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Tag Archives: Critical Race Theory

BOOKS LAUNCH – TWO NEW BOOKS BY PROFESSOR MIKE COLE

 

Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Revised 2nd Edition)

And

New Developments in Critical Race Theory and Education: Revisiting Racialized Capitalism and Socialism in Austerity

Both books are published by Palgrave Macmillan: Marxism and Education Serieshttps://www.palgrave.com/br/series/14811

Professor Mike Cole (ICPuP)

Cass School of Education and Communities

University of East London

Stratford Campus, UEL, ED.2.02

25 May 2017

17:00-19:00

With an introduction from Professor John Preston (University of East London)

The books address the nature of Critical Race Theory, including its origins, its varieties and its major strength. This is accompanied by a Marxist critique. Particular attention is paid to two of CRT’s major tenets, its prioritising of “race” over class and its use of “white supremacy”. Also discussed is the perceived decline of “BritiCrit.” Racialized neoliberal capitalism in the era of austerity and immiseration is also addressed as are CRT and Marxist visions of the future. With respect to educational practice, there is a consideration of multicultural and antiracist education in the UK and the US, and of CRT and Marxist suggestions for classroom practice. Moving to the global perspective, it is argued that the world has become polarised and that while discussion of democratic socialism has become more mainstream, fascistic rhetoric and narratives and neo-fascism are becoming normalised. Anything, it is concluded, is now possible.

The launch will be followed by a beer and wine reception

RVSP: Diane Sharrier @ D.Sharrier@uel.ac.uk

Dr Mike Cole is Professor in Education, University of East London, Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality, Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln and Visiting Research Fellow, Centre for Social Sciences, Zaman University, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. His other recent and forthcoming books include Racism: A Critical Analysis (Pluto Press, 2016) and the edited collection, Education, Equality and Human Rights: Issues of Gender, “Race”, Sexuality, Disability and Social Class 4th Edition (Routledge, forthcoming, 2017).

Mike Cole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

 

 

 

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Education Crisis

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES: VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 (2012)

Volume 10, Number 2: October 2012 – Now Out!

Some excellent and timely articles in this issue of Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies: Glenn Rikowski

See: http://www.jceps.com

ISSN 1740-2743 Online version / ISSN 2051-0959 Print version

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) is a peer-reviewed international scholarly journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS). The free, online version is published in association with the University of Athens (Greece). The print version (available on subscription or purchase – click on the Subscriptions and Purchasing link is published by IEPS). JCEPS will have three issues per annum, as from 2013. The journal website is www.jceps.com 

Enquiries should be addressed to dave.hill@ieps.org.uk or naomi.hill@ieps.org.uk

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education. JCEPS seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies, new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

 

CONTENTS:

Dave Hill: Immiseration Capitalism, Activism and Education: Resistance, Revolt and Revenge

Frank Truth: Pay Big to Publish Fast: Academic Journal Rackets

Mike Neary and Sarah Amsler: Occupy: a new pedagogy of space and time?

Periklis Pavlidis: The Antinomic Condition of the University: “Universal Labour” Beyond “Academic Capitalism”

Curry Malott: Rethinking Educational Purpose: The socialist challenge

Jennifer de Saxe: Conceptualizing Critical Feminist Theory and Emancipatory Education

Mike Cole: ‘Abolish the white race’ or ‘transfer economic power to the people’? : Some educational implications

Mike Neary: Teaching Politically: Policy, Pedagogy and the New European University

Ravi Kumar: The Charge of Neoliberal Brigade and Higher Education in India

Dionysios Gouvias: The Post-modern Rhetoric of Recent Reforms in Greek Higher Education

Babak Fozooni: The Politics of Encyclopaedias

Gun-Marie Frånberg and Marie Wrethander: The rise and fall of a social problem: Critical reflections on educational policy and research issues

Imed Labidi: Arabizing Obama: Media’s Racial Pathologies and the Rise of Postmodern Racism

Maria Nikolakaki: Building a Society of Solidarity Through Critical Pedagogy: Group Teaching as a Social and Democratic Tool

Navin Kumar Singh: Exploration of Praxis through Personal and Professional Journey: Implications

Olli-Jukka Jokisaari: A Philosophy for Education in the World of Technology

Reza Pishghadam and Elham Naji Meidani: A Critical Look into Critical Pedagogy

Geraldine Mooney Simmie: The Pied Piper of Neo Liberalism Calls the Tune in the Republic of Ireland: An Analysis of Education Policy Text from 2000-2012

 

**END**

 

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Dave Hill

 

Mike Cole

Mike Cole’s latest book

RACISM AND EDUCATION IN THE U.K. AND THE U.S. – TOWARDS A SOCIALIST ALTERNATIVE

By Mike Cole

Marxism and Education Series: Palgrave Macmillan

‘This is one of the most important contributions to the debates about international racism from one of the most outstanding Marxist scholars. This book is a gem.’ –– Alpesh Maisuria, Senior Lecturer, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

‘Mike Cole offers a devastating dissection of the appalling history and current realities of racism in the UK and the U.S., and in particular its manifestations in the educational system. He also presents an excellent synopsis of Venezuela’s efforts to develop a new, socially just and inclusive alternative in education which is an integral part of that country’s pioneering struggle to build ‘socialism for the twenty-first century.’ Cole’s latest book will be of great value in making students and educationalists consider progressive alternatives to the impoverished curricula and structures within which they operate at present.’ –– Diana Raby, Senior Research Fellow, Latin American Studies, University of Liverpool, UK

Following the success of the widely acclaimed Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Palgrave, 2009), in this new book Mike Cole extends his Marxist analysis to include key concepts from the work of neo-Marxists Antonio Gramsci and Louis Althusser. Cole begins by addressing what is distinctive about a neo-Marxist analysis. He then provides his own broad definition of racism and examines the differences between schooling and education, while outlining some practical antiracist classroom strategies for use in the UK and the U.S.

Racism and Education in the U.K and the U.S. – by Mike Cole: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=412084  

CONTENTS:

Socialism, Marxism, and neo-Marxism

Racism in theU.K.

Racism in theU.S.

Racism, Schooling and Education Against Racism in theU.K.and theU.S.

Twenty-First Century Socialism and Education in theBolivarianRepublicofVenezuela

Implications for Multicultural Antiracist Socialist Practice in the Educational Institutions

MIKE COLE is Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality and Director of the Centre for Education for Social Justice at Bishop Grosseteste University College Lincoln, UK. He is the author of Marxism and Educational Theory: Origins and Issues, (2008), and editor of Professional Attributes and Practice for Student Teachers, 4th Edition (2008), Equality in the Secondary School: Promoting Good Practice Across the Curriculum (2009), and Education, Equality and Human Rights: Issues of Gender, ‘Race’, Sexual Orientation, Disability and Social Class, 3rd Edition (2011).

*For information about Mike Cole’s previous book: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=329203

June 2011 Hardback £55.00 £27.50* 978-0-230-10379-5; Paperback £18.00 £14.40* 978-0-230-10380-1

Marxism and Education Series (Palgrave Macmillan): http://www.palgrave.com/products/series.aspx?s=ME

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Hubert Harrison

HUBERT HARRISON EVENT IN LONDON

Karia Press
Presents An “In Tribute” Event
Featuring A Presentation
By Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry
Based on his Biography
Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918

During Discussion he will be able to refer to:
Theodore W. Allen’s works:
The Invention of the White Race …

@ Centerprise
136-138 Kingsland Road
Dalston, London, E8 2NS
Friday, 20th May, 2011
7:30 – 10:00PM
Donations: £3.00

Restaurant on site

Bookings, and other information from: Karia Press: kariapress@yahoo.co.uk, Tel. 0750 4661 785

Books will be available for sale at the event.

If you wish to order a copy(ies) of the book(s) in advance, please email or call for availability and prices.

To get to the venue:
London Overground: Dalston Kingsland or Dalston Junction.
Buses: 149, 76, 243, 67, 236.

Background Information on Hubert Harrison

Hubert Harrison, (1883-1927) was an immensely skilled writer, orator, educator, critic, and political activist who, more than any other political leader of his era, combined class consciousness and anti-white-supremacist race consciousness into a coherent political radicalism. Harrison profoundly influenced “New Negro” militants, including A. Philip Randolph and Marcus Garvey, and his synthesis of class and race issues is a key unifying link between the two great trends of the Black Liberation Movement: the labour and civil-rights-based work of Martin Luther King Jr. and the race and nationalist work associated with Malcolm X.

Harrison played unique, signal roles in the largest class radical movement (socialism) and the largest race radical movement (the New Negro/Garvey) movement of his era. He was the foremost Black organizer, agitator, and theoretician of the Socialist Party of New York, the founder of the “New Negro” movement, the editor of the “Negro World,” and the principal radical influence on the Garvey movement.

He also helped transform the 135th Street Public Library into an international center for research in Black culture (known today as the world-famous Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture). His biography offers profound insights on race, class, religion, immigration, war, democracy, and social change in America.

About the Author

Jeffrey B. Perry is an independent, working class scholar who was formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia Universities. He was a long-time (33 years) activist, elected union officer with Local 300, and editor for the National Postal Mail Handlers Union (Division of LIUNA, AFL-CIO, CTW).

Dr. Perry preserved and inventoried the Hubert H. Harrison Papers (now at Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library) and is the editor of A Hubert Harrison Reader (Wesleyan University Press, 2001). He is also literary executor for Theodore W. Allen, author of The Invention of the White Race [2 Vols., Verso, 1994 and 1997), and edited and introduced Allen’s Class Struggle and the Origin of Racial Slavery: The Invention of the White Race.

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Blair's Educational Legacy

BLAIR’S EDUCATIONAL LEGACY: THIRTEEN YEARS OF NEW LABOUR

Edited by Anthony Green

Palgrave Macmillan (December 2010)

ISBN: 978-0-230-62176-3, ISBN10: 0-230-62176-7, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 244 pages

Providing an overview and Marxist assessment of Tony Blair and New Labour’sU.K.education policies, structures, and processes, the contributors in this exciting new collection discuss specific aspects of education policy and practices. This examination is set against the changing political and economic contexts of the British state’s responses to global and neo-liberal pressures.

Central themes include: New Labour and the education market state; New Labour, education, and ideology; and totality and open Marxism. 

Green’s work marks a timely contribution to Marxist analysis and Left critical assessment and is the first such collection addressing New Labour education policy.

Anthony Green is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Foundations and Policy Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London. He co-convenes Marxism and Education Renewing Dialogues (MERD), and is Series Editor for the Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series.

CONTENTS:

Introduction: Anthony Green * All the Wrong Answers: Labour’s Corporate-Centred Education Initiatives–Kevin Farnsworth * The Knowledge-based Economy and the Transformation of Higher Education: Issues concerning enclosing and protecting the intellectual commons–Molly Bellamy * The Professional Imagination: Further Education Professionalism in and beyond a Neo-liberal Context–Denis Gleeson * The Privatisation of Education Phase II: Perspectives on state schools the private sector and ten years of a Labour government–Thakir Hafid * Management and Governance of the School System–Richard Hatcher * City: Academies, Alienation, Economism and Contending Forces for Change–Philip Woods * Curriculum Change in the Blair Years–Terry Wrigley * Education still make you sick under Gordon Brown, Innit?–Martin Allen & Patrick Ainley * Ten Years of Education Policy and ‘Race’ Inequality: Whiteness or Neo-liberal Practice?–Alpesh Maisuria * Gendered Practices in Education–Rosalyn George & John Wadsworth

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Palgrave Macmillan): http://us.macmillan.com/blairseducationallegacy

Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series: http://www.palgrave.com/products/series.aspx?s=ME

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Amazon.co.uk): http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blairs-Educational-Legacy-Thirteen-Education/dp/0230621767/ref=sr_1_13?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304672910&sr=1-13

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Amazon.com): http://www.amazon.com/Blairs-Educational-Legacy-Thirteen-Education/dp/0230621767/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304673063&sr=1-10

‘I Read Some Marx (And I Liked It)’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wyqJ9wxZ9L0 

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SOUTH AFRICA TODAY: HOW DO WE CHARACTERISE THE SOCIAL FORMATION?

The 2011 ILRIG April Conference
Community House, Salt River, Cape Town
29 and 30 April 2011

Since 2007 ILRIG has been hosting an annual conference in April, either on behalf of, or in partnership with, the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation. It is our intention to continue this tradition of conferences in April as an interface between critical analysts showcasing their work and activists in the labour and social movements debating the nature of the current juncture and strategic challenges facing our movements. In 2010 we looked at the causes and consequences of the global capitalist crisis and the possibilities for developing anti-capitalist alternatives.

In 2011 we have decided to call for papers and to invite participants on the question: how do we characterise the Social African social formation today?

2011 is the 17th year of the achievement of democracy in SA. But in that time, instead of the mass struggles of the 1970s; 1980s and early 1990s leading to radical transformation we have seen a decline in the extent and depth of those struggles and the triumph of a neo-liberal order. South Africa has joined the BRICS as an aspiring power, South African corporations have become global players, the composition of the ruling class is still overwhelmingly white and we are now the most unequal society in the world. At the same time we have an ex-liberation movement in government, carried there by the struggles of a black working class majority and with a ruling Alliance which includes the biggest trade union federation and a long standing Communist Party. More recently we have seen the rise of movements and community-based activists who have waged struggles quite relentlessly for some 5-10 years – serving as a source of optimism and renewal on the left and yet not galvanising into a social force capable of speaking in its own name, let alone challenging the neo-liberal order. We have also seen a readiness of some organised workers to strike and test the limits of the partnership that comprises the ruling tripartite Alliance.

Part of the many challenges facing activists today is characterising what the nature of the new order is in South Africa today – unlike in the apartheid period where the nature of that order was starkly apparent. This means that activists battle with the tension between the legitimacy of their cause and the legitimacy of the liberation credentials of the current government and its associated democratic institutions in the state.

On the left, in the broadest sense, this tension has been variously characterised as “a society carrying out transformation against residual apartheid forces”; a victim of global forces imposing neo-liberalism “from the North”; a developmental state; a natural consequence of a nationalist or a social democratic project triumphing over a more radical alternative; and even the triumph of neo-apartheid.

How do we characterise this social formation? What configuration of social forces led to this conjuncture and what are the strategic, programmatic and organisational consequences of taking one characterisation over another? How does one’s choice/s inform how one sees international solidarity in Africa and the wider world today?

The conference will consist of two components:
1. Inputs by speakers on the basis of draft papers submitted by interested activists and analysts – South African and international, and
2. Workshopped and parallel sessions in which ILRIG facilitators engage the issues raised
at facilitated sessions using educational methodologies

Themes:
1. The recent evolution of the capitalist class in SA, its relations to other capitals globally, its “racial” and gendered make-up; its mode of accumulation and its relation to the state
2. The recent evolution of the ANC, the changing social composition of its cadre, its relations to the state and to the capitalist class, and to the dominated classes.
3. The working class of SA today and its changing “racial” and gendered nature as well its re-composition across both the sphere of production and reproduction; its consciousness and struggles and how do these impact, or otherwise, on various organisations today.

To this end ILRIG is inviting papers from any interested person.

! Final papers must be submitted by 21 April 2011 Where possible, ILRIG will provide travel and accommodation for successful candidates. All communication must be directed to Russell Dudley ilrigaprilconference@gmail.com or 084-915 9709

Publication
After the Conference the papers will be published in an annual journal to be edited, published and distributed by the conference hosts.

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World Crisis

SPRING & SUMMER EVENTS AT BOOKMARKS BOOKSHOP

From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia

With Jeff Webber

Tuesday 12 April, 6.30pm
Evo Morales rode to power on a wave of popular mobilisations against the neoliberal policies enforced by his predecessors. Yet many of his economic policies bare striking resemblance to the status quo he was meant to displace.
Based in part on dozens of interviews with leading Bolivian activists, Webber examines the contradictions of Morales’ first term in office.
Jeffery R. Webber teaches at the University of Regina in Canada. He has taught at several institutions in Canada, Europe, and Latin America, where he conducts field research. Webber is a member on the editorial boards of Historical Materialism, Latin American Perspectives, and New Socialist.
The event is free to attend, but please contact us to reserve your place: events@bookmarks.uk.com 020 7637 1848

Islamophobia and the Role of the Intellectual
With Hamid Dabashi & a speaker from Unite Against Fascism (UAF)
Monday 9 May, 6.30pm
Dabashi’s book ‘Brown Skin, White Masks’ picks up where Frantz Fanon left off. He extends Fanon’s insights as they apply to today’s world. Dabashi shows how intellectuals who migrate to the West are often used by the imperial powers to misrepresent their home countries. Just as many Iraqi exiles were used to justify the invasion of Iraq, Dabashi demonstrates that this is a common phenomenon, and examines why and how so many immigrant intellectuals help to sustain imperialism.
Hamid Dabashi is professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York and the author of 18 books and countless articles. His books include ‘Theology of Discontent’ (1993), ‘Iran: A People Interrupted’ (2007), ‘Islamic Liberation Theology: Resisting the Empire’ (2008) and ‘Brown Skins, White Masks’ (2011)
Hamid Dabashi is on a short speaking tour of Europe. Don’t miss the opportunity to hear him, and ask questions, in the relaxed atmosphere of Bookmarks Bookshop.
The event is free to attend, but please contact us to reserve your place: events@bookmarks.uk.com 020 7637 1848

We Sell Our Time No More: Workers’ Struggles Against Lean Production in the British Car Industry
With Paul Stewart
Wednesday 11 May, 6.30pm
This is the story of struggles against management regimes in the car industry in Britain from the period after the Second World War until the contemporary regime of lean production.
Told from the viewpoint of the workers, the book chronicles how workers responded to a variety of management and union strategies, from piece rate working, through measured day work, and eventually to lean production beginning in the late 1980s.
Paul Stewart is Professor of the Sociology of Work and Employment at Strathclyde University. He has been researching and writing on the automotive industry for many years and was joint convenor of the Automotive Workers Research Network.
The event is free to attend, but please contact us to reserve your place: events@bookmarks.uk.com 020 7637 1848

Liberate Your Mind
Bookmarks Bookshop
1 Bloomsbury Street
London WC1B 3QE
020 7637 1848
http://www.bookmarksbookshop.co.uk
http://twitter.com/bookmarks_books

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Student Rebellion

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd APRIL 2011

EVENTS

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (CAPLA) FALL FOCUS WORKSHOP AND AGM

November 13 -15, 2011
One King West Hotel
Toronto, Ontario

The significance of our conference venue at One King West (formerly the Dominion Bank Building) has provided the inspiration to consider the recognition of prior learning (RPL) as an investment in the future. Recognizing prior learning (RPL) pays big dividends for people, communities, organizations and countries. Managing one’s own knowledge assets is vital in an ever-changing labour market. Cashing in on what people know and can do is important to employers and to the future prosperity of Canadians and newcomers.

Sponsorship: CAPLA is looking for individuals and organizations who are able to provide financial support to assist with the costs associated with this important event. Please contact us at 1-613-860-1747 or capla@agendamanagers.com to hear more.

Attention Presenters! We are looking for innovative practices, current research, new trends, international programs and service delivery models that contribute to our understanding and overall effectiveness of prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR) and qualification recognition (QR). If you would like to be a presenter, please send a 100 word description to the Conference Secretariat at CAPLA@agendamanagers.com or call 1-877-731-1333 or 1-902-422-1886 by April 30.

Conference registration fees start at $379. Additional details and program updates can be found on the CAPLA website at http://www.capla.ca or by calling the Conference Secretariat at 1-877-731-1333.

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READNEX POETRY SQUAD, PRESENTED BY BARRIO NUEVO

April 15, 2011
9 pm
Blue Moon Pub
725 Queen St. East, Toronto

Description: “Since the emergence, disappearance, and resurgence of The Last Poets, no other group of young stanza-kickers have come about and made a significant impact in the music world. Thankfully the ReadNex Poetry Squad has decided to fill this void.”

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MINING AND RESISTANCE IN CENTRAL AMERICA: CANADIAN CORPORATIONS AT WAR AGAINST RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

April 10
2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor Street West, Room 5150
Toronto
No Registration. Everyone welcome.

Presenters: Juan Carlos Jimenez, Megan Cotton-Kinch, organizers in the Mining Injustice Solidarity Network.

Canadian mining companies are continuing to contaminate water, poison land and tear apart communities in Central America. In El Salvador, the government has ruled that metal mining would fatally pollute the rivers needed for agriculture, but the country itself is now being sued for $77 million under a free trade agreement. In Guatemala, Mayan communities are fighting back through community-controlled referendums, but face the imposition of martial law. In Honduras, the Canadian government was one of the first to legitimize a bloody military coup, which replaced a left-leaning government with one more friendly to mining interests.

Organizers from Mining Injustice Solidarity Network will present on how Canada is complicit in intimidation, assassinations, anti-environmental lawsuits and military coups and how we in Canada can join in solidarity with the struggle for justice.

Readings: http://www.miningwatch.ca/en/corporate-rights-over-human-rights-canadian-mining-central-america

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q20YxkM-CGI

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BOOK LAUNCH – MEDIA MEDIOCRITY: HOW THE TELEVISION MAKES US STOOPID!

April 16, 2011
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Another Story Bookshop
315 Roncesvalles Ave
Toronto, ON

Meteorologist, TV/film producer, university lecturer, writer, broadcaster and general media expert, Richard Zurawski is coming to the store to lead a discussion about how the media is failing to keep us informed.

Why do so many people still deny the “hypothesis” of global climate change? All but a few rogue scientists agree that we have a crisis on our hands, but all we get from TV and news media are debates in the form of sound bites… Why are we denying the voices of those experts in favor of politicians and pundits? So get up off the couch and let’s have a discussion (with an expert) face to
face!

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REBEL FILMS – MADE IN DAGENHAM

Friday, April 8
7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212
St. George Subway Station
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.

Made in Dagenham 2010, 113 minutes. In 1968, the Ford auto factory in Dagenham was one of the largest single private employers in the United Kingdom. In addition to the thousands of male employees, there are also 187 underpaid women machinists who primarily assemble the car seat upholstery in poor working conditions. Dissatisfied, the women fight for a better deal. However, Rita O’Grady learns that there is a larger issue in this dispute: that women are paid an appalling fraction of the men’s wages for the same work across the board on the sole basis of their sex. Refusing to tolerate this inequality any longer, O’Grady leads a strike by her fellow machinists for equal pay for equal work. What follows would test the patience of all involved in a grinding labour and political struggle that ultimately would advance the cause of women’s rights around the world. Marie Clarke Walker, Canadian Labour Congress Executive V.P., will lead off a discussion on the film.

Please visit: http://www.socialistaction-canada.blogspot.com or call 416 – 535-8779.

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – MANAGING HUMAN RESOURCES IN NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS CERTIFICATE

With Kunle Akingbola (University of Toronto / Toronto Rehab)

Human resources are not only the core asset of community organizations; such organizations cannot replace their human capital with investment in physical capital. Coupled with the pressure to be efficient and strategic, maximizing human capital is essential to achieving organizations goals. This
certificate program is designed to strengthen human resource management and leadership competencies by helping managers to acquire tools and resources to enhance leadership skills, manage organizational change and gain knowledge around effective compensation.

* Change Management – April 21
* Compensation and Benefits – May 27

9:30 am-4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto (St. George subway station)
         
Cost: $140 + HST.  A limited number of spaces are available to students at a discounted rate. Discount for those registering for more than one workshop, or for more than one person registering from the same organization.

To Register: Access the online registration form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FY65KMM or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@gmail.com, or 416-978-0022.

Kunle Akingola is a Human Resources Manager/Consultant and Adjunct Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto with extensive experience in both the non-profit and corporate sector

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NEWS & VIEWS

RACE, CLASS STRUGGLE AND ORGANIZED LABOUR IN THE “AGE OF WISCONSIN”

By Ajamu Nangwaya, Linchpin

…The racialized section of the United States’ working-class has been bearing the brunt of the racist, sexist and capitalist battering of the welfare state structures since the 1980s without much sympathy from their white working-class counterparts…But predominantly-white Wisconsin is up in arms when the chicken comes home to roost in their own backyard! Martin Luther King was quite right when he declared, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” We can only hope that white workers come to realize that white supremacist beliefs and practices only weaken the working-class – to the advantage of the small capitalist elite.

Read more: http://linchpin.ca/content/left/Race-class-struggle-organized-labour-%E2%80%9CAge-Wisconsin%E2%80%9D

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BILL 150: ATTACK ON PUBLIC SECTOR UNIONS

By Herman Rosenfeld, BASICSnews

By the end of March, the Ontario Liberal government of Dalton McGuinty will have passed Bill 150. It declares the TTC to be an essential service and denies Toronto public transit workers – members of the Amalgamated Transit Workers Union (ATU) Local 113 – the right to strike.

The attack on the transit workers was one of the first things that the newly elected right-wing populist Mayor of Toronto did this winter. Building on the memory of a short transit stoppage and the municipal workers strike from a couple of summers ago, Ford saw this as part of his plans to demonize public sector workers as a way of isolating all unions and weakening the collective gains of working people.

Read more: http://basicsnews.ca/?p=2918

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INVITATION TO JOIN LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCHERS OF ONTARIO (LARO)

The Latin American Researchers of Ontario (LARO), a recently formed non-profit association, is extending a warm invitation to individuals and organizations to join its membership and collective work.

The organization aims to promote research on Latin America and Latin Americans in Ontario. It hopes to provide an inclusive and interdisciplinary space for individuals who share an interest in the production and dissemination of written, oral, visual, and other knowledge and who define themselves and/or their work as Latin American.

In an effort to challenge elitist tendencies, the organization seeks give priority and visibility to grassroots research and to question prevalent forms of inequality.

Members will have the opportunity to share their work, knowledge, experiences and ideas with other members and constructively learn from each other. As a new organization, LARO is open to the incorporation of new ideas, visions, and projects.

For more information, we invite you to visit our website: http://www.latinamericanresearchers.com/

If you wish to become a LARO member and/or receive information from us, please click the link below to our contact page and send us your contact information, including your research interest, and let us know if you would like your name to appear in the public members’ list: http://www.latinamericanresearchers.com/contact.html.

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A PRIMER ON CLASS STRUGGLE

By Michael Schwalbe, Common Dreams

When we study Marx in my graduate social theory course, it never fails that at least one student will say (approximately), “Class struggle didn’t escalate in the way Marx expected. In modern capitalist societies class struggle has disappeared. So isn’t it clear that Marx was wrong and his ideas are of little value today?”

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/03/31-4

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MAKING IT COUNT – CCPA’S (CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES) FEDERAL ELECTION BLOG

The CCPA has launched a federal election blog to bring you expert analysis on the issues that will—or should—define the election.

Making It Count features timely commentary from CCPA staff and research associates, who will be weighing in everything from the economy and federal finances to the social and environmental challenges facing our country.

Read more: http://federalelectionblog.ca/

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Money

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010: Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

219 pp., 24.90€, ISBN 978-3-643-10949-1 threadstiching, softcover with flaps Lit Verlag | Berlin – Münster – London – Wien – Zurich

CONTENTS:

DAVID ROEDIGER: ACCOUNTING FOR THE WAGES OF WHITENESS: U.S MARXISM AND THE CRITICAL HISTORY OF RACE. 

ANJA WEISS: RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL: A BOURDIEUIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF RACISM. 

WULF D. HUND: NEGATIVE SOCIETALISATION, RACISM AND THE CONSTITUTION OF RACE.

STEFANIE AFFELDT: A PAROXYSM OF WHITENESS: WHITE LABOUR, WHITE NATION 
AND WHITE SUGAR IN AUSTRALIA.

JEREMY KRIKLER: RE-THINKING RACE AND CLASS IN SOUTH AFRICA: SOME WAYS FORWARD. 

DAGMAR ENGELKEN: A WHITE MAN’S COUNTRY? THE CHINESE LABOUR CONTROVERSY IN THE TRANSVAAL.

ELIZABETH ESCH: RACIALIZING TRANSNATIONALISM: THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY AND WHITE SUPREMACY FROM DETROIT TO SOUTH AFRICA.

The essays assembled in this volume shed light on the complex of class and race from which W.E.B. Du Bois saw originating “a sort of public and psychological wage” of whiteness. David Roediger (University of Illinois) preliminarily addresses the evolution of whiteness as a category of critical social analysis. Anja Weib (Universität Duisburg-Essen) explains that the perspective of whiteness studies can be expanded by a modification of Bourdieu’s category of symbolic capital. Wulf D. Hund (Universität Hamburg) pleads for the generalisation of this concept and for its application to an analysis of racism as negative societalisation. Stefanie Affeldt (Universitat Hamburg) specifies the analytic dimensions of the categories ‘racist symbolic capital’ and ‘wages of whiteness’ using the example of the white sugar campaign in Australia. Jeremy Krikler (University of Essex) explores some missing dimensions in the study of race and class in South Africa. Dagmar Engelken (University of Essex) investigates the Chinese Labour Question in South Africa. Elizabeth Esch (Columbia University) examines the ways in which corporate initiatives of the Ford Motor Company in the U.S. and South Africa imagined the assembly line worker as a white citizen and consumer.

Racism Analysis is a research series that explores racial discrimination in all its varying historical, ideological and cultural patterns. It examines the invention of race, the dimensions of modern racism and inquires into racism avant la lettre. The series brings together scholars from various disciplines and schools of thought. A key aim is to contribute to the conceptualisation of racism and to identify the practices of dehumanisation intrinsic to it.

The Racism Analysis Studies will publish monographs as well as anthologies, proceedings and textbooks, thereby assembling contributions committed to various perspectives of a critical research into society. The contributions will delve into examples of racist inclusion and exclusion, or outline specific aspects of the different fields of research into racism.

The Racism Analysis Yearbook will be issued by varying teams of special editors. Each volume will deal with key topics in the debates over racism and will focus on illuminating such topics through the investigation of particular subjects and will refer to the state of scholarly discussion on them.

Check out the book at Lit Verlag’s site: (http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-643-10949-1)

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Culture

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

(Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010) Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

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Mike Cole

AFROMODERNISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Afromodernisms 2

What’s really new? Blackness and Atlantic Modernism, 1907–61

Symposium: University of Liverpool, UK

Confirmed Keynote: Professor Tyler Stovall, University of California, Berkeley

30 June–2 July 2011

Afromodernisms 2 focuses on the relationship between the Afro-Atlantic and the modernist canon.  Specifically, the symposium seeks to address the ways in which current configurations of modernism—the art and literature of the new—may be inflected, expanded, or even called into question by either localized or transnational Africanist interventions into the politics and culture of the first half of the twentieth century.

Call for Papers:

* What constitutes a ‘modernist’ response to the experience of the modern? What categories underpin the aesthetic category ‘modernism’? 

* How might emphasis on black diapora subject positions, representations, and artistic and political interventions, inflect current canonical configurations of modernism?

* To what extent might black feminist positions revise or even reject the totalizing tendencies of the male voice in canonical works of black modernism, for example, Négritude?

The aims of the conference are the following:

* To debate the tenets of modernism (its newness, breaks with tradition, interest in the exotic and the primitive, its sense of fragmentation and displacement, and the way it conceives of the individual subject) in two contexts: first in terms of the work produced by African diaspora artists and writers; second, in relation to the symbolic presence of representations of blackness in the work of Anglo-American, Caribbean and European modernists.

* To consider the degree to which a variety of actors operating from what might be termed ‘alternative’ or ‘displaced’ metropoles interacted to produce, in Jameson’s terms, an ‘active sense’ of the history of modernity, one in which a black presence was of key aesthetic, political and cultural importance.

* To expand Perry Anderson’s claim, directed primarily at European modernist movements, that one of the indispensible co-ordinates for locating modernism is its ‘proximity to social revolution,’ to include a range of Afro-Atlantic revolutionary positions. We therefore welcome papers that consider the range of anti-colonial and/or feminist responses to the experience of modernity operating across the Atlantic in the inter- and post-war years.

*To reconsider the emergence of literary and artistic avant-gardes in the context of black anti-colonial, feminist, and (pan)nationalist movements, the two world wars, and, in the interwar period, against the backdrop of fascism and communism.

Individual papers and proposals for panels, in English, are invited, addressing, but not limited to the following circumatlantic themes:

* Gender
* Black performance/performance of blackness
* blackness and/in visual art
* modernism and primitivism
* modernist landscapes and/or the city
* science, technology and the machine
* narrative, subjectivity, psychoanalysis
* the politics of history
* blackness and genre
* island modernisms (e.g. Antillean, Irish, Cape Verdian)
* tradition and experimentation
* modernism, politics and the metropole (Paris, London, Mexico, Dublin, Marseille, Berlin, Hamburg, Moscow, DC, New York)
* modernist soundscapes
* black writers/artists in/and Europe
* modernism and ideology
* modernism and the canon, including the Harlem Renaissance, Négritude, and Paris Noir
* formal innovation/ the language of modernism
* informal networks
* the work of ‘high’ and not-so-high modernists, for example, Eliot, Faulkner, McKay, Beckett, Pound, Stevens, Williams, Hughes, Joyce, Hurston
* responses to revolution: Easter 1916, November 1918, Spain 1936

For individual papers, please send a working title, abstract of 250–350 words, and a biographical note to: Fionnghuala Sweeney: fsweeney@liv.ac.uk  or Kate Marsh: clmarsh@liv.ac.uk

Proposal for panels should contain a panel title, working titles for individual papers, with individual abstracts of 250 words each, and brief biographical notes on the chair and/or speakers to: Fionnghuala Sweeney: fsweeney@liv.ac.uk or Kate Marsh: clmarsh@liv.ac.uk.

Proposals on teaching and curating are also welcomed, as are offers to act as chair or respondent.

Closing date for call: 11 April, 2011.

Kate Marsh
Fionnghuala Sweeney

Afromodernisms2: http://www.liv.ac.uk/soclas/conferences/Afromodernism

Dr Kate Marsh
Senior Lecturer in French
School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies
University of Liverpool
L69 7ZR

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Taweret

POST-RACIAL IMAGINARIES

Darkmatter Journal is Calling for Papers for a …

Special Issue on Post-racial Imaginaries

http://www.darkmatter101.org/

Increasing reference to the notion of ‘post-race’ is suggestive of an emergent discursive framework in critical approaches to race and racism. ‘Post-race’, ‘post-racial’, ‘post-black’, and associated ideas, are being mobilized in various theoretical, cultural and political discourses to describe new racial formations. Post-race requires us to question in new ways the precepts of race thinking, positing the end of race as a point with which to think racial futures. The imprecise nature of much ‘post-’ talk means there has yet to be a rigorous assessment of the significance of post-race and its cognate terms, beyond simple endorsement or dismissal.

This special issue of darkmatter Journal is interested in delineating the contours of the ‘post-racial’ turn by asking: what is the post-racial? What are the conditions of its emergence? What assumptions and claims does it make about the logics of racism? What critical and political work is the term doing? What does the ‘post’ in post-race mean? How is racism theorized in post-race? What is the relationship between colonial history and the post-racial? When and where is the post-racial? Who claims post-raciality?

Given the multiple registers of post-race talk, these fundamental questions might be addressed in relation to:
  – The shifts from race to ethnicity, cultural difference and multiculturalism;
  – The ontology and epistemology of race;
  – Obama and the politics of anti-racism;
  – Utopia and the end of racism;
  – Modernity, history, nation and racial memory;
  – After whiteness;
  – Feminism, sexual politics and multiraciality;
  – Neoliberalism, Marxism and class politics;
  – Globalism, Orientalism, anti/post/de-colonialism;
  – Post-black aesthetics, popular culture and politics;
  – Digitalization, bio-technologies, genetic engineering and racial mutations

Submissions: between 1,500 – 8,000 words are welcome, as are alternative formats such as commentaries, reviews, audio, visual and digital contributions. Please email a 400 – 500 word abstract to submit@darkmatter101.org

Please note: submissions to darkmatter are now subject to external peer review. If your contribution is intended for the less formal (and non-peer reviewed) ‘commons’ section, indicate this on your submission.

For further inquiries about the ‘Post-racial Imaginaries’ special issue, email: editors@darkmatter101.org

Deadline for Abstracts: 1st Feb 2011
Deadline for Articles: 1st Aug 2011
Publication date: Nov 2011

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