Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Copyleft

Anarchism

CONTEMPORARY ANARCHIST STUDIES

LAUNCH OF NEW BOOK SERIES: CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS
CONTEMPORARY ANARCHIST STUDIES
CONTINUUM BOOKS

In association with the U.K. Anarchist Studies Network, the North American Anarchist Studies Network, and AK Press

This new book series, the first peer-reviewed English-language series in anarchist studies by a major international academic publisher, seeks to promote the study of anarchism as a framework for understanding and acting on the most pressing problems of our times. To this end, we invite proposals for original manuscripts that exemplify cutting edge, socially engaged scholarship bridging theory and practice, academic rigour and the insights of contemporary activism.

We welcome book proposals on a wide variety of subjects including, but not limited to the following: anarchist history and theory broadly construed; individual anarchist thinkers; anarchist-informed analysis of current issues and institutions; and anarchist or anarchist-inspired movements and practices. Proposals informed by anti-capitalist, feminist, ecological, indigenous, and non-Western or global South anarchist perspectives are particularly welcome. So, too, are projects that promise to illuminate the relationships between the personal and the political aspects of transformative social change, local and global problems, and anarchism and other movements and ideologies. Above all, we wish to publish books that will help activist scholars and scholar activists think about how to challenge and build real alternatives to existing structures of oppression and injustice.

All proposals will be evaluated strictly according to their individual merits and compatibility with the aims of the series. In accord with this policy, we welcome proposals from independent scholars and new authors as well as from those with an institutional affiliation and publishing record. Titles accepted for publication in the series will be supported by an engaged and careful peer review process, including impartial assessments by members of an international editorial advisory board consisting of leading scholars in the field.*

All books published in the series will be publicised widely and distributed internationally via co-operative arrangements among a prominent network of independent academic, activist, and publishing organisations, including Continuum Books, AK Press, the U.K. Anarchist Studies Network, the North American Anarchist Studies Network, and a range of other professional and activist groups and their associated websites and listservs. The general format of the series will be simultaneous hardback and paperback publication, with the latter priced affordably so as to reach as wide an audience as possible. All of the titles in the series will be published under a Creative Commons License (‘copyleft’). This distinctive feature of the series ensures that permission for non-commercial reproduction of the books will be granted by the publishers free of charge to voluntary, campaign and community groups.

We are currently seeking book proposals that fit the description above.

Please send proposals to one or more of the Book Series Editors: Laurence Davis (ldavis@oceanfree.net), Alex Prichard (a.prichard@bristol.ac.uk ), Nathan Jun (nathan.jun@mwsu.edu), and Uri Gordon (uri@riseup.net). Proposal guidelines may be downloaded from the Continuum website: http://www.continuumbooks.com/authors/default.aspx

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Archive

LIBRARIES IN THE DIGITAL AGE

The Association of Independent Libraries

Libraries in a Digital Age 

A one-day conference on the problems and opportunities facing libraries in the age of the Internet 

To be held at the Royal Astronomical Society, 

Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BQ 

Thursday 14 October 2010 

10.30 a.m. – 4.30 p.m. 

Programme 

10.30 Coffee and Welcome 

10.45 Social networking: just a lot of twittering?  Gwyneth Price

Gwyneth Price is Head of Collection Development Services at the Institute of Education (London) and is particularly interested in information literacy and the use of social networking software in libraries.  Her presentation will focus on some examples of Web 2.0 technologies and how they impact on libraries in the digital age. 

11.30 A plan for the future of our public library service.  Tim Coates 

Tim Coates is an author and was head of Waterstone’s bookshops in its early years. For the last decade he has become widely known for his pursuit of the improvement of the public library service. For his address to the conference on libraries in the digital age Tim has indicated his intention to use this opportunity to make a major statement on the state of libraries in England and what needs to be done for them to survive and fill a role for future generations.

12.15 The Oxford-Google Book Digitization Partnership.  Michael Popham

Michael Popham is Head of the Oxford Digital Library, a core service of the Bodleian Libraries, serving the University of Oxford. Michael has been working in the fields of digitization and electronic text creation for more than two decades, and co-ordinates Oxford’s collaboration with Google Books. The Bodleian Library was one of the first five libraries to began collaboration with the Google Books Library Project (see http://books.google.com/googlebooks/partners.html). This presentation will outline the Partnership’s efforts to digitize the Bodleian’s entire holdings of out-of-copyright C19th material, and the lessons we have learned from this challenging endeavour.

13.00 Lunch

14.00 Merchants of Culture: the publishing industry in the 21st century. Professor John B Thompson 

John B. Thompson is Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge. His publications include Books in the Digital Age (2005) and Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century (2010). The book publishing industry today is facing some of the greatest challenges it has known since Gutenberg. Caught in the pincer of an economic downturn and a digital revolution, everyone involved in the book business – publishers, agents and booksellers – is being forced to rethink what they do. Based on ten years of in-depth research on the publishing industry, Thompson analyses some of the key changes that have transformed the industry in recent years and shows how publishers are seeking to rethink their practices in the face of an uncertain future. 

14.45 Copyright and the Knowledge Commons.  Martyn Everett

Martyn Everett, writer, historian, former librarian and Chairman of Saffron Walden Town Library Society. The internet and digitisation provide the opportunity to create a knowledge and information Commons in which libraries could play a key role.  Yet the combination of new technology, commercialisation, and changes in the nature of ‘copyright’ threaten to constrict and regulate access to information as never before. Which side are you on?

15.30 Tour of the Royal Astronomical Society Library including a short talk about the Library’s digitisation programme by Librarian Peter Hingley. 

16.30 Concluding remarks 

Timings are approximate and the organisers reserve the right to change the programme without notification 

Cost £40 per person including lunch. 

Please make cheques payable to “The Association of Independent Libraries’ and send to: 

The Association of Independent Libraries, c/o The Leeds Library, 18 Commercial Street, Leeds LS1 6AL 

Tel: 0113-245-3071 

enquiries@theleedslibrary.org.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski