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Speculative Realism

Speculative Realism

NEW FORMS OF REALISM IN CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY

INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES – SKOPJE

New Forms of Realism in Contemporary Philosophy

In cooperation with the International Institute of Studies of Humanities and Social Sciences (Athens)

SUMMER SCHOOL

2015

June 26th – July 3rd 2015 in Ohrid, Macedonia

 

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities – Skopje in cooperation with the International

Institute of Studies of Humanities and Social Sciences (based in Athens) announces the summer school program “New Forms of Realism in Contemporary Philosophy.” Part 1 will be held in Ohrid (Macedonia) 26 June-3 July, 2015.

The “New Forms of Realism in Contemporary Philosophy” summer school in Ohrid will focus on the recent trends of realism in contemporary philosophy which has been labeled often erroneously under a single and vague category such as “speculative realism” or “new materialism” etc. Unpacking such generalizations and aiming at specific authors who have generated distinct strands of thought that nonetheless constitute what we have vaguely termed “new realisms in philosophy,” we conceptualized the sub-courses:

– “The non-standard philosophy of François Laruelle”; sub-course leader: François Laruelle

– “Non-standard epistemologies”; sub-course leader Anne Françoise Schmid

– “Magic Realism and Socialist Realism: Arts and Persuasion”; sub-course leader Svetlana Slapšak

– “Exploration of possibilities for realist readings in contemporary feminist philosophy in line with non-standard philosophy and the writings of Marx”; sub-course leader: Katarina Kolozova

Working language of the summer school will be English and French (with translation into English).

Professors:

Prof. Dr. François Laruelle, Prof. Dr. Anne Françoise Schmid, Prof. Dr. Katarina Kolozova, Prof. Dr. Ray Brassier (TBC) and Prof. Dr. GDil rA.nSvidejtalrana Slapšak, Prof.

Summer school Director:

Prof. Dr. Katarina Kolozova, Executive Director of the Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities – Skopje

Summer school academic coordinator:

Dr. Jordan Šišovski, Assistant Professor in the Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities – Skopje

Eligibility:

-Participants must be MA students or PhD candidates in any field belonging to the social sciences or humanities

-Participants must submit an abstract for a presentation in one of the summer school’s workshops or for one of the final presentations sessions;

-Participants from other countries are also eligible to participate;

Registration:

Early bird Registration: until February 20th

Participation fee: 140 Euro for 9 day course

Early bird applications from at least three persons from same institution: 100 Euro

Normal Registration: February 21st – March 20th

Participation fee: 170 Euro for 9 day course

Applications from at least three persons from same institution: 130 Euros

Late applications:

Registration: March 21st – April 10th

Participation fee: 210 euro for 9 day course

Late applications from at least three persons from same institution: 170 Euros

Number of participants: 50

Process of Selection

Members of the boards  of the Internaitonal Institute in Athens and of ISSHS will form the organizing committee and selection committee that will review the applications

Interested applicants should send short CV, abstract for presentation and the available application form.

Deadline for submitting an application: April 10th 2015

Deadline for announcing the results of the selection process: April 30th 2015

Accommodation:

It is entirely up to each student to decide accommodation of their own choosing. The organizers will provide information and enable and inform about possibilities for discount accommodation, and will be available to help logistically.

Contact persons:

Dr. Jordan Šišovski, Project Coordinator, e-mail: jordan.shishovski@isshs.edu.mk, info@isshs.edu.mk

Applications should be sent to the Project Coordinator to either of these two addresses.

Prof. Dr. Katarina Kolozova, Executive Director of Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities – Skopje, e-mail: katerina.kolozova@isshs.edu.mk

Address: 20 Oktomvri nr. 8 (second floor), 1000 Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

Tel/Fax: +389 2 3 113 059

http://www.isshs.edu.mk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Philosophy

Philosophy

FORMALISM AND THE REAL: ONTOLOGY AND THE SUBJECT

Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy

Duquesne University

Department of Philosophy

Pittsburgh, PA

 

Call for Applications

We are pleased to announce the 2014 Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy, held at Duquesne University. Details for the program are as follows:

 

Formalism and the Real: Ontology, Politics, and the Subject

August 4–8, 2014

 

(Optional Participants’ Conference, August 2-3)

 

“The real can only be inscribed on the basis of an impasse of formalization.”  — Jacques Lacan, Seminar XX 

 

“We need a theory of the pass of the real, in the breach opened up by formalization. Here, the real is no longeronly what can be lacking from its place, but what passes through by force.” — Alain Badiou, Theory of the Subject 

 

Seminar Leaders:

Prof. Bruno Bosteels (Cornell University)Prof. Tom Eyers (Duquesne University)

Prof. Paul Livingston (University of New Mexico)

 

Course Description:

Philosophy in the twenty-first century has seen an extensive reconsideration of formalistic methodologies and theoretical structures. This is heavily influenced by the formalism developed by a number of mid-twentieth century French thinkers who rejected humanist philosophies of experience or consciousness typified by dominant forms of existentialism and phenomenology. Insights derived from Marxism, Freudianism, and philosophy of science were argued to undermine central tenets of the latter, including the priority of description and the emphasis on first-person experiences. Rather, stress was placed on the priority of construction, an emphasis on the concept, and a rethinking of the nature of knowledge and the object of science. The recent history of formalist approaches is framed in important ways by Louis Althusser and Jacques Lacan. As is well known, Althusser rejected historicist and humanist readings of Marx in favor of a structuralist approach, which was amenable to the conception of science developed bythinkers like Jean Cavaillès, Gaston Bachelard, and Georges Canguilhem. Simultaneously, Lacan rejected ego-psychological readings of Freud, forming interpretive, theoretical, and clinical bases for psychoanalysis that drew on Ferdinand de Saussure’s structuralist linguistics and Claude Levi-Strauss’s structuralist anthropology. This led him to a methodological formalism, particularly when addressing the Real and the psycho-dynamics in which it is involved. The presence of Althusser and Lacan at the École Normale Supériere during this time formed the intellectual milieu in which students such as Alain Badiou, Jacques-Alain Miller, Étienne Balibar, and Jacques Rancière would begin to develop their own thought. An important forum for this was the journal the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (1966-69). The current project to translate itinto English has prompted a surge in research related to these themes. In the Cahiers, efforts were made to reconcile Marxist politics with a Lacanian account of the subject. Lacan’s notion of the Real was essential to this and, along with the other elements of his thought, came to be developed by Badiou to address political and ontological domains.

More recently, formalism in philosophy has expanded to address issues beyond these origins. For instance, formalistic reconstructions of Heideggerian and Husserlian thought have proved intensely productive and have problematized the opposition of philosophies of the concept to phenomenological philosophies. Moreover, recent efforts to address questions in aesthetics and politics with formal approaches has further expanded the boundaries of formalism’s theoretical scope. Paul Livingston’s book, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein, and the Consequences of Formalism, examines the landscape of political criticism and change given the results and paradoxes of 20th century projects of formalization in mathematics and logic. Following this, his current project focuses on Heidegger’s philosophy, and will re-examine our inherited notions of sense and truth. After writing a book on Lacan’s concept of the Real, Tom

Eyers has analyzed the intellectual foundations of structuralism in 1930s and 1940s French epistemology and philosophy of science. He is presently writing a book entitled Speculative Formalism: The Poetics of Form in Literature, Science, and Philosophy which will bring that work to bear on poetics and literary theory. In addition to translating Badiou’s Theory of the Subject and Wittgenstein’s Antiphilosophy, Bruno Bosteels has devoted numerous books to Badiou and issues in political thought. In his recentMarx and Freud in Latin America: Politics, Psychoanalysis, and Religion in Times of Terror, Bosteels investigates ways art and literature provide insight into processes of subjectification at the core of Marxist and psychoanalytic concerns. This summer symposium will bring together interested graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty for a week of discussion, lecture, and close textual study. Together, we will pursue questions regarding formalism and its relation to the Real in contemporary ontology, politics, and theories of the subject and their consequences for understanding knowledge, history, state, language, art, and literature. Lacanian and Badiouian thought will form a key theoretical backdrop. Yet, we expect our studies will include work by a number of other figures, including Plato, Marx, Nietzsche, Frege, Freud, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Lautman, Bachelard,Canguilhem, Althusser, Deleuze, Derrida, Macherey, Milller, Butler, Jameson, Žižek, Hägglund, and Malabou.

All texts and discussion will be in English.

Application:

We invite current graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty in philosophy orrelated disciplines to submit an application composed of a C.V. and a short letter of intent (500words maximum) to pghsummersymposium2014@gmail.com.

The deadline for applications is Friday, April 25th, 2014.

We expect to respond with notifications regarding acceptance to the symposium by Thursday, May 1st, 2014 to help facilitate summer plans. The seminar will be limited to 30-40 participants. For more information as it becomes available, we have created a website for the symposium: http://pghsummersymposium6.wix.com/pghsummersymp2014

Participants’ Conference (August 2–3):

In order to facilitate a further exchange of ideas and research, a participants’ conference will be held the weekend before the seminar begins. Applicants who receive notice of acceptance as participants will be asked – if interested – to submit an abstract of up to 500 words on any theme related to the topic of the seminar. The participants’ conference will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 2-3, 2014.

Financial Information:

There will be a $200 registration fee for each participant of the seminar. This money will be used for event expenses like a conference dinner, celebration, daily coffee, etc. Please note that participants will be responsible for arranging their own housing as well as financing most of theirown meals for the duration of the symposium. However, with respect to lodging, we expect alimited number of arrangements with graduate students will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

Organizers:

James Bahoh, Dept. of Philosophy, Duquesne University, bahohj@duq.edu

Martin Krahn, Dept. of Philosophy, Duquesne University, krahnm@duq.edu

Jacob Greenstine, Dept. of Philosophy, Duquesne University, greenstinea@duq.edu

Dave Mesing, Dept. of Philosophy, Villanova University, dmesing@villanova.edu

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Philosophy and Romanticism

Philosophy and Romanticism

NATURE AND CULTURE IN GERMAN ROMANTICISM AND IDEALISM

UNSW Australia and the University of Sydney
12-14 March, 2014

The last two decades can be described as witness to a genuine revival of interest in German romantic and idealist philosophy. Philosophers working in a variety of areas have embraced the ideas of the romantics and idealists, disentangling them from false or misunderstood legacies, and reexamining them in light of contemporary debates. This conference aims to advance this significant historical and philosophical research, by investigating the two most central themes in German idealist and romantic philosophy: nature and culture and their interdependence.

Precisely because of the interdisciplinary character of romanticism and idealism, the conference approaches the two movements from a number of related angles. In the first instance, the goal is to consider how various thinkers from the romantic era conceived nature and culture, and sought to harmonize the sphere of the natural sciences (Naturwissenschaften) and the sphere of the humanities (Geisteswissenschaften), which, only some fifty years later, became fully separated. In addition, the conference seeks to investigate the interdisciplinary conception of “Geist” developed during that time, which today can be translated into “mind” as well as its various externalizations as “society,” “arts,” “institutions,” and “culture.” In these two ways, the conference will explore the uniqueness of the romantic and idealist views, and consider their potential significance for contemporary debates.

Conference organisers:
Heikki Ikäheimo (UNSW),
Dalia Nassar (Sydney) and
Paul Redding (Sydney)
E: Click here to email coordinators

Conference sponsored by the Sydney Intellectual History Network (SIHN) at the University of Sydney and the Faculty of Arts and Social Science and the School of Humanities and Languages at UNSW Australia.

Conference Registration

Registrations close 7 March 2014
Click here to register

Conference website: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/philosophy/about/ncgri_conference.shtml

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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R.C. SmithCONTINENTAL AND ANALYTICAL POLITICAL THEORY: AN INSURMOUNTABLE DIVIDE?

28 May 2013

School of Politics & International Relations
Queen Mary, University of London

Analytical and Continental political theory are divided not only over substantial issues, but also over the very nature of political theorising. Theorists working within one tradition view with scepticism the work and conclusions of theorists within the other tradition, and the two traditions often speak past one another because they do not agree what theorising amount to in the first place. Further, the division is also marked by different conceptions of politics and the political. Consequently, Analytical and Continental theorists have different understandings of the role of and relationship between philosophy and politics.

We invite contributions that address the divisions between Analytical and Continental political theory, and between liberal normative theory and post-structuralism. Is it possible to bridge the different traditions? If so, what would this entail? If divisions will remain, what is the exact nature of those divisions? Are they primarily political or philosophical? And are there approaches that eschew these divisions? Contributions can be comparative discussions between different approaches, analyses of specific debates, or readings of texts that address the divisions in an indirect way.

Paper givers should send an abstract of no more than 300 words to the conference organisers: Clayton Chin (c.chin@qmul.ac.uk) and Lasse Thomassen (l.thomassen@qmul.ac.uk) by 28 February 2013. Notifications by 15 March 2013.

Keynote speaker: Professor Paul Patton, University of New South Wales

Roundtable participants: Professor Paul Patton, University of New South Wales, Professor David Owen (University of Southampton) and Dr David Howarth (University of Essex)

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Walter Benjamin

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WALTER BENJAMIN – Second Call for Papers

2nd Call for Papers: ‘The Philosophy of Walter Benjamin’

One-Day Conference, December 14th, 2012 – Goldsmiths College, University of London
InC – Goldsmiths Continental Philosphy Research Group

The work of the German-Jewish critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) spans a vast array of themes, ranging from the metaphysics of youth to the Paris arcades. His writings on Goethe and Scheerbart; Kafka and Baudelaire, as well as his work on the relationship between art and technology continue to fascinate and polarize in equal measure. His singular intersection of Marxian and Jewish thought is amply evidenced in the extensive correspondence with Ernst Bloch, Theodor Adorno, Bertold Brecht and Hannah Arendt, amongst others. Undoubtedly it is the sheer breadth of Benjamin’s interests that accounts for the enduring concern with his often fragmentary work across academic disciplines. That is to say, Benjamin is no longer a stranger at the Academy. Nevertheless, a central aspect of Benjamin’s work is all-too-often overlooked when his aesthetic and literary works are treated in isolation. The manifest content of Benjamin’s writing is never merely incidental: rather, it is shot through with a burgeoning philosophical project – from the ‘Programme of the Coming Philosophy’ (1917) to the ‘Theses on the Concept of History’ (1940). In this regard it appears that recent anniversary of Benjamin’s birth in 1892 warrants a re-appraisal of this legacy by asking the question: how can the various strands of Benjamin’s work be engaged to illuminate the unfolding of his philosophical position, and – vice versa – how does Benjamin’s philosophy illuminate other aspects of his thought?

This conference aims, then – on the one hand – to explore Benjamin’s thought in relation to the various philosophical traditions that inform his project (Leibniz, Kant, Schlegel, Lukács etc.), and – on the other hand – to ask how these influences continue to operate between the lines even where Benjamin is not explicitly concerned with the philosophical canon? In short: how are we to understand the philosophy of Walter Benjamin?

We ask potential speakers to submit abstracts of no more than 200 words to  sebastian.truskolaski@gmail.com by September 30th. The full programme will be announced in due course.

For updates check www.walterbenjamin2012.blogspot.com

 

Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-philosophy-of-walter-benjamin-goldsmiths-14-december  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Walter Benjamin

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WALTER BENJAMIN CONFERENCE

Call for Papers:

‘The Philosophy of Walter Benjamin’

One-Day Conference, December 14th, 2012 – Goldsmiths College, University of London

InC – Goldsmiths Continental Philosophy Research Group

The work of the German-Jewish critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) spans a vast array of themes, ranging from the metaphysics of youth to the Paris arcades. His writings on Goethe and Scheerbart; Kafka and Baudelaire, as well as his work on the relationship between art and technology continue to fascinate and polarize in equal measure. His singular intersection of Marxian and Jewish thought is amply evidenced in the extensive correspondence with Ernst Bloch, Theodor Adorno, Bertold Brecht and Hannah Arendt, amongst others. Undoubtedly it is the sheer breadth of Benjamin’s interests that accounts for the enduring concern with his often fragmentary work across academic disciplines. That is to say, Benjamin is no longer a stranger at the Academy. Nevertheless, a central aspect of Benjamin’s work is all-too-often overlooked when his aesthetic and literary works are treated in isolation. The manifest content of Benjamin’s writing is never merely incidental: rather, it is shot through with a burgeoning philosophical project – from the ‘Programme of the Coming Philosophy’ (1917) to the ‘Theses on the Concept of History’ (1940). In this regard it appears that recent anniversary of Benjamin’s birth in 1892 warrants a re-appraisal of this legacy by asking the question: how can the various strands of Benjamin’s work be engaged to illuminate the unfolding of his philosophical position, and – vice versa – how does Benjamin’s philosophy illuminate other aspects of his thought?

This conference aims, then – on the one hand – to explore Benjamin’s thought in relation to the various philosophical traditions that inform his project (Leibniz, Kant, Schlegel, Lukács etc.), and – on the other hand – to ask how these influences continue to operate between the lines even where Benjamin is not explicitly concerned with the philosophical canon? In short: how are we to understand the philosophy of Walter Benjamin?

We ask potential speakers to submit abstracts of no more than 200 words to: sebastian.truskolaski@gmail.com by September 30th. The full programme will be announced in due course.

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-philosophy-of-walter-benjamin-goldsmiths-london-14-december-2012

***END***

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

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Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

 

The Island

ONTOLOGY AND POLITICS

 

MANCHESTER WORKSHOPS IN POLITICAL THEORY 2011: August 31st – September 2nd 2011

Call for Papers: Ontology and Politics Workshop

Convenors: Paul Rekret (Queen Mary), Simon Choat (Kingston), Clayton Chin (Queen Mary)

Despite its pervasiveness, the question of the relation between ontology and politics continues to be a crucial one for Continental philosophy.  While the place and status of the question of being in the realm of the political has occupied much of social theory in the past twenty or thirty years, we remain no closer to drawing any common ground on these themes.

Post-structuralist or post-foundational political thought has insisted on the inherent contingency of any political ontology and has, from this notion, sought to draw out a framework for an emancipatory politics grounded in the concepts of difference and otherness. However, such a stance finds itself increasingly challenged today. On the one hand, thinkers such as Alain Badiou and Jacques Ranciere call for the need to think a politics grounded in a conception of universality rather than alterity, while on the other hand, so-called speculative realism more fundamentally challenges the very notion of ontology as it has been conceived by the majority of Continental thinkers in recent decades.  This panel aims to explore the intersections of politics and ontology and the resulting implications for thinking both the political and the philosophical.

We invite papers addressing the following and any other related themes:
-Is there a place for reflection on ontology in the theorisation and study of politics?
-Is there a necessary transitivity between the ontological and the political?  How should this relation be conceived?
-Is there a necessarily leftist or emancipatory ontology?
-Should the politics which has generally been thought to follow from post-foundational or post-structuralist ontologies be re-evaluated in light of recent critiques?
-Does a new and different relation between ontology and politics follow from recent speculative materialist ontologies?

If you would like to present a paper at this workshop, please submit an abstract of 300-500 words (or a full paper) to p.rekret@qmul.ac.uk or S.Choat@kingston.ac.uk by 15 June 2011.

For more information on the conference see: http://manceptworkshops.wordpress.com/

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WHAT IS A COMMANDMENT? 

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy

Monday 28 March 2011, 6.00-8.00pm

‘What is a Commandment?’

Giorgio Agamben: Visiting Professor, Philosophy, University of Paris 8

Venue: Clattern Lecture Theatre, Main Building,

Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston University

The event is free

See: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/crmep

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Man in Black

Philosophy

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN MODERN PHILOSOPHY SEMINARS

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP)
Kingston University London
Research Seminars, Semester 2, January-April 2011
Thursdays/Fridays, 6-8pm

Open to all

20 January
‘Hegel’s Other Woman: The Figure of Niobe in Hegel’s Lectures on Fine Art’
Andrew Benjamin (Aesthetics and Critical Theory, Monash University)
Venue: Art Workers Guild Lecture Hall, 6, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AT

27 January
‘Lacan and the Cahiers pour l’analyse’
Tom Eyers (CRMEP, Kingston)
Venue: John Galsworthy Building, Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston

3 February
‘Basic Concepts of Transcendental Materialism’
Rainer E. Zimmermann (Philosophy, University of Applied Sciences, Munich)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

10 February
‘”Look Out It’s Real”: Documentary Truth and Tear Gas’
Hito Steyerl (Artist, Berlin)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

11 March
‘Assembling Untimeliness: On Gerhard Richter’s Paintings’
Paul Rabinow (Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

17 March
‘Disjunctive Captures of the Body and Movement’
Bojana Cvejic (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Venue: John Galsworthy Building, Penrhyn Road Campus, Kingston

14 April
‘Eleven Theses on Marx and Marxism’
Étienne Balibar (University of Paris X and Irvine, University of California)
Venue: Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH

Dr Stella Sandford

Principal Lecturer in Modern European Philosophy
Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy
Kingston University

Holmwood House
Penrhyn Road Campus
Kingston upon Thames
KT1 2EE
+44 (0)20 8417 2088
www.kingston.ac.uk/crmep

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Time

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME AND THE TIME OF REVOLUTION

The Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture Student Alliance at Binghamton University (S.U.N.Y.) Presents:
*The Revolution of Time and the Time of Revolution*
*A conference*
The 25th – 26th of March, 2011

Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Peter Gratton, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of San Diego, CA

What sense of time is produced through radical politics? Is the understanding of time as future part of a radical imagination? If the commitment to radical social change involves looking forward into the future, will that leave us with a sense of futurity that depends on the linearity of yesterday, today, and tomorrow?

To interrogate the emergence of radical creations and socialities, we welcome submissions that theorize time as it relates broadly to politics, cultural conflicts, alternative imaginaries, and resistant practices. Time has historically been thought and inhabited through a variety of frameworks and styles of being. At times the present repeats or seems to repeat the past. There are actions that seem to take place outside of time, to be infinite or instantaneous.

Theories of emergence view time as folding in on itself. Indigenous cosmologies and Buddhist philosophers put forward the possibility of no-time or of circular and cyclical time.

The radical question of time is one around which the work of many scholars has revolved: Derrida on the to-come [*a-venir*] of democracy, Negri’s work on *kairos*, Agamben on kairology, Santos on the expansive notion of the present, Deleuze and Guattari on becoming. This heterological list is far from exhaustive, while hinting at the depth of the theme that our conference cultivates. A central political concern, time invokes our most careful attention and the PIC conference provides the setting for this endeavor. We must find the time for time.

At its core, this conference seeks to explore the relationship between time and revolution. Time here may mean *not just *simple clock and calendar time but rather a way of seeing time as part of a material thread that can go this way and that, weaving* *together* *the fabric of political projects producing the world otherwise. Ultimately, the question of time fosters a critical engagement with potentiality, potency, and power; as well as with the virtual and the actual, of the to be and the always already.

We seek papers, projects, and performances that add to the knowledge of time and revolution, but also ones that clear the way for new thinking, new alliances, new beings.

Some possible topics might include:

  – Radical notions of futurity, historicity, or the expansive present.

  – Conceptions on the right moment of action.

  – The political reality of time as stasis or cyclical.

  – The colonial creation of universal time, and decolonial cosmologies of time.

  – Work on thinkers of time and revolution.

  – Work on potentiality, the virtual, and the actual.

  – Capital and labor time.

In keeping with the interdisciplinary emphasis of Binghamton University’s Program in Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture, we seek work that flourishes in the conjunction of multiple frames of epistemological inquiry, from fields including, but not limited to:  postcolonial studies, decolonial studies, queer and gender studies, ethnic studies, media and visual culture studies, urban studies, science and technology studies, critical theory, critical animal studies, continental philosophy, and historiography.

Workers/writers/thinkers of all different disciplinary, inter-disciplinary, and non-disciplinary stripes welcome, whether academically affiliated or not. Submissions may be textual, performative, visual.

Abstracts of 500 words maximum due by Feburary 1, 2011.  In a separate paragraph state your name, address, telephone number, email and organizational or institutional affiliation, if any.

Email proposals to: pic.conference2011@gmail.com with a cc: to clawren1@binghamton.edu

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Speed of Life

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME AND THE TIME OF REVOLUTION

EUROPEAN PHILOSOPHY AFTER THE EPISTEMOLOGICAL BREAK

Philosophical Journal Nowa Krytyka, Socially Involved Journal Recykling Idei and Althusser Studies Journal Décalages and Szczecin University are inviting for the conference:

European Philosophy After the Epistemological Break

Date: 16 – 20. IX . 2010

Place: Pobierowo, ul. Grunwaldzka 66

Poland

The leading theme of the conference will be the conditions and possibilities of Louis Althusser’s philosophy, with the emphasis made on the effects which it is able to produce in the current politico-philosophical conjuncture. To examine the consequences of “philosophical intervention in politics” and “political intervention in the world of philosophy” we will try to map the key concepts of Althusser’s theoretical apparatus. Thus, during the conference, next to the tangle of misunderstandings concerning the notion of anti-humanist critique of subject and ideology, one will find possibility to discuss also the reception of Althusser’s late works concerning the “materialism of encounter”, or the epistemological concepts of theoretical practice and epistemological break. The other goal of the conference is to establish constant, international collaboration between critically oriented philosophical circles. 

CONTACT: 

Jerzy Kochan „NOWA KRYTYKA” / jerzy_kochan@poczta.onet.pl /

Mateusz Janik „RECYKLING IDEI” / m.janik@recyklingidei.pl /

To see the program, go to:  http://www.recyklingidei.pl/aktualnosci/european_philosophy_after_the_epistemological_break 

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