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Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE FUTURE OF NGOs – CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers: The Future of NGOs: incorporation, reinvention, critique?

Special issue of Critical Sociology

 

Special Issue Editors:

Sangeeta Kamat, Associate Professor, International Education, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Feyzi Ismail, Teaching Fellow, Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

The last three decades have seen a range of critical studies on NGOs, and in particular a growing body of theoretical work on the links between NGOs, the neoliberal state and social movements (Kamat 2004; Hearn 2007; Fernando 2011; Choudry and Kapoor 2013; Dauvergne and LeBaron 2014). These studies have contributed to our understanding of ‘NGOisation’ as a vital aspect of global capitalism and its crucial function in stabilising the neoliberal order. In this special issue we seek to build upon these critiques towards a theorisation that illuminates the present conjuncture of the new aid architecture – now unfolding in the context of the global financial crisis – that has further subordinated NGOs to global capital but which is also confronted by a deepening crisis of the neoliberal state (Harvey 2010; Duménil and Lévy 2011; Saad Filho 2011).

Critical Sociology (http://crs.sagepub.com/ ) invites contributions analysing the role of NGOs at this conjuncture, how they are responding to critiques and struggles against neoliberalism and whether they seek to articulate a new politics.

Since the late 1990s visible and widespread challenges to neoliberalism have taken the form of the anti-globalisation and anti-war movements, including the popular movements in Latin America and the World Social Forums, the vast mobilisations against the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Occupy movement, the Arab uprisings and demonstrations against austerity. In some cases the movements have led to mass strikes in workplaces and the mobilisation of trade unions. NGOs have often had an ambivalent relation to these oppositional movements, either participating on the fringes of these movements or seeking new kinds of alliances with Left or progressive politics. At the same time, the aid regime of the new millennium has undergone significant changes, with corporate entities playing a leading role in the development sector and partnering with states to enforce new rules of compliance for NGOs. In other words, NGOs today straddle both the imperialist and neoliberal ambitions of the aid regime and the popular mobilisations, which at times dominate the political landscape.

In this special issue we seek to analyse how NGOs mediate these struggles toward particular ends. How are NGOs being repositioned within contemporary capitalism, and how is the relationship between NGOs, the state and the private sector evolving? In what ways are NGOs being further co-opted by corporate power? As the neoliberal state becomes increasingly privatised on the one hand – and challenged on the other – how have NGOs analysed these times of crisis and flux? Is the general critique of neoliberalism that many NGOs also espouse leading to a new kind of politics and new political understandings within the sector? What are the factors that determine the political direction that NGOs take? Are there examples of NGOs reinventing themselves to maintain or pursue radical politics, and are they adopting new ideas and new ideologies? What kinds of new organisational alliances or strategic partnerships are being made, for example, with the political Left?

Our contention is that the existence of an organised Left makes a difference, shaping both political history and the political space that is occupied by NGOs. Where left-wing political parties have had a strong legacy, we wish to investigate the historical relationship between NGOs and the Left in order to understand the politics of NGOs in that particular context. Where NGOs have taken on traditional roles, and have been funded and professionalised, we seek to understand not only the political compulsions that influence NGOs but what kind of political alternatives are possible. The focus here is on the factors that influence one tendency or the other, with the aim of drawing general conclusions on how the work of NGOs is being reshaped both at national and global levels.

We are seeking manuscripts (8,000 words maximum) on the following themes (though not limited to these), and encourage interdisciplinary approaches:

Neoliberalism and the co-option of NGOs;

The relationship between NGOs and left-wing political parties in power;

Conflict and collaboration between NGOs and social movements;

Class, class struggle and the role of NGOs;

Questions of strategy and democracy amongst NGOs and within the sector;

Ways that NGOs are reinventing themselves and envisioning new forms of political engagement;

The role of NGOs and the global financial crisis;

Labour NGOs and trade union organising;

Development NGOs in the present aid architecture and the implications for Left politics.

 

Within this broad thematic we are interested in case studies from Latin America (e.g. Venezuela and Bolivia), where left-wing governments have been in power; South Asia (e.g. India, Nepal and Bangladesh), where Left parties and social movements have a strong presence inside and outside of government; Eastern Europe (e.g. Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo), where previous democratic transitions meant compromise between communist parties and NGOs; South East Asia (e.g. Cambodia, Thailand and the Philippines), where there have been significant and sustained popular movements and workers’ strikes; and the Middle East (e.g. Egypt, Syria and Palestine), which has experienced colossal political upheaval and polarisation during and since the uprisings in 2011. In addition, we are interested in case studies documenting the work of labour NGOs and their relationship with trade union activity (e.g. China, Qatar and Saudi Arabia), and the role of NGOs in the Arab uprisings.

To submit your proposal, email the title, abstract (300 words maximum), and contact information for the primary author to Sangeeta Kamat <skamat@educ.umass.edu> and Feyzi Ismail <fi2@soas.ac.uk>, with the subject line “ATTN: SPECIAL ISSUE PROPOSAL”. All papers are subject to the standard review process at Critical Sociology.

 

Submission of abstracts: 31 May

Solicitation of full papers: 15 June

Draft paper submissions due to editors: 31 August

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-future-of-ngos-incorporation-reinvention-critique-special-issue-of-critical-sociology

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Global Economic Crisis

Global Economic Crisis

SOCIOLOGY AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Sociology

A journal of the British Sociological Association

Sociology and the Global Economic Crisis

 

Special Issue Call for Papers

Deadline for submissions: 31 August 2013

 

Editorial Team:

Ana C. Dinerstein (University of Bath), Gregory Schwartz (University of Bath) and Graham Taylor (University of the West of England)

 

Brief: As the Editors of the 2014 Annual Special Issue of Sociology (http://soc.sagepub.com), a journal of the British Sociological Association (http://www.britsoc.co.uk), would like to invite you to submit a paper, and extended book review essay, or a theoretical intervention that does one of two broadly defined things: 

·         Explore how sociology can contribute to a better understanding of (the lived experience of) the global economic crisis; and/or

·         Reflect on how social processes and movements confronting the crisis can inspire a new sociological imagination.

 

Our aim is to bring together contributions that:

·         Bridge disciplines

·         Unsettle conventions

·         Cosmopolitanise epistemologies

·         Renew sociology

 

We welcome contributions on relevant topics in any field of social science engaging with sociological research, from early career and established academics, and from those outside academia.

 
Rationale: The Editorial Board of Sociology considered a high number of proposals in response to the tender for the Special Issue of the journal in 2014. Our proposal, titled ‘Sociology and the Global Economic Crisis’ was selected as the successful submission. The Special Issue will address the urgent need to deconstruct and interrogate the formulation and reality of the global economic crisis. Additionally, it will systematically and critically investigate the specifically social processes underpinning its development and intensification.

Our aim in this proposal has been to tackle the challenge confronting the social sciences by the current economic crisis, in that there has largely been a failure to translate a quotidian reality of crisis into adequate forms of knowledge. While there has been discussion of ‘the crisis’, or ‘austerity’, of growing poverty, precarity, unemployment, and proletarianisation, there have been severe limitations in the disciplines of social science to engage with their object of knowledge in a way that seriously rethinks the epistemological and methodological assumptions of such knowledge. In short, the emergence of the current crisis has tended to highlight serious limits to the sociological imagination. Rethinking the ‘crisis’ could facilitate the renewal of sociology as an intellectual force in the public sphere, and imbue sociology with a critical or radical force that has been missing in recent decades.

With the explicit aims of the special issue to bridge disciplines, unsettle conventions and cosmopolitanise epistemologies, we see the contribution of critical Marxist theorists as paramount. Why? Above all, by asking authors to reflect on how social relations of production are confronted and rethought by various (new) movements and (new) forms of politics, and how modes of protest are not only confronting the political-cultural and class changes, but how social mobilisation itself nurtures epistemological innovation. 

Queries: The full paper should be submitted by the 31 August 2013. The articles will be peer reviewed following the journal’s usual procedures. The special issue is to be published in October 2014. To discuss initial ideas, seek editorial advice, or discuss a specific paper, please contact the Special Issue Editors by email on sociology.specialissue.2014@gmail.com

The Full Call for Papers can be viewed at: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/48566/Global_Economic_Crisis_SOC_SI_2014_CFP.pdf

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-sociology-and-the-global-economic-crisis

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

CRISIS

CRISIS

 

Books

Books

NEW TITLES FROM HAYMARKET BOOKS AND CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY

 

Haymarket Books is proud to announce the publication of the five latest titles in the Studies in Critical Social Science Book Series:
Labor Regime Changes in the Twenty-First Century by Tom Brass
The Age of Knowledge by James Dziash and Henry Etzkowitz
Neoliberalism and National Culture by Cory Blad
The Cuban Revolution as Socialist Human Development by Henry Veltmeyer and Mark Rushton
The Entropy of Capitalism by Robert Biel

 This peer-reviewed book series, through the publication of original manuscripts and edited volumes, offers insights into the reality of 21st century Neoliberalism by exploring the content and consequences of power relationships under capitalism, by considering the spaces of opposition and resistance to these changes, and by articulating capitalism with other systems of power and domination—for example race, gender, culture—that have been defining our new age. For a full list of titles in the series visit www.haymarketbooks.org/category/scss-series 

For review, desk copies, or to request examination copies, contact John McDonald, john@haymarketbooks.org, 773-583-7884, www.haymarketbooks.org

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LABOR REGIME CHANGES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

Unfreedom, Capitalism, and Primitive Accumulation

BY Tom Brass

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“Tom Brass, one of the United Kingdom’s leading Marxist scholars has written a brilliant, theoretically informed, comprehensive critique of past and present, Marxist and non-Marxist writers of capitalist labor regimes and puts forth an alternative theoretical-conceptual framework”

— James Petras, Science and Society

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This volume assesses the validity, through current economic developments, of different historical interpretations linking capitalism, unfreedom, and primitive accumulation. Conventional wisdom holds that Marxism takes its lead from Smith and others in viewing capitalism as based on free labor. Challenging this, it is argued that Marxism fully accepts the need, in certain contexts, for capital to exploit unfree labor.

—————————-

Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 314 pages | ISBN: 9781608462407 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/9wU5E

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THE AGE OF KNOWLEDGE

The Dynamics of Universities, Knowledge, and Society

BY James Dziash and Henry Etzkowitz

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This title emphasizes that the ongoing transformations of knowledge, both within universities and for society more generally, must be understood as a reflection of the larger changes in the constitutive social structures within which they are invariably produced, translated and reproduced. As the development of knowledge continues to be implicated in the habitual practices of the human social enterprise, visualizing these alterations requires the consideration of the social and materialistic contexts informing these transformations. This is necessary because the process of globalization has not only created new challenges for societies but has also unleashed a new political economy of knowledge within which different institutions mus re-affirm their identity and place.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 342 pages | ISBN: 9781608462414
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/1H9un

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NEOLIBERALISM AND NATIONAL CULTURE

State-Building and Legitimacy in Canada and Québec

BY Cory Blad

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This book argues that despite popular claims to the contrary, global capitalism requires state institutional authority, but the legitimation of this authority is incrasingly tied to cultural rather than economic means. Canada and Québec are presented as examples of how neoliberal states achieve integration wile relying on cultural legitimation to maintain social policies that mitigate social changes.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 270 pages | ISBN: 9781608462438 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/cc1p4

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THE CUBAN REVOLUTION AS SOCIALIST HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

BY Henry Veltmeyer and Mark Rushton

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This re-reading of the Cuban Revolution from the perspective of socialist-humanism engages unresolved issues in the notion of human development popularized by the United Nations Development Programme. UNDP and other agencies of international cooperation for devleopment give a human face to ta capitalist development process that is anything but humane. This titles argues that understanding Cuba provides an alternative model.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 368 pages | ISBN: 9781608462445 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/qDp6X


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THE ENTROPY OF CAPITALISM

BY Robert Biel

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Drawing on his experience in international systems and low-input agriculture, Biel explores the interactions of social and physical systems. In the process revealing the early twenty-first century as a period when capitalism starts parasiting on the chaos it itself creates, notably in the link between the two sides of imperialism: militarism (the ‘war on terror’) and speculative fiance capital.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 390 pages | ISBN: 9781608462421 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/fKFr7

HaymarketBooks 

BOOKS FOR CHANGING THE WORLD

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-titles-from-haymarket-books-and-critical-sociology

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Sociology

CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY – ISSUE 38:6

 

CONTENTS:

 

David Fasenfest

Political Leadership and Social Transformation

 

SYMPOSIUM: Brazil under President Dilma Rousseff: A Preliminary Assessment

 

Anthony W Pereira
Continuity is Not Lack of Change

 

Lecio Morais and Alfredo Saad-Filho 
Neo-Developmentalism and the Challenges of Economic Policy-Making under Dilma Rousseff

 

Mahrukh Doctor
Brazil’s New Government and Trade: An Evaluation of Policy and Performance

 

Juliana Bertazzo
Brazilian Security and Defense Policy under President Dilma Rousseff: Transition and Initial Challenges

 

Fiona Macaulay
Deepening the Federative Pact? The Dilma Government’s Approach to Crime, Justice and Policing

 

Par Engstrom 
Brazilian Foreign Policy and Human Rights: Change and Continuity under Dilma

 

Anthony Hall and Sue Branford
Development, Dams and Dilma: The Saga of Belo Monte

 

Carolina Matos
Media Democratization in Brazil and Future Challenges

 

Paul Heritage
The Game is Violent! Opening Gambits at the Ministry of Culture

 

Juliana Bertazzo 
An Initial Survey of the Dilma Rousseff Administration in Brazil

 

REVIEW ESSAYS

 

Andrew Stevens
Labor, Governance, and Ecological Politics

 

Devereaux Kennedy
Constructing the Geo-culture and Strengthening the Core

 

Available online at: http://crs.sagepub.com/content/current

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/critical-sociology-vol-38-6-is-now-available

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

Critical Sociology

CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY REVIEW ESSAYS

Critical Sociology‘s book review section will now begin focusing on publishing more comprehensive review essays. Such essays of approximately 5,000 words in length generally examine three to four books of a similar topic through a scholarly lens. For example, we currently have four titles that examine the economic crisis from a critical/left perspective. They are:

1. McNally, David. Global Slump: The Economics and Politics of Crisis and Resistance
2. Lilley, Sasha. Capital and its Discontents: Conversations with Radical Thinkers in a Time of Tumult
3. Albo, Greg, Sam Gindin, and Leo Panitch. In and Out of Crisis: The Global Financial Meltdown and Left Alternatives
4. Calhoun, Craig and Georgi Derluguian. Business as Usual: The Roots of the Global Financial Meltdown

Alternatively, a review essay may draw on a single book title and discuss its relevance along a broad  framework such as contemporary scholarship, or in light of recent e vents, or its utility in an activist setting, etc.

In addition, Critical Sociology welcomes review essays concerned with contemporary media and cultural productions, including but not limited to fiction, cinema, and independent music. These review essays should meet the same criteria set out for book review essays, discussed above.

If you are interested in writing a book review essay for the journal or proposing a potential review essay of your own, please contact the book review editor, George Sanders, at the following e-mail: critsoc.reviews@gmail.com

If you are interested in writing a culture review essay (concerned with fiction, cinema, music, photography and the graphic arts, etc.) for the journal or proposing a potential review essay of your own, please contact the media and culture editor, Graham Cassano, at the following e-mail: critsoc.mediaculture@gmail.com
*****
Professor David Fasenfest
Dept of Sociology
Wayne State University
Editor, Critical Sociology 
crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor
Studies in Critical Social Science
www.brill.nl/scss

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Sociology

AFRICAN-CENTERED SOCIOLOGY

Call for Papers

Special Issue of Critical Sociology

Critical Sociology (http://crs.sagepub.com) invites papers for a special edition on African-centered / Africana Sociology. Africana Sociology critically investigates and interrogates the social worlds of people of African descent from African-centered theoretical and/or methodological perspectives. This special edition seeks articles that address the major issues of identity, education, health, criminal justice, sexuality/gender, methodology, racism/oppression, religion/spirituality and intellectual history.

Despite the fact that this special issue is targeted at a sociological audience, we wish to encourage papers that have sociological import in the areas delineated below written by sociologists and others, recognizing that critical African-centered perspectives may be interdisciplinary and/or multidisciplinary in nature.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to) the following:
· The rationale for African-centered Sociology
· Definitions and conceptual models/orientations in African-centered Sociology
· History of the development of African-centered Sociology
· African-centered Sociology in literature
· The relationship between African spirituality/philosophy and African-centered Sociology
· Media images and Africana identity
· Sexuality and sexism in Africana communities from an African-centered perspective
· The training of Africa-centered sociologists
· The social viability of African-centered Sociology

We also welcome book review essays of recent and new publications within the domain of African-centered/Africana Sociology (contact cs_reviews@sagepub.co.uk for more information).

The selection criteria will involve: relevance to theme, clarity of paper, intellectual significance, and originality. Please send a 250 word abstract by July 1st to Dr. Nikitah Okembe-RA Imani, with full paper expected by September 1st. Solicited manuscripts (approximately 10,000 words) must be submitted to http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/critical-sociology (further instructions will follow with the notification that your abstract has been accepted).

Contact:

Dr. Nikitah Okember-RA Imani, Special Issue Editor
Email: imanino@jmu.edu

============

Professor David Fasenfest
Department of Sociology
Editor, Critical Sociology
http://crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor, Studies in Critical Social Sciences
http://www.brill.nl/scss

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Sociology

ONLINE FIRST FOR CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY

Critical Sociology now publishes accepted articles on-line, in advance of their appearance in the pages of the print journal.  Anyone at an institution getting the journal has access to the online version of Critical Sociology, which includes all back issues from Vol.1 Issue 1, as well as the online first articles (these are removed from the web site and appear online in the journal version).

You can sign up for table of content alerts and announcements of additions to the OnlineFirst page by going to the link below and registering.

See: http://crs.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts/etoc

(Potential authors–this counts as a publication date and the Document Object Identification [DOI] serves as a direct link to the article.)

The most recent additions to Critical Sociology OnlineFirst are:

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Articles
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Neoliberal Globalization and Trade Unionism: Toward Radical Political Unionism?
Martin Upchurch and Andy Mathers
Crit Sociol published 11 January 2011, 10.1177/0896920510396384
http://crs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0896920510396384v1?papetoc

The Four Horsemen of the Fair Housing Apocalypse: A Critique of Fair Housing Policy in the USA
Robert Silverman and Kelly L. Patterson
Crit Sociol published 11 January 2011, 10.1177/0896920510396385
http://crs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0896920510396385v1?papetoc

Independent Travel: Colonialism, Liberalism, and the Self 
Kristin Lozanski
Crit Socio l published 11 January 2011, 10.1177/0896920510379443
http://crs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0896920510379443v1?papetoc

Urban Workers’ Leisure Culture and the ‘Public Sphere’: A Study of the Transformation of the Workers’ Cultural Palace in Reform-era China
Guoxin Xing
Crit Sociol published 11 January 2011, 10.1177/0896920510392078
http://crs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0896920510392078v1?papetoc

— 
Professor David Fasenfest
Dept of Sociology
Wayne State University

Editor, Critical Sociology 
crs.sagepub.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalist Crisis

CRISIS AND CHANGE TODAY

Crisis and Change Today: Basic Questions of Marxist Sociology
Second Edition

By Peter Knapp and Alan Spector

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Crisis and Change Today provides a solid introduction to Marxist social theory. The work’s unique voice is expressed in its Socratic-dialogic approach, structured around forty questions that students have about society and social change. Topics range from theories of history, economics, unemployment, racial oppression, the state, fascism, the collapse of the Soviet bloc, and points of convergence and difference between the dialectical approach and other approaches to social science. The content and tone of the work invites students to evaluate various traditional and current explanations of social institutions and social processes and encourages them to weigh the debates and investigate further.

The first edition was very well received (recipient of the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on Marxist Sociology of the ASA), and the second edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to be relevant for students today. Though the first edition was written during the wake of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the growing gap between the rich and the poor and the economic crisis have generated more interest in using Marxist analysis as a tool to understand both the crises of capitalism and the weaknesses of past Marxist praxis.

Peter Knapp is Professor of Sociology at Villanova University and author of books and articles on Marx and Hegel.

Alan Spector is Professor of Sociology at Purdue University Calumet. In addition to publishing, he has served as Chair of the Section on Marxist Sociology of the American Sociological Association and is currently on the editorial board of Critical Sociology.

========================================================

More information on the book is available here: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439&thepassedurl=collegepublishing&exam_copy=true

For European readers: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/Eur/Singlebook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439

Prepublication reviews from Bertell Ollman, Rhonda Levine, David Fasenfest, and Berch Berberoglu are available here: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/Reviews.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Sociology

CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY

SAGE Publications has implemented an early access to accepted articles through its Online First feature on Critical Sociology’s web page.  

Now, as articles are accepted and prepared for publication in the journal’s pages they will become available as an electronic publication, accessible by all subscribers of the journal (institutional subscribers through their organizational affiliation).  Increasingly authors experience long delays before an article appears on the printed page, so this feature will allow research and scholarship to be available more quickly.  Authors no longer have to wait to disseminate their accepted articles.

You can go to the web site below and sign up for electronic notification whenever an article is added.  These articles will remain on the web site until it is published in the print version of the journal.

— 
Prof. David Fasenfest
Editor, Critical Sociology: crs.sagepub.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Community

GHETTO AND WITHIN: CLASS, IDENTITY, STATE AND POLITICAL MOBILISATION

My latest book is out:

Ghetto and Within: Class, Identity, State and Politics of Mobilisation

By Ravi Kumar

Aakar Books: Delhi

ISBN 978-93-5002-069-2

Aakar Books: http://www.aakarbooks.com

This work is an effort to understand and explore the linkages between the process of ghettoisation, identity formation and the political economy of capitalism. Through fieldwork in the city of Delhi it looks at how a particular form of identity politics sustains the process of ghettoisation of a community and creates a situation which downplays the need for a class based mobilisation. It argues that identity politics need to be seen in conjunction with the way class formation and class politics within a particular community unfolds itself. This framework allows us to not only understand the larger issues such as that of communal politics but also provides us insights into the way differential perceptions about ‘violence’ are forged within a community. It seeks to explore how class antagonism becomes a non-issue because the social identity dominates the discourse.  

“Ravi Kumar’s exploration of identity formation in the context of community offers the reader an important analysis of how class and religion can influence residential decisions, and paints a careful picture of how seemingly homogenous communities when seen from the outside are actually multi-layered social structures. This is an important work, taking on the common view that a ghetto represents socially imposed separation of minority groups, highlighting instead a process of defensive isolation from a hostile environment and demonstrating how class-based social reproduction within this microcosm of society is also a site of political struggle for change. Ghetto and Within is an important read for any student of social mobilization providing important lessons about identity politics and resistance” — David Fasenfest, Wayne State University, and Editor, ‘Critical Sociology’.

“Ravi Kumar argues convincingly that, in a world ‘where the rule of capital has penetrated every sphere of our existence’, a consideration of class dynamics must be central to a full understanding of religious ghettos in modern India” — Mike Cole, Author of ‘Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Analysis’.

Ghetto and Within is a lucid examination of the political economy of identity formation. Examining the social, political, economic and historical processes of ghetto formation, the book makes a powerful case for ghettos as internal relations that are constitutive products of the crisis of capitalism. It is a book relevant to the serious conflicts of our time as these are imbricated in capitalist social relations. And it will help point towards avenues of transformation” — Peter McLaren, University of California, Los Angeles.

“This is an important contribution to and contextually located Marxist analysis of how religion, communalism, collective religious identity suppress and displace consciousness of exploitation based on class. It is important in the global analysis of the empirical and analytical and political relationships between identitarian consciousness and class consciousness. This analysis has resonance not just within the Muslim ghettos of India, but within religious, ‘racial’/ethnic ghettos globally, in Harlem New York, in the ex-mill towns of northern England, and wherever ghettos of space are reinforced by ghettos of the mind that prioritise culturalist analyses at the expense of materialist analyses, consciousness and solidaristic, class-based political action” — Dave Hill, Chief Editor, ‘Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies’.

Ravi Kumar is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. He worked on the ‘Dynamics of Identity Formation: The Political Economy of Backward Castes in Bihar’ for his doctorate, and has written over a dozen articles on education, communalism and politics. His publications include The Politics of Imperialism and Counterstrategies (co-edited, Delhi, Aakar Books, 2004); The Crisis of Elementary Education in India (edited, New Delhi, Sage, 2006); Global Neoliberalism and Education and Its Consequences (co-edited, New York, Routledge, 2009). His specialisation is social movements, identity politics, social theory and sociology of knowledge. He is co-editor of Radical Notes, an online journal.

Ravi Kumar, Ph.D. || Assistant Professor || Department of Sociology || Jamia Millia Islamia University || Maulana Mohammad Ali Jauhar Marg, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi – 110025
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Radical Notes: http://www.radicalnotes.com
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Blog: http://againstcapital.wordpress.com
Blog: http://againstcapital.blog.com

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World Social Forum

CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND THE SOCIAL FORUM PROCESS: FROM THE GLOBAL TO THE LOCAL

June 21, 2010

General Lectures 100 and Mangoongian 150 and 151
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI

http://irows.ucr.edu/conferences/ussf10conf/ussf10conf.htm

Program Schedule

9-10:30: Session 1: The Significance of the World Social Forum Process

Moderator: Jackie Smith, University of Notre Dame

David Fasenfest (Sociology, Wayne State University and editor, Critical Sociology), Opening Remarks

Christopher Chase-Dunn (Sociology & Institute of Research on World Systems, UC-Riverside), “The New Global Left and the World Revolution of 20xx”

Lauren Langman (Sociology, Loyola University at Chicago), “Globalization from Below”

Francis Shor (History, Wayne State University), “The World Social Forum as Utopian Alternative”

10:40-12pm: Session 2 (concurrent): Organizing and Decision-making within the Social Forum Process

Moderator: Juliann Allison (Political Science, UC-Riverside)

Peter J. Smith (Athabasca University) and Elizabeth Smythe, Concordia University, College of Alberta), “Academic Disconnections? Social Scientists, Faith Groups and Transnational Activism: The Case of the World Social Forum”

Nicole Doerr (Sociology, Free University, Berlin), “Decision-making in multilingual groups? Comparative impressions from the European Social Forum”

Scott Byrd (Sociology, UC-Irvine, Nicolas Haeringer, http://www.mouvements.info, http://www.m-e-dium.net, Mallory Knobel, May First / People Link, National Technology Coordinator, USSF), “Technological Resources and Social Forum Organizing”

Jeffrey S. Juris, Erica Bushell, Meghan Doran, Mathew T. Judge, Amy Lubitow, Lauren Nicoll, and Chris Prenner (Anthropology & Sociology, Northeastern University), “From Boston to Detroit: Tracing Grassroots Mobilization to the 2010 United States Social Forum (USSF)”

10:40-12pm: Session 3 (concurrent): Do Social Forums Challenge or Reproduce Social Inequalities by Race, Nativity, and Nation?

Moderator: Ellen Reese (Sociology, UC-Riverside)

James Love (Sociology, UC-Riverside) “Global Racism: Connecting The Local to The Global in USSF and WSF Meetings”

Rose Brewer (African-American and African Studies, University of Minnesota and founding member of AfroEco), “Resisting Racism and the USSF: Possible or Not?”

Janet Conway (Sociology, Brock University), “Is the Global Justice Movement Colonial? A Study of Indigenous Positionality at the World Social Forum”

David W. Everson (Political Science, UC-Riverside), “An Indigenous Voice? The Indigenous Movement, Representation, and the Social Forum Process”

12-1:10pm: Lunch break (sponsored by Critical Sociology)

1:10-2:30pm: Session 4 (concurrent): Who Participates and for What?

Moderator: Juliann Allison (Political Science, UC-Riverside)

Mark Herkenrath (University of Zurich), Wolfgang Stuppert (Social Science Research Center Berlin), Dieter Rucht (Social Science Research Center Berlin), “Who participates? Socio-demographic and Political Characteristics of European Social Forum Participants”

Gary Coyne, Jesse Fletcher and Preeta Saxena (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “From Recruitment to Participation: Bridging the Gap between Differential Recruitment and Collective Action”

Anthony Roberts (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “The U.S. Social Forum and the U.S. Class System: Local-Global Orientation of Participants and Social Movements”

1:10-2:30pm: Session 5 (concurrent): Social Movements and the Social Forum Process

Moderator: Christopher Chase-Dunn (Sociology, UC-Riverside)

Elizabeth Schwarz and James Love (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “The Internet and the US Social Forum: Tracing Connections and Demographics of the Environmental Movement”

Elena Shih (Sociology, UC-Los Angeles), “Globalizing Morality: The Transnational Moral Economy of Women’s Work in the Anti-Trafficking Movement”

Edwin Elias (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “Immigrant Rights in the U.S. Social Forum: Role and Impact.”

2:40-4:20pm: Workshop Training #1: “Doing Collective Ethnography at the 2010 U.S. Social Forum,” Jackie Smith (Sociology, University of Notre Dame) and Jeffrey S. Juris (Anthropology & Sociology, Northeastern University)

4:30-5:30pm: Workshop Training #2: “Doing Survey Research at the 2010 U.S. Social Forum,” Juliann Allison (Political Science, UC-Riverside), Christopher Chase-Dunn (Sociology, UC-Riverside), Ellen Reese (Sociology, UC-Riverside)

This conference is co-sponsored by the Center for Peace and Conflict at Wayne State University, the Political Economy of World-Systems section of the American Sociological Association, the journal Critical Sociology, the Program on Global Studies at the University of California-Riverside,  the Institute for Research on World-Systems at the University of California-Riverside, the Global Studies Association, the World Society Foundation and Sociologists Without Borders.

Professor David Fasenfest, Department of Sociology, Wayne State University
Editor, Critical Sociology http://crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor, Studies in Critical Social Science, http://www.brill.nl/scss

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