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Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN POLITICS, PUBLIC POLICY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

We welcome applications from excellent candidates for our MPhil/PhD programmes and our Masters by Research.

Areas of study

We supervise topics ranging across political science and international relations.  We particularly encourage students whose research interests will complement or extend our expertise in three general areas:

Critical Global Politics:

Including foreign policy, global media, regional governance, borders, politics and religion, international security, international law, human rights and migration, theorizing global cities and global political economy

Politics and Public Policy:

Including the politics of the EU, theories of the policy process, normative and critical political theory, British political issues and ideologies, environmental policy, competition policy and regulation

Cultural Politics, Communications and Media:

Including cultural politics, media culture and identity, media events and rituals, media and globalisation, communications and media, public service broadcasting, competition policy and regulation, copyright and new business models in the creative industries, new media and society, political communication, international communication, language and politics, interculturalism, and contemporary cultural and political theory.

More details, including on how to apply, can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/political-social-international-studies/research-degrees

Funding

We invite applications for Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded doctoral studentships as partners in the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts Southeast England (CHASE) http://www.chase.ac.uk.  CHASE will be awarding up to 75 studentships in 2015.

The Faculty will also offer up to 15 University-funded PhD studentships available to students from within or outside the EU.

More information on studentships can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/arts-humanities/graduate-school/studentships

To be considered for a studentship for October 2015 entry, the application deadline is 14 January 2015.  We advise early initial contact with potential supervisors to maximise the chance of success.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Fear of a Blank Planet

Fear of a Blank Planet

DISTRIBUTED INTIMACIES

Banff Research in Culture 2014

Summer Research Residency

Program Dates: May 26, 2014 – June 13, 2014

Application Deadline: December 2, 2013

Application and Program Info: http://www.banffcentre.ca/programs/program.aspx?id=1394

Faculty: Lauren BerlantFrancisco CamachoWendy Hui Kyong Chun

Intimacy describes our relations with those people, places, creatures, and things to which we feel the deepest, most powerful or most abiding connections. The multiple ways in which we experience intimacy today draw attention to the complex patterning of closeness and distance that has always unconsciously structured our cultural, social and political practices. There have long been forms of distant intimacy—staying ‘in touch’ via the drama of epistolary exchanges or through sound waves emanating from a telephone—but recent technological developments, increased travel, the expansion of migration and immigration, and instantaneous virtual communication are fundamentally reshaping our understanding and experience of the proximity of bodies, sentiments, and ideas. Social networking and the democratization of modes of communication and media have had a profound significance for the experience of community, collectivity, and affinities; at every level, from the family to the nation, our sense of belonging is being redefined in ways that affect our daily experience but remain difficult to comprehend. 

One can see evidence of the new distribution of intimacy everywhere: in the immediacy of a rock concert, one witnesses people en masse recording the spectacle for friends not present; on public transit around the world, passengers make connections to different elsewheres via newspapers, music, text messages, and mobile phone calls; and in political protests (as evidenced by the Arab Spring and recent dissent in Turkey), which have been reshaped by the use of technologies that are, for a new generation, part and parcel of everyday life. Intimacies of friendship, collectivity, love and belonging are being substantially redefined through the devices in our hands and a global infrastructure that supports instantaneous sharing.

Banff Research in Culture (BRiC) 2014 will investigate the cultural, social, and political repercussions of “distributed intimacies”—the processes and outcomes of new forms of mediation that have reshaped how we relate to one another, imagine ourselves as parts of groups, and constitute communities. Given the fractal character of our subjectivity—the ways in which we are necessarily the outcome of networks of intersubjective relations, experiences, and concepts—how are our intimacies constituted by the ways we live? What are the modes and machines by which intimacies are distributed, and what determines their intensities? How does the global distribution of goods, ideas and affects across oceans and continents shape forms of intimacy, belonging and community? What forms of intimacy feel inescapable? What impedes intimacy from flourishing? Are local scenes and forms of collectivity (e.g., non-traditional families, polyamory, activist movements, alternative forms of political practice) enabled by new forms of distributed intimacies? In what ways do contemporary cultural and art practices participate in the distribution of intimacy? To what extent are our intimacies segmented, remote-controlled, and apportioned, and can we redefine these distributions without lapsing into a nostalgic primitivism? Finally, what does distributed intimacy imply for social change as well as for the politics of shaping one’s own self in relation to others?

We look forward to receiving compelling and original project proposals from thinkers and creators working on a wide range of projects.

Imre Szeman

Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies

Killam Annual Professor

Professor of English, Film Studies and Sociology

University of Alberta

www.crcculturalstudies.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Ayers Rock

ONLINE CONFERENCE ON MULTIDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES

29-31 March 2013

Australian International Cultural and Educational Institute: www.auaicei.com

Online conference is an innovative conference organisational form which has brought a series of revolutionary changes to the traditional conference. Traditional conference requires participants to travel and stay in a particular place. It is a time-consuming and costly process. Online conference uses the Internet as a conference “venue” in which participants can access the conference from anywhere at any time. You won’t miss any presentations you are interested and have adequate time to share your insights with other delegates.

AICEI aims to build a platform allowing scholars, researchers, and professionals who are interested in sharing their studies from various perspectives in the aspects of social sciences, including: Culture, Education, Communication, Library & Information Studies, Psychology, Health Studies, Society and so forth. All theoretical, empirical, and practical papers in the above fields (but not strictly limited) are all highly welcomed.

Please refer to the website: www.auaicei.com for more detailed information.

Your paper may be published on:

* Conference Proceedings (refereed and non-refereed);

* International Journal of Multidisciplinary Social Sciences (with articles from selected refereed papers);

* Book chapters (with articles from selected refereed papers).

Yours faithfully,

AICEI Committee

www.auaicei.com

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

MARX IS BACK: THE IMPORTANCE OF MARXIST THEORY AND RESEARCH FOR CRITICAL COMMUNICATION STUDIES TODAY

Marx is Back: The Importance of Marxist Theory and Research for Critical Communication Studies Today

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of tripleC – Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society
Edited by Christian Fuchs and Vincent Mosco: http://fuchs.uti.at/wp-content/uploads/CfP_Marx_tripleC.pdf
For inquiries, please contact the two editors.

In light of the global capitalist crisis, there is renewed interest in Karl Marx’s works and in concepts like class, exploitation and surplus value. Slavoj Žižek argues that the antagonisms of contemporary capitalism in the context of the ecological crisis, the massive expansion of intellectual property, biogenetics, new forms of apartheid and growing world poverty show that we still need the Marxian notion of class. He concludes that there is an urgent need to renew Marxism and to defend its lost causes in order to render problematic capitalism as the only alternative (Žižek 2008, 6) and the new forms of a soft capitalism that promise, and in its rhetoric makes use of, ideals like participation, self-organization, and co-operation, without realizing them. Žižek (2010, chapter 3) argues that the global capitalistcrisis clearly demonstrates the need to return to the critique of political economy. Göran Therborn suggests that the “new constellations of power and new possibilities of resistance” in the 21st century require retaining the “Marxian idea that human emancipation from exploitation, oppression, discrimination and the inevitable linkage between privilege and misery can only come from struggle by the exploited and disadvantaged themselves” (Therborn 2008, 61). Eric Hobsbawm (2011, 12f) insists that for understanding the global dimension of contemporary capitalism, its contradictions and crises, and the persistence of socio-economic inequality, we “must ask Marx’s questions” (13).

This special issue will publish articles that address the importance of Karl Marx’s works for Critical Media and Communication Studies, what it means to ask Marx’s questions in 21st century informational capitalism, how Marxian theory can be used for critically analyzing and transforming media and communication today, and what the implications of the revival of the interest in Marx are for the field of Media and Communication Studies.

Questions that can be explored in contributions include, but are not limited to:

* What is Marxist Media and Communication Studies? Why is it needed today?

* What are the main assumptions, legacies, tasks, methods and categories of Marxist Media and Communication Studies and how do they relate to Karl Marx’s theory?

* What are the different types of Marxist Media/Communication Studies, how do they differ, what are their commonalities?

* What is the role of Karl Marx’s theory in different fields, subfields and approaches of Media and Communication Studies?

* How have the role, status, and importance of Marx’s theory for Media and Communication Studies evolved historically, especially since the 1960s?

* In addition to his work as a theorist and activist, Marx was a practicing journalist throughout his career. What can we learn from his journalism about the practice of journalism today, about journalism theory, journalism education and alternative media?

* What have been the structural conditions, limits and problems for conducting Marxian-inspired Media and Communication Research and for carrying out university teaching in the era of neoliberalism?

* What are actual or potential effects of the new capitalist crisis on these conditions?

* What is the relevance of Marxian thinking in an age of capitalist crisis for analyzing the role of media and communication in society?

* How can the Marxian notions of class, class struggle, surplus value, exploitation, commodity/commodification, alienation, globalization, labour, capitalism, militarism and war, ideology/ideology critique, fetishism, and communism best be used for analyzing, transforming and
criticizing the role of media, knowledge production and communication in contemporary capitalism?

* How are media, communication, and information addressed in Marx’s work?

* What are commonalities and differences between contemporary approaches in the interpretation of Marx’s analyses of media, communication, knowledge, knowledge labour and technology?

* What is the role of dialectical philosophy and dialectical analysis as epistemological and methodological tools for Marxian-inspired Media and Communication Studies?

* What were central assumptions of Marx about media, communication, information, knowledge production, culture and how can these insights be used today for the critical analysis of capitalism?

* What is the relevance of Marx’s work for an understanding of social media?

* Which of Marx’s works can best be used today to theorize media and communication?  Why and how?

* Terry Eagleton (2011) demonstrates that the 10 most common held prejudices against Marx are wrong. What prejudices against Marx can be found in Media and Communication Studies today? What have been the consequences of such prejudices? How can they best be contested? Are there continuities and/or discontinuities of prejudices against Marx in light of the new capitalist crisis?

All contributions shall genuinely deal with Karl Marx’s original works and discuss their relevance for contemporary Critical Media/Communication Studies.

Eagleton Terry. 2011. Why Marx was right. London: Yale University Press.
Hobsbawm, Eric. 2011. How to change the world. Marx and Marxism 1840-2011. London: Little, Brown.
Therborn, Göran. 2008. From Marxism to post-Marxism? London: Verso.
Žižek, Slavoj. 2008. In defense of lost causes. London: Verso.
Žižek, Slavoj. 2010. Living in the end times. London: Verso.

Editors

Christian Fuchs is chair professor for Media and Communication Studies at Uppsala University’s Department of Informatics and Media. He is editor of the journal tripleC – Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society. His areas of interest are: Critical Theory, Social Theory, Media & Society, Critical Political Economy of Media/Communication, Critical Information Society Studies, Critical Internet Studies. He is author of the books “Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies” (Routledge 2011) and “Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age” (Routledge 2008, paperback 2011). He is co-editor of the collected volume “The Internet and Surveillance. The Challenges of Web 2.0 and Social Media” (Routledge 2011, together with Kees Boersma, Anders Albrechtslund, Marisol Sandoval). He is currently writing a book presenting a critical theory of social media. http://fuchs.uti.at 

Vincent Mosco is professor emeritus of sociology at Queen’s University and formerly Canada Research Chair in Communication and Society. Dr. Mosco is the author of numerous books on communication, technology, and society. His most recent include Getting the Message: Communications Workers and Global Value Chains (co-edited with Catherine McKercher and Ursula Huws,Merlin, 2010), The Political Economy of Communication, second edition (Sage, 2009), The Laboring of Communication: Will Knowledge Workers of the World Unite (co-authored with Catherine McKercher, Lexington Books, 2008), Knowledge Workers in the Information Society (co-edited with Catherine McKercher, Lexington Books, 2007), and The Digital Sublime: Myth, Power, and Cyberspace (MIT Press, 2004). He is currently writing a book on the relevance of Karl Marx for communication research today.

Publication Schedule and Submission

Structured Abstracts for potential contributions shall be submitted to both editors (christian.fuchs@im.uu.semoscov@mac.com) per e-mail until September 30th, 2011 (submission deadline). The authors of accepted abstracts will be invited to write full papers that are due five months after the feedback from the editors. Full papers must then be submitted to tripleC. Please do not instantly submit full papers, but only structured abstracts to the editors.

The abstracts should have a maximum of 200 words and should be structured by dealing separately with each of the following five dimensions.

1) Purpose and main questions of the paper
2) Description of the way taken for answering the posed questions
3) Relevance of the topic in relation to the CfP
4) Main expected outcomes and new insights of the paper
5) Contribution to the engagement with Marx’s works and to Marxian-inspired Media and Communication Studies.

Journal

tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society, http://www.triple-c.se 

Focus and Scope:

Critical Media-/Information-/Communication-/Internet-/Information Society-Studies; tripleC provides a forum to discuss the challenges humanity is facing today. It publishes contributions that focus on critical studies of media, information, communication, culture, digital media, social media and the Internet in the information society. The journal’s focus is especially on critical studies and it asks contributors to reflect about normative, political, ethical and critical implications of their research.

Indexing:
Scopus, EBSCOHost Communication and Mass Media Complete, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
Open Access: tripleC is an open access journal that publishes articles online and does not charge authors or readers. It uses a Creative Commons license (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License) that allows reproduction of published articles for non-commercial purposes (without changes of the content and only with naming the author). Creative Commons publishing poses a viable alternative to commercial academic publishing that is dominated by big corporate publishing houses.

Prof. Christian Fuchs
Chair in Media and Communication Studies
Department of Informatics and Media
Uppsala University
Kyrkogårdsgatan 10
Box 513
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
christian.fuchs@im.uu.se
Tel +46 (0) 18 471 1019
http://fuchs.uti.at
http://www.im.uu.se
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Editor of tripleC: http://www.triple-c.se
Book “Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies” (Routledge 2011)
Book “Internet and Society” (Paperback, Routledge 2010)

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Books

FOUNDATIONS OF CRITICAL MEDIA AND INFORMATION STUDIES

A New Book by Christian Fuchs

Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-58881-2. 384 pages. Rouledge Advances in Sociology No. 52, 2011

More information: http://fuchs.uti.at/books/foundations-of-critical-media-and-information-studies/

Available from the same author: “Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age” (Paperback 2011) http://fuchs.uti.at/books/internet-society/

Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies lays down foundations for the analysis of media, information, and information technology in 21st century information society, as well as introducing the theoretical and empirical tools necessary for the critical study of media and the information society.

Reasons for reading this book:
* To find out more about critical theory today: The book updates critical theory for 21st century information society.
* To acquire tools for critical analyses: The book introduces methodological and theoretical tools for studying media, information technology, and the information society in a critical way.
* To read more about a critical theory of media and the information society: The book explains the foundations of a critical theory of media, information, information technology, and the information society.
* To find out more about how power structures frame the media and the Internet: The book provides a power structure analysis of the media and the Internet.
* To engage with alternative media and the alternative Internet: The book identifies alternative potentials of the media, culture, and the Internet.

Contents

1 Introduction

PART I: Theory

2 Critical theory today
3 Critical media and information studies
4 Marx and critical media and information studies

PART II: Case studies

5 The media and information economy and the new imperialism
6 The new crisis of capitalism and the role of the media and information economy
7 Participatory web 2.0 as ideology

PART III Alternatives

8 Alternative media as critical media
9 Conclusion


Professor Christian Fuchs
Chair in Media and Communication Studies
Department of Informatics and Media
Uppsala University
Kyrkogårdsgatan 10
Box 513
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
christian.fuchs@im.uu.se
Tel +46 (0) 18 471 1019
http://fuchs.uti.at
http://www.im.uu.se
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Editor of tripleC: http://www.triple-c.at
Book “Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies” (Routledge 2011)
Book “Internet and Society” (Paperback, Routledge 2010)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Mediation

MAPPING COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA RESEARCH

Mapping Communication and Media Research: Conjunctures, Institutions, Challenges

by Juha Koivisto, Juha and Peter D. Thomas

218 p.
ISBN: 978-951-44-7920-5 29.00€
Publisher: Tampere University Press. TUP

Communication and media research has emerged in recent years as one of the most successful and dynamic fields of activity in the contemporary university. The explosive growth has prompted concern about a ‘lack of clarity’ of the field and its capacity to respond productively to current and future challenges. How can we account for the spectacular rise of communication and media research? What type of academic activity is it? Is it a ‘discipline’, an interdisciplinary ‘field’, a new ‘discourse’ or an ‘institution’ including different approaches?

Communication and media research is analysed in this study as a ‘hegemonic apparatus’, or a terrain of conflicting forces and organisation forms upon which social, cultural and political projects and values are produced, criticised and challenged. The authors argue that contemporary communication and media research can only be understood by referring to the concrete social, cultural and political contexts in which it occurs.

Drawing upon a series of detailed reports covering communication and media research internationally, from Germany, France, Belgium, The Netherlands, Finland, Estonia, the USA, the UK, Australia, Japan and South Korea, the study provides a global overview of the contemporary situation and assesses future challenges and opportunities. Key indices include university departments, professorships and research centres, doctoral studies, gender relations, research funding, internationalisation and publishing and the impact of university reforms.

This study will be essential reading for all those concerned with the current state of this successful ‘non-discipline’ and its significance for critical intellectual practice today.

Orders and further information are available here: http://granum.uta.fi/english/kirjanTiedot.php?tuote_id=20194

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Swan

THE JOURNAL OF MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES

The Journal of Media and Communication Studies (JMCS) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed Journal that will be published monthly by Academic Journals (www.academicjournals.org/JMCS, http://www.acadjourn.org). JMCS is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.

Call for Papers

JMCS will cover all areas of the subject. The journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence, and will publish:

* Original articles in basic and applied research

*  Case studies

* Critical reviews, surveys, opinions, commentaries and essays

We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to jmcs.journal@gmail.com for publication. Our objective is to inform authors of the decision on their manuscript(s) within four weeks of submission. Following acceptance, a paper will normally be published in the next issue. Instruction for authors and other details are available on our website; www.academicjournals.org/JMCS,

JMCS is an Open Access Journal

One key request of researchers across the world is unrestricted access to research publications. Open access gives a worldwide audience larger than that of any subscription-based journal and thus increases the visibility and impact of published works. It also enhances indexing, retrieval power and eliminates the need for permissions to reproduce and distribute content. JMCS is fully committed to the Open Access Initiative and will provide free access to all articles as soon as they are published.

Best regards,

Oriabure Otoigiakhi, Editorial Assistant, Journal of Media and Communication Studies (JMCS), Academic Journals, E-mail: jmcs.journal@gmail.com, www.academicjournals.org/JMCS,

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com