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Tag Archives: Critical Education Policy Studies

End the Damage

AN INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION: EXPOSING AND RESISTING THE NEOLIBERAL AGENDA – JCEPS SPECIAL ISSUE + CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies
Special Issue: Spring 2012
An International Examination of Teacher Education: Exposing and Resisting the Neoliberal Agenda
Chief Editor: Professor Dave Hill, Chief/Managing Editor and Founding Editor, Professor Dave Hill, Professor Peter L. McLaren Editor, North America, Professor Pablo Gentili Editor, Latin America

Guest Editors: Dr. Brad Porfilio, Lewis University & Dr. Julie Gorlewski, SUNY at New Paltz

In recent decades, the transnational capitalist class has wielded power and influence to gain control over elements of social life that were once considered vital domains to fostering the social welfare of global citizens. Affected public domains include natural resources, health care, prisons, transportation, post-catastrophe restoration, and education. The chief linchpin in the elite’s corporatization over social affairs is its effective propaganda campaign to inculcate the global community to believe that neoliberal capitalism ameliorates rather than devastates humanity. According to political pundits, free-market academics, and corporate leaders, economic prosperity and improvements in the social world emanate from “unregulated or free markets, the withering away of the state as government’s role in regulating businesses and funding social services are either eliminated or privatized, and encouraging individuals to become self-interested entrepreneurs” (Hursh, 2011).

Since neoliberalism is a term rarely uttered is most dominant (mainstream) media outlets, most citizens are not cognizant of how it is linked to many deleterious economic and social developments at today’s historical juncture, such as massive unemployment, the swelling of home foreclosures, homelessness, militarism, school closings, maldistribution of wealth, and environmental degradation (Hill, 2008; Hursh, 2011; McLaren, 2007; Ross & Gibson, 2007; Scipes, 2009). Equally important, many global citizens fail to recognize how the transnational elite have spawned a McCarthy-like witch hunt to eliminate academics, policies, and programs that have the potential to engage citizens in a critical examination of what is responsible for today’s increasingly stark social world – as well as what steps are necessary to radically transform it.

In this special issue of The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies, we call on progressive scholars from across the globe to provide empirical research, conceptual analysis, and theoretical insights in relation to how corporate policies, practices, and imperatives are structuring life in schools of education.

Since the impact of neoliberal capitalism on programs, policies, relationships, and pedagogies in schools of education is not uniform, as local histories and politics structure how macro-forces come to impact people in local contexts (Gruenwell 2003), the issue will be integral in understanding and confronting the social actors and constitute forces gutting the humanizing nature of education. Additionally, we call on critical scholars and pedagogues who have found emancipatory fissures amid corporatized schools of education to share policies, pedagogies, and cultural work that have the potency promote critical forms of education, democratic relationships, and peace, equity and social justice across the globe.

Manuscripts are due by December 1, 2011 and should be submitted as email attachments to porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu.

Papers submitted for publication should be between 5,000 and 8000 words long. While we would hope that papers would be submitted in accordance with the Harvard Referencing Style, we do accept those written in any commonly accepted academic style, as long as the style is consistent throughout the paper.

Please direct all inquires about this special issue to the guest editors at Porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

MARXIAN ANALYSIS OF SOCIETY, SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION SIG OF THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (MASSES)
CALL FOR PAPERS

2012 Annual Meeting – Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2012
http://www.facebook.com/l/7ba756tNF7qOe9ItKjSdc1iil3A/www.aera.net/

*Why Marxism? Whose Marxism? Let’s Begin from the Beginning.*

*Rethink Class, Race and Gender Inequalities and Education*

The current global momentum is a profound paradox. On one hand, our era has been witnessing huge and dramatic transformations propelled by the biotech movement including genetic and biotechnological discoveries, as well as, the electronic revolution of communications and information both of which have had a huge impact on the way knowledge has been produced and reproduced.

Despite such progress, on the other hand, global societies have been experiencing, among other things, the shocking exacerbation (and in some cases the return) of horrendous social evils, namely, the return of slavery, legitimization of human genocide, new pandemics, the return of high vulnerability to old sicknesses that seemed to have been eradicated and now appear to be linked to new pandemics like HIV/AIDS, and naturalization of war, the domestication of revolting social inequalities (cf. Sousa Santos, 2005), the need of a more predatory capitalism to sustain neoliberal capitalism, the emergence of a new economy propelled by the need to fight terror(ism) (cf. Giroux, 2011).

Despite the fact that we never had a society that produced as much knowledge as today’s society, the fact is such production not only has been incapable of building a fairer and just society, but also as it has just served to increase and multiply social inequality. Such shocking paradoxes bring to the fore the vitality of (neo)Marxist analyses, as the ‘most rigorous, comprehensive critique of capitalism ever to be launched’ (Eagleton, 2011).

The 2012 Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG program asks scholars and educators around the globe, profoundly committed with the struggle for social and cognitive justice, to rethinking not only class, race, and gender inequalities and education, but also if the reinvigoration of the (neo)Marxist analyses and contributions to society and education implies the need to ‘begin from the beginning’ (Zizek, 2009). We asked scholars to critically address questions such as why (neo)Marxism and whose (neo)Marxism is a key to rethink and understand the current global disruption of capitalism and its implications of the daily live of teachers and students.

AERA: http://www.area.net

MASSES Yahoo Group (Marx and Education SIG): http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MarxSIG/  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marx and Education

ANOTHER REVIEW OF ‘MARX AND EDUCATION’ BY JEAN ANYON

If nothing else, Jean Anyon’s new book, Marx and Education has put the question and significance of Karl Marx’s views on education on the landscape of Marxist thought and writings. It follows Robin Small’s Marx and Education (2005) in establishing this relatively new field of enquiry, with the pioneers in the field, Colin Waugh and Gary Taylor having made a glorious start in the 1990s with their articles in General Educator.

In my view, Curry Stephenson Malott’s review of Anyon’s book is the best we have so far. You can see his review, entitled ‘Pseudo-Marxism and the Reformist Retreat from Revolution: A Critical Essay Review of Marx and Education’ in the latest issue of the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, at: http://www.jceps.com/?pageID=article&articleID=206

 

Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies: http://www.jceps.com

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Capitorg

CAPITORG: EDUCATION AND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE HUMAN IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY – GLENN RIKOWSKI

The Praxis and Pedagogy Group of GradCAM present:

Glenn Rikowski

“Capitorg: Education and the Constitution of the Human in Contemporary Society”

Wednesday May 25th 2011

6.00 – 8.00pm

Henry Clarke Room, NCAD, 100 Thomas Street, Dublin

Our lives are increasingly constrained by the social relations that capital coordinates. The educational discourse of neoliberalism; promoting literacy for job opportunities, economic advancement, and individual success are of paramount importance to producing human capital rather than human beings. Neoliberal literacy includes training students and workers to accept “a new work discipline” and conditioning their will to maximise the accumulation of capital and wealth. As students increase their marketability, they are “always already shaped by the labyrinthine circuits of capitalist desire” (Peter McLaren and Ramin Farahmandpur, 2002)

We not just learning, teaching, and living in neoliberal capitalist societies, but are becoming “a new life-form: human-capital” through “the capitalization of humanity” (Glenn Rikowski, 2002).

Flyer for the event: http://www.gradcam.ie/glenn_rikowski.pdf

The Capitorg: http://www.ccfi.educ.ubc.ca/publication/insights/v10n02/html/kim/kim.html (Many thanks to Soowook Kim: Glenn)

Dr. Glenn Rikowski is a Senior Lecturer in Education Studies in the School of Education at the University of Northampton

Now is the time to ask questions.

Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin: http://www.gradcam.ie

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

World Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 10th APRIL 2011

EVENTS

POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes. In the final two evenings of the course, we will focus on specific feedback and problem solving to help each participant use popular education relevant to their own context. All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support. No experience necessary, but experience is welcome!

Dates and Times: (attendance for each day required for the certificate)
Saturday June 25th:  10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sunday June 26th:  10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Wednesday June 28th:  6:00-9:00 p.m.
Thursday June 29th:  6:00-9:00 p.m.

Cost: $203.40 (Cdn). Scholarships and bursaries are available. Email heather.read@utoronto.ca to inquire.

To register: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/tlc/Summer_Institute/Registration.html
CODE SI-009 W
Deadline June 21

About the Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America for the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

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SANCTUARY SCHOOLS FORUM

Saturday May 7th
10am – 1pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 2-211
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto

Our schools, and especially our students and their parents, are increasingly under attack. Teachers have a unique and special responsibility to ensure that our schools can be places of sanctuary where we can all create the socially just and equitable communities we expect and deserve.

Often teachers find ourselves working in isolation from our colleagues, from the communities we work in, and from the lives of our students and their families. The Sanctuary Schools Forum will be an opportunity to break this isolation, and connect teachers to each other as well as to the social movements being led by our students and their communities.

Forum topics:        
* Gender Based Violence & Supporting LGBTQ2 Youth and their Families
* Don’t Ask Don’t Tell: Keeping Students Safe from Deportation
* Protecting Students from Police in Schools
* Movement Building: Mobilizing Teachers to Resist Neo-Liberalism

Child care provided upon request.
Organized by Educators for Peace & Justice and No One Is Illegal

Register at: http://bit.ly/SanctuarySchoolForum

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BEARING WITNESS, CREATING HOPE: 10 YEARS OF RABBLE.CA

April 18, 2011
7:00pm – 11:00pm
The Gladstone Hotel
1214 Queen Street West
Toronto

rabble.ca invites you to join us in celebrating 10 years of rabble.ca, April 18th at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto!

Join moderator and rabble founder Judy Rebick, and special guests for a panel discussion on the state of Canadian left politics, historical memory, and the upcoming federal election, and stay on after for a reception and party featuring Toronto’s criticaly acclaimed LAL and dancing with DJ b#!

Can’t join in person? This event will also be streamed live: http://rabble.ca/rabbletv

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EXHIBITION – EDWARD BURTYNSKY: OIL
Opens Saturday, April 9

Institute for Contemporary Culture
Roloff Beny Gallery, Level 4
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto

Ryerson Gallery and Research Centre, Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival and Scotiabank Group present Edward Burtynsky: Oil, hosted by the ROM’s Institute for Contemporary Culture. The exhibition features fifty-three beautiful and provocative large-format photographs by internationally renowned Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky. His images explore the hotly-debated effects of oil extraction, our international dependency on the substance, and with an unflinching eye, Burtynsky presents us with the reality of oil production as its role in our civilization undergoes massive transformation.

Read more about the exhibition: http://www.rom.on.ca/exhibitions/special/oil.php

Related Event at the ROM:
Downstream: The Oil Sands Industry and the Athabasca River April 13, 7-8 pm

Learn of the controversy over the role of pollution from the oil sands industry in causing cancer deaths in Fort Chipewyan on the Athabasca River in Alberta.
http://www.rom.on.ca/programs/lectures/index.php?ref=showinfo&program_id=6839

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RICE (RESEARCHING INTERNATIONAL & CONTEMPORARY EDUCATION) SYMPOSIUM – THEORIZING INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION: (SHIFTING) CONTEXTS, CONCEPTS, METHODS

Friday, April 15, 2011
Faculty of Education – Althouse College
University of Western Ontario
London, ON

Featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Jane Kenway, Monash University, Australia

We are anticipating a thought-provoking, discussion-rich day. To see more details and to register please go to: http://www.edu.uwo.ca/research/cie/rice/symposiumDetails.html

If you are planning on coming to the event, a couple of important notes:
– We have had some technical difficulties with the registration process, but the system is now fixed. If you have already registered please do so again as we might not have received your submission.
– Once you register please mail in your cheques as soon as possible (according to the details on the website) so they we can better organize the catered lunch and drinks.
– Check out the website for more details in early April for a suggested format on how you can contribute your research in our last informal sharing session and also to read invited paper submissions (will be posted by April 8) that will be discussed during session ii of our symposium.

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WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY COFFEEHOUSE: PUBLICATIONS, MOVEMENT BUILDING, AND RADICAL TRANSFORMATION

Thursday, April 21
7:30 pm
Reagle Beagle
335 Bloor St West (east of Spadina), back room
Toronto

This forum brings together a multi-generational panel of activists who have been involved in publishing movement publications on the political left, from the older and more well-established to more recent projects. By sharing their experiences and reflecting on both the significance and challenges of this work – from political to financial – it is our hope that we can develop and expand on our analysis of the important role such publications play for advancing our struggles, as places for dialogue and debate, educating, agitating and organizing, as well as for strategizing and visioning otherwise.

Speakers:
– Clare O’Connor, Upping the Anti and UofT OPIRG
– Chanteal-Lee Winchester, UofT OPIRG – Action Speakers Louder
– Noaman Ali, Basics
– Paul Kellog, Former Editor of Socialist Worker
– Leo Panitch, Socialist Register
– Mick Sweetman, Linchpin

For more info: http://www.workersassembly.ca

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO: RAISE WELFARE AND DISABILITY RATES, RESTORE THE SPECIAL DIET!

It has been 16 long years since Mike Harris cut welfare and froze disability. McGuinty’s Liberals have been in power for half that time and done nothing to deal with poverty. In fact people are worse off today. It would take a 55% increase to bring benefits to pre-Harris levels. If benefit levels were restored to the same level of spending power as they had in 1994, a single person on Ontario Works would now be receiving $904 a month instead of the miserable $593 now being issued.

Now as the economy continues to slump and the need is greater than ever, this government is destroying the vital Special Diet Allowance that has enabled people to survive…The new Special Diet comes into affect on April 1st, 2011 and all those who are not eligible under the new program will be cut off by July 31st.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls98.php

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MINISTERS OF EDUCATION CELEBRATE INTERNATIONAL ADULT LEARNERS’ WEEK

TORONTO, April 8 /CNW/ – Ministers of education joined this week with Canadians to celebrate International Adult Learners’ Week (IALW 2011).

First established in 2000 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), IALW serves to raise awareness of the importance of adult learning and its integral role in the lifelong learning process.

Read more: http://news.morningstar.com/all/canada-news-wire/20110408C2581/ministers-of-education-celebrate-international-adult-learners-week.aspx

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AGAINST CATASTROPHISM

By Doug Henwood, Left Business Observer

This is the text of my introduction to a panel on catastrophism that (Catastrophism and the Crisis of the Left) I MC’d at the Left Forum, March 19, 2011, at Pace University, New York.

Events in Japan have gotten me thinking about crises in general. At first, I thought that it might promote the realization that finding clean, renewable forms of energy may the most urgent task facing us today. But then I thought back a bit to other energy-related crises. One of my beefs with the peak oilers, aside from the empirical one in which I suspect that they’re just wrong about hydrocarbon production, is that impending scarcity doesn’t make people more amenable to rational argument—it inclines them to desperate measures.

Read more: http://lbo-news.com/2011/04/08/against-catastrophism/

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A NEW TRADE UNIONISM IN THE MAKING?

From The Bullet

A trade unionism that is able to facilitate and express the practical knowledge of its members, as workers and as citizens, is critical to the renewal of public services and for confronting a global politics of austerity. Hilary Wainwright has been at the forefront of such attempts to forge a new public sector unionism for some time. She has attempted to link the struggle over the state with the building of the popular power and democratic capacities necessary for a renewal of unionism, and also the socialist project.

We are at the beginning of what will likely prove to be a long phase of public sector struggle in Canada and the U.S. The Bullet publishes here a recent contribution by Wainwright to the debate on union renewal. There is a need for many more such interventions, from a variety of perspectives, from militants and activists in North America as part of the coming battles against the ruling classes’ attempts to forge a new ‘age of austerity’.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/488.php

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CORPORATE INCOME TAXES, PROFIT, AND EMPLOYMENT PERFORMANCE OF CANADA’S LARGEST COMPANIES

By David Macdonald, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

This study tracks 198 companies on the S&P/TSX composite from 2000 through 2009 and finds those companies—Canada’s largest corporations—are making 50% more profit and paying 20% less tax than they did a decade ago.

However, in terms of job creation, they did not keep up with the average growth of employment in the economy as a whole. From 2005 to 2010, the number of employed Canadians rose 6% while the number of jobs created by the companies in the study grew by only 5%. In essence, the largest beneficiaries of corporate tax cuts are dragging down Canadian employment growth.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/corporate-income-taxes-profit-and-employment-performance-canadas-largest-compa

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NEW RESEARCH PAPER – HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE NEEDS IN RURAL AND NORTHERN ONTARIO: A HOLISTIC NURSING PERSPECTIVE

I would like to bring your attention to a newly released research paper I’ve written through my work with the Ontario Nurses’ Association, which is the RN union in Ontario. The paper is called “Health and Health Care Needs in Rural and Northern Ontario: a holistic nursing perspective.” The paper has a feminist analysis of health issues, as well as insight from front line nurses, among other elements. It can be found at: http://www.ona.org/political_action/submissions_to_government.html#ruralandnorthernhealthcare

Salimah Valiani, PhD
Policy Analyst/Economist
Communications and Government Relations Team
Ontario Nurses’ Association

(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

THE ROUGE FORUM – UPDATE 8th APRIL 2011

Dear Friends

You can register now for the Rouge Forum Conference in Chicagoland, May 20-22, with keynoters Peter McLaren, Dennis Carlson, and Substance News’ George Schmidt at: http://www.rougeforumconference.org/

The Rouge Forum Dispatch with news of the Schools Not Banks demonstrations in Oakland and that too rare context which links schools and society is here: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

Good luck to our side,
Rich Gibson

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Critical Pedagogy

EDUCATIONAL SPACES OF ALTERITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

Educational Spaces of Alterity
University of Nottingham, Tuesday 26th April 2010

Nottingham Critical Pedagogy invites contributions for a day of workshops considering spaces (both inside and outside the academy) that may help challenge the dominance of neoliberal logics, alienated practices and Eurocentric hegemony in contemporary educational practice, and in so doing contribute to radical social change. We are pleased to announce that John Holloway will be hosting a keynote workshop at the event.

We hope to welcome contributions from a variety of disciplines and from inside and outside the academy. These can be in any format, but we especially encourage those that break from traditional conference paper models: workshops, artistic engagements, poster presentations and performances would all be welcomed. We welcome suggestions for entire workshop sessions (90 minutes), or single contributions, which we will group into workshops.

Our event partners Spaces of Alterity: a conference hosted by the University of Nottingham’s Department of Culture, Film and Media on Wed 27th-Thurs 28th April, with keynote addresses by China Miéville and Alberto Toscano. Both events are designed to work on their own, but participants are more than welcome to attend both should they wish, and we will be co-curating an Annexinema film night with Spaces of Alterity (details tbc) to show short films which touch upon the themes of the two events.

A non-exhaustive list of themes you may wish to consider is offered over the page. Please do not feel these are mutually exclusive:

Critical Education and ‘The Crisis’

  • How can critical education respond to the crisis in higher education and wider societal crises?
  • Do these crises close down or create spaces of hope for critical education?
  • Defending the university? Transforming the university? Abandoning the university?

 

Education and the Affective

  • Emotional epistemologies and pedagogies.
  • The role of hope in critical education.
  • ‘Radical love’.

 

Community Education

  • Skillshare workshops.
  • Social movements/community politics.
  • Challenging the borders between HE and community.
  • The role of non-traditional educational spaces (art galleries, social centres, etc).

 

Border Thinking and Hybridity

  • The importance of identity and difference for critical education.
  • Challenging hegemonic and Eurocentric perspectives.
  • How can we introduce the subaltern into the classroom?

 

Reflections on Practice

  • Experiences of critical education.
  • What can we learn from past experiences, experiments and struggle?

 

Art, Music and Critical Education

  • The role of art and music in critical education.
  • Resonances between critical education and contemporary theory and practice in art and music.
  • Problems of assessment in critical and artistic education: or is assessment the problem?

 

Please send abstracts and information on the format you wish your presentation to take to nottinghamcriticalpedagogy@gmail.com no later than Tuesday 8th February. These should be no more than 300 words, but may contain links to further reading regarding your chosen method of presentation.

Registration is free for Educational Spaces of Alterity but there are fees for Spaces of Alterity: attendance for one day is £25/£35; for both days it’s £45/55 (cheaper price for students and unwaged).

We have a limited amount of money to help cover the travel and accommodation costs of participants who would not otherwise be able to attend, or to help with fees for those who wish to stay for Spaces of Alterity. Details will be announced once abstracts have been received. Food and drink will be provided for all.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 2 (DECEMBER 2010)

The latest edition of JCEPS (The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies) is now online.

JCEPS is a free, online, peer-juried/refereed international scholarly journal.

It is online at: http://www.jceps.com

Dave Hill (Chief/ Founding Editor; Middlesex University, London, UK; Visiting Professor of Education at  Athens University, Greece; Visiting Professor of Critical Education Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland)

Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, Volume 8, Number 2: December 2010

CONTENTS:

Anna-Carin Jonsson and Dennis Beach (University of Borås, Sweden): Reproduction of social class in teacher education: The influence of scientific theories on future teachers’ implicit beliefs

Petar Jandric (Polytechnic Graduate School, Zagreb, Croatia): Wikipedia and education: anarchist perspectives and virtual practices

Periklis Pavlidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece): Critical Thinking as Dialectics: a Hegelian-Marxist Approach

Andrew N. McNight (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA): A Pragmatic and pedagogically Minded Revaluation of Historical Materialism

Diana Mulinari and Anders Neergaard (Centre for Gender Studies, Lund University, Sweden; Institute for Migration, Ethnicity and Society, Linköping University, Sweden): The ‘others’ in Sweden. Neoliberal policies and the politics of ‘race’ in education

James Avis (Huddersfield University, UK): Workplace learning, knowledge, practice and transformation

Imed Labidi (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA): Arab Education Going Medieval: Sanitizing Western Representation in Arab Schools

Margaret Kennedy and Martin J. Power (University of Limerick, Ireland): ‘The Smokescreen of meritocracy’: Elite Education in Ireland and the reproduction of class privilege

Magnus Dahlstedt and Mekonnen Tesfahuney (Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society), Linköping University, Sweden; University of Karlstad, Sweden): Speculative Pedagogy: Education, Entrepreneurialism and the Politics of Inclusion in Contemporary Sweden

Jean Leon Boucher (The University of Texas at El Paso, USA): There Will be Struggle: The Development and Operational Issues of Social Justice Programs at State Universities in the United States of America

Knud Jensen and Dirk Michel-Schertges (Aarhus University, School of Education, Denmark): Transforming of Educational Institutions after GATS – Consequences in Social Relations as Corporation, Competition and State Regulation

Donn Short (University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada): Conversations in Equity and Social Justice: Constructing Safe Schools for Queer Youth

Shahrzad Mojab (Ontario Institute in the Studies of Education, University of Toronto, Canada): Pedagogical Possibilities of Class in Culture: Review of: Ebert, Teresa, L. and Mas’ud Zavarzadeh (2008) Class in Culture. Boulder, Colorado: Paradigm Publishers.

Samuel Day Fassbinder (DeVry University. USA): Book Review: Nocella II, Anthony J., Steven Best, and Peter McLaren, eds. Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic-Industrial Complex. Oakland CA: AK, 2010.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is a free e-journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS)

IEPS is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing policy analysis and development of education policy. It is at www.ieps.org.uk The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and DAVE6@mdx.ac.uk

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Michael Neary

MARKETISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE STUDENT AS CONSUMER

Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer, jointly edited by Mike Molesworth, Lizzie Nixon and Richard Scullion and was published by Routledge in October 2010.

The Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer was launched at the House of Commons on 28th October. The launch was hosted by Baroness Estelle Morris in the Thatcher Room in Portcullis House.

About the Book:

Until recently government policy in the UK has encouraged an expansion of Higher Education to increase participation and with an express aim of creating a more educated workforce. This expansion has led to competition between Higher Education institutions, with students increasingly positioned as consumers and institutions working to improve the extent to which they meet ‘consumer demands’.

Especially given the latest government funding cuts, the most prevalent outlook in Higher Education today is one of business, forcing institutions to reassess the way they are managed and promoted to ensure maximum efficiency, sales and ‘profits’. Students view the opportunity to gain a degree as a right, and a service which they have paid for, demanding a greater choice and a return on their investment. Changes in higher education have been rapid, and there has been little critical research into the implications. This volume brings together internationally comparative academic perspectives, critical accounts and empirical research to explore fully the issues and experiences of education as a commodity, examining:

The international and financial context of marketisation

The new purposes of universities

The implications of university branding and promotion

League tables and student surveys vs. quality of education

The higher education market and distance learning

Students as ‘active consumers’ in the co-creation of value

Changing student experiences, demands and focus

With contributions from many of the leading names involved in Higher Education including Ron Barnett, Frank Furedi, Lewis Elton, Roger Brown and also Laurie Taylor in his journalistic guise as an academic at the University of Poppleton, this book will be essential reading for many.

About the Authors

Mike Molesworth is Senior Lecturer in Online Marketing and Consumer Behaviour at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Richard Scullion is Senior Lecturer in Marketing Communications and Political Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Elizabeth Nixon is Lecturer in Marketing Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

The book can be bought from:

Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415584470/

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775427&sr=1-1

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775597&sr=1-1

A pre-print version of a chapter in the book by Michael Neary and Andy Hagyard, Pedagogy of Excess: An alternative political economy of student life can be viewed here: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/files/2010/10/Pedagogy-of-Excess-preprint.pdf  

Michael Neary and Joss Winn’s chapter 10 in the book, Student as Producer: reinventing the student experience in higher education can be found at: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/1675/1/Future_of_HE_-_Chapter_10.pdf

See also:

Neary, M. (2010) Student as Producer: A Pedagogy for the Avant-Garde; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach? Learning Exchange, Vol.1 No.1, online at: http://learningexchange.westminster.ac.uk/index.php/lej/article/viewFile/15/13

Student as Producer blog, is at: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/blog/

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Marketisation of Higher Education