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Annihilate Creativity!

Annihilate Creativity!

CULTURAL CAPITAL: THE RISE AND FALL OF CREATIVE BRITAIN

BY ROBERT HEWISON

OUT NOW

“Hewison’s analysis of how a golden age turned to lead is highly authoritative, well argued & conceptually robust.” Guardian

See: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

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Britain began the twenty-first century convinced of its creativity. Throughout the New Labour era, the visual and performing arts, museums and galleries, were ceaselessly promoted as a stimulus to national economic revival, a post-industrial revolution where spending on culture would solve everything, from national decline to crime. Tony Blair heralded it a “golden age.” Yet despite huge investment, the audience for the arts remained a privileged minority. So what went wrong?

In Cultural Capital, leading historian Robert Hewison gives an in-depth account of how creative Britain lost its way. From Cool Britannia and the Millennium Dome to the Olympics and beyond, he shows how culture became a commodity, and how target-obsessed managerialism stifled creativity. In response to the failures of New Labour and the austerity measures of the Coalition government, Hewison argues for a new relationship between politics and the arts.

————

ROBERT HEWISON is a historian of contemporary British culture. Beginning in 1939 with Under Siege, his series of books presents a portrait of Britain that runs from the perils of wartime to the counterrevolution of Thatcherism in The Heritage Industry. He is an internationally recognized authority on the work of John Ruskin, and has held chairs at Oxford, Lancaster and City Universities. He is an Associate of the think tank Demos, and has written on the arts for the Sunday Times since 1981. He has been a consultant to the Clore Duffield Foundation, the Gulbenkian Foundation, the Arts Council, the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Royal Shakespeare Company, and is on the editorial advisory board of the journal Cultural Trends.

————

“A brilliant analysis of the way that the intrinsic value of art was undermined by a Blair-led government’s attempts to control creative production and turn it into an instrument of social engineering. It is a timely warning about the dangers of political interference and a rallying cry for art to both be publicly supported and maintain a hard won independence. Art needs this independence from power in order to show us to ourselves in ways that the media and politics never do and never can.” – Antony Gormley

“Long Britain’s best chronicler of culture and political policy, Robert Hewison turns his unflinching gaze on the New Labour era, a time of targets, access and excellence for all, complete with the National Lottery, Cool Britannia, the Millennium Dome and the 2012 Olympics. It’s not a pretty sight, and his findings of folly, incompetence and vanity will entertain and disturb readers in equal measure. They should also embarrass any politicians and arts administrators who retain a degree of self-awareness.” – Alwyn Turner, author of A Classless Society

“This is essential reading for anyone who has the slightest interest in the funding of the arts in this country.” – Richard Eyre

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PAPERBACK: NOVEMBER 2014 / 288 pages / ISBN: 9781781685914 / £14.99 / $24.95 / $28.95 (Canada)

CULTURAL CAPITAL is available at a 40% discount (paperback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here:http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

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​First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cultural-capital-by-robert-hewison-out-now

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Joy Heroe

Joy Heroe

JOY FOREVER: POLITICAL ECONOMY OF SOCIAL CREATIVITY

Edited by Michał Kozłowski, Agnieszka Kurant, Janek Sowa, Krystian Szadkowski, Kuba Szreder

Joy Forever refers to the false promise of a common happiness, constantly played out by the proponents of the creative class and creative economy – the very promise that since Romanticism has been ascribed to art itself, a vow which remains unfulfilled. The aim of Free/Slow University’s publication is to scrutinize the false promises of distributed creativity as an ideology of cognitive capitalism. The authors devote themselves to critical examination of the structural links between art, creativity, labour and the creation of value under contemporary relations of production. Some of them do not stop at a critical diagnosis but go further, reflecting upon potential alternatives to the status quo.

The book covers more than the issues of a narrowly understood art world, despite the fact that it pays a lot of attention to them. Art is conceived here as a social lab, where innovative ways of organizing of
labour, socializing both for labour and through labour, as well as different types of production, speculation, generation and accumulation and appropriation of value are experimented with and tested.

Authors: Hans Abbing, Joanna Bednarek, Luc Boltanski, Isabelle Bruno, Neil Cummings, Diedrich Diederichsen, Freee Art Collective, Isabelle Graw, Alex Neumann, Precarious Workers Brigade, John Roberts, Gigi Roggero, Martha Rosler, Stevphen Shukaitis, Massimiliano Tomba, Marina Vishmidt.

Electronic version freely accessible at: http://mayflybooks.org/?page_id=107

Publishers: Free/Slow University of Warsaw (http://www.wuw-warsaw.pl), MayFly Books (http://www.mayflybooks.org) and Bęc Zmiana Foundation (http://www.funbec.pl)

Print version is available from MayFly Books and other distributors.

Joy

Joy

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Utopia

Utopia

MICRO-UTOPIAS: EXPLORING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN ANTHROPOLOGY, RELATIONALITY AND CREATIVITY

International Society for Ethnology and Folklore
Internationale Gesellschaft für Ethnologie und Folklore
Société Internationale d´Ethnologie et de Folklore

SIEF2015 12th Congress
Zagreb, Croatia
21-25 June 2015

SIEF2015 Call for Papers opens

The Call for Papers has opened for SIEF2015 and will stay open until January 14th. This Call for Panels brought in the highest number of panel proposals for a SIEF congress yet: there were 121 panel/workshop proposals in total. 108 panels were accepted, of which 2 are poster sessions and 5 workshops.

In order to consolidate the strong thematic currents inspired by the congress theme, the Scientific Committee decided to divide the accepted panels into 18 topical streams. Please go to the Call for Papers page to read more and submit your paper proposal.

 

Micro-utopias: exploring connections in anthropology, relationality and creativity

Convenors

Ruy Blanes (University of Bergen) email
Alex Flynn (Durham University) email
Jonas Leonhard Tinius (University of Cambridge and Universität zu Köln) email
Maïté Maskens (Université Libre de Bruxelles) email
Mail All Convenors

Short Abstract

In this panel we propose to discuss anthropological approaches – ethnographic or theoretical – to human interactions and processes of imagination and creativity, understood as “micro-utopias” following the work of Nicolas Bourriaud and others.

Long Abstract

In this panel we propose to discuss anthropological approaches – ethnographic or theoretical – to human interactions and processes of imagination and creativity. Inspired by the proposals set forth by Bourriaud (1998) concerning art as a product of a relational aesthetics that is a ‘micro-utopia’, a product of communitarian association (or antagonism – see Bishop 2004) working to change the present, we challenge our colleagues to use an understanding of social movement and organization as an art form whereby processes of interaction are understood as generative, transformational, poïetic micro-utopias. We thus propose to move beyond the concrete sphere of artistic production, seeing micro-utopias as part of our morphogenetic élan vital (Bergson 1907), the creativity and improvisation of our unscripted everyday lives (Hallam and Ingold 2008) that is however and necessarily framed as political act produced within historical context (Geuss 2009). Our goal is thus to engage with micro-utopias as ‘concrete utopias’ (McGuire 2011): examples – from artistic collaborations to architectural configurations, political localisms, economic partnerships, religious community makings, etc. – of relationalities and temporal redefinitions.

Discussant: Roger Sansi-Roca

Propose paper

Papers

The panel has no papers to display. Only accepted papers will be shown here: http://www.nomadit.co.uk/sief/sief2015/panels.php5?PanelID=3361

 

GENERAL SIEF CALL FOR PAPERS

SIEF2015 12th Congress: Zagreb, Croatia. 21-25 June 2015

Call for papers, workshop contributions and posters

The call for papers is now open and closes at midnight on January 14th, 2015.

Before you propose a paper, a workshop contribution or a poster, please read the theme of the congress, the rulesbelow, and then browse the list of panels.

For SIEF2015, panels have been divided into thematic streams: Archives, Body/Embodiment, Digital/Virtual, Disciplinary discussions, Food, Gender and sexuality, Heritage, Home, Migration/Borders, Museums, Narrative, Politics and social movements, Religion, Rural, Socialist and post-socialist studies, Urban. The specific streams are complemented by a “General” stream that includes panels that did not directly fit into any of the thematic streams. Apart from the panels, there is also the Workshops and posters stream that includes the workshops ans poster sessions. When browsing through the list of panels, you can alternate between the All panels view that shows all the panels in one list, regardless of the stream and the All streams view that shows the list of streams.

Proposing a paper

Paper proposals must consist of:

  • a paper/contribution/poster title
  • the name/s and email address/es of author/s
  • a short abstract of fewer than 300 characters
  • a long abstract of fewer than 250 words

All proposals must be made via the online form, not by email. There is a ‘propose a paper’ link beneath the long abstract of each panel page, workshop page and the poster session page (in the case of poster sessions and workshops, the “paper” will mean a workshop contribution or a poster proposal). Go to the panel/workshop/poster session page you are interested in and then click on this proposal link to make your proposal directly to that panel/workshop.

On submission of the proposal, the proposing author (but not the co-authors) will receive an automated email confirming receipt. If you do not receive this email, please first check the Login environment – Cocoa (see toolbar above right) to see if your proposal is there. If it is, it simply means your confirmation email got spammed/lost; if it is not, you will need to re-submit, as for some reason the process was not completed. Co-authors cannot be added/removed nor can papers be withdrawn by the proposers themselves – for that, please email congress(at)siefhome.org .

Proposals will be marked as pending until the end of the Call for papers (14/01/2015). Convenors will then be asked to make their decisions over the papers proposed to their panel by 28th of January and to communicate those to the proposers, marking them up within the login environment (Cocoa). Papers which are neither accepted nor rejected, but marked for ‘transfer’, will then be considered by the Scientific Committee to see where else they might fit in the conference programme. There is no guarantee that such papers can be re-housed. We aim to resolve all transfers by the end of February.

Rules

Delegates may only make one presentation, although they may also convene one plenary session or panel; or be a discussant or chair in one plenary session or panel. Even though delegates may make multiple proposals, we discourage this practice as later you will be required to withdraw papers if you have multiple acceptances, inconveniencing those convenors.

Delegates are not obliged to become members of SIEF for 2015, however all are encouraged to support the Society in this way. There will be a financial incentive to do so, in that non-members will pay a higher registration fee.

Workshops

Workshops are conceptualised as practical events, guided discussions and free-format exchanges leading to specific public outputs. They may include elements of performance, exhibition materials, or interactive media displays.

Poster sessions

The poster sessions are meant to provide everyone with the opportunity of presenting their work, without overburdening the program, and accommodate those who do not wish to present orally. Posters must confirm to the same basic requirements as outlined for the panel sessions. Sessions will run throughout the Congress, with dedicated slots when poster presenters will be available at their respective display to discuss their topic with the colleagues. Junior scholars are especially encouraged to participate with a poster presentation.

Useful information for later in this process

Editing your paper/workshop contribution/poster

Paper authors can use the login link in the toolbar above to edit their proposals.

Pre-circulation of papers

SIEF has no rule about this; however many convenors are keen to pre-circulate completed papers. To facilitate this and save on email traffic, if requested by convenors, authors can upload PDFs of their papers within the online system, which will then show as a downloadable file beneath their abstract on the public panel page on this site.

Timing of presentations

Each panel/workshop slot will be 90 minutes long, accommodating a maximum of 3 presenters; each panel/workshop may only extend over three slots, i.e. a maximum of 9 presenters and no longer than a day. Convenors should allot each presenter a maximum of 30 minutes (20 for presentation and 10 for questions/discussion).

We are unable to represent specific intra-panel timings in our programme. Delegates reading the conference book will have to work on the assumption that papers will be evenly distributed through the panel.

Communication between authors/convenors

Convenor/author email addresses are not shown on the panel pages for anti-spam reasons. However there is an in-built secure email messaging system. If you cannot work that, please email congress(at)siefhome.org to obtain relevant email addresses.

Any queries with the above please email congress(at)siefhome.org.

Website: http://www.siefhome.org/congresses/sief2015/cfp.shtml

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Critical Education / Education is Critical

Critical Education / Education is Critical

CREATIVE SPACES FOR COLLECTIVE VOICES – DPR15

Discourse, Power and Resistance Conference 2015

DPR15 – Creative spaces for collective voices
Goldsmiths, University of London, UK 15-17 April, 2015

We have for some time been looking into the effects of neoliberalism on culture, identity, and institutions – effects that have included ‘audit culture’ (Marilyn Strathern), self-branding, and the subsuming of any collective ‘voice’ into individualistic ‘consumer power’ (Nick Couldry). At the same time, we have struggled with the fading importance of structural inequalities in the minds of policymakers.

There are developing answers, though, in many theoretical idioms. Stephen Ball has commented that “both structural and poststructural theories and analyses are necessary for ‘bearing witness’ and for an adequate critical understanding of educational realities”. We could add to this that other kinds of practice, developed in fields like art or drama, also contribute to the working out of critique and the embodying of alternatives.

At DPR, these varied perspectives all find a home. Over the years, the conference has asked, how can we develop such creative theoretical approaches? And how would they look in practice? DPR 15 continues this line of work. Beyond critique, it asks how we can resist, subvert, and create spaces for multiple and collective voices, for change, and for social justice.

The conference brings together a range of practitioners, researchers, policy-makers, learners and teachers, who are actively engaged in these kinds of challenge. Presentations at the conference will take the form of papers, workshops, performances, exhibitions, and posters. We hope that presenters will come with ideas to share about research and practice, through single or joint presentations or as a contribution to any of the symposia that will be taking shape.

The DPR website is here.

If you have suggestions, or ideas for a contribution you would like to discuss, please contact the conference organizer,
Anna Carlile
DPRConference@gold.ac.uk
Call for Papers

We encourage proposals for presentations of papers (single or joint author), symposia, workshops, posters, exhibition work and performances. Please use the following format for your proposal:
·         Name(s) of presenter(s)
·         Institution(s), with country
·         Title of abstract
·         Format (paper, symposium presentation, workshop, poster, exhibition work, performance.)
·         Brief description (150-250 words)
Abstracts can be submitted here  or as Word attachments via email to DPRConference@gold.ac.uk Abstracts are available to be viewed at http://dprconf.wordpress.com/.

Deadline: January 30 2015

Presentations are allocated 35 minutes; presenters are encouraged to leave generous time (10 minutes or more) for discussion. Please let us know if you would like a double session (particularly if your proposal is for a workshop).

If you would like to discuss a presentation please contact Anna Carlile either by email
(DPRConference@gold.ac.uk) or on +44 (0)20 7717 2206.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Work

WORKING USA: THE JOURNAL OF LABOR AND SOCIETY (June 2012)

Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society

June 2012

Volume 15, Issue 2

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/wusa.2012.15.issue-2/issuetoc

The Changing Shape of Unions and Working Class Organizations: Lessons from North America and Europe (pages 149–151)

Immanuel Ness

ROBERT J. ALEXANDER’S U.S. LEFT-WING INTERVIEW COLLECTION AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF DISSIDENT COMMUNISM (pages 153–175)

Victor G. Devinatz

A RENEGADE UNION: ORGANIZING IN THE SERVICE AND DISTRIBUTIVE INDUSTRIES, SOME LESSONS FROM THE PAST (pages 177–195)

Lisa Phillips

THE CHICAGO COURIERS UNION, 2003–2010: A CASE STUDY IN SOLIDARITY UNIONISM (pages 197–215)

Colin Bossen

WHY WE NEED A SURVEY OF UNIONS (pages 217–232)

Jack Fiorito and Gregor Gall

GERMANY AND IRELAND UNEMPLOYMENT COMPARED, OR WHY GERMANY PROFITED FROM THE WORLD ECONOMIC CRISIS (pages 233–265)

Ralf Jeremias

LABOR UNIONS IN CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA: AN ASSESSMENT OF CONTRASTING FORMS OF ORGANIZATION AND REPRESENTATION (pages 267–283)

Irina Olimpieva

JUDGING WORK: WHAT LAW SEES OR DOES NOT SEE (pages 285–296)

Ellen Dannin

Commentary and Review Essays

WHO IS THE UNION? TWO STUDIES IN LABOR PATRIOTISM AND SHOP-FLOOR DISSENT (pages 297–303)

Steve Early

“THE SKY IS FALLING!” (pages 305–308)

Steve Leberstein

Book Reviews

Wisconsin Uprising: Labor Fights Back – Edited by Michael D. Yates (pages 309–313)

Fernando Gapasin

With God on Our Side: The Struggle for Workers Rights in a Catholic Hospital – By Adam D. Reich (pages 313–315)

Samantha Winslow

Play, Creativity and Social Movements – By Benjamin Shepard (pages 315–318)

Heather Gautney

Policing Sexuality: Sex, Society and the State – By Julian C. H. Lee (pages 319–320)

Harri Sutherland-Kay

Power, Freedom, Compassion: Transformations for a Better World – By Richard Winter (pages 320–322)

John Green

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/announcing-summer-2012-issue-of-wusa-the-journal-of-labor-and-society  

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Aesthetics

THE METROPOLITAN FACTORY: MAKING A LIVING AS A CREATIVE WORKER – A WORKERS’ INQUIRY

Minor Compositions is launching a workers’ inquiry into the shaping of creative, cultural, and artistic labor in the metropolis.

We are currently searching for accomplices and comrades to take part and further develop this investigation. There is a description and more information below.

Cheers
Stevphen Shukaitis

The Metropolitan Factory: making a living as a creative worker

Website: http://metropolitanfactory.wordpress.com
Short survey on creative labor here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/97K8BNK

Surviving as a cultural or artistic worker in the city has never been easy. Creative workers find themselves celebrated as engines of economic growth, economic recovery and urban revitalization even as the conditions for our continued survival become more precarious. How can you make a living today in such a situation? That is, how to hold together the demands of paying the rent and bills while managing all the tasks necessary to support one’s practice? How to manage the tensions between creating spaces for creativity and imagination while working through the constraints posed by economic conditions?

In a more traditional workplace it is generally easy to distinguish between those who planned and managed the labor process and those who were involved in its executions: between the managers and the managed. For creative workers these distinctions become increasingly hard to make. Today the passionate and self-motivated labor of the artisan increasingly becomes the model for a self-disciplining, self-managed labor force that works harder, longer, and often for less pay precisely because of its attachment to some degree of personal fulfilment in forms of engaging work. And that ain’t no way to make a living, having to struggle three times as hard for just to have a sense of engagement in meaningful work.

This project sets out to investigate how cultural workers in the metropolis manage these competing tensions and demands. The goal is to bring together the dispersed knowledges and experiences of creative workers finding ways to make a living in the modern metropolis. And by doing that to create a space to learn from this common experiences that often are not experienced as such while we work away in different parts of the city.

:: Minor Compositions ::
http://www.minorcompositions.info
Autonomous Politics & Aesthetics in the Revolutions of Everyday Life

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Nietzsche

ANTI-NIETZSCHE – BY MALCOLM BULL

NEW TITLE: ANTI-NIETZSCHE
By MALCOLM BULL
Published: 21 NOVEMBER 2011
——————————–
“A great thought-experiment…an astonishing call to arms (or to disarm)” – T. J. CLARK
——————————–
Nietzsche, the philosopher seemingly opposed to everyone, has met with remarkably little opposition himself. He remains what he wanted to be-the limit-philosopher of a modernity that never ends. In this provocative, sometimes disturbing book, Bull argues that merely to reject Nietzsche is not to escape his lure. He seduces by appealing to our desire for victory, our creativity, our humanity. Only by ‘reading like a loser’ and failing to live up to his ideals can we move beyond Nietzsche to a still more radical revaluation of all values-a subhumanism that expands the boundaries of society until we are left with less than nothing in common.

ANTI-NIETZSCHE is a subtle and subversive engagement with Nietzsche and his twentieth-century interpreters-Heidegger, Vattimo, Nancy, and Agamben. Written with economy and clarity, it shows how a politics of failure might change what it means to be human.
———————————
Praise for MALCOLM BULL:

“Malcolm Bull is one of the English language’s foremost thinkers, philosophers and art historians” – LUC BOLTANSKI

Praise for THE MIRROR OF THE GODS:

“Magnificent…gripping…so well told” – SUNDAY TIMES

“A book that transforms our understanding of Renaissance art” – DAILY TELEGRAPH

“A treasure of scholarship that is most unlikely to be superseded.” – TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION:
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storyCode=203534&sectioncode=20

“An extremely learned work… how he manages to cram in so much learning – from all the variant ancient literary sources, to an uncountable number of Renaissance interpretations – is quite astonishing” – GUARDIAN:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2006/may/20/art

Praise for SEEING THINGS HIDDEN:

“A brilliantly idiosyncratic thinker with solidly progressive allegiances… SEEING THINGS HIDDEN makes a sustained argument in political philosophy and cultural theory, deeply pondered and finely wrought.” – JONATHAN REE, NEW LEFT REVIEW
———————————
MALCOLM BULL is a theorist and art historian who teaches at Oxford. His books include SEEING THINGS HIDDEN, THE MIRROR OF THE GODS, and ANTI-NIETZSCHE. He is on the editorial board of NEW LEFT REVIEW and writes for the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS.
———————————
ISBN: 978 1 85984 574 5 / $26.95/£16.99/$33.50CAN / Hardback / 224 pages
———————————–
For more information about ANTI-NIETZSCHE, or to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/1010-anti-nietzsche
———————————
Academics can request an inspection copy. For further information please go to: http://www.versobooks.com/pg/desk-copies

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

THE POLITICS OF UTOPIA: MARXISM, MYTH AND RELIGION

UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD
BAKHTIN CENTRE

The Politics of Utopia: Marxism, Myth and Religion
Friday, 19th November 2010

Workshop jointly organised by the Centre for Ernst Bloch Studies and the Bakhtin Centre

Humanities Research Institute, Gell St., University of Sheffield.

10.00 – 11.00: Reception and coffee

11.00 – 12.30 

Peter Thompson (Sheffield): “The Communist Hypothesis and the Invariant of Direction: Badiou, Bloch and the political theology of the impossible”

Craig Brandist (Sheffield): “Semantic Palaeontology and the Passage from Myth to Science and Poetry: The Work of Izrail Frank-Kamenetskii (1880-1937)”

12.30 – 13.30: Lunch

13.30 – 15.00

Esther Leslie (Birkbeck): “Mountains and Crystals: Utopia in the Snows of Weimar”

Richard Howells (King’s College London): “Creation and Creativity: Utopia and Navajo Design”

15.00 – 15.30: Coffee

15.30 – 17.00

Caitríona Ní Dhúill (Durham): “Experiments with the name of God: Bloch’s reading of mystery”

Johan Siebers (IGRS/Lancaster): “Parks and Deserts: Outline of a Blochian environmental philosophy”

17.00 – 18.00: Wine reception

18.00 – 19.30

Film screening and discussion in the Exhibition Space (titles TBA)

— 
Craig Brandist,
Professor of Cultural Theory and Intellectual History,
Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies,
University of Sheffield,
Jessop West,
1 Upper Hanover Street,
Sheffield, S3 7RA.
Tel. +44 (0)114 2227413
fax +44 (0)114 275 1198

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Culture

REVIEWS IN CULTURAL THEORY – UPDATE AUGUST 2010

New reviews in Reviews in Cultural Theory are now accessible online at reviewsinculture.com. We’re also seeking reviewers for new and forthcoming books. Please see our list of books for which we’re seeking reviewers below and email us at editors@reviewsinculture.com, if you are interested in contributing a review.

Summer reviews:

Erin Wunker reviews Barbara Godard’s Canadian Literature at the Crossroads of Language and Culture.

Will Straw reviews Davin Heckman’s A Small World: Smart Houses and the Dream of the Perfect Day. 

Evan Mauro reviews Seth Moglen’s Mourning Modernity: Literary Modernism and the Injuries of American Capitalism.

Matthew MacLellan reviews Gerald Raunig’s A Thousand Machines: A Concise Philosophy of the Machine as a Social Movement.

Gerry Canavan reviews Mark Bould and China Miéville’s Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction.

Melissa Aronczyk reviews Guy Julier and Liz Moor’s Design and Creativity: Policy, Management and Practice.

Books for review:

Anderson, Patrick. So Much Wasted: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance. Duke UP, 2010.

Aronczyk, Melissa, and Devon Powers, eds. Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture. Peter Lang, 2010.

Blanco, Maria del Pilar and Esther Peeren. Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture. Continuum Press, 2010. 

Bowman, Paul, ed. The Rey Chow Reader. Columbia UP, 2010. 

Chatterjee, Partha. Empire and Nation: Selected Essays. Columbia UP, 2010.

Coole, Diana and Samantha Frost, eds. New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics. Duke UP, 2010.

Dabashi, Hamid. Brown Skin, White Masks. Pluto Press, 2010.

The Edu-factory Collective. Toward a Global Autonomous University: Cognitive Labor, The Production of Knowledge, and Exodus from the Education Factory. Autonomedia, 2009.

Foley, Barbara. Wrestling with the Left: The Making of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. Duke UP, 2010.

Floyd, Kevin. The Reification of Desire: Toward a Queer Marxism.  University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Fumagalli, Andrea and Sandro Mezzadra, eds. Crisis in the Global Economy: Financial Markets, Social Struggles, and New Political Scenarios. Semiotext(e), 2010.

Gregg, Melissa and Gregory J. Seigworth, eds.  The Affect Theory Reader. Duke UP, 2010.

Grossberg, Lawrence. Cultural Studies in the Future Tense. Duke UP, 2010.

Hill, Rod and Tony Myatt. The Economics Anti-Textbook: A Critical Thinker’s Guide to Microeconomics. Zed, 2010.

Hitchcock, Peter. The Long Space: Transnationalism and Postcolonial Form. Stanford UP, 2010.

Holmes, Brian. Unleashing the Collective Phantoms: Essays in Reverse Imagineering. Pluto Press, 2010.

Johnson-Woods, Toni. Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. Continuum Press, 2010.

Kim, Jodi. Ends of Empire: Asian American Critique and the Cold War. U of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Kusch, Rodolfo. Indigenous and Popular Thinking in America. Duke UP, 2010.

Lanza, Fabio. Behind the Gate: Inventing Students in Beijing. Columbia UP, 2010.

Latour, Bruno. On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods.  Duke UP, 2010.

Lepecki, Andre and Jenn Joy, eds. Planes of Composition: Dance, Theory and the Global. U of Chicago P, 2010.

Merrifield, Andy. Magical Marxism: Subversive Politics and the Imagination. Pluto Press, 2010.

Nguyen, Vinh-Kim. The Republic of Therapy: Triage and Sovereignty in West Africa’s Time of AIDS. Duke UP, 2010.

Paik, Peter. From Utopia to Apocalypse: Science Fiction and the Politics of Catastrophe. U of Minnesota P, 2010.

Pasotti, Eleonora. Political Branding in Cities: The Decline of Machine Politics in Bogota, Naples, and Chicago. Cambridge UP, 2010.

Rancière, Jacques, and Steven Corcoran. Chronicles of Consensual Times. Continuum, 2010.

Seth, Vanita. Europe’s Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500–1900. Duke UP, 2010.

Sharpe, Christina. Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects. Duke UP, 2010.

Sholette, Gregory. Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture. Pluto Press, 2010.

Toscano, Alberto. Fanaticism: On The Uses of An Idea. Verso, 2010.

Reviews in Cultural Theory

Department of English and Film Studies

3-5 Humanities Centre

University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

T6G 2E5

For more about, and the origins of, Reviews in Cultural Theory see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/reviews-in-cultural-theory/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Alternative Culture

ALTERNATIVE CULTURE NOW: THE POLITICS OF CULTURE AT THE PRESENT CONJUNCTURE

 

Call for Proposals:

‘Alternative Culture Now: The Politics of Culture at the Present Conjuncture’
Conference and Event
Budapest, Hungary
April 8-10, 2010

Proposal Deadline: January 25, 2010

How do things stand with respect to the fate of the alternative? Branded and normativized, incorporated into a whole ensemble of mainstream discourses, and no longer the threat it once posed to capitalist and communist states alike, the political and social force of the alternative seems to have faded away. And yet the dream of the alternative continues to inspire political and social movements, artists, theorists, and all kinds of creative practices. How might we begin to situate and think alternativity as a global phenomenon at this precise conjuncture in world history? What is alternative about culture today? And what might or can it become?

The alternative, of course, has always been phraseable in the singular and the plural. On the one hand, it is a phenomenon locked into local configurations, a multi-polar and non-totalizable practice of myriad deviation. Here, its ambit can be that of a family drama or workplace, a national concatenation, or the homogenizing logic of a dominant cultural medium or genre. The dreams it holds in reserve are vitally minor: the fissuring of a regime with a joke or dissidence, the freedom mobilized in small, almost imperceptible defections or reversals. The production of the alternative is in this sense the aggregate, spontaneous effort of innumerable cultural agents to resist every species of stasis and capture, every grammar and vernacular, every gestural hierarchy and total system.

At the same time, this molecular vision of the alternative, of a plurality of fissions and margins, has always been accompanied by attempts to think what it is in the tendency of a moment which suppresses cultural possibilities on a global level. This is a dream of a communication or inter-mediation between margins, a system of deviances which comprehensively address the conditions which negatively hypostatize the life of the virtual. Global patriarchy, violent state expansionisms, the inhibiting logics of capital, and the globalization of the English language can be envisioned as transnational, systematized normativities that threaten cultural specificity or possibility in a way that is never exhausted by its expression on the register of the local. Is there, in this sense, only one alternative: an alternative to which there is no alternative? This notion of a single alternative-a universal difference necessary to shelter the future lives of difference–immediately sets into motion its own paradoxical dialectics of alternativity, itself appearing to erase the thing it promises. How do we escape this vortex, or at least make its impasses productive?

Is one alternative more important than another? Can alternatives be exhausted or rendered obsolete? What kind of method could we develop to test the valences of alternatives? Can or should alternative culture polemically charge the space of its own marginality, or would this degenerate into an infinite sectarianism?

We understand “alternative culture” to include diverse forms of cultural expression and activity, which are connected by their shared goal of creating just, humane, and equitable human relations by means of their opposition to existing cultural, social, and political forms.

This conference encourages contributions from scholars, educators, artists, cultural workers, policy makers, journalists, and others involved in alternative culture and international cultural policies. We are especially interested in contributions addressing alternative culture in Central/Eastern Europe and countries/regions of the former Soviet Union.

Areas of inquiry for submissions may include, but are not limited to, the following general topics in relation to the politics of alternative culture today:

Aesthetics – Collectivity – post-Communist Culture – Creativity – Cultural Studies – Eastern Europe – Geography -Globalization – Higher Education – Media – Memory/Nostalgia – Music – New Media – ex-Socialist History – ex-Soviet Urban Spaces – Visual Culture

The “Alternative Culture Now: The Politics of Culture at the Present Conjuncture” conference will take place at the OSA Archivum in Budapest, Hungary, April 8-10, 2010. It is organized and sponsored by the International Alternative Culture Center, with the support of the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology (Central European University) and the Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies (University of Alberta). The conference format will be diverse, including paper presentations, panels, round-table exchanges, artistic performances, and exhibitions. We encourage individual and collaborative paper and panel proposals from across the disciplines and from artists and community members.

Paper Submissions should include: (1) contact information; (2) a 300-500 word abstract; and (3) a one page curriculum vitae or a brief bio.

Panel Proposals should include: (1) a cover sheet with contact information for chair and each panelist; (2) a one-page rationale explaining the relevance of the panel to the theme of the conference; (3) a 300 word abstract for each proposed paper; and (4) a one page curriculum vitae for each presenter.

Please submit individual paper proposals or full panel proposals via e-mail attachment by January 25, 2010 to 
alternativeculturenow@gmail.com with the subject line “Alternative Culture Now.” Attachments should be in .doc or .rtf formats. Submissions should be one document (i.e. include all required information in one attached document).

Website: http://www.alternativeculture.org

Conference Organizing Team: Sarah Blacker (University of Alberta, Canada), Jessie Labov (Ohio State, USA), Andrew Pendakis (University of Bonn, Germany), Justin Sully (McMaster University, Canada), Imre Szeman (University of Alberta, Canada), Maria Whiteman (University of Alberta, Canada), and Olga Zaslavskaya (OSA, Hungary)

Sarah Blacker
Department of English and Film Studies
3-5 Humanities Centre
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
T6G 2E5

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

DeadwingWORK, PLAY & BOREDOM

Call for Papers on ‘Work, Play & Boredom’ for an ephemera Conference at University of St. Andrews, 5-7 May 2010. Deadline for abstracts: 31 January 2010.

In recent years, play has become an abiding concern in the popular business literature and a crucial aspect of organizational culture. While managerial interest in play has certainly been with us for some time, there is a sense that organizations are becoming ever-more receptive to incorporating fun and frivolity into everyday working life. Team-building exercises, simulation games, puzzle-solving activities, office parties, themed dress-down days, and colourful, aesthetically-stimulating workplaces are notable examples of this trend. Through play, employees are encouraged to express themselves and their capabilities, thus enhancing job satisfaction, motivation, and commitment. Play also serves to unleash an untapped creative potential in management thinking that will supposedly result in innovative product design, imaginative marketing strategies and, ultimately, superior organizational performance. Play, it seems, is a very serious business indeed.

But this has not always been the case. Until very recently, play was seen as the antithesis of work. Classical industrial theory, for examples, hinges on a fundamental distinction between waged labour and recreation. Play at work is thought to pose a threat not only to labour discipline, but also to the very basis of the wage bargain: in exchange for a day’s pay, workers are expected to leave their pleasures at home. Given this context, we can well understand Adorno’s (1978: 228) comment that the purposeless play of children – completely detached from selling one’s labour to earn a living – unconsciously rehearses the ‘right life’. But play no longer holds the promise of life after capitalism, as it once did for Adorno; today, the ‘unreality of games’ is fully incorporated within the reality of  
organizations. When employees are urged to reach out to their ‘inner child’ (Miller, 1997: 255), it becomes clear that the traditional boundary between work and play is in the process of being demolished.

A certain utopianism underpins contemporary debates about play at work, evoking the pre-Lapsarian ideal of a happy life without hard work. In this respect, organizations seem to have taken notice of Burke’s (1971: 47) compelling vision of paradise: ‘My formula for utopia is simple: it is a community in which everyone plays at work and works at play. Anything less would fail to satisfy me for long’. But such idealism is not necessarily desirable. For while play promises to relieve the monotony and boredom of work, it is intimately connected to new forms of management control: it is part of the panoply of techniques that seek to align the personal desires of workers with bottom-line corporate objectives. We should not be surprised, then, when an overbearing emphasis on fun in the workplace leads to cynicism, alienation, and resentment from employees (Fleming, 2005).

While play at work has been extensively discussed in the popular and academic literature, the role of boredom in organisations has been somewhat neglected. It seems that boredom is destined to share the fate of other ‘negative emotions’, such as anger and contempt, which have generally been silenced in organization studies (Pelzer 2005). But boredom remains an important part of organisational life. As Walter Benjamin (1999: 105) observes, ‘we are bored when we don’t know what we are waiting for’. Boredom thus contains a sense of anticipation, even promise: ‘Boredom is the threshold to great deeds’ (ibid.). Since capitalism is preoccupied with fun and games, perhaps it is boredom rather than play that now serves unconsciously to rehearse the ‘right life’ in contemporary times.

This ephemera conference and special issue ask its participants to explore the interrelated themes of work, play, and boredom alongside an exploration of the cultural and political context out of which they have emerged.

Possible topics include:
–    The politics of play
–    Play and reality
–    Anthropology of play
–    Play and utopia
–    The boredom of play
–    Boredom as resistance
–    Identity and authenticity when played
–    The blurring of work and play
–    Playfulness at work
–    Creativity and play
–    Experience economy
–    Management games
–    Cultures of fun
–    Play and pedagogy
–    Seriousness and indifference
–    Foolishness and fooling around
–    Tedium and repetition
–    Humour, jokes, and cynicism
–    Childishness and management
–    Invention and innovation through play
–    Organizing spontaneity

The best papers of the conference will be published in a special issue of ephemera.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Niels Åkerstrøm Andersen, Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. Author of many books, including his recent Power at Play: The Relationship between Play, Work and Governance (2009, Palgrave Macmillan).

Professor René ten Bos, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. His many books include Fashion and Utopia in Management Thinking (John Benjamins, 2000).

Dates and Location:

5-7 May 2010 at School of Management, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.

Deadline, Conference Website, and Further Information:

The deadline for abstracts is 31 January 2010. The abstracts should be submitted as a Word document to Martyna Sliwa at martyna.sliwa@newcastle.ac.uk  The conference fee has not been set yet, as it is dependent on the number of participants, but will be kept to a minimum. PhD candidates pay a reduced fee.

Further information about the conference can be found on the conference website: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/conference With queries, you can also contact one of the conference organizers: Bent Meier Sørensen (bem.lpf@cbs.dk), Lena Olaison (lo.lpf@cbs.dk), Martyna Sliwa (martyna.sliwa@ncl.ac.uk), Nick Butler (nick.butler@st-andrews.ac.uk), Stephen Dunne (s.dunne@le.ac.uk), Sverre Spoelstra (sverre.spoelstra@fek.lu.se).

References:

Adorno, T. (1978) Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life. London and New York: Verso.
Benjamin, W. (1999) The Arcades Project. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press.
Burke, R. (1971) ‘“Work” and “play”’, Ethics, 82(1): 33-47.
Fleming, P. (2005) ‘Workers’ playtime? Boundaries and cynicism in a “culture of fun” programme’, Journal of Applied Behavioural Science, 41(3): 285-303.
Miller, J. (1997) ‘All work and no play may be harming your business’, Management Development Review, 10(6/7): 254-255.
Pelzer, P. (2005) ‘Contempt and organization: Present in practice – Ignored by research?’ Organization Studies, 26(8): 1217-1227.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Deadwing

Deadwing

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski