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Tag Archives: Crises

Unemployment

Unemployment

THE FUTURE AND PRACTICE OF DECENT WORK

International Center for Development and Decent Work, KasselUniversity, 14 – 15 February 2013

The Financial and Economic Crisis: A Decent Work Response report prepared by the International Institute for Labour Studies and the Employment Sector and Policy Integration and Statistics Department Geneva in 2009 indicates that the Decent Work Agenda should provide a policy framework to stem crises by placing employment and social protection at the heart of ‘extraordinary fiscal stimulus measures’ which can both protect vulnerable people, and reactivate investment and demand in economies.

The International Labour Organisation’s World of Work Report 2012 forecasts a global unemployment rate of 6.1 per cent in 2012, with total world unemployment rising from 196 million in 2011 to 202 million in 2012. In this context, and with the rise in austerity measures which cannot guarantee growth but which have already triggered social disruption and harm, this conference will explore the concept of decent work and search for a praxis of decent work in all countries, all contexts, and for all people.

Guy Ryder, an experienced trade unionist, was elected as the ILO’s new Director General on 28th May 2012, to take office in September, and he has stated his commitment to prioritise people and the world of work (Ryder, 2012).  In June 2012, India, Brazil and South African signed a long term Declaration of Intent in a number of areas including development and cooperation, and labour, which is explicitly designed to further the Decent Work Agenda, aiming toward creating jobs, guaranteeing rights at work, extending social protection and the promotion of social dialogue, with gender equality as a core objective. These types of initiatives indicate a continuation of the relevance of a concept that was coined by Juan Somavia, Director General 1999 – September 2012, but the global climate of strained governance continues to challenge the possibilities for decent work in developed and developing countries alike.
 
The ILO’s new Director General faces a Eurozone crisis, rising unemployment, a spate of emergency crisis-driven labour policy deregulation that has often not been passed with consent from relevant social partners, and the dramatic rise in precarity and nonstandard employment which impacts lives in all corners of the world. Several governments across the European Union, including Portugal, Spain, Hungary, and the United Kingdom, have recently passed emergency labour motions and reforms using the rationale of austerity to decentralise collective bargaining, disempower temporary workers, and increase working time for less remuneration, in many cases via Memoranda of Understanding passed in consultation and consent with the Troika (the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the IMF) (Clauwaert and Schomann, 2012). Nonetheless the ‘international consensus’ remains committed to securing ongoing decent work, and labour law is expected to provide the theatre for appropriate labour standards and rights despite labour law modernisation (Faioli, 2010).

The conference involves papers dealing with questions around the legitimation and the tripartite structure of the International Labour Organisation, questions about the world of work in the current context of global recession, issues surrounding social unrest as linked to rising unemployment, and the nature of international labour standards in this context. The concept of decent work is in crisis and this conference is a call for praxis around these issues.

Please email decentworkconference@gmail.com to express interest in attending this event. 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-future-and-praxis-of-decent-work-international-center-for-development-and-decent-work-kassel-university-14-2013-15-february-2013

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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David Harvey

DAVID HARVEY LECTURE IN BRISTOL

David Harvey Lecture, Bristol, 19th July: Crises, Urbanization and the City as a Terrain for Anti-Capitalist Struggle

PUBLIC LECTURE

Bristol Institute of Public Affairs

Crises, Urbanization and the City as a Terrain for Anti-Capitalist Struggle

Professor David Harvey, Graduate Centre, City University of New York

 

David Harvey is one of the world’s most influential social scientists.  His many books include The New Imperialism; Paris, Capital of Modernity; Social Justice and the City; Limits to Capital; The Urbanization of Capital; The Condition of Postmodernity; Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference; Spaces of Hope; Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography, A Brief History of Neoliberalism and The Enigma of Capital.  His work also contributes to broader social and political debate; he is a leading proponent of the idea of ‘The Right to the City’, and in recent years he has become an internationally recognised ‘public intellectual’ in part due to the success of his very popular online lectures on Marx’s Capital  and superb public lectures.  We are delighted to welcome you all to this very special event.

Tuesday, 19 July 2011, 5:30pm

Peel Lecture Theatre, Reception to Follow

School of Geographical Sciences, University Road, University of Bristol

 

Details: http://socofed.com/2011/06/15/david-harvey-lecture-bristol-19th-july-crises-urbanization-and-the-city-as-a-terrain-for-anti-capitalist-struggle/

 

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Critical Sociology

CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY REVIEW ESSAYS

Critical Sociology‘s book review section will now begin focusing on publishing more comprehensive review essays. Such essays of approximately 5,000 words in length generally examine three to four books of a similar topic through a scholarly lens. For example, we currently have four titles that examine the economic crisis from a critical/left perspective. They are:

1. McNally, David. Global Slump: The Economics and Politics of Crisis and Resistance
2. Lilley, Sasha. Capital and its Discontents: Conversations with Radical Thinkers in a Time of Tumult
3. Albo, Greg, Sam Gindin, and Leo Panitch. In and Out of Crisis: The Global Financial Meltdown and Left Alternatives
4. Calhoun, Craig and Georgi Derluguian. Business as Usual: The Roots of the Global Financial Meltdown

Alternatively, a review essay may draw on a single book title and discuss its relevance along a broad  framework such as contemporary scholarship, or in light of recent e vents, or its utility in an activist setting, etc.

In addition, Critical Sociology welcomes review essays concerned with contemporary media and cultural productions, including but not limited to fiction, cinema, and independent music. These review essays should meet the same criteria set out for book review essays, discussed above.

If you are interested in writing a book review essay for the journal or proposing a potential review essay of your own, please contact the book review editor, George Sanders, at the following e-mail: critsoc.reviews@gmail.com

If you are interested in writing a culture review essay (concerned with fiction, cinema, music, photography and the graphic arts, etc.) for the journal or proposing a potential review essay of your own, please contact the media and culture editor, Graham Cassano, at the following e-mail: critsoc.mediaculture@gmail.com
*****
Professor David Fasenfest
Dept of Sociology
Wayne State University
Editor, Critical Sociology 
crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor
Studies in Critical Social Science
www.brill.nl/scss

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Cultural Marxism

MARXISM AND CULTURE: CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS

Marxism and Culture 
Series Preface (Pluto Press) 
Call for Book Proposals 

The Marxism and Culture series aims to revive, renew and develop Marxism as an emancipatory tool for analyzing media and cultural practices within capitalism and class society. During the 1990s Marxism got bashed; it was especially easily mocked once its ‘actually existing’ socialist version was toppled with the fall of the Berlin Wall. Postmodernism made Marxism a dirty word, and class struggle a dirty thought and even dirtier deed. But those days that consigned Marxism to history themselves now seem historical. The crash of neo-liberalism in a now global economy has trashed many so-called certainties about the superiority of capitalism. A new spirit of critical questioning is emergent in the context of a crisis that is political, economic, social, cultural and ecological. 

Marxism, however critically its inheritance is viewed, cannot be overlooked by the increasing numbers who make efforts to provide an analysis and a consequent practice. Our series is dedicated to exploring both Marxist methodologies and the role of culture in this situation, from the mass media to the avant-garde. Culture is the contested terrain on which we imagine alternative models of social being and critically decode the ways we remain tied, by habits and perspectives, values and emotions, to the horizon of capital. We welcome proposals that contribute to the understanding of our urgent situation through the prism of culture. 

Books published in the series so far: 

Marxism and Media Studies: Key Concepts and Contemporary Trends – Mike Wayne 

Philosophizing the Everyday, The Philosophy of Praxis and the Fate of Cultural Studies – John Roberts 

Marxism and the History of Art, from William Morris to the New Left – Andrew Hemingway (ed) 

Red Planets, Marxism and Science Fiction – Mark Bould & China Mieville 

Dark Matter, Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture , Gregory Scholette 

Magical Marxism, Subversive Politics and the Imagination, Andy Merrifield 

Series Editors 
Esther Leslie (e.leslie@bbk.ac.uk
Mike Wayne (michael.wayne@brunel.ac.uk

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Despair

NEOLIBERALISM AND THE CRISES OF ECONOMIC SCIENCE – SECOND IIPPE CONFERENCE

INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVE FOR PROMOTING POLITICAL ECONOMY (IIPPE)

SECOND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN POLITICAL ECONOMY

Neoliberalism and the Crises of Economic Science

May 20-22, 2011,
Istanbul University, Beyazit

CALL FOR PAPERS

The global crisis of the last years of the “noughties” has cruelly exposed the deficiencies not only of mainstream economics but also of broader strands of political economy from across the social sciences more generally that have promoted neoliberalism. Media and academic commentary has focused on the inability to predict the crisis and the corresponding inadequacies of the economics profession, expecting a sort of self-criticism and reconstruction from within the discipline, whilst the inadequate treatment of the economic and the economy across the social sciences has been less harshly exposed to criticism.

In the case of economics, this has led to a spirited deference of the existing frame of analysis (What crisis? Bubbles don’t exist) and to the assertion that the discipline’s principles remain adequate but they need to be better and more realistically applied, possibly with the incorporation of other behavioural elements and techniques. Similar minor modifications to analytical frameworks have emanated from the international financial institutions and national treasuries, etc, if to some extent to allow for more discretion in policy rather than fundamental rethinks. Accordingly, the degree of rethinking within mainstream economics is strikingly underwhelming as, indeed, is the rethinking informing policy responses where neoliberal support to globalisation of finance remains to the fore, with dramatic adjustments at the expense of working people and the poor.

Although, then, the urgent issues brought about by the global crisis have made such questioning of mainstream economics both necessary and inevitable, there are also wider implications for a more inclusive reconstruction of economic understanding across the social sciences as a means to inform both academic and policy-making circles.

This conference will probe much deeper into the multiple crises of economic science, informed by the perspectives of political economy that have long been ignored and marginalised by the mainstream, whether deriving from critical political economy and heterodox economics or from the treatment of the economy from across the social sciences as a whole. The ultimate aim is to explore new avenues in promoting and developing critical political economy in view of recent developments. As well as engagements with economics and the economic, we are seeking individual contributions and proposals for panels that address Neoliberalism and the Crises of Economic Science through:

● the critical weaknesses of the mainstream in its continuing evolution;

● critique of recent developments within mainstream economics such as game theory, experimental economics, behavioural economics, neuroeconomics, complexity theory, etc;

● the challenges to, and potential for, heterodox economics and Marxist political economy;

● the lessons that can be gained from the history of economic thought;

● the role of methodology in the critique of mainstream economics and neoliberal political economy in providing for alternatives;

● the relation between economics and other social sciences in view of economics imperialism: economics and politics, economic history, philosophy, sociology, law, etc;

● the role of interdisciplinarity in promoting alternatives to the mainstream;

● the role to be played by critical political economy within social science;

● the ways in which an alternative economics can engage with and promote both activism and alternative theories, policies and ideologies;

● how to locate the world economy and the role of the (neoliberal) (nation-) state;

● the relationships between finance and accumulation and between economic and social reproduction;

● the analytical location of class, power and conflict.

We welcome both individual submissions and proposals for panels (or streams of panels), with the latter ideally already incorporating a number of proposed submissions but allowing for others to be added as appropriate.

The deadline for submission of both individual abstracts of papers and proposals for panels is the 15th of February 2011(submissions should be sent toiippe@soas.ac.uk and/or t.s.b.d@superonline.com.

Potential participants will be notified by the 15th of March. The deadline for the submission of full papers is the 15th of April. Early submissions, even if only provisional, are essential both to avoid disappointment and to help in the appropriate allocation of papers to designated panels and streams that will themselves be strengthened through solicited contributions and the plenaries.

Update: 23rd January 2011: New online abstract submission: http://www.iippe.org/wiki/Conference_2011/Abstract_Submission

Hosted by
Turkish Social Sciences Association (TSSA)
And
Istanbul University
Research Center for Global Politics and Administration (GLOPAR)

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Crisis Management

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Karl Marx

FREE COURSE ON MARX’S ‘CAPITAL’

Free course on Marx’s Capital at Middlesex Philosophy Department, 15 October-12 November 2010

Starting on Friday 15 October at 4pm, Meade McCloughan will present an exposition of the main argument of volume 1 of Marx’s Capital, in four parts.

The course will focus on the conceptual structure of the text, with special attention paid to key passages.

– 15th October.  Commodities and money: The mystery of surplus value.

– 22nd October.  Capital and labour: The mystery of surplus value solved.

– 29th October.  The dynamics of capitalist production: Absolute and relative surplus value, formal and real subsumption.

– 12th November.  The accumulation of capital; crises, revolution and communism.

The Penguin Marx Library/Penguin Classics edition (tr. Ben Fowkes) will be used.

This course is free and open to the public. All welcome.

Time: Fridays 4-6pm. Please note the hiatus during the week ending 5 November.

Place: Room M009 (The Green Room), Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ.

Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

Further enquiries: c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk

Philosophical resources on the Web can be found at http://www.liv.ac.uk/pal  

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Co-operation

THE NEW COOPERATIVISM

Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, and Action
Volume 4, Issue 1, 2010
http://www.affinitiesjournal.org

Cooperative practices and values that challenge the status quo while, at the same time, creating alternative modes of economic, cultural, social, and political life have emerged with dynamism in recent years. The 15 articles in this issue–written by activists, co-op practitioners, theorists, historians, and researchers–begin to make visible some of the myriad modes of cooperation existing today around the world that both directly respond to new enclosures and crises and show pathways beyond them. Prefiguring other possibilities for organizing life and provisioning for our needs and desires, we call these cooperative experiments the new cooperativism.
+++

http://journals.sfu.ca/affinities/index.php/affinities/issue/view/4/showToc

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Social Movements

INTERFACE – A JOURNAL FOR AND ABOUT SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Interface – A Journal For and About Social Movements

Call for papers – Issue 3: CRISES, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS

Interface is a new journal produced twice yearly by activists and academics around the world in response to the development and increased visibility of social movements in the last few years – and the immense amount of knowledge generated in this process. This knowledge is created across the globe, and in many contexts and a variety of ways, and it constitutes an incredibly valuable resource for the further development of social movements. Interface responds to this need, as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses and knowledge that allow lessons to be learned from specific movement processes and experiences and translated into a form useful for other movements.

We welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements – in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We are seeking work in a range of different formats, such as conventional articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews – and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally will be geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

Our third issue, to be published in May 2010, will have space for general articles on all aspects of understanding social movements, as well as a special themed section on crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations.

CRISES, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS

“In every country the process is different, although the content is the same. And the content is the crisis of the ruling class’s hegemony, which occurs either because the ruling class has failed in some major political undertaking, for which it has requested, or forcibly extracted, the consent of broad masses … or because huge masses … have passed suddenly from a state of political passivity to a certain activity, and put forward demands which taken together, albeit not organically formulated, add up to a revolution. A “crisis of authority” is spoken of: this is precisely the crisis of hegemony, or general crisis of the state”

So wrote the Italian revolutionary Antonio Gramsci from behind the walls of Mussolini’s prison, in his famous notes on “State and Civil Society”. His words aptly describe the trajectory of crises in modern history – these are periods when the wheels of economic growth and expansion grind to a halt, when traditional political loyalties melt away, and, crucially, when ruling classes find themselves confronted with popular movements that no longer accept the terms of their rule, and that seek to create alternative social orders.

The clashes between elite projects and popular movements that are at the heart of any “crisis of hegemony” generate thoroughgoing processes of economic, social and political change – these may be reforms that bear the imprint of popular demands, and they may also be changes that reflect the implementation of elite designs. Most importantly, however, crises are typically also those moments when social movements and subaltern groups are able to push the limits of what they previously thought it was possible to achieve in terms of effecting progressive change – it is this dynamic which lies at the heart of revolutionary transformations.

Gramsci himself witnessed, organised within and wrote during the breakdown of liberal capitalism and bourgeois democracy in the 1910s through to the 1930s. This was a conjuncture when tendencies towards stagnation in capitalist accumulation generated the horrors of the First World War and the Great Depression. Movements of workers and colonized peoples threatened the rule of capital and empires, old and new, and elites turned to repressive strategies like fascism in an attempt to secure the continuation of their dominance.

Today social movements are once again having to do their organizing and mobilizing work in the context of economic crisis, one that is arguably of similar proportions to that witnessed by Gramsci, and a political crisis that runs just as deep. The current crisis emerged from the collapse of the US housing market, revealing an intricate web of unsustainable debt and “toxic assets” whose tentacles reached every corner of the global economy. More than just a destruction of “fictitious capital”, the crisis has propelled a breakdown of world industrial production and trade, driving millions of working families to the brink and beyond. And, far from being a one-off, this crisis is the latest and worst in a series of collapses starting with the stock market crash of 1987, the chronic stagnation of the once all-powerful Japanese economy, the Asian financial meltdown of 1997 and the bursting of the dot.com bubble.

The current conjuncture throws into question the fundamentals of the neoliberal project that has been pursued by global elites and transnational institutions over the past three decades. Taking aim at reversing the victories won by popular movements in the aftermath of the Second World War, neoliberalism transferred wealth from popular classes to global elites on a grand scale. The neoliberal project of privatizing the public sector and commodifying public goods, rolling back the welfare states, promoting tax cuts for the rich, manipulating economic crises in the global South and deregulating the world’s financial markets continued unabated through the 1980s and 1990s.

As presaged by Gramsci, neoliberal policies have whittled away the material concessions that underpinned social consensus. Ours is a conjuncture in which global political elites have failed in an undertaking for which they sought popular consent, and as a consequence, popular masses have passed from political passivity to a certain activity.

Since the middle of the 1990s, we have seen the development of large-scale popular movements in several parts of the globe, along with a series of revolutionary situations or transformations in various countries, as well as unprecedented levels of international coordination and alliance-building between movements and direct challenges not only to national but to global power structures. The first stirrings of this activity were in the rise of the Zapatistas in Mexico, the water wars in Bolivia, and the protests on the streets of Seattle. On a global scale we saw dissent explode in the form of opposition to the wars waged by the US on Afghanistan and Iraq. In terms of sheer numbers, the mobilisation of against the latter invasion was the largest political protest ever undertaken, leading the New York Times to call the anti-war movement the world’s “second superpower”.

Each country has had its own movements, and a particular character to how they have moved against the neoliberal project. And for some time many have observed that these campaigns, initiatives and movements are not isolated occurrences, but part of a wider global movement for justice in the face of the neoliberal project. An explosion of analysis looking at these events and movements has occurred in the academic world, matched only by extensive argument and debate within the movements themselves.

In this issue of Interface, we encourage submissions that explore the relationship between crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations in general and the character of the current crisis and how social movements across different regions have related and responded to it in particular. Some of the questions we want to explore are as follows:

– What are the characteristics of the current economic and political crisis, what roles do social movements – from above and below – play in its dynamics, and how does it compare to the political economy of previous cycles of crises and struggle?

– What has been the role played by social movements in moments of crisis in modern history, and what lessons can contemporary popular movements learn from these experiences?

– What kinds of qualitative/quantitative shift in popular mobilisation we might expect to see in a “revolutionary wave”?

– Are crises – and in particular our current crisis – characterized by substantial competitions between different kinds of movements from below? How does such a dynamic affect the capacity to effect radical change?

– What goals do social movements set themselves in context of crisis and what kinds of movement are theoretically or historically capable of bringing about a transformed society?

– What are the criteria of success that activists operate with in terms of the forms of change social movements can achieve in the current conjuncture?

– Is revolutionary transformation a feasible option at present? Is revolution a goal among contemporary social movements?

– What are the characteristic features of elite deployment of coercive strategies when their hegemony is unravelling?

– How have global elites responded to the current crisis in terms of resort to coercion and consent? Have neoliberal elites been successful in trying to reestablish their legitimacy and delegitimizing opponents?

– Are we witnessing any bids for hegemony from elite groups outside the domain of Atlantic neoliberalism?

– How is coercion in its various forms impacting on contemporary social movements and the politics of global justice?

The deadline for contributions for the third issue is January 1, 2010.

Please contact the appropriate editor if you are thinking of submitting an article. You can access the journal and get further details at: http://www.interfacejournal.net/.

Interface is programmatically multilingual: at present we can accept and review submissions in Afrikaans, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. We are also willing to try and find suitable referees for submissions in other languages, but cannot guarantee that at this point.

We are also very much looking for activists or academics interested in becoming part of Interface, particularly with the African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, Mediterranean, Oceanian and North American groups.

Editorial contacts

Interface is not a traditional, centralised journal with a single key editor! Because we are a global journal, and movements (and their relationships to academia) are organised so differently in different parts of the world, the basic structure of the journal is as a network of regional or linguistically-defined groups, each of which organises its own editorial processes and tries to find an appropriate way of working with its own local realities. Articles and queries should go to the contact person listed below for the relevant region:

Movements in Africa: Please submit papers in Zulu, Afrikaans or English to Richard Pithouse indianocean77@gmail.com; in English to Mammo Muchie mammo@ihis.aau.dk; and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in the Arab world: Please submit papers in Arabic or English to Rana Barakat barakat.rana@gmail.com or Abdul-Rahim al-Shaikh aalshaikh@birzeit.edu; or in Arabic, English, German or Hebrew to Magid Shihade mshihade@gmail.com.

Movements in Central and South America: Please submit papers in Spanish to Sara Motta saracatherinem@googlemail.com or Adriana Causa acausa@gmail.com and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in Eastern Europe: Please submit papers in Croatian, English, German, Hungarian, Latvian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian or Turkish to Steffen Böhm steffen@essex.ac.uk or Andrejs Berdnikovs aberdnikovs@gmail.com.

Movements in North America: Please submit papers in English to Ray Sin raysin@ku.edu or Lesley Wood ljwood@yorku.ca.

Movements in South Asia: Please submit papers in English to Alf Nilsen alfgunvald@gmail.com . We are currently looking for another regional editor to work with Alf.

Movements in Southeast Asia and Oceania: Please submit papers in English to Elizabeth Humphrys lizhumphrys@gmail.com, in Spanish to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in Western Europe:
Please submit papers:
* in English to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com or Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie or
* in French or Italian to Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie or
* in German to Steffen Böhm steffen@essex.ac.uk or Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie
* in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com
* in Spanish to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com
* We can also accept papers in Catalan, Maltese and Norwegian: please contact Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie in relation to these.

Transnational Movements:
Please submit papers in English, Dutch, French and Spanish or with special reference to labour or social forums, to Peter Waterman pwaterma@gmail.com; in English, with special reference to dialogue-based movements, to Richard Moore rkm@quaylargo.com; in Arabic, English, German or Hebrew to Magid Shihade mshihade@gmail.com; or in English, French, Italian or German to Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie.

Book reviews: In English: please contact Aileen O’Carroll Aileen.OCarroll@nuim.ie.

Movements in Central Asia and East Asia: We are hoping to expand our intellectual and linguistic capacity to include these areas, but at present do not have sufficient editorial expertise to review papers on movements in these regions. Expressions of interest from potential regional editors, willing to help assemble a regional subgroup of academics and activists to review papers on movements in any of these regions, are very welcome.

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Capitalist Crisis: An Interview with Andrew Kliman

Anyone interested in the current crisis of capital would find this pamphlet by Andrew Kliman to be most timely and illuminating. Kliman demolishes several myths, over-exaggerations and hypes regarding the current crisis of capital and indicates its real roots. He shows that the ideas of Karl Marx have much greater explanatory power than those of Keynes or mainstream economics for understanding our predicament.

The full details regarding this pamphlet are:

Capitalist Crisis: An Interview with Andrew Kliman, Pamphlet No.4, November 2008, published by The Commune

Price £1 percopy + postage and packing

Available from Housemans Bookshop, Caledonian Road, King’s Cross, London, or order by email: uncaptiveminds@gmail.com

For more articles about the economic crisis, visit: http://thecommune.wordpress.com/category/2008-financial-crisis

Correspondence: The Commune, 2nd Floor, 145-147, St. John Street, London EC1V 4PY

The Commune: http://www.thecommune.co.uk

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The New SPACE (The New School for Pluralistic Anti-Capitalist Education)

PresentsWorse than They Want You to Think:
A Marxist Analysis of the Economic CrisisA talk by Andrew Kliman

Tuesday, October 21 at 7:00 p.m.
New York City
This talk will be held at TRS Inc. Professional Suite.
Located at 44 East 32nd Street, 11th floor (between Park & Madison Aves.), New York City

$7 – $10, Suggested Donation

Kliman will draw on Karl Marx’s value theory in order to explain how the crisis results from the weakness of the U.S. economy since the collapse of the dot-com bubble. He will also draw on Raya Dunayevskaya’s theory of state-capitalism in order to explain why supposedly “free-market” policymakers and economists are ushering in a new period of statified property and state control of the economy.
Andrew Kliman, professor of economics at Pace University, is the author of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency and a member of the New SPACE Organizing Committee. He has written two essays on the current economic crisis, “Trying to Save Capitalism from Itself” (April 25 http://www.marxisthumanismtoday.org and http://www.thehobgoblin.co.uk) and “A Crisis of Confidence” (Aug. 23, International Socialism journal, Issue no. 120, http://www.isj.org.uk).

The New SPACE (The New School for Pluralistic Anti-Capitalist Education) http://new-space.mahost.org/
new-space@mutualaid.org
Tel: 1 (800) 377-6183

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Currently listening :
Deadwing
By Porcupine Tree
Release date: 2005-04-26