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Ruth Rikowski

DIGITAL FUTURES

We have 2 places remaining on the Digital Futures Academy run by Simon Tanner and Tom Clareson.

The full programme and rates are available here: http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/digifutures/london.html

Guest speakers include:
Professor Tim Hitchcock, University of Hertfordshire
William Kilbride, Digital Preservation Coalition
Alistair Dunning, The European Library

We will visit behind the scenes at The National Gallery and The British Library.

If you wish to come then please email me.

We have 23 delegates so far this year from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, representing libraries, museums, archives, plus corporate and national repositories. Delegates range from senior management, curatorial and content specialists to technical implementation staff.

All my best
Simon Tanner

Digital Futures Academy
The British Library, London
March 19-23, 2012
http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/digifutures/london.html

King’s College London is pleased to announce the Digital Futures Academy 5-day training event. We are thrilled that this year it will be hosted at The British Library.

Digital Futures focuses on the creation, delivery and preservation of digital resources from cultural and memory institutions. Lasting five days, Digital Futures is aimed at managers and other practitioners from the library, museum, heritage and cultural sectors looking to understand the strategic and management issues of developing digital resources from digitisation to delivery. Delegates will also receive 2 half day visits with expert talks and behind the scenes tours of The National Gallery and The British Library.

As the Academy enters its 9th year we invite you to join our experts of international renown in London, UK. Delegates from over 40 countries have experienced the benefits of the Digital Futures Academy. This is what they have said:
               “Excellent – I would recommend DF to anyone anticipating a digitization program”
               “I was very pleased. The team was exceptionally knowledgeable, friendly and personable.”
               “Thanks, it has been an invaluable experience.”
               “A really useful course and great fun too!”

Digital Futures is led by Simon Tanner, Director of Digital Consultancy at King’s College London and Tom Clareson, Lyrasis. They have over 20 years experience each and worked on over 500 digital projects across the world in delivering digital content or preserving culture. They will be supported by Alistair Dunning of  The European Library and William Kilbride of the Digital Preservation Coalition.  Other experts at the National Gallery and The British Library will give talks during the tours.

Digital Futures  covers the following core areas:
               Planning and management
               Fund raising
               Understanding the audience
               Social media and its impact
               Metadata – introduction and implementation
               Copyright and intellectual property
               Sustainability, value and impact
               Financial issues
               Implementing digital resources
               Digital preservation
A certificate of attainment is offered to all Digital Futures Academy delegates on completion of the course.

If you are interested, please email me as soon as possible, spaces are limited.

Best regards,
Simon

Simon Tanner
Director of Digital Consultancy (KDCS)
Department of Digital Humanities
King’s College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL

Email: simon.tanner@kcl.ac.uk
Web: www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/ http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/ and www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/
Twitter: @SimonTanner http://twitter.com/#!/SimonTanner
Phone: +44(0)7887-691716 (direct)   +44(0)20-7848-2861 (Dept Office)

Co-Director of MA in Digital Asset Management<http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/depts/cch/pg/madam/>
DDH research and teaching: my personal page<http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh/people/core/tanner/index.aspx>

 **END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

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The Entire Net

MARXISM AND NEW MEDIA CONFERENCE – DUKE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS / CALL FOR PROJECTS: MARXISM AND NEW MEDIA
DUKE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM IN LITERATURE (DURHAM, NC)
JANUARY 20 & 21, 2012
KEYNOTES: ALEX GALLOWAY (NYU) and RICARDO DOMINGUEZ (UCSD)
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: OCTOBER 30, 2011

CONTACT: marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

New media technologies are leading to the emergence of vibrant public spaces in countries like China and Tunisia, facilitating previously restricted dissent and political deliberation. Similarly, scholars, journalists, and activists are using networking and social media to organize coalitions and mobilize resistance in contexts as diverse as the Wisconsin protests, the Wall Street protests, and the so-called “Arab Spring.” In an ironic self-critique, smartphone applications like the newly released “Phone Game” are even exposing the global working conditions and problematic material production of contemporary consumer technology through their very gameplay. With the implicit resistance to hegemony and material critique in these examples, Marxism offers both methodological and interpretive tools for interfacing with new media, not least among them a dialectical analysis of the global relations of production. However, writing in the Nation, Chris Lehmann has recently argued that the Internet is less the harbinger of post-capitalist cyber-Utopia than a “digital plantation” in which unpaid digital labor and leisure time become transmogrified into ad revenue. In their article, “The Internet’s Unholy Marriage to Capitalism,” John Bellamy Foster and Robert W. McChesney likewise argue that the Internet and related media signify not the suspension of the laws of capitalism, but rather their final perfection.

It seems, then, that a number of unresolved questions linger concerning the ways new media both participate in and creatively resist institutional power. As such, we hope to provide a fresh articulation interrogating the intersection between the theories and practices of new media technologies and Marxist critique. For example: how should we consider the economic, environmental, and human costs incurred in the production of new media technologies? How might resistance and radical change emerge among the ongoing institutionalization, and the incumbent conservatism, of both Marxism and new media studies? How will we navigate through the internal divisions of an academy that has eagerly appropriated new media as a strategy to “reinvigorate” the humanities through renewed funding and (often) corporate partnership?

We invite both papers and creative/artistic work that address these issues and others that deal with the engagement of Marxist thought and the study of media technologies. Papers may intervene at points of seeming incompatibility, address the current place of this convergence in one or many institutional and cultural settings, or perhaps look forward to emerging discourses relating to this intersection.

 

Possible paper, project, and panel topics might include:

* New Opportunities for Resistance, Wikileaks, Hacking and Hacktivism, Pirate Culture, the Arab Spring, the Jasmine Revolution, and Anonymous

* Immaterial Labor, User-Generated Content, the Knowledge Worker, Affective Labor, Precariousness and “the Precariat,” the DigitalPlantation, and the Attention Economy

* Intellectual Property, Copyright,Creative Commons, Open Access and Open Source Practices, and Virtual Property

* New Forms of Collectivity, Wikipedia, Crowdsourcing, Flash Mobs, Smart Mobs, and Partcipatory Journalism

* New Regimes of Control, Censorship, Filtering, Firewalls, and Search Engine Rankings

* New Media Art

* Critical Code Studies

* Critical Game Studies

* Biomedicine and Biometrics

* Energy, Ecology, Tech Trash

* The Open University

* ‘Re-Visualizing’ Marxism

* Ideology, Contact Zones, and Interfaces

 

Please send a 250-500 word abstract to marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com by October 30, 2011.

ORGANIZERS
Zach Blas
Gerry Canavan
Amanda Starling Gould
Rachel Greenspan
Melody Jue
Lisa Klarr
Clarissa Lee
John Stadler
Michael Swacha
Karim Wissa

 

Marxism and New Media Conference: http://literature.duke.edu/marxism-and-new-media-conference

CONTACT: marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

 

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Archive

LIBRARIES IN THE DIGITAL AGE

The Association of Independent Libraries

Libraries in a Digital Age 

A one-day conference on the problems and opportunities facing libraries in the age of the Internet 

To be held at the Royal Astronomical Society, 

Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BQ 

Thursday 14 October 2010 

10.30 a.m. – 4.30 p.m. 

Programme 

10.30 Coffee and Welcome 

10.45 Social networking: just a lot of twittering?  Gwyneth Price

Gwyneth Price is Head of Collection Development Services at the Institute of Education (London) and is particularly interested in information literacy and the use of social networking software in libraries.  Her presentation will focus on some examples of Web 2.0 technologies and how they impact on libraries in the digital age. 

11.30 A plan for the future of our public library service.  Tim Coates 

Tim Coates is an author and was head of Waterstone’s bookshops in its early years. For the last decade he has become widely known for his pursuit of the improvement of the public library service. For his address to the conference on libraries in the digital age Tim has indicated his intention to use this opportunity to make a major statement on the state of libraries in England and what needs to be done for them to survive and fill a role for future generations.

12.15 The Oxford-Google Book Digitization Partnership.  Michael Popham

Michael Popham is Head of the Oxford Digital Library, a core service of the Bodleian Libraries, serving the University of Oxford. Michael has been working in the fields of digitization and electronic text creation for more than two decades, and co-ordinates Oxford’s collaboration with Google Books. The Bodleian Library was one of the first five libraries to began collaboration with the Google Books Library Project (see http://books.google.com/googlebooks/partners.html). This presentation will outline the Partnership’s efforts to digitize the Bodleian’s entire holdings of out-of-copyright C19th material, and the lessons we have learned from this challenging endeavour.

13.00 Lunch

14.00 Merchants of Culture: the publishing industry in the 21st century. Professor John B Thompson 

John B. Thompson is Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge. His publications include Books in the Digital Age (2005) and Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century (2010). The book publishing industry today is facing some of the greatest challenges it has known since Gutenberg. Caught in the pincer of an economic downturn and a digital revolution, everyone involved in the book business – publishers, agents and booksellers – is being forced to rethink what they do. Based on ten years of in-depth research on the publishing industry, Thompson analyses some of the key changes that have transformed the industry in recent years and shows how publishers are seeking to rethink their practices in the face of an uncertain future. 

14.45 Copyright and the Knowledge Commons.  Martyn Everett

Martyn Everett, writer, historian, former librarian and Chairman of Saffron Walden Town Library Society. The internet and digitisation provide the opportunity to create a knowledge and information Commons in which libraries could play a key role.  Yet the combination of new technology, commercialisation, and changes in the nature of ‘copyright’ threaten to constrict and regulate access to information as never before. Which side are you on?

15.30 Tour of the Royal Astronomical Society Library including a short talk about the Library’s digitisation programme by Librarian Peter Hingley. 

16.30 Concluding remarks 

Timings are approximate and the organisers reserve the right to change the programme without notification 

Cost £40 per person including lunch. 

Please make cheques payable to “The Association of Independent Libraries’ and send to: 

The Association of Independent Libraries, c/o The Leeds Library, 18 Commercial Street, Leeds LS1 6AL 

Tel: 0113-245-3071 

enquiries@theleedslibrary.org.uk

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Pirates Only

PIRATES AND PIRACY – MATERIAL REALITIES AND CULTURAL MYTHS

Editorial Notes: Pirates and Piracy – Material Realities and Cultural Myths

By Andrew Opitz

This special issue of darkmatter sets out to examine the complicated and often incongruous cultural meanings assigned to pirates and piracy in the twenty-first century. Debates about piracy have long featured certain telling contradictions. At different times, pirates have been seen as both violent monsters and colorful folk heroes. They have been cast by historians and cultural critics as both capitalist marauders and militant workers fighting for a restoration of the commons. How can we account for these seemingly incompatible visions? Of course, it is important to observe that pirates were hardly uniform in their social and political orientations. Some were greedy opportunists. Some were desperate sailors and slaves driven to mutiny. Others were somewhere in-between. We should also recognize that our understanding of piracy is powerfully shaped by our economic interests and our relationship with the law. The propertied targets of piratical theft are quick to view pirates as criminal actors outside the bounds of civilized behaviour, but the dispossessed are inclined to take a more nuanced approach that admires the defiance of the pirates at the same time as it fears their violence.

It is also important to note that pirates now have a symbolic importance that transcends the basic material conditions behind their banditry. Our enduring cultural fascination with pirates is tied to their status as celebrated figures of rebellion and nonconformity in popular novels and films. Although the actual history of maritime robbery is sordid and contradictory, the pirate has become a compelling symbol of freedom: freedom from oppressive work routines; freedom from polite behaviour; freedom from institutional controls; freedom from restrictive property laws; freedom from unjust social conventions surrounding race and gender roles. We now apply the pirate label to an assortment of activities – from the formation of transgressive sexual identities to the technology-assisted defiance of copyright law – that have little or nothing to do with the sea or those who “go down to it in ships.” The articles assembled in this special issue take a broad approach to the study of pirates and piracy, examining diverse subjects ranging from the working-class politics of transatlantic piracy in the eighteenth century to the actions of Nigerian media pirates in the twenty-first century and recent debates about Somali pirates within East African immigrant communities in North America.

The authors who contributed to this special issue of darkmatter have approached the cultural politics of pirates and piracy from different angles. They are historians, literary critics, legal scholars and media/cultural theorists. However, their scholarship is linked by the shared understanding that modern piracy, like the modern world itself, is inextricably bound to the history of colonial and neo-colonial relations of production and the legacy of racial and class conflict that they produced – a history that forged the global capitalist order that continues to shape our everyday relationships with other people. 

Pirates are often dismissed in the media as exotic anachronisms – colorful characters out of step with present realities. But the forces that produced, and continue to produce pirates – global shipping, the extraction of resources from colonial and neocolonial holdings, the mobilization and control of labor in the service of investment capital – still drive our world today. Studying pirates and their ongoing cultural resonance is hardly a frivolous activity. It is necessary for a true understanding of the socially uneven, violent and unstable world in which we live – a world that is still very much at sea.

Andrew Opitz
Guest Editor

Editorial Notes: Pirates and Piracy – Material Realities and Cultural Myths by Andrew Opitz • 20 Dec 09

Revolution Bootlegged: Pirate Resistance in Nigeria’s Broken Infrastructure by Jason Crawford • 20 Dec 09

Digital Pirates and the Enclosure of the Intellect by Irmak Ertuna • 20 Dec 09

Where’s the Booty?: The Stakes of Textual and Economic Piracy as Seen Through the Work of Kathy Acker by Paige Sweet • 20 Dec 09

Life Under the Jolly Roger: Reflections on Golden Age Piracy – Interview with Gabriel Kuhn by Nora Räthzel • 20 Dec 09

Hostis humani generis. History of a multi-faceted word by Salvatore Poier • 20 Dec 09

Atlantic Orientalism: How Language in Jefferson’s America Defeated the Barbary Pirates by Angela Sutton • 20 Dec 09

Voyage of the Black Joke: Piracy and Gallows Humor in an Era of Primitive Accumulation by Andrew Opitz • 20 Dec 09

The Pirate and the Colonial Project: Kanhoji Angria by Derek L. Elliott • 20 Dec 09

Unravelling Narratives of Piracy: Discourses of Somali Pirates by Muna Ali and Zahra Murad • 20 Dec 09

‘Liberty or Life!’: The Convict Pirates of the Wellington by Erin Ihde • 20 Dec 09

See: http://www.darkmatter101.org/site/category/journal/issues/5-pirates-and-piracy/

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Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski