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PosthumanTHE MATERIALITY OF THE IMMATERIAL: ICTs AND THE DIGITAL COMMONS

Call for Papers: The Materiality of the Immaterial: ICTs and the Digital Commons

See: http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/announcement/view/23

Special issue of tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique

Online @ http://www.triple-c.at

Abstract submission deadline: January 15, 2015

Guest Editors:

Vasilis Kostakis, Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia), P2P Lab (Greece);

Andreas Roos, Human Ecology Division, Lund University (Sweden)

With an escalating environmental crisis and an unprecedented increase of ICT diversity and use, it is more crucial than ever to understand the underlying material aspects of the ICT infrastructure.  This special issue therefore asks the question: What are the true material and socio-environmental costs of the global ICT infrastructure?

In a recent paper (Fuchs 2013) as well as in the book Digital Labour and Karl Marx (Fuchs 2014), Christian Fuchs examined the complex web of production relations and the new division of digital labour that makes possible the vast and cheap ICT infrastructure as we know it. The analysis partly revealed that ICT products and infrastructure can be said to embody slave-like and other extremely harsh conditions that perpetually force mine and assembly workers into conditions of dependency. Expanding this argument, the WWF reported (Reed and Miranda 2007) that mining in the Congo basin poses considerable threats to the local environment in the form of pollution, the loss of biodiversity, and an increased presence of business-as-usual made possible by roads and railways.  Thus ICTs can be said to be not at all immaterial because the ICT infrastructure under the given economic conditions can be said to embody as its material foundations slave-like working conditions, various class relations and undesirable environmental consequences.

At the same time, the emerging digital commons provide a new and promising platform for social developments, arguably enabled by the progressive dynamics of ICT development. These are predominantly manifested as commons-based peer production, i.e., a new mode of collaborative, social production (Benkler 2006); and grassroots digital fabrication or community-driven makerspaces, i.e., forms of bottom-up, distributed manufacturing. The most well known examples of commons-based peer production are the free/open source software projects and the free encyclopaedia Wikipedia. While these new forms of social organisation are immanent in capitalism, they also have the features to challenge these conditions in a way that might in turn transcend the dominant system (Kostakis and Bauwens 2014).

Following this dialectical framing, we would like to call for papers for a special issue of tripleC that will investigate how we can understand and balance the perils and promises of ICTs in order to make way for a just and sustainable paradigm. We seek scholarly articles and commentaries that address any of the following themes and beyond. We also welcome experimental formats, especially photo essays, which address the special issue’s theme.

Suggested themes

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise the scope of the socio-environmental impact of the ICT infrastructure.

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise surplus value as both ecological (land), social (labour) and intellectual (patent) in the context of ICTs.

Understanding the human organisation of nature in commons-based peer production.

Studies of the environmental dimensions of desktop manufacturing technologies (for example, 3D printing or CNC machines) in non-industrial modes of subsistence, e.g. eco-villages or traditional

agriculture, as well as in modern towns and mega-cities.

Suggestions for and insights into bridging understandings of the socio-economic organisation of the natural commons with the socio-economic organisation of the digital commons drawing on types of

organisations in the past and the present that are grounded in theories of the commons.

Elaboration of which theoretical approaches can be used for overcoming the conceptual separation of the categories immaterial/material in the digital commons.

 

References

Benkler, Yochai. 2006. The wealth of networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Fuchs, Christian. 2014. Digital labour and Karl Marx. New York: Routledge.

Fuchs, Christian. 2013. Theorising and analysing digital labour: From global value chains to modes of production. The Political Economy of Communication 1 (2): 3-27, online at: http://www.polecom.org/index.php/polecom/article/view/19.

Kostakis, Vasilis and Michel Bauwens. 2014. Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Reed, Erik and Marta Miranda. 2007. Assessment of the mining sector and infrastructure development in the congo basin region. Washington DC: World Wildlife Fund, Macroeconomics for Sustainable Development Program Office, 27, online at: http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/congobasinmining.pdf

 

Schedule

Submission of abstracts (250-300 words) by January 15, 2015 via email to [log in to unmask]

Responses about acceptance/rejection to authors: February 15, 2015.

Selected authors will be expected to submit their full documents to tripleC via the online submission system by May 15, 2015:

http://triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Expected publication date of the special issue: October 1, 2015.

About the journal

tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique is an academic open access online journal using a non-commercial Creative Commons license. It is a journal that focuses on information society studies and studies of media, digital media, information and communication in society with a special interest in critical studies in these thematic areas. The journal has a special interest in disseminating articles that focus on the role of information in contemporary capitalist societies. For this task, articles should employ critical theories and/or empirical research inspired by critical theories and/or philosophy and ethics guided by critical thinking as well as relate the analysis to power structures and inequalities of capitalism, especially forms of stratification such as class, racist and other ideologies and capitalist patriarchy. Papers should reflect on how the presented findings contribute to the illumination of conditions that foster or hinder the advancement of a global sustainable and participatory information society. TripleC was founded in 2003 and is edited by Christian Fuchs and Marisol Sandoval.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn’s article Education, Capital and the Transhuman has also recently been added to Academia, and can be found at: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTDOCTORAL LECTURING FELLOWSHIP IN CULTURAL POLITICS, COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA

University of East AngliaSchool of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

Location: Norwich, Norfolk, UK

Salary: £24,775 to £30,434 per annum, pro rata

Hours: Part-time (65% Full-time Equivalent)

Contract: Contract/Temporary

Applications Close: 11th July 2014

Job Ref: ATS651

This fixed term, part-time post is designed to allow a postdoctoral student to develop teaching skills and experience, as well as to complete a programme of publications to advance their academic career. This post is open to postdoctoral students whose PhD was submitted or awarded between 1 August 2012 and 1 August 2014

You must be able to teach on core first-year modules and other modules as required, as well as to supervise undergraduate dissertations.

This part-time post (65%FTE) is available from 1 September 2014 to 30 June 2015.

We especially welcome applicants from women, ethnic minorities and other groups currently underrepresented among the academic staff at the University of East Anglia.

The University is a Bronze Athena Swan Award holder, currently working towards Silver

For further details see here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIZ643/postdoctoral-lecturing-fellowship-in-cultural-politics-communications-and-media/

University of East Anglia

  • No.1 for Student Experience (Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2013)
  • World top 1% (Times Higher Education World Rankings 2013)
  • World Top 100 (Leiden Ranking 2013)
  • UK Top 20 (Guardian University Guide 2014, Times Good University Guide 2014 and Complete University Guide 2014)
UEA

UEA

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Fear of a Blank Planet

Fear of a Blank Planet

DISTRIBUTED INTIMACIES

Banff Research in Culture 2014

Summer Research Residency

Program Dates: May 26, 2014 – June 13, 2014

Application Deadline: December 2, 2013

Application and Program Info: http://www.banffcentre.ca/programs/program.aspx?id=1394

Faculty: Lauren BerlantFrancisco CamachoWendy Hui Kyong Chun

Intimacy describes our relations with those people, places, creatures, and things to which we feel the deepest, most powerful or most abiding connections. The multiple ways in which we experience intimacy today draw attention to the complex patterning of closeness and distance that has always unconsciously structured our cultural, social and political practices. There have long been forms of distant intimacy—staying ‘in touch’ via the drama of epistolary exchanges or through sound waves emanating from a telephone—but recent technological developments, increased travel, the expansion of migration and immigration, and instantaneous virtual communication are fundamentally reshaping our understanding and experience of the proximity of bodies, sentiments, and ideas. Social networking and the democratization of modes of communication and media have had a profound significance for the experience of community, collectivity, and affinities; at every level, from the family to the nation, our sense of belonging is being redefined in ways that affect our daily experience but remain difficult to comprehend. 

One can see evidence of the new distribution of intimacy everywhere: in the immediacy of a rock concert, one witnesses people en masse recording the spectacle for friends not present; on public transit around the world, passengers make connections to different elsewheres via newspapers, music, text messages, and mobile phone calls; and in political protests (as evidenced by the Arab Spring and recent dissent in Turkey), which have been reshaped by the use of technologies that are, for a new generation, part and parcel of everyday life. Intimacies of friendship, collectivity, love and belonging are being substantially redefined through the devices in our hands and a global infrastructure that supports instantaneous sharing.

Banff Research in Culture (BRiC) 2014 will investigate the cultural, social, and political repercussions of “distributed intimacies”—the processes and outcomes of new forms of mediation that have reshaped how we relate to one another, imagine ourselves as parts of groups, and constitute communities. Given the fractal character of our subjectivity—the ways in which we are necessarily the outcome of networks of intersubjective relations, experiences, and concepts—how are our intimacies constituted by the ways we live? What are the modes and machines by which intimacies are distributed, and what determines their intensities? How does the global distribution of goods, ideas and affects across oceans and continents shape forms of intimacy, belonging and community? What forms of intimacy feel inescapable? What impedes intimacy from flourishing? Are local scenes and forms of collectivity (e.g., non-traditional families, polyamory, activist movements, alternative forms of political practice) enabled by new forms of distributed intimacies? In what ways do contemporary cultural and art practices participate in the distribution of intimacy? To what extent are our intimacies segmented, remote-controlled, and apportioned, and can we redefine these distributions without lapsing into a nostalgic primitivism? Finally, what does distributed intimacy imply for social change as well as for the politics of shaping one’s own self in relation to others?

We look forward to receiving compelling and original project proposals from thinkers and creators working on a wide range of projects.

Imre Szeman

Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies

Killam Annual Professor

Professor of English, Film Studies and Sociology

University of Alberta

www.crcculturalstudies.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Dialectics

Dialectics

COMMUNICATION, CRISIS, CRITIQUE AND CHANGE

Call for Abstracts by Research Network 18 – Sociology of Communications and Media Research: Communication, Crisis, Critique and Change

Coordinator: Christian Fuchs christian.fuchs@ut.at
Communication, Crisis, Critique and Change
http://www.esa11thconference.eu/call-for-papers/research-networks/RN18
https://www.facebook.com/events/450441271689391/

Abstracts should not exceed 1750 characters (including spaces, approximately 250 words). Each paper session will have the duration of 1.5 hours. Normally sessions will include 4 papers.

For submission, please use the form that shows up when clicking on the links next to the session titles onhttp://www.esa11thconference.eu/call-for-papers/research-networks/RN18

Abstracts can only be submitted online no later than 1st of February 2013 to the submission platform hosted on the conference website. Abstracts sent by email cannot be accepted.

ESA RN18 focuses in its conference stream on the discussion of how crisis, critque and societal changes shape the study of media, communication & society today. The overall questions we want to address are:
* Which crises (including the fnancial and economic crisis of capitalism, global wars and conflicts, ecological crisis, the crisis of democracy, legitimation crisis, etc) are we experiencing today and how do they influence media and communication in contemporary society?
* What are the major changes of society, the media, and communication that we are experiencing today?
* What forms of political critique (political movements) and academic critique (critical studies, critical media sociology, critical theory, etc) are emerging today and are needed for interpreting and changing media, communication and society?

ESA RN18 is calling for both general submissions on “Communicaton, Crisis, Critique and Change” that address these questions as wellas more specific submissions that address a number of specific session topics. For detailed session descriptions, please see: http://www.esa11thconference.eu/call-for-papers/research-networks/RN18

01RN18. Capitalism, Communication, Crisis & Critique Today
This session focuses on how to critically study the connection of capitalism and communication in times of crisis.

02RN18. Communication, Crisis and Change in Europe
This session focuses on media and communicaton in Europe in times of crisis and change. We are especially interested in presentations that cover Europe as a whole and go beyond single-country studies

03RN18. Knowledge Labour in the Media and Communication Industries in Times of Crisis

04RN18. Critical Social Theory and the Media: Studying Media, Communication and Society Critically

05RN18. Sociology of Communications and Media Research (open)

06JS18. RN18 Joint session with RN06 Critical Political Economy
Critical Political Economy of the Media and Communication in Times of Capitalist Crisis and Change
(Chairs: Ian Bruff & Christian Fuchs)

18JS29. RN18 Joint session with RN29 Social Theory
Social Theory and Media Sociology Today
(Chairs: George Pleios and Csaba Szalo)

 

First published: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-abstracts-by-research-network-18-sociology-of-communications-and-media-research-communication-crisis-critique-and-change.-esa-conference-turin-28-31-august-2013

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

Ayers Rock

ONLINE CONFERENCE ON MULTIDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES

29-31 March 2013

Australian International Cultural and Educational Institute: www.auaicei.com

Online conference is an innovative conference organisational form which has brought a series of revolutionary changes to the traditional conference. Traditional conference requires participants to travel and stay in a particular place. It is a time-consuming and costly process. Online conference uses the Internet as a conference “venue” in which participants can access the conference from anywhere at any time. You won’t miss any presentations you are interested and have adequate time to share your insights with other delegates.

AICEI aims to build a platform allowing scholars, researchers, and professionals who are interested in sharing their studies from various perspectives in the aspects of social sciences, including: Culture, Education, Communication, Library & Information Studies, Psychology, Health Studies, Society and so forth. All theoretical, empirical, and practical papers in the above fields (but not strictly limited) are all highly welcomed.

Please refer to the website: www.auaicei.com for more detailed information.

Your paper may be published on:

* Conference Proceedings (refereed and non-refereed);

* International Journal of Multidisciplinary Social Sciences (with articles from selected refereed papers);

* Book chapters (with articles from selected refereed papers).

Yours faithfully,

AICEI Committee

www.auaicei.com

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Sociology

COMMUNICATION, CRISIS, AND CRITIQUE IN CONTEMPORARY CAPITALISM

Communication, Crisis, and Critique in Contemporary Capitalism
Conference of the European Sociological Association’s Research Network 18 – Sociology of Communications and Media Research

October 18-20, 2012.

University of the Basque Country, Bilbao

Details: http://fuchs.uti.at/wp-content/uploads/ESA_RN18_CfP2012.pdf

Keynote Talk: Professor Peter Golding (Northumbria University,UK) – Why a Sociologist should take Communications and Media Seriously

Abstract
In the presentation of this paper, Peter Golding will reflect on why the study of communications and media demands the insights and methods of sociology, and why RN18 therefore is an appropriate network within the European Sociological Association. He will present reflections on how such key sociological concerns as inequality, identity, power, and change are at the heart of the questions we should be posing in addressing the nature and role of the media as institutions and communications as a social process. The paper will also address how far changes in the technologies of media and communications alter, or should alter, our approach to generating research and insight in this field.
Peter Golding is pro-vice chancellor of research & innovation at Northumbria University, founder and honorary chair of ESA RN18.

Call for Submissions and Participation
We are living in times of global capitalist crisis that require rethinking the ways we organize society, communication, the media, and our lives. The current crisis seems to a certain degree be different compared to previous ones, among other reasons due to the role of mediated communication and information in establishing/changing economic, political, and social relations as well as the crisis itself. The crisis can also be seen as crisis of what has been called consumer capitalism or informational capitalism. More precisely it has resulted on the one hand in a hyper-neoliberal intensification of neo-conservative policies and on the other hand in the emergence of new popular movements that are critical of the commodification of everything and demand the strengthening of society’s commons. The second movement has in the social sciences been accompanied by a renewed interest in critical studies, the critique and analysis of class and capitalism, and critical political economy. The overall goal of this conference is to foster scholarly presentations, networking, and exchange on the question of which transitions media and communication and media sociology are undergoing in contemporary society. The conference particularly welcomes contributions that are inspired by sociological theories, critical studies, and various strands and traditions of the critical study of media & society.

Questions that can be covered by presentations include, but are not limited to:

* What is a crisis? What forms of crisis are there? How do they relate to capitalism and communication?

* How have the media presented the crisis? Which similarities and differences in crisis reporting are there between different media (television, press, and new media) or between media in different countries?

* How has the crisis affected various media and cultural industries? What is the role of changing media technology in the economic crisis? How has the media economy changed since the start of the crisis in 2008? How have advertising investments, profits, market values, etc developed in the media economy since the start of the crisis? How has the global expansion of media industries been reshaped by the crisis and what is the future of global media and news agencies? What changes can be traced in the production of news and other media content? Are there changes in the nature of media products?

* What is the role of media and communication technologies in the financialization, acceleration, and globalization of the capitalist economy? How can a post-crisis media economy look like? How has advertising favoured a climate of private consumer debt?

* What are the ideological implications of the crisis for mediascapes? Which ideological discourses do companies, CEOs, managers, or neoliberal politicians use for justifying their interests, lay-offs, high bonuses, inequalities, etc and how are these discourses represented by the media or in strategic company reports? How are hyper-neoliberal crisis policy responses (“socialism for the rich and capitalism for the poor” in the form of bank bail outs and budget cuts in areas like welfare, education, social security, health care, etc) ideologically justified and how do the media represent such ideologies? What is the role of finance capital in the media and cultural industries? Which hegemonic, alternative, or contradictory interpretations and reception practices of media content that relates to the crisis are there? Which ideologies and myths underlie the capitalist crisis?

* What is the role of media, communication, critical journalism, and alternative media in contemporary uproars, riots, rebellions, social movements, protests, demonstrations, and revolutions?

* How do identities and mediated identities change in times of crisis? How should one think about the relationship of economy and culture in light of the capitalist crisis? What is the relationship of class and identities and of politics of redistribution and recognition today? How do we have to rethink and reshape the relation between political economy and cultural studies in the light of capitalist crisis in order to adequately study the media and communication?

* How is the public sphere changing in the light of the global crisis? What are perspectives for politics, participation, and democracy today and how do these perspectives relate to the media and communication? Is the role of media in democracy changing? If so, how? Are media a distinct player in politics? If the established media form an estate of power in democracy, do we today new a new estate of power? If so, how could it look like?

* What are the causes, realities, and consequences of the commodification of the communication commons? What are alternatives to the commodification of the communication commons? How can one strengthen and create public media and commons-based forms of communication? What are the relationships and differences between the commodity logic, the gift logic, and the logic of public goods and how do these logics shape the media?

* How do contemporary societal trends, such as integration, diversity and conflicts in Europe and the world, transnationalism and networking, digitization, informatization, globalization, glocalization, prosumption, neoliberalism, privatization and commodification, migration, racism, changing gender relations, consumer and advertising culture, warfare, terrorism, the new imperialism, surveillance, social movement protests, global societal risks, the strengthening of right-wing extremist and fascist movements, or the anti-corporate movement and other movements, shape media and communication and how do media and communication in turn shape society in times of crisis and transition?

* What are the tasks, roles, responsibilities, and identities of the sociology of media and communication in a society that is facing deep crisis? What is the actual or potential role of critique, ethics, struggles, counter-power, resistance, protest, civil society, and social movements in contemporary societies and contemporary communications?

* What are the major trends that shape contemporary society and how are these trends related to mediated communication and knowledge production? In what society do we live? What society do we desire to have? What forms of media and communication do we find in contemporary society? What forms of media and communication do we desire and how must society change in order to achieve these goals?

* What are the major trends in respect to crisis, communication, and critique in Europe? What are the major trends in respect to crisis, communication, and critique in other parts of the world?

* How do different companies and organizations make use of different information transmission technologies? What is the role of high speed financial flows and associated transmission networks in the finance industry? How (in)visible are these flows?

Submission

An abstract of 200-250 words should be sent to Dr. Romina Surugiu, University of Bucharest, at the following e-mail address: bilbao.conference@yahoo.com. Please insert the words Bilbao in the subject. The deadline for abstract submission is May 31st 2012. 

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Info Tech

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION CONFERENCE

10 November 2011, London, UK

http://www.collegeofteachers.ac.uk/events/communication-conference?utm_source=t&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=unicom

Conference Focus:

The year 2011 has been designated by the UK Government as the National Year of Communication, putting the importance of speech, language and communication firmly on the public radar. The College of Teachers is supporting this by holding an International Communication Conference at the Institute of Education.

The conference features

Presentations from 8 speakers
A choice of afternoon of workshops
Panel discussion and audience Q&A
Opportunity to network with other delegates and speakers

Speakers include

Jean Gross

The Communication Champion
Jonathon Douglas

Director of the National Literacy Trust
Dr Elizabeth Vallance

Virginia Beardshaw
CEO of ‘I Can’

To be held on 10 November 2011 in the Jeffery Hall at the prestigious Institute of Education, London, UK

Workshop A

Julie Westrop / Bev Bird: Engaging with families to develop communication and literacy – The Cafe Programme in Norfolk

or

Professor Peter Chatterton: Effective learning, working and communicating in a digital age

Workshop B

Professor Rosemary Sage: Identifying narrative levels for learning success

or

Daryle Abrahams: Using analytical psychology as the basis for differentiation in the classroom to understand preferred learning styles

Workshop C

Professor Bozydar L.J. Kaczmarek: Narrative is key to learning? Research evidence from all ages and
abilities

Our International Communication conference is aimed at:
Teachers
Parents
People working with children
Young people
Commissioners
Providers of services

Prices
Non- Members: 95.00
Current Member of The College of Teachers: 75.00
Early bird rate

We have an early bird discount of 20 per ticket available until Monday 24 October 2011.

Please use discount code COMMSCONF2011 at the checkout

Register Now!

To register your place at our Communication conference visit: http://www.collegeofteachers.ac.uk/events/communication-conference
http://www.collegeofteachers.ac.uk/events/communication-conference?utm_source=b&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=unicom

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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The Swan

THE JOURNAL OF MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES

The Journal of Media and Communication Studies (JMCS) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed Journal that will be published monthly by Academic Journals (www.academicjournals.org/JMCS, http://www.acadjourn.org). JMCS is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.

Call for Papers

JMCS will cover all areas of the subject. The journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence, and will publish:

* Original articles in basic and applied research

*  Case studies

* Critical reviews, surveys, opinions, commentaries and essays

We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to jmcs.journal@gmail.com for publication. Our objective is to inform authors of the decision on their manuscript(s) within four weeks of submission. Following acceptance, a paper will normally be published in the next issue. Instruction for authors and other details are available on our website; www.academicjournals.org/JMCS,

JMCS is an Open Access Journal

One key request of researchers across the world is unrestricted access to research publications. Open access gives a worldwide audience larger than that of any subscription-based journal and thus increases the visibility and impact of published works. It also enhances indexing, retrieval power and eliminates the need for permissions to reproduce and distribute content. JMCS is fully committed to the Open Access Initiative and will provide free access to all articles as soon as they are published.

Best regards,

Oriabure Otoigiakhi, Editorial Assistant, Journal of Media and Communication Studies (JMCS), Academic Journals, E-mail: jmcs.journal@gmail.com, www.academicjournals.org/JMCS,

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Capitalism

CAPITALIST CRISIS, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE

 tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society

Vol. 8. No. 2: Special Issue on Capitalist Crisis, Communication & Culture
Edited by Christian Fuchs, Matthias Schafranek, David Hakken, Marcus Breen
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/issue/current

Suggested citation: Fuchs, Christian, Matthias Schafranek, David Hakken and Marcus Breen. Eds. 2010. Special issue on “Capitalist crisis, communication & culture“. tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society 8 (2): 193-309.

“Capitalism […] is approaching an apocalyptic zero-point” (Slavoj Žižek).

What is the role of communication in the general situation of capitalist crisis?
The global economic downturn is an indicator of a new worldwide capitalist crisis. The main focus of most public debates as well as of economic and policy analyses is the role of finance capital and the housing market in creating the crisis, less attention is given to the role of communication technologies, the media, and culture in the world economic crisis. The task of this special issue of tripleC is to present analyses of the role of ICTs, the media, and culture in the current crisis of capitalism. The seven papers focus on the causes, development, and effects of the crisis. Each paper relates one or more of these dimensions to ICTs, the media, or culture.

Capitalist Crisis, Communication, & Culture – Introduction to the Special Issue of tripleC
Christian Fuchs, Matthias Schafranek, David Hakken and Marcus
Breen (Special Issue Editors)
pp 193-204
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/228/189

Computing and the Current Crisis:
The Significant Role of New Information Technologies in Our Socio-Economic Meltdown
David Hakken
pp 205-220
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/161/193

The Virtual Debt Factory: Towards an Analysis of Debt and Abstraction in the American Credit Crisis
Vincent R. Manzerolle
pp 221-236
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/149/192

Calculating the Unknown. Rationalities of Operational Risk in Financial Institutions
Matthias Werner and Hajo Greif
pp 237-250
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/184/194

Crisis, What Crisis? The Media: Business and Journalism in Times of Crisis
Rosario de Mateo, Laura Bergés, Anna Garnatxe*
pp 251-274
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/212/195

Anglo-American Credit Scoring and Consumer Debt in the Subprime Mortgage Crisis of 2007 as Models for Other Countries?
Thomas Ruddy
pp 275-284
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/176/198

Crise, Genre et TIC : Recette pour une Dés-Union Pronon- cée. L’Exemple de l’Afrique du Sud (in French)
Joelle Palmieri
pp 285-309
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/141/197

– – –
Priv.-Doz. Dr. Christian Fuchs
Unified Theory of Information Research Group
christian.fuchs@uti.at
Personal Website: http://fuchs.uti.at
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Research Group: http://www.uti.at
Editor of
tripleC – Cognition, Communication, Co-Operation | Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society
http://www.triple-c.at
Fuchs, Christian. 2008. Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age. New York: Routledge.
http://fuchs.uti.at/?page_id=40

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Capitalism

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

Crisis Theory

Crisis Theory

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND THE CURRENT CRISIS

 

Call for Papers

A Special Issue of tripleC (http://www.triple-c.at): Information and Communication Technologies and the Current Crisis: How Are They Connected?

The Crisis that began in 2007 continues to convulse the world. Labelled by some as merely a recession, yet it is associated with dramatic changes in national and global power. Others frame the Crisis as merely a consequence of over-promoting a narrow range of financial transactions associated with subprime mortgage instruments. These were indeed overly aggressively oversold by deregulated bankers, but this was likely only an important trigger of the Crisis, not the primary cause.

In this special issue, we will explore the notion that much of the basis of the Crisis should be assigned to financial transactions not just made possible but also strongly afforded by use of computer technologies. Thus, those operating at the highest levels of algorithmic capacity bear substantial responsibility for the Crisis.

For students of technological innovation and diffusion, many questions emerge about the connection between the Crisis in general and computerization. Some of the questions involve the tight relationship between cultures of technological empowerment and financial elites. Others questions, while appearing initially to be purely economic, turn out on examination to articulate strongly with the public interest, civil society, policymaking, and public discourse more generally.

These in turn lead to further, perhaps quite new critical questions about the emerging relationships between capitalism, democracy and the data-information-knowledge-technology nexus. Thus, equally important for responsibility is specification of what is known within computer science about the technological dimensions of the Crisis of this crisis. Ultimately, a rethinking of the very notion of “crisis” itself may be needed.

Some specific questions authors may choose to address include:

* What kind of crisis is this, how is it different from previous ones, how are these differences related to automated ICTs and the changed practices they have afforded?

* What role do computer professionals have in the crisis?

* Does this crisis suggest a dystopian post-human future?

* What media theories best explain the crisis, or has the time arrived for newly radical approaches in this area?

* How does public policy fit in the private world of computerization?

* What historical guides are available as tools to foster better analyses of technological crisis?

* Will the BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China) be the “winners” of this crisis?

* Are there artistic innovations that help refine political and policy responses to this crisis?

* What new knowledge innovations are needed to understand the forces at work in this crisis and its implications for democracy?

* What new questions need to be addressed to orientate research about the crisis?

* How are the computing-, information-, and media-industries affected by this crisis? How will they develop in the future?

This special issue of tripleC is intended to feature research from both theoretical and practical perspectives. We seek contributions from any theoretical, professional, or disciplinary perspective that offers innovative analysis that promotes debate about technology and the Crisis.

Submission deadline: Full papers should be submitted until October 31st, 2009. All papers will be peer reviewed. The special issue will be published in spring 2010. 

tripleC – Cognition, Communication, Co-operation: Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society (http://www.triple-c.at) promotes contributions within an emerging science of the information age with a special interest in critical studies following the highest standards of peer review.

Submissions must be formatted according to tripleC’s guidelines: http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, make use of APA style, and use the style template: http://triplec.at/files/journals/1/template-0.dot. Papers should be submitted online by making use of the electronic submission system: http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/user/register, http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/login). When submitting to the electronic system, please select “Special issue on crisis & communication” as the journal’s section.

ISSUE CO-EDITORS: David Hakken (dhakken@indiana.edu) and Marcus Breen (m.breen@neu.edu)

David Hakken is professor of informatics at Indiana University. Marcus Breen is associate professor of communication studies at Northeastern University.

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