revealed the privatization of the William Osler Hospital in Brampton cost almost $500 million more than had Ontario used traditional public procurement and financing.

For further information: Greg Hamara, OPSEU Communications, (647) 238-9933 cell

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GROCERY UNIONS JOIN WITH COMMUNITY TO BUILD BETTER SUPERMARKETS

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

In New York City 11,600 retailers sell food, but fewer than 5 percent of them are grocery stores. In Detroit, more than half the city’s residents live in a “food desert,” where they’re closer to a fast food joint or a convenience store than to a supermarket.

UFCW locals in both cities are building community coalitions to create more and better grocery stores – which they hope, one day, will be union.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2461

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LABOUR BOOK OF THE WEEK – THE KILLING OF KAREN SILKWOOD

It has now been 35 years since the murder of American trade unionist Karen Silkwood.

Silkwood was working at a plutonium processing plant and was killed in a mysterious car crash on her way to deliver important documents to a newspaper reporter.

She had been working on health and safety issues at the plant. She was 28 years old when she died.

To learn more about Karen and to celebrate her life please buy a copy of The Killing of Karen Silkwood — this week’s Labour Book of the Week.

The issues this book explores — whistle-blowers, worker safety, the environment, and nuclear vulnerability — are as relevant today as they were 35 years ago.

To read more: https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=silkwood&affl=labourstart

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Radical Pedagogy

Radical Pedagogy

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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NOW AVAILABLE! UPDATED & EXPANDED EDITION OF “INTEGRATING EQUITY, ADDRESSING BARRIERS: INNOVATIVE LEARNING PRACTICES BY UNIONS”

The Labour Education Centre is pleased to announce the publication of the updated and expanded new edition of the report “Integrating Equity, Addressing Barriers: Innovative Learning Practices by Unions”.

Available on LEC’s website: http://www.laboureducation.org  Printed copies are available for $10 plus shipping / 25% discount for 10 or more copies.

The second edition features 11 new sketches as well as updates for most of the 35 sketches included in the first edition.

Original 2-4 page “sketches” provide a sampling of programs from different parts of Canada. The 46 sketches include programs from local, provincial and national unions, from central labour bodies at the labour council, regional building trades council, provincial and territorial federation and level of the Canadian Labour Congress. Some are joint union-management initiatives; some are community-sponsored. Each sketch outlines how the program started and evolved, impacts and what’s next, contact information and references. The 190-page report includes an introduction and additional references.

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THE POLITICS OF OLDER ADULT EDUCATION: POSSIBILITIES FOR TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICE

Marvin Formosa, University of Malta
Wednesday, October 14, 2009
12.00-1.30 pm
Room 7-162, OISE/University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

In recent decades, late-life learning has developed into a global success story. Whether holding a ‘top-down’ administrative arrangement or embodying a culture of self-help, there can be no doubt as to the triumph of programs in meeting the educational, social, and psychological needs of older persons. However, a cautionary note must be warranted. Research has reported that in many cases programs of older adult education tend to function as yet another euphemism for glorified occupational therapy that is both conservative and oppressive. Moreover, practice models seem to be running the risk of becoming obsolete as societies embark on a ‘late-modern’ (as opposed to a ‘modernist’) model of the life course in which the sequential division between learning, work and retirement is becoming increasingly blurred.

This seminar puts forward the suggestion that older adult education must go through a cultural revolution to remain relevant to current ageing lifestyles as well as become an agent of transformative change. Seven possible directions are outlined: embracing a transformational rationale, ensuring that access overcomes class, gender and ethnic biases to become more equally distributed, guaranteeing that teaching and learning strategies are suited to older persons, promoting ICT knowledge whilst making greater use of e-learning techniques, extending its activities to frail and physically dependent elders including those in residential/nursing homes, and organizing activities that promote intergenerational learning.

Marvin Formosa (European Centre of Gerontology, University of Malta) is currently writing a handbook on ‘Lifelong Learning in Later Life’ (Sense, 2010). He has published on older adult learning in the journals Education and Ageing, Ageing International, Recerca, and Malta Review of Educational Research. His most recent publications include ‘Class Dynamics in Later Life’ and ‘Supporting Family Careers of Older Persons in Europe’. This year, Marvin Formosa is a visiting scholar in the Adult Education and Community Development Program, OISE/UT.

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VINCENZO PIETROPAOLO – HARVEST PILGRIMS EXHIBIT

Launch: Sunday, October 18
1-5 pm
Workers Arts and Heritage Centre
51 Stuart Street
Hamilton, ON
905-522-3003
http://www.wahc-museum.ca

Acclaimed Canadian documentary photographer and social activist Vincenzo Pietropaolo has been photographing migrant agriculture workers and recording their stories since 1984 – in the process travelling to forty locations throughout Ontario and to their homes in Mexico, Jamaica, and Montserrat.

Pietropaolo has borne witness to these “harvest pilgrims” — tens of thousands of migrant workers who arrive in the spring, leave in the fall, are the backbone of the agricultural industry in Canada — yet continue to be denied many of the basic workplace rights that protect other workers in Canada.

Meet the artist at the book launch and photo exhibition of HARVEST PILGRIMS, Sunday October 18.

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TRANSFORMING CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: REFLECTIONS ON THE FREIRE CONFERENCE GATHERING IN SPAIN, OCTOBER 28

*Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you believe that another world is possible?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE for our 2009-2010 Dialogue Circles Series.

Upcoming events include:

*Transforming Critical Pedagogy: Reflections on the Freire Conference Gathering in Spain, Emear O’Neill, Wednesday October 28
* Buy-Nothing Day, Wednesday November 25
* Inter-faith Dialogue, Wednesday December 16

Everyone is invited!
Hosted in the 7th Floor Peace Lounge at OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George) from 4:00 to 5:30 pm, last Wednesday of every month, Sept 2009 to April 2010.

For more information, visit the TLC website at: http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca

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ISRAEL / PALESTINE: FREEDOM OF SPEECH, FREEDOM TO TEACH

A conference on elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education – rights and repression

Friday, October 16, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 17, 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, Toronto

Friday, October 16 Panel:
7:00-9:00: Sharing Stories of Repression and Fightback Panelists include Javier Davila, Adnan Husain, Golta Shahidi, and Palestinian educator, Saed Abu-Hijleh

Saturday, October 17 Programme: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

9:00 – 10:30 – Keynote addresses: Yafa Jarrar and Sherene Razack

11:00-12:30 – Sectoral Workshops
*Post-Secondary Faculty – Academic Research, Conferences, Publication and Organizing
*Post-Secondary Faculty -Teaching and the Curriculum
*Elementary and Secondary Teachers – The Classroom, the Curriculum and Finding Spaces within the Union
*Student Organizing
*Community

Lunch – 12:30 – 1:30 – vegetarian with vegan and gluten-free options (included in registration)

1:30 – 2:30 – Legal Context: Know Your Rights as Activists – Yutaka Dirks and Irina Ceric
2:45 – 4:00 – Plenary
4:00 – 4:15 – Closing Comments

Registration: $5–$30 sliding scale (incl. lunch with vegetarian, vegan,and gluten-free options)

For further information and to pre-register, contact us at freedomtoteach.registration@yahoo.ca.

*Organized by Educators for Peace and Justice, Faculty for Palestine, and Students Against Israeli Apartheid*

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INDIGENOUS SOVEREIGNTY WEEK – TORONTO

Forums, art, performances and discussions supporting and celebrating the Indigenous struggle for land and sovereignty on Turtle Island

http://www.defendersoftheland.org/toronto

October 26 – November 1, 2009

Invited speakers include:
* Arthur Manuel, Secwepemc Nation
* Algonquins of Barriere Lake
* Shawn Brant, Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory
* Pauline Shirt, Plains Cree
* Russell Diabo, Mohawk Nation, Kahnawake.
* Grafton Antone, Oneida
* Vicki Monague, Beausoleil FN

Featured events:
* Opening Ceremonies with Men’s and Women’s Drum Circle, Youth slam poetry and speaker
* Dear Harper: A Canadian Colonial History
* Justice Redone
* Struggles for Land
* Haudenosaunee Storytelling
* The Great Indian Bus Tour. Exploring the indigenous history of Toronto
* Building the Circle Stronger: Traditional feast, Sharing Circle and Next Steps meeting
* and more …

Full schedule will be updated shortly. Please visit our website often.

Email iswtoronto@gmail.com for more.

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VIDEO: SOLIDARITY! RESISTANCE! CHANGE! ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Steve Williams in Toronto, October 2 2009

Steve Williams is co-director of the California based group POWER: People Organized to win Employment Rights, which since the late 1990’s has been one of the most important Worker’s Action Centres in the U.S., and co-authour of the book Towards Land, Work and Power: Charting a Path of Resistance to U.S.-led Imperialism.

* Moderated by Stephanie Ross – Prof. Labour Studies, York University.
* Sam Gindin – Visiting Packer Chair in Social Justice at York University.

A Left Streamed Video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

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PLANNING MEETING FOR DAY OF ACTION, CAMPAIGN FOR A POVERTY-FREE ONTARIO 

On behalf of the over 300,000 members of the Canadian Federation of Students-Ontario, we would like to invite your organisation to participate in and help shape the campaign for a Poverty-Free Ontario, bringing students, community and labour organisations together in a united call for the government to invest in people by supporting basic social services and standards. Your organisation has been contacted to participate because you have endorsed the campaign for a Poverty-Free Ontario or have expressed interest in doing so.

On October 15, we will be holding a planning meeting to discuss how we can coordinate our organising and build for the day of action. The planning meeting will be held on:

Thursday, October 15
12 pm
Ryerson Student Center
55 Gould Street, Toronto

We are pleased to invite a representative of your organisation to join us for a catered lunch and a discussion of how to effectively mobilise to challenge our government’s spending priorities and call for investment in people.

Please RSVP soon, and notify us of who is able to attend. We will be following up in the next few days to confirm participation. Please do not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions or concerns.

In solidarity,
Shelley Melanson
Chairperson Canadian Federation of Students – Ontario
office – 416.925.3825 x 29
cell – 416.882.9927
http://www.cfsontario.ca

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ONTARIO FEDERATION OF LABOUR EMPLOYMENT EQUITY SEMINAR

November 9 & 10
Doubletree International Plaza Hotel
655 Dixon Road, Toronto

Mobilizing for equality rights makes our unions, the trades labour movement and communities stronger and better for everyone. To increase our actions the OFL is holding a seminar on Employment Equity.

Although the Employment Equity legislation was dismantled in 1995 by the Conservative Harris government, the labour movement has continued to push for employment equity gains through collective bargaining over the past decade.

The seminar will assist advocates through political action and collective bargaining, dispel myths and focus on the positive realities of employment equity and help overcome the challenges of implementing employment equity.

The registration fee is $150. The deadline for registration is October 26, 2007.

For more information or to register, contact Catherine Corcoran, Secretary
p: 416-443-7656, f: 416.441.0722, email: ccorcoran@ofl.ca

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FORUM – FROM CRISIS TO JUSTICE: LABOUR AND COMMUNITY WORKING TOGETHER FOR AN EQUITABLE AND INCLUSIVE ECONOMIC FUTURE

Saturday, November 21, 2009
Sheraton Centre Hotel
Toronto, Ontario

The population of Ontario is becoming more diverse. By 2011 most new entrants to the labour force will be peoples of colour. Yet in percentage terms, fewer and fewer peoples of colour are joining unions.

To bring about a deeper familiarity between unions and communities, unions must work in solidarity with peoples of colour on issues that are important to these communities, in order to build long lasting relationships of trust, respect and sustainability.
Why? The survival of the labour movement is at stake.

The Forum will:

* Link activists from unions and community organizations to advance a shared vision for social, economic and environmental justice in our workplaces and in our communities;

* Develop best practices and policies that can be implemented locally, provincially and nationally through collective bargaining and form the framework to lobby for effective provincial and national employment equity and for organizing legislation.

* Increase public awareness of the potential for “green-collar” jobs to provide equitable pathways out of poverty, curb global warming, and transform the economy.

The registration fee is $130 per delegate and cheques are payable to “OFL From Crisis to Justice Forum”. Delegates can register on-line at http://www.ofl.ca
Registration and payment must be received by November 1, 2009.

Additional information and forms can be found on the OFL website: http://www.ofl.ca or contact us directly by calling Paulette Hazel at 416.443.7667 – toll free 1.(800).668.9138 or e-mail phazel@ofl.ca

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HERE’S THE SKINNY ON WHY WAL-MART IS SO EVIL (AND HAS MADE SUCH A KILLING)

By David Moberg, In These Times.

Wal-Mart’s origins in the Ozarks created a patriarchal and religiously-tinged corporate culture that dominated the American marketplace.

http://www.alternet.org/story/143009/here%27s_the_skinny_on_why_wal-mart_is_so_evil_(and_has_made_such_a_killing)

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ORGANIZED AGAINST LABOR: ATTACKS ON UNIVERSITY UNION CENTERS

Source: Inside Higher Education

Conservative group has been filing information requests and complaints against university centers that work with unions; AAUP charges violation of academic freedom.

To read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/10/12/labor

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NEW REPORT! ALLIANCES FOR CHANGE: ORGANIZING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

Workers’ centers, youth-based action groups, and urban justice organizations are among those changing the face of traditional community organizing. Many of these groups engage a range of approaches beyond targeted campaign work from service delivery to media ownership to voter engagement. This report looks at nearly a dozen examples of organizing efforts rising to scale and adapting to the urgent challenges and political opportunities at the beginning of the 21st century.

http://www.buildingmovement.org/news/entry/93

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MICHAEL MOORE WAS RIGHT: PROGRESSIVES DON’T WATCH ENOUGH TV

By Vanessa Richmond, AlterNet.

Why TV is ground zero for understanding American culture — the 9 best shows on air that you should be watching.

http://www.alternet.org/story/143178/michael_moore_was_right%3A_progressives_don%27t_watch_enough_tv

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REPORT – CANADA IS FALLING BEHIND OTHER COUNTRIES ON SOCIAL INNOVATION

Cross-sector collaboration needed to advance social innovation in Canada

October 8, 2009 – Canada is falling behind other countries, such as Australia, the UK and the US in recognizing the value of social innovation (SI) for addressing complex public policy issues.

A new report from Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN), Social Innovation in Canada: An Update by Mark Goldenberg, Wathira Kamoji, Larry Orton and Michael Williamson highlights the urgency of the social challenges before us, such as climate change, sustainability, poverty and globalization, particularly in the midst of a global economic downturn, and points to the importance of fostering SI as a solution.

The report notes that while governments in Canada have acknowledged the importance of social capital and the social economy, and have been relatively active in these areas in recent years, Canada has missed opportunities to encourage SI by failing to develop adequate models for public support, engagement and funding. The report calls on Canadian leaders to establish a cross-sectoral national strategy to advance SI in this country.

To read more: http://www.cprn.org/doc.cfm?doc=2057&l=en&utm_source=20091008&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter

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MURRAY DOBBIN’S BLOG – THE VALUE OF TILTING AT WINDMILLS

It’s easy to get demoralized these days with so much going wrong around the world. So it is incredibly encouraging to see a campaign for justice and workers’ health and safety prevail against supposedly insurmountable odds.

That is how the “odds” would have been described a year and a half ago for anyone musing about taking on the asbestos industry in Quebec.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2009/10/08/the-value-of-tilting-at-windmills/

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REQUEST FOR PAPERS – COSMOPOLITANISM AND COLLECTIVITY: CULTURAL REPRESENTATIONS VS. THEORIES OF COMMUNITY IN THE 20TH AND 21ST CENTURY

We are inviting paper proposals for an accepted seminar at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (New Orleans, April 1-4). Please do not submit proposals directly to the organizers–see specific instructions for online submission below. Papers must be submitted before November 13. Note: seminars at the ACLA are typically held over the course of three days–participants are expected to attend all meetings.

Session description: “Cosmopolitanism and Collectivity: Cultural Representations vs. Theories of Community in the 20th and 21st Century”

This panel intends to interrogate the relationship between collectivity and cosmopolitanism by studying the disjoints between the accounts of both concepts produced by culture on the one hand and theory on the other. The ultimate goal of this panel will be to complicate our understanding of the possibilities and limitations of contemporary forms of collectivity in relation to a renewed interest in the category of the universal in general and concepts such as cosmopolitanism in particular. Furthermore, this panel seeks to trace the historically and materially concrete determinations that link current conceptions of collectivity and cosmopolitanism. However, it strives to do so not by focusing on the harmonic parallels but rather on the contestations and differences between theoretical and cultural versions of thinking/representing the collective.

Proposals should not be submitted directly to the organizers but via the ACLA website prior to November 13, 2009: http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php.

When submitting a proposal, be sure to select the correct title of the seminar to which you are applying in the dropdown menu immediately following the field for the proposal text.

General information about the conference topic and logistics can be found on the ACLA 2010 website: http://www.acla.org/acla2010/

Please feel free to contact us any time with questions or concerns–all best,

Emilio Sauri (University of Illinois at Chicago), esauri1@uic.edu
Mathias Nilges (St. Francis Xavier University, Canada), mnilges@stfx.ca

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CO-OP WEEK: A TIME TO CELEBRATE!    

Co-op Week– October 11-17 — is here, and co-operators across Canada are preparing for next week’s celebrations.

Co-op Week is a time for co-op and credit union members across Canada to reflect on the achievements of the co-operative sector and the contribution our sector has made to the lives of Canadians and their communities.

This year Co-op Week themes focus on the advantages of co-operatives and credit unions in an uncertain economy. Co-op Week 2009 is highlighting three of these advantages:

Co-operatives are…putting people first
Co-operatives are…creating sustainable jobs
Co-operatives are…investing in communities

In addition, International Credit Union Day — which will be celebrated this year on Thursday, October 15 — will have its own theme “Your Money, Your Choice, Your Credit Union”.

A calendar of Co-op Week events activities can be found at http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/orphan/CoopWeekEvents

If your event isn’t listed, please contact Donna Balkan at communications@coopscanada.coop and it will be posted as soon as possible.

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CALL FOR ADVISORS – BEST START RESOURCE CENTRE

Over the past few years, the Best Start Resource Centre (http://www.beststart.org), a program of Health Nexus, has produced a number of brochures and booklets on topics related to preconception, pregnancy and child development. These documents have generally been produced in French and English and have mainly been distributed in Ontario.

Health Nexus (http://www.healthnexus.ca) has recently received funding from Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Ontario Region, to translate eight of their existing resources for the general public into other languages. Our standard resource adaptation process includes input from advisors as well as testing with end users, to ensure that adaptations meet the needs of the various linguistic and cultural groups. To this end, Health Nexus is seeking two Advisors for each of the following languages:

1. Arabic
2. Tagalog (Filipino)
3. Spanish
4. Punjabi
5. Urdu
6. Hindi
7. Tamil
8. Simplified Chinese

At least one Advisor per language will be a service provider working in reproductive health or child development. Advisors will review the identified resources, provide insights on adaptations needed to make the resources linguistically and culturally appropriate, and help ensure proper wording. Advisors will review the completed translations. An honorarium will be provided to each Advisor.

This project begins immediately, and is to be completed by March 31st, 2010.

If you are interested in being an Advisor, please send a brief (300 words or less) letter of interest outlining your background and experience by October 14, 2009 to:

Subha Sankaran
Health Promotion Consultant
Health Nexus
s.sankaran@healthnexus.ca
http://www.healthnexus.ca
http://www.beststart.org

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JOB POSTING: PROJECT COORDINATOR – COLOUR OF POVERTY CAMPAIGN

The Colour of Poverty Campaign seeks to hire an individual committed to racial justice to help coordinate a province wide project to increase awareness of and efforts to mitigate the impact of racialized poverty and racial inequities.  The project aims at building community capacity through various activities in six communities across Ontario, namely, Hamilton, London, Peel, Ottawa, Toronto, and Windsor.

Responsibilities:

* Overall coordination of the project, meeting timelines and deliverables
* Liaison with and support of the six lead partners at the 6 project sites
* Research, writing and development of new tools
* Assist in organizing the web content, working with the webmaster to make the site the go-to site in the province for racial equity work and analysis as it relates to racialized communities, particularly with respect to poverty reduction and eradication
* Help organize training for community animators for the 6 communities
* Help organize the first community meeting in each of the 6 communities

Qualifications:

* Post-secondary degree from a recognized university related to education, social work, political science, community development or interdisciplinary studies.
* Knowledge and experience conducting public education, outreach, community development, and policy analysis
* Experience working with community groups, non-profit agencies, advocacy or activist groups
* Experience with campaign strategy and grassroots mobilization
* Experience in event planning, conducting workshops, training and facilitation
* Ability to take initiative and problem solve with minimal supervision
* Excellent facilitation, organization, writing and communication skills
* Knowledge and understanding of anti-oppression and anti-racism frameworks
* Valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle is an asset
* Must be able to attend meetings on evenings and weekends

Duration: 1 year contract – Full Time 35 hours per week
Salary: $45,000 pa (including statutory benefits)
Deadline for application: November 20, 2009
Anticipated start date: January 2, 2010

Please send cover letter, resume and writing sample in confidence to the Colour of Poverty Campaign Steering Committee c/o the Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic at 180 Dundas Street West, Suite 1701, Toronto, Ontario. Fax: (416) 971-9674 or email: goa@lao.on.ca

The Colour of Poverty Campaign is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from members of racialized communities, First Nations People, women, and people with disabilities. We thank all applicants but only those chosen for an interview will be contacted.

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JOB POSTING: KAIROS PARTNERS AND NETWORKS ASSOCIATE

KAIROS, the national social justice of eleven national churches and church related organizations, is seeking a Partners and Networks Associate to join our outreach team.

The Partners and Network Associate works to strengthen KAIROS’ relationships with partners from the Global South, Canadian ecumenical activist networks and the general public. S/he collaborates with partnership staff in coordinating the visits of Southern partners to Canada, and plans special events with partners to engage donors, foundations, government and networks. S/he also facilitates general promotion of KAIROS and promotion and distribution of KAIROS print resources The Partners and Networks Associate is on the front line for information and support to KAIROS activists, and shares reception responsibilities.

If you are a creative, energetic individual with a passion for engaging people in social justice, please apply.

To read the complete posting, click here: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/who-we-are/job-opportunities/

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Addressing the underemployment of persons with disabilities: Recommendations for expanding organizational social responsibility
Karen S. Markel, Lizabeth A. Barclay
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal
http://www.springerlink.com/content/t0087r34h1000720/

* First approaches toward understanding Mexico City’s culture of consumption
Steven B. Bunker
Journal of Urban History published 8 October 2009, 10.1177/0096144209349894
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209349894v1

*All the world’s New York, all New York’s a stage: Drama, draft riots, and democracy in the mid-nineteenth century
Hilary Moss
Journal of Urban History published 22 September 2009, 10.1177/0096144209347095
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209347095v1

* Private equity and American labor: Multiple, pragmatic responses mirroring labor’s strengths and weaknesses
Larry W. Beeferman
JIR 2009;51 543-556
http://jir.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/51/4/543

* Sin city or suburban crucible? Searching for meanings in the new Las Vegas
Lawrence Culver
Journal of Urban History published 15 September 2009, 10.1177/0096144209347100
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209347100v1

*Book Review: DeRienzo, H. (2008). The Concept of Community: Lessons From the Bronx. Milan, Italy: IPOC di Pietro Condemi
Angela M. Eikenberry
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 2009;38 905-907
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/38/5/905

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Unemployment

Unemployment

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 30th SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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FORUM: SOLIDARITY, RESISTANCE, CHANGE: ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Public forum featuring: Steve Williams, Co-Director and co-founder of the California based group “People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER)” and co-author of the book “Towards Land, Work and Power”.
Join us to hear Steve Williams speak about POWER, and organizing working-class communities in the current context of the economic crisis.

Introductions and opening remarks will be made by Sam Gindin, CAW (Retired), and Stephanie Ross, York University. With Q & A.

Friday October 2, 2009
7pm
Ryerson Student Centre
55 Gould Street, Room 115
Toronto

Directions: http://www.oakhamhouse.com/pages/directions.php

In 1997, in the wake of Clinton’s historic attack on social assistance, welfare and public support measures for the poor, activists in the San Francisco area formed POWER: People Organized to Win Employment Rights. Since its inception, POWER members have waged more than twenty campaigns to improve the living and working conditions for welfare workers, domestic workers, low-income tenants and other working class people of color.

Co-sponsored by Socialist Project and Centre for Social Justice
Endorsed by Black Action Defence Committee (BADC), No One Is Illegal (NOII) and Ontario Coalition against Poverty (OCAP)

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STUDENT-LED CONFERENCE PUTS THE PRIDE BACK INTO HEALTH RESEARCH

Research with Pride
Friday, October 2nd, 2009
8:30 am – 4:30 pm
University of Toronto
Dalla Lana School of Public Health
155 College Street, Room 610

In partnership with The 519 Church Street Community Centre, this unique forum will offer the opportunity for students, community members, academics, and allies of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, two spirit, and queer (LGBTT2Q) communities to come together to discuss relevant health research, with a specific focus on community-based research (CBR) strategies.

Free. Lunch and snacks provided.

For more information or to register:  http://researchwithpride.org/index.html

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MAKING MUNICIPAL VOTING MATTER

Thursday, October 1
9 am to Noon
89 Chestnut Street
Toronto, Ontario

Elections in Toronto are not meeting our expectations. Voter turn-out is surprisingly low. New faces on City Council are uncommon. And perhaps most importantly, our City Council does not reflect the evolving demographic of Toronto’s population. What are options for renewal?

Join other community organizations and individuals in a discussion about the changes we need to make municipal elections matter in Toronto.

RSVP for this event: http://www.facebook.com/l/2617e;tinyurl.com/lgcywd

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BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

Friday, October 2, 2009
9:00 am to 4:00 pm
New College, University of Toronto
$50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments)

The Symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century.

Panels:

* Ending Poverty
* Social Infrastructure
* Good Jobs
* Social Security and Economic Stabilizers

Register online at http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/symposium

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SHOVEL READY IS NOT THE WHOLE STORY: OPTIONS AND PRIORITIES FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN THE GTA

Public Forum on Housing

Presented by The Older Women’s Network (OWN) and The Centre for Women’s Studies in Education at OISE, University of
Toronto

Sunday, October 4, 1:30 to 5 pm
OISE Auditorium
252 Bloor Street West (St. George Subway)

Panel Members:

* Heather McGregor, Chief Executive Officer, YWCA Toronto
* Angela Robertson, Executive Director, Sistering – A Woman’s Place
* Michael Shapcott, Director, Affordable Housing & Social Innovation, Wellesley Institute

The Older Women’s Network (OWN) – A Voice for Mid-Life and Older Women – is a not for profit organization incorporated in 1988. In 1997 OWN was instrumental in building a 142 unit Housing Co-op in the St. Lawrence Market area of Toronto.

For more information:  http://www.olderwomensnetwork.org

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A SERIES OF LEARNING CIRCLES: IN CELEBRATION OF THE LIFE AND WORK OF ALAN THOMAS

By the holders of the Alan Thomas Fellowship
of the Carold Institute
In Celebration of the Life and Work of Alan Thomas

Date: Monday October 5, 2009
Time: 6:00 – 8:00 PM
Place: Concordia University
Hall Building 7th Floor
Room H-762
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W.
Montreal

RSVP: 514-848-2424 (2036)
For more information: qaal@alcor.concordia.ca
Admission is FREE
Light Refreshments will be available

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FIRESIDE CHAT ON RACE, GENDER, INCOME VIA TELEPHONE/INTERNET

A special invitation to:
Public health planners and practitioners, policy makers, public health evaluators, community partners working with public health (e.g., NGOs, community health centres, school boards and educational institutions)….

A Fireside Chat – free pan-Canadian discussion via telephone/internet

Thursday October 8, 2009
1:00pm-2:30pm (Eastern Time)
Using an Online Toolkit to Address Social Determinants of Health through Multiple Intervention Programs

For more information and to register:  http://www.chnet-works.ca

Race…gender…income…All of these affect our health. In fact, considerable evidence exists that unequal social conditions contribute significantly to the persistent inequalities in the health of populations, internationally and in Canada.

How can public health programs address these, and other, social determinants of health? How are ‘social determinants’ understood and defined? What information can we draw upon to identify the determinants that we might be able to address? What kinds of interventions might be effective? How can we assess the impact of health interventions on social determinants? Is there any evidence that the social determinants can be altered through public health programming?

If you have ever asked yourself these questions, please join us on October 8. This Fireside chat will focus on using elements of the Multiple Interventions Program Tool Kit, an on-line resource for public health planners, to take into account social determinants of health when planning, implementing, and evaluating multiple intervention programs.

CHNET-works! hosts weekly fireside chats re: community health issues a project of RRASpHIRN, University of Ottawa Population Health Improvement Research Network – Réseau de recherches d’amélioration de la Santé de la population

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WOMEN TOGETHER: ENCOURAGING WOMEN TO TAKE A BIGGER PART IN POLITICS

An evening with:

* Andrea Horwath, Ontario NDP Leader
* Peggy Nash, President of the Federal NDP
* Cheri DiNovo, MPP Parkdale-High Park & ONDP Women’s Critic

Monday October 5 2009
CAW 1285 Hall,
23 Regan Street, Brampton
(McLaughlin & Bovaird– easily reached from the 401, 407 & 410)
6:30PM reception, 7:00PM start
Dinner will be served.

Tickets are $24 or five for $100
$15 for students, or on layoff
Make cheques out to CAW 1285, write Elect Women Together in the memo area, and mail to CAW 1285, 23 Regan Road, Brampton, ON L7A 1B2

All are welcome to attend.

Introducing potential candidates, Party members, supporters, friends and others, to the nuts and bolts of getting elected.

Women Party members who have run for office are asked to share their experience and knowledge.

To order tickets, for more info, or to volunteer: ondpwomen@gmail.com

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DIVERSITY: STRATEGIES FOR A CHANGING WORKFORCE

The Toronto Training Board in partnership with Working Skills Centre and Working Women Community Centre is holding a one-day forum entitled “Diversity: Strategies for a Changing Workforce”.

The Forum is intended to gather “promising practices” related to creating a robust, multi-generational, diverse workplace, something that is essential to Toronto’s ability to attract and retain skilled workers.

If you are unable to attend, please consider finding another representative of your workplace.

Friday Oct. 16
Metro Hall
55 John Street, Room 308
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Registration: $35 before Oct. 1 and $50 after Oct. 1 (including at door)
Includes breakfast, light lunch and snacks.
To register:  Carmen@ttb.on.ca
For more info:  416-703-7770 x. 519

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FOOD ISSUES PANEL: BROKEN SYSTEM

In conversation with Matt Galloway

How do we rethink our food distribution and quota systems along with various other antiquated food policies in order to rebuild our food systems so that we can help support a model that is based around small-scale local producers, while we ensure that we can provide nutritious and affordable food for all of our diverse communities.

Panelists:

* John Rowe, Farmer
* Debbie Field, Food Activist, FoodShare Toronto
* Ruth Klahsen, Artisan Cheese Maker
* Nick Saul, Food Activist, The Stop Community Food Centre

Tuesday October 20
Hart House, University of Toronto
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Free Event

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RISK MANAGEMENT FOR NONPROFITS: NO COST & LOW COST WAYS TO PROTECT YOUR PEOPLE AND REPUTATION

October 15, 2009
8:30am – 12:30pm
Centre for Social Innovation
215 Spadina Ave.
Alterna Boardroom, 4th floor
$73.50 (inclusive of GST)
Coffee and light breakfast will be provided

We’re pleased to announce that the Centre for Social Innovation will be hosting a half-day workshop on effective risk management! Every organization needs to take risks in order to grow and reach the next level, but learning to do it smart is key. Presented by David Hartley, this workshop will help guide you to that place and is geared towards staff members, board members, and key volunteers of small and medium nonprofit organizations.

To register: http://socialinnovation.ca/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=8

For questions, please contact Yumi Hotta, Community Animator at yumi@socialinnovation.ca

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FREE FILM FEST SHOWCASES LABOUR

Source: rabble.ca

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival is close to its goal of screening films in 100 communities across Canada. The movies will screen in cinemas, labour halls and living-rooms. There’s still time to get involved. CLIFF board member Raj Virk explains how.

http://rabble.ca/podcasts/shows/redeye/2009/09/free-film-fest-showcases-labour

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MULTI-UNION COALITION AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STRIKES BACK AT DEVASTATING CUTS

By Jack Gerson, Tanya Smith, Labor Notes

Students, faculty, and staff at the University of California’s campuses walked out Thursday to protest hundreds of layoffs, cuts to academic programs and research centers, a staggering 32 percent tuition increase, and the stripping of any pretense of shared governance by placing “emergency” dictatorial powers in the university president’s hands. Photo: andydr

A coalition of unions, faculty, and students gave a sharp rebuke to cuts and corporate giveaways at the renowned University of California system on September 24—the first day back for most UC campuses.

Organizers called picket lines, rallies, and teach-ins on each of the 10 campuses to protest a wave of layoffs, tuition increases, and academic and research program cuts—all steps toward the decimation of public education in California.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2459

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UNIONS MUST MOVE LEFT, THEY HAVE NO ALTERNATIVE – MONTHLY REVIEW

David Bacon (dbacon.igc.org) is a California writer and documentary photographer. He was a union organizer among immigrant workers for two decades. He documents the changing conditions in the workforce, the impact of the global economy, war, and migration, and the struggle for human rights.

To read more: http://www.monthlyreview.org/090928bacon.php

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VIDEO: NAOMI KLEIN VS. ALAN GREENSPAN ON CRONY CAPITALISM IN THE US

Source: http://www.youtube.com
Except from September 24th 2007 Democracy Now! Naomi Klein and Alan Greenspan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09zvzzCOB2M

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CANADA MUST FORGE ITS OWN ECONOMIC FATE

Source: murraydobbin.ca

The SPP is dead. Let’s keep it that way.

With virtually no fanfare or media analysis, one of the most transformative agreements ever signed by Canada and the U.S. (and Mexico) is officially dead. The Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP), the formal expression of a corporate lobbying campaign called deep integration, is no more.

To read more: http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2009/09/24/EconomicFate/

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VIDEO: FIX EI TOWN HALL – JUDY REBICK – SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

Source: http://www.youtube.com
Author and social justice activist Judy Rebick addresses the “Fix EI” Town Hall Meeting held at Ryerson University in Toronto – September 21, 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK5rOQpQxVA

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UNION RIGHTS AS HUMAN RIGHTS: BUILDING THE LABOUR MOVEMENT IN MANITOBA

By Errol Black

The Manitoba Federation of Labour (MFL) is holding its annual convention in Brandon October 2 – 4, 2009. There are many important issues to be dealt with however the one issue that should be on the agenda and should be the focus of discussion is the spectre of eroding memberships in trade union organizations, evident in all jurisdictions in Canada.

To read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/reports/2009/09/article2314/

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ONTARIO FACULTY RELEASE REPORT ON UNIVERSITIES AND THE RECESSION: PAPER FINDS SERIOUS FINANCIAL IMPACTS ON INSTITUTIONS AND STUDENTS

TORONTO , Sept. 29 /CNW/ – The Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations (OCUFA) today released a research report, written by Hugh MacKenzie, analyzing the impact of the recent recession on Ontario’s universities. The report, commissioned by OCUFA, indicates that the economic downturn highlights fundamental problems with how the province funds higher education.

“This paper reveals serious cracks in Ontario’s funding model,” said Professor Mark Langer, President of OCUFA. “The recession starkly illustrates how our institutions are seriously under-funded, and how this under-funding puts serious financial pressure on students and their families.”

The negative effects of the recession are due to policy changes that began in the mid-1990s. After huge cuts to public university funding, institutions were forced to turn to private sources of income such as endowment funds and higher tuition fees. Now, 14 years later, the global financial crisis has significantly reduced the value of endowment funds and pension plans, hurting university revenue. Moreover, record student unemployment has made it even harder for students to pay for Ontario’s already expensive tuition fees. The Government of Ontario’s current tuition policy will allow fees to increase by an average of five per cent in the 2009-10 school year.

OCUFA has recently launched the Quality Matters campaign (http://www.quality-matters.ca) to raise awareness of the need for greater public funding in the university system. This investment will help mitigate the effects of the recession while improving educational quality and controlling tuition fees.

To read the report, please go to http://www.ocufa.on.ca/Publications.researchreports.gk.

Founded in 1964, OCUFA represent 15,000 faculty in 24 faculty associations across Ontario. For more information, please visit the OCUFA website at http://www.ocufa.on.ca

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PODCAST: NAOMI KLEIN INTERVIEWS MICHAEL MOORE

Source: Common Dreams

On September 17, in the midst of the publicity blitz for his cinematic takedown of the capitalist order, Moore talked with Nation columnist Naomi Klein by phone about the film, the roots of our economic crisis and the promise and peril of the present political moment.

To listen to a podcast of the full conversation:  http://www.thenation.com/doc/20091012/moore_podcast

To read an edited transcript of their conversation: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2009/09/25

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VIEWS: MUTUAL AID SOCIETY – INSIDE HIGHER ED

Source: http://www.insidehighered.com

Did humanity evolve with selfish genes? Scott McLemee looks into an alternative theory.

http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee260

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JOB POSTING: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SISTERING, TORONTO

You will foster learning, innovation, research, and philanthropy across the organization while promoting collaboration throughout Sistering and within the wider community. You will represent our organization to the broader community, build and maintain strong relationships, and ensure our financial health and sustainability. A ‘big picture’ thinker and inspirational leader, you have a graduate degree in a human services field or the equivalent, a proven five-year track record of success as a senior manager, ideally within a diverse, non-profit organization serving marginalized communities, and experience working with a Board of Directors. You have five years of experience in the social services or not-for-profit sectors, strong government and community relations expertise, and advocacy skills to effect change in social policies.

You may be required to work occasional weekends, provide periodic on-call support for weekend drop-in shifts, and travel within the city.

We offer excellent compensation and benefits. Please apply to:
962 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M6H 1L6
tel: 416-926-9762
fax: 416-926-1932
e-mail: jkali@sistering.org

Sistering has anti-racism/oppression and employment equity policies and especially encourages Aboriginal women, women of colour, immigrant and refugee women, and women from other disadvantaged groups to apply.

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JOB POSTING: PROGRAM COORDINATOR, MAYWORKS, TORONTO

Deadline: 6:00 p.m. on October 13, 2009

Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts seeks a Program Coordinator for the festival events.

For more information on this position: http://www.mayworks.ca/

***END***

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowsk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Work No More

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 21st SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW: EDUCATION FOR CHANGING UNIONS

By B. Burke, J. Geronimo, D. Martin, B. Thomas, C. Wall

This book is destined to become a key work in popular education. Education for Changing Unions presents a rich, stimulating, and provocative storehouse of practical and structured activities, ideas, and debate about union education. Written in a clear and accessible style, the authors have created a book to inspire working people and teachers in many settings and locations. All the exercises and activities have been widely tested.

Between the Lines, 2003. Available online from publisher: http://www.btlbooks.com or on-line at http://www.amazon.ca

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FORUM: JOBLESS RECOVERY – BROKEN EI

Who is going to fix EI? As election fever starts to heat up, the Tories are desperate to pretend that they have dealt with the nagging issue of thousands of laid-off workers who can’t get EI benefits.

Monday, Sept. 21
Registration: 6:00 p.m.
Event starts: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Rogers Communications Centre, Ryerson University, 80 Gould Street (at Church Street), Room 204

Speakers:
Unemployed workers from the GTA;
Judy Rebick, CAW Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy; and
Gilles Paquette, Quebec Federation of Labour/Unemployed Coalition.

Contact: 416-441-3663 ext.224

Organised by the Good Jobs for all Coalition (http://www.goodjobsforall.ca)

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FORUM: SOLIDARITY. RESISTANCE. CHANGE: ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Public forum featuring: Steve Williams, Co-Director and co-founder of the California based group “People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER)” and co-author of the book “Towards Land, Work and Power”.

Friday October 2, 2009
7pm
Ryerson Student Centre
55 Gould Street, Room 115
Toronto

Directions: http://www.oakhamhouse.com/pages/directions.php

Co-sponsored by Socialist Project and Centre for Social Justice
Endorsed by Black Action Defence Committee (BADC), No One Is Illegal (NOII) and Ontario Coalition against Poverty (OCAP)

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TWITTER IS A MALL: WADE RATHKE, CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG   

Author of Citizen Wealth: Winning the Campaign to Save Working Families (http://chieforganizer.org/citizen-wealth-the-book/)

Stephanie Ross from York University and Peter Sawchuk from University of Toronto had invited me to be the first speaker to discuss organizing with a group of academics and activists coming together on a 5-year project called APCOL:  Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning, a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. The project is fascinating and it will be interesting to see how it progresses and what conclusions it draws over the years, but right now it was interesting for the discussion it allowed about organizing and the challenges before us.

To read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2009/09/18/twitter-is-a-mall/

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DEBORAH BARNDT: POPULAR EDUCATION PHOTO EXHIBITS AVAILABLE

Over the past year, I produced two photo exhibits which are now available for use in conferences, community centres, and classes. They relate to popular education, community art, and social movements and are meant to stimulate the integration of these three.

“Cross-Pollinations: Photography and Social Change in the Americas – A Retrospective” is an exhibit of 18 photographs drawn from Deborah Barndt’s work in Peru, Nicaragua and Canada between 1976 and 1992.The photographs traces four key moments in Barndt’s photographic work – from creating foto-novelas and Freirean codes for literacy classes in Peru in the 1970s to making photo-stories and posters for ESL classes in Toronto in the 1980s, from teaching photo-journalism to adult educators in Nicaragua in the 1980s to coordinating collective photo-story production in the Moment Project in Toronto into the 1990s.

“If the Walls Could Speak…What Stories Would They Tell” is a traveling photo exhibit of community murals. Community murals are more than paintings on the wall – they encourage communities to dig into their histories, memorialize loved ones, express diverse identities, honour the land, name critical issues, brighten streets and alleys, tell stories of local people, envision a healthier community.

If you are interested in booking either one of them for an upcoming event or for display, please contact Andie Shabbar (andie13@yorku.ca), production and distribution assistant, and copy me at dbarndt@yorku.ca.

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JUST RELEASED: UNIONS, EQUITY AND THE PATH TO RENEWAL

Editors: Janice Foley and Patricia Baker

Trade unions in Canada are losing their traditional support base, and membership numbers could sink to US levels unless unions recapture their power. Advancing equity within an increasingly diverse membership has been identified as one important step in the union renewal process. This book shows that equity within unions is not simply one path among many — it is the path to union renewal.

Unions, Equity, and the Path to Renewal brings together a distinguished group of union activists and equity scholars to document how traditional union cultures, practices, and structures have eroded solidarity and activism and created an equity deficit in Canadian unions. Informed by a feminist vision of unions as instruments of social justice — and by an appreciation of the decades-long effort by labour and feminist activists to build union democracy, solidarity, and strength — the contributors propose the changes needed to encourage member participation and to reposition organized labour as a central institution in workers’ lives.

University of British Columbia Press, 2009. For more information or to order: http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=299172753

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FROM SOCIAL JUSTICE TO POETIC JUSTICE: UN INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE CELEBRATION

* Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you publicly laugh at beauty queens talking about world peace but secretly hope for the same?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE in observance of the UN International Day of Peace as we read, exhibit, and compose poems for peace. The Centre invites all those interested to come out and compose a peace poem or bring a poem/quote for peace from diverse traditions around the world. Everyone is invited!

Monday September 21, 2009
12:00 to 3 pm
7th Floor Peace Lounge
OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George)

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A NIGHT ON WATER JUSTICE: FILM AND DISCUSSION

with Susan Koppelman and Shawn Brant

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Koffler Auditorium, Room 108
569 Spadina Avenue, just north of College

First Nations peoples in Canada, and Palestinians, are facing similar challenges and systemic discrimination in obtaining their basic water needs. Join us for an evening of film screening and discussion on the challenges to obtain equity and justice in access to water, on how different communities are mobilising to obtain this basic right, and on how we can develop effective solidarity for these causes.

Organizers:  Bike Chain, GSU Social Justice Committee, Greenpeace, Science for Peace, the Really Free Market, Trinity College, Streets are for People, UTERN, OCAA, UTSU
Endorsers: OPIRG Toronto, SAIA

For more information:
http://www.opirguoft.org/index.php?cmd=ShowData&section=4&subsection=14&type=3

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2009 MAYTREE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE – TELLING STORIES; CREATING CHANGE

Do stories matter to you and your organization?

Register now for the 2009 Maytree Leadership Conference – Telling Stories; Creating Change on Thursday, October 1.

This year’s Maytree Conference examines how organizational narrative and personal stories can become compelling and powerful catalysts for social change. John Cruikshank, publisher of the Toronto Star, kicks off the conference telling us why stories are so important to the media and what creates a story that “sticks.” Acclaimed author and filmmaker Nelofer Pazira closes the conference with the story of her own journey from Afghanistan to Canada and how she is rebuilding women’s lives in her native country.

You can choose from a range of workshops which give expert advice in the art of persuasion, communication and media skills, storytelling and much more.

Register now to avoid disappointment: http://www.maytree.com/training/2009-maytree-leadership-conference/registration

Become part of the conversation. Read our conference blog with daily posts on storytelling techniques, social change through storytelling, narrative as persuasion and other topics: http://www.maytree.com/2009-leadership-conference-blog/

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO SYMPOSIUM – BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

The symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century. Ratna Omidvar, president of Maytree, will be one of the speakers.

Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
New College, University of Toronto
Cost: $50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments)

For more information and registration: http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/symposium.

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CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION TOUR AND INFORMATION SESSION – SEPTEMBER DATES!

September 24, 2009
Centre for Social Innovation
215 Spadina Avenue, Suite 400
Toronto

Are you interested in permanent or part-time work space at CSI? Are you curious about our model? Do you want to check out the space and learn more about ‘how we do what we do’?

Join us for our weekly Tour and Information Session! Every week, a member of our staff team will offer a brief tour and then answer any questions you have about the Centre, the work we do, and how you can get involved.

Visit our events list for a listing of times and additional dates: http://socialinnovation.ca/community/events/listing

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LABOUR RIGHTS WEBSITE: UFCW CANADA VS. WALMART

The United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Canada created and has maintained an excellent labour rights website at http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca for workers at Walmart stores.  It’s an excellent example of grass-roots organizing by using the internet. Supporters of the workers are urged to go to http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca/freespeech to join them in sending protest letters to Walmart; they are also using Facebook to spread the word about their campaign.

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DO THE MATH!

The Stop Community Food Centre is engaged in grass-roots work in all their work.  An imaginative campaign to build support for the province to increase financial assistance for persons who receive inadequate assistance is to add a healthy food supplement to what people receive now. “Do the Math” is explained at http://dothemath.thestop.org/ to illustrate how much money is necessary for a person to live with dignity and in health.

Indeed, some people are meeting their own MPPs to “do the math” with them, and so lobby for change using the exercise to educate their MPP. Groups of people who want to do this can get help and advice from Jonah Schein at the Stop, and also they can inform Jonah afterwards how successful their meeting was. Jonah is available at (416) 652-7867 x235 or at civicengagement@thestop.org.

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LEARN AT WORK WEEK: THE POWER OF A COMMUNITY LEARNING NETWORK INSPIRING LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING INNOVATION

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
6:00pm Light lunch and refreshments
6:30pm-7:20pm Speaker introduction, presentation, and Q & A
7:20pm- Networking

Royal Canadian Legion, 10425 Kingsway NW
Edmonton, Alberta
(FREE parking; license plate number sign-in)

Price:
Member price: $25.00+GST
Non-Member price: $30.00+GST

Payment Method:
VISA/MasterCard/AMEX only

The Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) Edmonton chapter invites you to attend an interactive learning and networking event during Learn @ Work Week – Sept 21-25/09.

The Community Learning Network (CLN) is a provincial not-for-profit organization that supports community adult learning by providing leadership, resources and connections to Alberta’s 81 Community Adult Learning Councils who assist adults in the areas of ESL, literacy, general interest courses and courses that support the work environment.

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CANADIAN INDEX OF WELLBEING (CIW) FRONT AND CENTER AS A PICTURE OF CANADIAN WELLBEING

Sept 15 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/695624

Sept 14 – National Post
http://www.nationalpost.com/news/world/story.html?id=1992691

Sept 13 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/694584

Check out our website…
To find out more about the Institute, and look for our latest reports, please check out our website at http://www.ciw.ca. Everything produced by the Institute is available free of charge in both user-friendly and research-rich format.

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CANADIANS TO CLEAR UP HEALTH CARE MYTHS FOR AMERICANS
rabble.ca posts U.S. health care page debunking myths and posting health care testimonials

TORONTO – In the wake of President Obama’s health care speech, rabble.ca is asking Canadians to weigh in on the American health care debate by providing testimonials on a new section of their website that can be found at: http://rabble.ca/issues/healthcareUSA.

rabble.ca’s new “Health Care USA” section presents some simple facts about Canadian health care, links to resources on single-payer for Americans and testimonials from Canadians from all walks of life on the Canadian health system.

“Canadians are shocked and even angry that their health-care system, what we call ‘Medicare’, has been used to frighten Americans trying to make up their minds. Some of what has been said about our Medicare system are outright falsehoods, like the claim that we can’t choose our own doctors or that government ‘bureaucrats’ can deny us needed treatment,” said rabble Senior Contributing Editor Murray Dobbin. “These falsehoods would be laughable were it not for the fact that Americans might abandon the opportunity for excellent, less expensive health care because they believe these stories,” Dobbin said.

rabble will be posting testimonials from ordinary Canadians who have used our system and from the professionals, doctors, nurses, and administrators who provide the service.

rabble.ca is Canada’s most popular source of independent news and views, and features original news, opinion, book reviews, podcasts and live and pre-recorded video exploring issues facing Canadians. rabble.ca is in its 9th year of providing 100% free news content to Canadians.  rabble is a non-profit, community supported organization.

For more information contact:
Murray Dobbin, Contributing Senior Editor (604) 483-9667
Derrick O’Keefe, Editor (604) 803-6927
Kim Elliott, rabble.ca, Publisher (647) 477-8534
http://rabble.ca

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DOWN IN THE VALE: SUDBURY STEELWORKERS STRIKE AT VALE INCO

By Petra Veltri

For a valley so used to being torn up, spit out, and poisoned daily, everything is eerily quiet in and around Sudbury, Ontario these days. Beginning June 1st with a Vale Inco plant shutdown, that was then followed by a strike on July 13 when 3300 members of United Steelworkers of Canada (USW) Local 6500 rejected the concessionary demands of the Brazilian multinational subsidiary, the mines, smelter, mill, and refinery, and ‘superstack’ have all been closed. In addition, many mining supply and service companies are temporarily shuttered, idling thousands more usually employed in spin-off businesses.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/253.php

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO FORUM: IMPACTS OF SCHOOL CLOSURES ON CHILDREN AND COMMUNITIES

Friday, September 25
9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Presenters:

* Dr. Ranu Basu, York University
* Dr. David Clandfield, University of Toronto
* Annie Kidder, People for Education

The forum will address issues of school closures and the impact on citizenship; the role public policy plays in determining school closures and the importance of community hubs; and the Toronto District School Board perspective from the Toronto Lands Corporation.

To register, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/machform/view.php?id=1

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Toward Real Education

Toward Real Education

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK UPDATE SEPTEMBER 15 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW: ADULT LEARNING AND TECHNOLOGY IN WORKING-CLASS LIFE

By P.H. Sawchuk

Adult Learning and Technology in Working-Class Life explores the everyday learning lives of workers as they cope, use, understand and contest computer technology in their lives.

Cambridge University Press, 2003
Available online from publisher: http://www.cambridge.org

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SEMINAR WITH WADE RATHKE OF ACORN USA

Co-sponsored by Labour Studies (York University) & the Centre for the Study of Education and Work (OISE/UT) Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning (APCOL-CURA) Project

Thursday, September 17, 2009
9:30am – 11:30am
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Room 12-199
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, ON
   
Wade Rathke is a co-founder of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) and Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 100.

Rathke was ACORN’s chief organizer from its founding in 1970 until 2008. He is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Social Policy, a quarterly magazine for scholars and activists, and he is the author of two recently published books. As a student, Rathke organized draft resistance for Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and later organized welfare recipients in Springfield and Boston, Massachusetts for the National Welfare Rights Organization.

ACORN is the largest organization of lower income and working families in the United States, with 175,000 dues-paying families spread across about eighty-two staffed offices in American cities. The ACORN family of organizations includes radio stations, publications, housing development and ownership (ACORN Housing), and a variety of other supports for direct organizing and issue campaigns, such as Project Vote and the Living Wage Resource Center. ACORN International has offices in Lima, Peru, and Toronto and Vancouver, Canada.

The APCOL Project (2009-2014) is operated out of the Ontario Institute for Education (University of Toronto). Using Action Research methods, its goal is to bring together community organizers, university and college researchers in the Toronto area to document relations between community organizing, the economy and activist development.

For more information on APCOL, contact g.demontmollin@utoronto.ca
For more information on Wade Rathke, go to http://chieforganizer.org/

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FORUM: JOBLESS RECOVERY – BROKEN EI

Who is going to fix EI? As election fever starts to heat up, the Tories are desperate to pretend that they have dealt with the nagging issue of thousands of laid-off workers who can’t get EI benefits.

Registration: 6:00 p.m.
Event starts: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Rogers Communications Centre, Ryerson University, 80 Gould Street (at Church Street), Room 204

Speakers:
Unemployed workers from the GTA;
Judy Rebick, CAW Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy; and
Gilles Paquette, Quebec Federation of Labour/Unemployed Coalition.

Contact: 416-441-3663 ext.224

Organised by the Good Jobs for all Coalition: http://www.goodjobsforall.ca

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BOOK LAUNCH – CITIZEN WEALTH: THE CAMPAIGN TO SAVE WORKING FAMILIES
September 16, 2009
5:30pm – 7:30pm
Hart House (UofT)

Wade Rathke is among the most prolific community and labor organizers of his generation. He is the founder of ACORN USA (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, USA), which has worked to build the largest community based organization of low and moderate income families in America fighting for social and economic justice. ACORN CANADA has been a vital partner of the Toronto labour movement in the Good Jobs for All Coalition and the $10 Minimum Wage fight. Wade Rathke will be speaking about lessons learned from a life of community organizing, as well as signing copies of his new book and answering questions. For more information on the book and Wade, please visit here.

To find out more about the book and Wade, click here: http://chieforganizer.org/

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UNITED STEELWORKER RADIO ADS STAND UP FOR SUDBURY, AND ADVERTISE SEPT 19 RALLY

SUDBURY, ON, Sept. 14 /CNW/ – “You know… Sudbury’s a good place to grow up… to raise a family… to retire”, begins the radio ad launched by the United Steelworkers in support of the Vale Inco strike.

The first of four ads goes on to explain: “That’s because we give back to our community when we can. But the Brazilian company Vale could ruin all this.”

In the series of radio ads (two to be launched Monday, Sept 14), the Steelworkers are reaching out to fellow Sudburians to recognize that Vale Inco is not just attacking the compensation of its workers. Vale is also challenging the very quality of life that has been built up over decades in Sudbury.

“The ads remind Sudbury citizens that Vale is massively profitable, currently has huge cash assets, and increased its executive compensation by 121% in the last two years. Yet Vale is demanding drastic concessions from the Sudbury workforce,” said John Fera, President of USW Local 6500.

The ads publicize an International and Community Support Rally that is taking place on Saturday, Sept 19 at 11am at the Sudbury Arena.

The rally will have guests from around the world, including Brazil, Mexico, UK, Switzerland, USA, and others. The rally was the brainchild of international supporters of the Vale Inco strike.

“The international community is closely monitoring the Sudbury strike against Vale Inco in what has become a battle between a massively profitable multinational corporation and a committed workforce joined by a strong union and supportive community,” added Fera.

For further information: John Fera, USW President Local 6500, (705) 675-3381 x238 / (705) 561-3093; Bob Gallagher, USW Communications, (416) 434-2221

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JOSSEY-BASS ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING – ONLINE CONFERENCE

The conference comes to you.

The most popular guidebooks on Online Teaching and Learning come to life as an Online Conference. Join us OCTOBER 6-8, 2009. Interact with over 20 authors and hundreds of colleagues, right from your desktop. And every participant receives a choice of 3 books.

To learn more, click here: http://www.onlineteachingandlearning.com/program
To register, click here: http://www.onlineteachingandlearning.com/register

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SEIZE THE MOMENT!

Seize the Moment (STM) is a method of democratic critical thinking used in community building and development for positive social change.

STM is a democratic way for community organisations to do problem solving around issues that affect the communities they serve. Using STM leads to stronger collective abilities to do social analysis for action, more efficient delivery of services to people in need, a more interconnected service and social movement sector, and a more informed and involved public amongst other things.

Based on the process Naming the Moment, an innovative method developed in the 1980s that incorporated the then current learnings from the fields of organizational development, adult education, skills training, conflict resolution, coalition building and more, STM builds on this history and, like its predecessor, builds on the best practices available both in the above-mentioned fields as well as drawing on the unique experiences of participating organizations.

The Catalyst Centre designs and facilitates STM processes in collaboration with a volunteer steering committee (representative of the participating organizations or communities) that shares responsibility for design, outreach and facilitation. Once designed the Catalyst Centre with the steering committee conducts a series of workshops (e.g. five to eight 3-hour evenings over a few months or two to three full days over a weekend or a few half days) to which participating community members and organizations are invited.

For more information, contact The Catalyst Centre at (416) 516-9546, email catalystcentre@web.net, or visit their web site at http://www.catalystcentre.ca

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ONLINE RESOURCES FOR COMMUNITY BUILDING

From COMM-ORG, the On-Line Conference on Community Organizing and Development. The list is moderated and maintained by Randy Stoecker at the University of Toledo.

http://ourblocks.net/neighborhood-resources-from-bill-berkowitz/
http://ourblocks.net/built-environmental-justice/

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THE PROBLEM WITH ECONOMICS

By Duncan Cameron, rabble.ca

What economics has to offer is rich and varied. What has to be avoided is what did in the American profession, and is always a threat to any academic pursuits: conformity to prevailing norms.

To read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2009/09/problem-economics

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A LIFELONG SEARCH FOR REAL EDUCATION

by Julia Putnam

Grace Lee Boggs and Jimmy Boggs brought people together to rebuild inner-city Detroit and to teach the things you can’t learn in a classroom. At 94, Grace is still at it.

To read more:
http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/learn-as-you-go/a-lifelong-search-for-real-education?utm_source=sep09&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=14_Grace

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WHAT ARE YOU DOING FOR CO-OP WEEK? LET CCA KNOW!    

The Canadian Co-operative Association (CCA) wants to know about the activities co-ops and credit unions across Canada are planning for Co-op Week, October 11-17, 2009.

CCA will be posting a day-by-day listing of Canadian Co-op Week events on its website, in an effort to create an inventory of Co-op Week and International Credit Union Day activities taking place across the country.

CCA will be also be hosting a Co-op Week blog in which co-operators and members of the public can write about what co-operatives mean to them.  They are looking for guest bloggers from different parts of the country to talk about their own experiences in the co-operative sector and how their co-ops contribute to the economic and social lives of their communities.

To send in a Co-op Week event listing, or to volunteer to be a guest blogger, contact Donna Balkan, CCA communications manager, at donna.balkan@coopscanada.coop

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FRIENDING A STRIKE

From Insider HigherEd

When Oakland University, in Michigan, and the union that represents 600 of its faculty members failed to reach labor agreement last week, the professors went on strike and the university shut down — while representatives from the opposing sides went behind closed doors in downtown Detroit to negotiate. At the same time, a much larger and more eclectic group began discussing the issue in a space that had no doors — just walls. At Oakland U., the action isn’t just on the picket lines. It’s on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

To read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/09/10/facebook

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AGM: METRO TORONTO CHINESE & SOUTHEAST ASIAN LEGAL CLINIC

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
6:00 – 8:00pm
University Settlement House, 23 Grange Road, Toronto

Presentation: The Economic Crisis: What caused it and how does it affect racialized communities and other marginalized groups?, by Jim Stanford, Chief Economist, Canadian Auto Workers

This special presentation is co-sponsored by the Colour of Poverty Campaign

Light refreshments will be served! (No pre-registration required. Just show up!)

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JOURNALISM IS DEAD; LONG LIVE JOURNALISM – HOW THE WEB IS REINVENTING JOURNALISM

Tuesday, September 15, 2009
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario

There’s no debate that journalism is in the midst of an alarming transition. Newspaper circulation figures, advertising revenues, job openings and journalists’ wages have been in a downward slide for several years. At the same time, the internet has given birth to new forms of journalism. Green shoots are emerging in the form of online news gathering and reporting, the rise of social media, citizen journalism and crowdsourced news.

This is where the debate begins. What will these changes mean for democracy? Is there a business model for quality journalism? And what will the jobs of the future look like?

Join Rem Rieder, editor and publisher of the American Journalism Review, in conversation with Ira Basen, CBC writer and producer of “News 2.0: The Future of News in the Age of Social Media”, as they explore these questions and more.

Sponsored by the Canadian Journalism Foundation.

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ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

*The consequences of caring: skills, regulation and reward among early years workers
Patricia Findlay, Jeanette Findlay, and Robert Stewart
Work Employment Society 2009;23 422-441
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/3/422

*A cross-cultural examination of student volunteering: Is it all about résumé building?
Femida Handy, Lesley Hustinx, Ram A. Cnaan, and Chulhee Kang
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 3 September 2009, 10.1177/0899764009344353
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009344353v1

*A feminine perspective of giftedness
Linda Kreger Silverman and Nancy B. Miller
International Handbook on Giftedness
http://www.springerlink.com/content/u028h31368580278/

*Financialization and changes in the social relations along commodity chains: The case of coffee
Susan A. Newman
Review of Radical Political Economics published 1 September 2009, 10.1177/0486613409341454
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0486613409341454v1

*The limits of black activism: Philadelphia’s public housing in the depression and World War II
James Wolfinger
Journal of Urban History 2009;35 787-814
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/35/6/787

*Satisfaction with spirituality, satisfaction with religion and personal well-being among Spanish adolescents and young university students
Ferran Casas, Mònica González, Cristina Figuer, Sara Malo
Applied Research in Quality of Life, Volume 4, Number 1 / March, 2009
http://www.springerlink.com/content/d5228j0520621383/

***END*** 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Learning at Work

Learning at Work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 26th AUGUST 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW – THE EDUCATION-JOBS GAP: UNDEREMPLOYMENT OR ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY

by D.W. Livingstone

“In a scorching and informative critique of the growing discrepancy between knowledge and human capacity and the available opportunities for decent work, D.W. Livingstone has written one of the most important books of the decade. This is a book that breathes new life into the much over-looked relationship between education and economic reform.”
(Henry A. Giroux)

Garamond Press or-Percheron Press, 2004 (2nd edition with New Introduction)

Available online from publisher, UTP http://www.utppublishing.com/pubstore, or by phone 416.978.2239 or from http://www.amazon.ca

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VOLUNTEER WITH CLIFF – CANADA ’S ONLY NATIONAL FILM FEST!

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) is now accepting volunteer applicants to help out with our inaugural festival. Our not-for-profit festival celebrates films about workers, for workers and by workers.

Volunteers can be involved in many aspects of the festival from suggesting recent films for inclusion to helping throw media-related events like the one we are planning for Labour Day! As our festival launch draws closer we will also need people to help distribute leaflets, assemble media kits, as well as helping manage other volunteers. During the festival itself we’ll also need help taking tickets and individuals to act us ushers. There’s a place for everyone.

Upon request, volunteers will receive a letter reflecting their commitment and involvement in the festival.  Don’t pass up this unique opportunity to see the inner workings of a festival in its first year!

All volunteers should be:

* 18 years of age or older
* willing to attend a mandatory volunteer orientation session
* committed, friendly, team players

The festival launches November 22nd in Toronto and runs until November 29th.  It launches country-wide November 28th. We will be holding volunteer orientations sessions in August through the start of November.

Please e-mail us at festival@labourfilms.ca and with the word “Volunteer” in the subject line.

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THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE – REGISTRATION OPEN!
November 18-20, 2009

Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action 

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009.

The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Register now at http://www.secouncil.ca

Hosting the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is the Social Enterprise Council of Canada (http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil).

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“UNION STRATEGIES FOR HARD TIMES” PUBLISHED

A new book outlining how unions can help their laid off members, protect those still working, and prevent the gutting of their hard-won contracts – and their very unions themselves – has been published by Union Communication Services, Inc. (UCS).

Union Strategies for Hard Times: Helping Your Members and Building Your Union in the Great Recession, offers how-to counsel for unions as the continuing economic crisis ravages workers and threatens to destroy decades of collective bargaining gains. Urging leaders to avoid falling into a strictly defensive posture, it outlines how unions can seize the time and turn crisis into opportunity.

The author is Bill Barry, director of labor studies at the Community College of Baltimore County and a 40-year veteran of the movement. Barry calls on his long history of activism and years of “what works, what doesn’t” discussions with other leaders to come up with strategies to survive these terrible times and even use the crisis to build a better future.

Union Strategies for Hard Times outlines a frank and systematic program for union leaders, stewards and activists who want to respond aggressively to those employers and financial interests that would have working people and their institutions just shut up, be nice and accept what’s given them.

Topics in the book include:

* Hanging Tough at the Table
* New Tactics on Grievances
* Aiding and Mobilizing Members on Layoff
* Confronting Financial Strains
* Effective Communications for a New Day
* Where We are and How We Got Here

The book describes today’s challenges to unions representing workers in every sector of the economy and offers concrete, Organizing Model tactics to deal with them. No union activists who want to help their members — working or laid off — while defending and even growing their unions should be without this important book.

Barry is the author of I Just Got Elected – Now What: A New Union Officer’s Handbook. Both books are offered by Union Communication Services, Inc., publishers of The Union Steward’s Complete Guide, Steward Update newsletter and other tools for union activists. Union Strategies for Hard Times is available for $15 plus $3 shipping and handling from http://www.unionist.com, 800-321-2545, or UCS Inc., 165 Conduit St., Annapolis MD 21401.

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IFWEA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE – WORKERS’ EDUCATION AS A GLOBAL CHALLENGE

Thursday 8 –Friday 9 October 2009

* What are the values and traditions of workers’ education and how did they evolve?
* Why is internationalism so important for workers’ education?
* What are the similarities and differences between various models of workers’ education as practised by IFWEA affiliates in different countries?
* Are any of these workers’ education models appropriate for dealing with rising social exclusion and extremism that characterises 21st century societies?
* How do these models address political education and the building of social organisation and mobilisation?
* Should workers’ education focus on individual or systemic change? Can it do both, and if so, how?

These are some of the questions that will be discussed at the Workers’ Education as a Global Challenge international conference, which will be run in partnership with the School of Management and Labour Relations at Rutgers State University of New Jersey, and the Workers’ Education Association (ABF) of Sweden.

For further details, click here: http://www.ifwea.org/conference/register.html

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CALL FOR PAPERS ON “LABOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT”

For The Labor Studies Journal Conference Issue and Presentation at the United Association for Labor Education Conference
San Diego, CA
March 24-27, 2010

The Labor Studies Journal invites submission of papers on the theme of labor and environment. Best papers will be selected for presentation at the 2010 UALE Conference and afterwards will undergo the peer-review process for possible publication in the Labor Studies Journal Special Issue.

We welcome papers address issues including but not limited to the following:

* Coalition building between labor, environmental group, and other organizations in reversing climate change
* Organized labor’s effort in protecting workers or/and community from environmental harms
* Unions and workforce development for green jobs
* Unions’ role in creating a sustainable economy
* Unions’ political action in protecting the environment
* Labor and the environment in other countries
* International comparison on labor and the environment

Please send electronic copies of manuscript draft of 5 to 8 pages by December 10, 2009 to one of the guest editors, listed below. Full-length manuscripts are expected at the time of presentation at the conference in March.

Julie Martinez Ortega   
American Rights at Work
JMartinez@americanrightsatwork.org   

Tracy Chang
University of Alabama at Birmingham
tracyc@uab.edu

The Labor Studies Journal is the official journal of the United Association for Labor Education (http://www.uale.org) and is a peer-reviewed journal. It publishes multidisciplinary research on work, workers, labor organizations, and labor studies and worker education in the United States and internationally.

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PUBLIC SERVICE ALLIANCE OF CANADA (PSAC) – REGIONAL NEGOTIATOR

Position Number 5610-0015
Closing Date: August 28, 2009 at 3:30 p.m

Job Description: Under the direction of the Coordinator of Negotiations, the Negotiator acts as chief spokesperson and chair of PSAC negotiating teams for bargaining units in the federal public and private sectors, and in provincial and territorial jurisdictions and represents the PSAC in third party dispute resolution processes such as conciliation, arbitration and mediation, in the context of federal and provincial labour legislation and the PSAC Constitution, regulations and policies. The Negotiator also provides advice and guidance to PSAC collective bargaining committees, elected officers and members on issues related to collective bargaining, including strike strategy and collective agreement interpretation.

A detailed job description is available on our website: http://www.psac.com/careers/selectjob-e.cfm or upon request. Closing Date: August 28, 2009 at 3:30 p.m. Please submit your résumé stating how your knowledge, skills and abilities relate to the qualifications of the position by mail to: Human Resources Section, PSAC, 233 Gilmour Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K2P 0P1. By fax: (613) 248-4885, by e-mail: HRACTION@psac.com  If you apply by e-mail, do not send a duplicate by fax or regular mail.

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CONFERENCE – INFORMING PUBLIC POLICY:  SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LABOUR IN NEW BRUNSWICK

1-2 September 2009

Understanding New Brunswick’s present by knowing about its past is the theme of a two-day bilingual conference on public policy and labour history to be held 1-2 September 2009 at the Wu Centre on UNB’s Fredericton campus.
The conference, Informing Public Policy:  Socio-economic and Historical Perspectives on Labour in New Brunswick, brings together researchers and community leaders from all parts of the province and also features keynote speakers from Laval, Harvard and Concordia universities.

Sessions include “ The Crisis in the Forest Industry”, “The Making of Labour Law and Public Policy”, “The Ongoing Crisis in Nursing”, “What Workers Need to Know: A Labour Education” and “L’Acadie at Work: The Survival and Development of Acadian Communities”.

Other highlights of the conference include the official launch of the New Brunswick Museum Nursing History Exhibition, a labour and business documents display by the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, and multimedia and research poster displays by graduate students. 

The conference is a major event associated with “Re-Connecting with the History of Labour in New Brunswick:  Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Issues,” a Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) project supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and led by researchers at the University of New Brunswick and the Université de Moncton. To learn more about the CURA visit http://www.lhtnb.ca

Speakers will present in both English and French, and simultaneous translation is provided.
Register at http://www.informingpublicpolicy.ca

For more information contact 453-4599 or email lkealey@unb.ca or dave.steele@unb.ca

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“TELLING STORIES; CREATING CHANGE”: REGISTER NOW FOR 2009 MAYTREE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Registration is now open for the 2009 Maytree Leadership Conference on Thursday, October 1, 2009, 12 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at 89 Chestnut Street, Toronto.

Join Toronto’s leaders and explore the universal power of storytelling, the art of creating compelling stories and how to use individual and organizational narratives as powerful tools for change. This year’s theme is Telling Stories; Creating Change. Keynote speaker is John Cruickshank, publisher of the Toronto Star. He’s followed by former Chief of Staff to the Prime Minister, Tim Murphy, in conversation with Deena Ladd of the Workers’ Action Centre, moderated by CBC Radio’s Mary Wiens.

Workshops will include Online Communities and Offline Action, Building Your Public Narrative, Pitching Your Story to the Media and The New Front Page: Telling Your Organization’s Stories Online.

The day will end with a tenth-year celebration of Maytree’s scholarship program along with the release of an anniversary publication telling the students’ stories. The publication will also include policy insights on Canada’s refugee policies and programs.

Click here for full conference program and registration: http://www.maytree.com/training/2009-maytree-leadership-conference

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd AUGUST 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

•   RESOURCE FROM CSEW – BEYOND PD DAYS: TEACHERS’ WORK AND LEARNING IN CANADA

•   GOOD GREEN JOBS FOR ALL CONFERENCE

•   CALL FOR PAPERS – CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FILM STUDIES / REVUE CANADIENNE D’ÉTUDES CINÉMATOGRAPHIQUES

•   THE CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE HALL OF FAME IS NOW LIVE!

•   CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – OUR VOICE/NOTRE VOIX: VIEWPOINTS OF THE PSYCHIATRIZED / POINTS DE VUES DES PSYCHIATRISÉS

•   PROTECTING VULNERABLE WORKERS IN ONTARIO

•   THE RIGHT-WING PRESCRIPTION FOR ECONOMIC RECOVERY: LIONIZE THE RICH AND DEMONIZE THE POOR

•   WALL DECLARES WAR ON ORGANIZED LABOUR IN SASKATCHEWAN

•   FROM MERGER TO CIVIL WAR: MEASURING THE COST OF UNION INFIGHTING

•   ONTARIO TRILLIUM FOUNDATION TREND REPORTS

•   A ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN NEEDS VITAL AND HEALTHY NONPROFIT SECTOR

•   THE UNHEARD VOICES: COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICE LEARNING

•   BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

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RESOURCE FROM CSEW – BEYOND PD DAYS: TEACHERS’ WORK AND LEARNING IN CANADA

By R. Clark, F. Antonelli, D. Lacavera, D. W. Livingstone, K. Pollock, H. Smaller, J. Strachan, & P. Tarc

This book (and accompanying DVD, “No Two Alike”) encapsulates key findings from a decade of research into teacher work and formal and informal learning. It explores issues in teacher professional development, and provides practical suggestions. Using this book for supporting evidence and job-embedded strategies, PD planners can now go Beyond PD Days.

Ontario Teachers’ Federation, Toronto, 2007

Available from OTF by phone 416-966-3424 or 1-800-268-7061

GOOD GREEN JOBS FOR ALL CONFERENCE

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Allstream Building, CNE at the Princess Gate

Registration: 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Conference: 9:00 am – 4:30 pm

The former Automotive Building, now Allstream, has been restored to LEEDS Silver standard and is easily accessible by public transit.

For more information, please contact the Good Jobs for All Coalition: http://www.goodjobsforall.ca or call one of these numbers:

Judy Persad 416-441-3663 ext. 224

Julius Deutsch 416-892-4380

Ana Fonseca 416-441-3663 ext. 221

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CALL FOR PAPERS – CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FILM STUDIES / REVUE CANADIENNE D’ÉTUDES CINÉMATOGRAPHIQUES

http://www.filmstudies.ca  email: cjfsedit@filmstudies.ca

The editors of CJFS/RCEC – Charles Acland (Communication Studies) and Catherine Russell (Cinema Studies) at Concordia University, Montreal – seek submissions of manuscripts in film and moving image studies for the following special topics issues:

* Film Publics Reconsidered

* Star Performance

* Expanded Screens

As always, we continue to seek high quality research for general topic issues. The CJFS/RCEC is Canada’s leading scholarly venue for moving image studies, refereed using a double-blind review process. We publish innovated research on all topics and formats related to moving image studies. We also regularly publish book reviews.

Complete guidelines for contributors can be found in each issue of the journal, as well as on our website at: http://www.filmstudies.ca  Send queries and manuscripts to cjfsedit@filmstudies.ca

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THE CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE HALL OF FAME IS NOW LIVE!

Launched at the Canadian Co-operative Association’s 2009 National Congress as part of CCA’s 100th anniversary celebrations, the Hall of Fame honours the legacies and achievements of outstanding Canadian co-operators past and present.

Inductees into the Hall of Fame include all winners of CCA’s Canadian Co-operative Achievement Award and Global Co-operator Award, as well as 14 pioneers of the Canadian co-op movement, as nominated by co-operators and supporters across Canada.

Visit the Hall of Fame to learn about Canada’s greatest co-operators including Alphonse Desjardins, named history’s Greatest Canadian Co-operator in an on-line vote; Glen Tully, winner of the 2009 Canadian Co-operative Achievement Award and Olha Zawerucha Swyntuch, winner of the 2009 Global Co-operator Award.

The Canadian Co-operative Hall of Fame can be found at http://www.coopscanada.coop/public_html.hof

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – OUR VOICE / NOTRE VOIX: VIEWPOINTS OF THE PSYCHIATRIZED SINCE 1987 / POINTS DE VUES DES PSYCHIATRISÉS DEPUIS 1987

Our Voice/Notre Voix – Viewpoints of the Psychiatrized since 1987/Points de Vues des Psychiatrisés depuis 1987 calling for submissions for their 50th issue.

The theme is “Dare to Imagine: From Lunatics to Citizens”. They are accepting submissions of poems, opinions and articles and the call is open to all stakeholders. Honorariums provided to all who have their work published.

Deadline is September 30 at 4 pm.

For details email ovnvletters@nb.aibn.com. Visit http://www.ourvoice-notrevoix.com to learn more about the organization.    

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PROTECTING VULNERABLE WORKERS IN ONTARIO

Deena Ladd, co-ordinator of the Workers’ Action Centre, reports that the Ontario Ministry of Labour has just released a consultation paper addressing provincial protections needed on issues facing live-in caregivers and workers coming into Canada through the Temporary Foreign Workers Program. The information gathered from this consultation will form the basis for new legislation introduced later on this year.

To read more:  http://www.industrymailout.com/Industry/LandingPage.aspx?id=412853&lm=20377760&q=138135738&qz=0fca39212d4c8e01b58be5b10647f9f2

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THE RIGHT-WING PRESCRIPTION FOR ECONOMIC RECOVERY: LIONIZE THE RICH AND DEMONIZE THE POOR

By Dylan Headley, AlterNet

Wing-nut commentary about the crisis blames the victims. As if things weren’t already bad enough.

To read more: http://www.alternet.org/media/141035/the_right-wing_prescription_for_economic_recovery%3A_lionize_the_rich_and_demonize_the_poor/

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WALL DECLARES WAR ON ORGANIZED LABOUR IN SASKATCHEWAN

By J.F. Conway, Bullet No. 239

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall has had a cakewalk since defeating Lorne Calvert and the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the November 2007 provincial elections. After Calvert’s resignation and as the NDP went through a leadership contest, Wall enjoyed a period of easy living. You can call this a honeymoon for the new Saskatchewan Party government, or you can admit that the NDP in opposition has been singularly pathetic. There are just no fundamental ideological differences on the big economic issues, and that will be even more true now that Dwain Lingenfelter, the former deputy premier under Roy Romanow, has been anointed NDP leader.

Continue Reading: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/bullet239.html

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FROM MERGER TO CIVIL WAR: MEASURING THE COST OF UNION INFIGHTING

By Robert Hickey

In 2004, the clothing and textile union UNITE, merged with the hotel and gaming union, HERE. What began as the merger between two of North America’s most progressive and activist-oriented unions has disintegrated into a destructive civil war.

Fierce internal politics are not new to the labour movement. The tools of union democracy provide rank-and-file members with accountability from their leaders and a source of strength for their organization. However, a divided house of labour hurts unions and working people in general.

To read more: http://rabble.ca/news/2009/07/merger-civil-war-measuring-cost-union-infighting

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ONTARIO TRILLIUM FOUNDATION TREND REPORTS

In order to keep abreast of change and make healthy adaptive choices for your community and organization, non-profit organization leaders need to keep an ear to the ground and identify the latest trends, threats and opportunities. For readers working in Ontario, the Ontario Trillium Foundation has provided a concise way to keep up with changes in your local community.

Your Community in Profile are a series of customized statistical reports on economic, social and demographic trends in Ontario. They put a face to Ontario communities and provide the most recent demographic data and analyses available about 16 regions in Ontario and the province as a whole.

Find them at: http://www.trilliumfoundation.org/Your_Community_in_Profile//english/index.html

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A ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN NEEDS VITAL AND HEALTHY NONPROFIT SECTOR

Economic recovery throughout the Greater Toronto Region requires the active engagement of all sectors, including the vital non-profit sector that delivers a variety of critical programs and services and provides a valuable boost in the form of jobs and other economic activity

The Greater Toronto Region Economic Summit held in May has released their economic recovery plan, Choosing Our Future, focused on the role of nonprofits in ensuring a vibrant economy.

To read more: http://wellesleyinstitute.com/greater-toronto-region-economic-recovery-plan-needs-vital-and-healthy-non-profit-sector

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THE UNHEARD VOICES: COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICE LEARNING

http://www.temple.edu/tempress/titles/2023_reg.html

This book is based on the work of a student seminar using a community-based research methodology. Its design (along with one of its chapters) is informed by community organization staff. Its content is based on interviews conducted by students to understand how community organization staff think about service-learning.

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SYMPOSIUM – BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

The symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector, and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century.

Keynote speaker: Hon. Edward Broadbent, Former Leader, New Democratic Party of Canada, and Past Director, International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development

Speakers will include:

* John Cartwright, President, Toronto and York Region Labour Council

* Don Drummond, Senior Vice President & Chief Economist, TD Bank

* Marvyn Novick, Professor Emeritus, Ryerson University

* Ratna Omidvar, President, Maytree Foundation

* Armine Yalnizyan, Senior Economist, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Panels will include: Ending Poverty, Social Infrastructure, Good Jobs, Social Security, and Economic Stabilizers

Cost and further information: $50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments). More information and registration package to follow.

For more details visit: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/councilnews/building-the-future-we-want-finding-opportunity-in-adversity/

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk