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Antonio Negri

BIOPOLITICS OF THE COMMONS

Call for papers to the Colloquium “Biopolitics of the Commons”
Institute for Humanities and Faculty of Social Science and History
Diego Portales University
Santiago-Chile
Thursday, October 27th 2011, 15.00 – 20.30 hrs.

The commons has emerged as one of the key concepts around which social, political and cultural demands are being articulated and theorized today. Harkening back to the displacement of people from shared communal spaces and their transformation from public into private property – a central act in the development of European capitalism in the 18th and 19th centuries — the commons insists on the fundamentally shared character of social life: that everything from language to education, from nature to our genetic inheritance, belongs irreducibly to all of us; to a living which is, in that sense, always ours.

Moreover, in a national and global conjuncture, where the private seems to appropriate everything that is collective, this symposium will explore which are the possible answers given by the contemporary political theory to the so called “accumulation by dispossession”, based on the approaches of Antonio Negri, Giorgio Agamben, Roberto Esposito, Jean-Luc Nancy and Étienne Balibar, among others.

To this end, we invite scholars who would be interested in participate in this event, to submit an abstract of 300 words (in Spanish or English) by the August 30th, 2011to the professors Ricardo Camargo (ricardo.camargo@udp.cl) and Miguel Vatter (miguel.vatter@udp.cl) There will be a selection of the submitted proposals. The accepted applicants should send the complete paper at least two weeks before of the symposium’s date.

This symposium will count with the presence and participation of Antonio Negri, one of the most prominent political thinkers of our time. Professor Negri has been involved in developing a theoretical approach not only to the notion of the commons, but also to the notions of Empire, Multitude, Intellectual Labor, among others theoretical categories, all of which are embodied in his recent trilogy, co-authored with Michael Hardt: Empire, Multitude and Commonwealth.
The symposium will be closed with an open lecture given by Professor Negri.
 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Incident

LAW AND THE POSTCOLONIAL

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy

Series edited by Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, Queen Mary University of London; Dr Mark A. Harris, La Trobe University and Dr Brenna Bhandar, University of Kent

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy seeks to expand the critical scope of racial, postcolonial, and global theory and analysis, focusing on how the global juridico-economic apparatus has been, and continues to be, shaped by the Colonial and the Racial structurings of power. It includes works that seek to move beyond the previous privileging of culture in considerations of racial and postcolonial subjectivity to offer a more comprehensive engagement with the legal, economic and moral issues of the global present.

The following categories of works have been identified which would fit with the aims and objectives of the series:

1. Architectures, Apparatuses, and Procedures: with a focus on the legal-economic institutions, frameworks, agreements, and processes, including multilateral agreements, the state, international financial institutions, International NGOs, etc.

2. Dispossession, Displacement and Obliteration: with a focus on the various strategies of appropriation of land and resources, exploitation of labour, processes that create forced and voluntary displacement of populations, or threaten or cause the eradication of local population

3. Occupation, Intervention, and Detention: with a focus on policing strategies and the related moral statements that sustain them, including humanitarian interventions, military occupations, the criminalization and detention of migrant works; the criminalization of economically dispossessed urban populations and racial and ethnic collectives

4. Grammars, Discourses, and Practices: with the focus on structures and mechanism of symbolic representation, and related moral (including religious), and legal frameworks, such as the Human Rights framework, with particular attention to how they enable the articulation of political subjects

This interdisciplinary series welcomes exclusively theoretical essays that engage with the conceptual and analytical questions detailed above and discussions of how particular conceptual approaches can illuminate existing processes and help in the study of the global landscape. In addition monographs and edited volumes, using qualitative and quantitative methods with a strong theoretical grounding, which deal with these questions and processes are also welcomed.

To discuss or propose an idea for a book, please contact the series editors:

Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, d.ferreiradasilva@qmul.ac.uk, School of Business & Management,
Queen Mary College, University of London, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (0) 20 7882 8414

Dr Brenna Bhandar, B.Bhandar@kent.ac.uk, Kent Law School, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (1227) 824774

Dr Mark A. Harris, Mark.Harris@latrobe.edu.au, School of Law, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Australia, Tel. +61 (3) 94791276

Guidelines for preparing a book proposal can be found at: http://www.routledge.com/info/authors

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

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Gerrard Winstanley

TONY BENN AND PAUL MASON ON GERRARD WINSTANLEY

NEW TITLE FROM VERSO’S ‘REVOLUTIONS’ SERIES:

GERRARD WINSTANLEY:­ A COMMON TREASURY

Introduced by TONY BENN

Published 10th April 2011

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EVENT:

TONY BENN in conversation with PAUL MASON at the Southbank Centre on WINSTANLEY, the Diggers and English radicalism.

Monday 23rd May, 2011

Part of the Festival ofBritain

More information and tickets: http://ticketing.southbankcentre.co.uk/find/literature-spoken-word/tickets/tony-benn-57704

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”Sick to death of the royal wedding? Then where better to take refuge than in the radical ruminations of Gerrard Winstanley, the voice of revolutionary republican England?…a useful and inspiring collection” — SOCIALIST REVIEW http://www.socialistreview.org.uk/article.php?articlenumber=11625

”With house prices at ridiculous levels and employment plummeting, perhaps this neat introduction to Winstanley’s writings could provide an excellent instruction manual for a new breed of 21st century Digger?” —  MORNING STAR http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/index.php/content/view/full/103449
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In Spring 1649, at the end of the English Civil War, Gerrard Winstanley and his comrades, the Diggers, went to St George’s Hill to farm the common land and to distribute the food amongst themselves. Winstanley’s extraordinary writings from this period have remained a huge influence for many on the left, and are cited as some of the earliest examples of communist thought.

Legendary voice of the left, Tony Benn, introduces this collection of Winstanley’s work and shows how it still has the power to inspire us to turn our world upside down. Benn credits the Diggers, along with the Levellers, with helping to launch into the public domain ideas about freedom, equality and democracy which, though now regarded as normal were then hugely threatening of the status quo, and are “some of the most important radical ideas of all time.”

Winstanley and the Diggers saw the earth and its natural resources as belonging to all mankind, a “common treasury”.  Since the 15th century, the enclosure of land by private landlords had meant that the poor were unable to farm and increasingly had to rely on wage labour. The Diggers attempted to seize the revolutionary moment to reclaim these common rights to the land through both argument and direct action.  Protestant agrarian socialists, the Diggers are an example of the long-standing relationship between Christianity and radicalism.

Emerging at the end of the English Civil War, the Diggers started their colony at St George’s Hill on 1st April 1649, just two months after the King, Charles I had gone to the scaffold. While the Diggers were ultimately unsuccessful in reclaiming the common land and destroying the system of “enclosures”, Winstanley’s ideas resonate to this day.

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 595 1 / $15.95 / £8.99 / CAN$20 / 192 pages
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For more information and to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/479-a-common-treasury
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Part of Verso’s REVOLUTIONS series
http://www.versobooks.com/series_collections/6-revolutions

Other titles that may be of interest include:

GEOFFREY ROBERTSON presents THE LEVELLERS:­ THE PUTNEY DEBATES
http://www.versobooks.com/books/297-the-putney-debates

and

WU MING present THOMAS MÜNTZER :­ SERMON TO THE PRINCES
http://www.versobooks.com/books/367-sermon-to-the-princes

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Academics based outside North America may request an inspection copy please contact tamar@verso.co.uk

Academics based within North America may request an examination copy please contact clara@versobooks.com

Please check the guidelines at http://www.versobooks.com/pg/desk-copies and include all necessary information.
———————————–

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: NEW CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS

CALL FOR PAPERS

For Proposed International Sociological Association 2012 Panel:

Title: Marxism and IPE: New Critical Engagements

Abstract:

Accumulation through dispossession, new enclosures, rent becoming profit, general intellect, immaterial labor, multitudes and the common. All of these are Marxist concepts of some variety or another which although prevalent in geography, sociology, anthropology and cultural studies still have not made their way into International Political Economy, where Marxist perspectives remain marginal and somewhat parochial (limited to historical materialist and world-systems analyses).

This panel calls for papers interested in exploring issues of global capital and empire from fresh theoretical angles such as those offered by autonomist Marxists like Hardt & Negri, Christian Marazzi, Sandro Mezzadra, Franco Berardi (bifo), and Silvia Federici, normative Marxists like George Caffentzis, Massimo de Angelis, David Graeber, and Harry Cleaver and Marxist geographers like Saskia Sassen, David Harvey, and Jamie Peck.

We welcome both theoretical engagements with questions of accumulation and valorization in internation al politics as well as more specific studies of the politics of everyday life, e.g., financialization, labor, education, consumption, culture, identity and ecology.    

Please submit your papers titles and abstracts to the conveners, Wanda Vrasti wndvrst@googlemail.com and Nicholas Kiersey kiersey@ohio.edu, by May 25th.

Note, please, that we intend to make this panel the basis of an edited book volume, should it be accepted. Thank you!

International Sociological Association: http://www.isa-sociology.org/

Universities in Crisis (an ISA blog): http://www.isa-sociology.org/universities-in-crisis/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

 

Blair's Educational Legacy

BLAIR’S EDUCATIONAL LEGACY: THIRTEEN YEARS OF NEW LABOUR

Edited by Anthony Green

Palgrave Macmillan (December 2010)

ISBN: 978-0-230-62176-3, ISBN10: 0-230-62176-7, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 244 pages

Providing an overview and Marxist assessment of Tony Blair and New Labour’sU.K.education policies, structures, and processes, the contributors in this exciting new collection discuss specific aspects of education policy and practices. This examination is set against the changing political and economic contexts of the British state’s responses to global and neo-liberal pressures.

Central themes include: New Labour and the education market state; New Labour, education, and ideology; and totality and open Marxism. 

Green’s work marks a timely contribution to Marxist analysis and Left critical assessment and is the first such collection addressing New Labour education policy.

Anthony Green is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Foundations and Policy Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London. He co-convenes Marxism and Education Renewing Dialogues (MERD), and is Series Editor for the Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series.

CONTENTS:

Introduction: Anthony Green * All the Wrong Answers: Labour’s Corporate-Centred Education Initiatives–Kevin Farnsworth * The Knowledge-based Economy and the Transformation of Higher Education: Issues concerning enclosing and protecting the intellectual commons–Molly Bellamy * The Professional Imagination: Further Education Professionalism in and beyond a Neo-liberal Context–Denis Gleeson * The Privatisation of Education Phase II: Perspectives on state schools the private sector and ten years of a Labour government–Thakir Hafid * Management and Governance of the School System–Richard Hatcher * City: Academies, Alienation, Economism and Contending Forces for Change–Philip Woods * Curriculum Change in the Blair Years–Terry Wrigley * Education still make you sick under Gordon Brown, Innit?–Martin Allen & Patrick Ainley * Ten Years of Education Policy and ‘Race’ Inequality: Whiteness or Neo-liberal Practice?–Alpesh Maisuria * Gendered Practices in Education–Rosalyn George & John Wadsworth

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Palgrave Macmillan): http://us.macmillan.com/blairseducationallegacy

Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series: http://www.palgrave.com/products/series.aspx?s=ME

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Amazon.co.uk): http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blairs-Educational-Legacy-Thirteen-Education/dp/0230621767/ref=sr_1_13?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304672910&sr=1-13

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Amazon.com): http://www.amazon.com/Blairs-Educational-Legacy-Thirteen-Education/dp/0230621767/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304673063&sr=1-10

‘I Read Some Marx (And I Liked It)’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wyqJ9wxZ9L0 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Antonio Negri

SELF ORGANISING III: COMMUNITY

Friday May 6th  2011
Venue: Lock Keepers Cottage, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, E1 4NS
Nearest Station: Mile End
Time: 5-7pm
Self-Organising: http://www.self-org.blogspot.com/

An encounter to muse and think together about external dynamics, political discourse and outreach; the role of the organizer when working with constituencies; issues of politicization, outreach, involvement and negotiation.

Conversations will be triggered by:

Doina Petrescu (Atelier d’Architecture Autogérée, Paris)

Doina Petrescu is an architect, co-founder together with Constantin Petcou of atelier d’architecture autogérée (aaa) in Paris and Professor of Architecture and Design Activism at the University of Sheffield. Her publications include Trans – Local – Act: cultural practices within and across (2010), Agency: Working with Uncertain Architectures (2009), Altering Practices: Feminist Politics and Poetics of Space (2007), Urban Act: a handbook for alternative practice (2007), Architecture and Participation (2005). During our session, Doina will speak about metropolitan commons and self-organised spaces.

Jane Wills (QMUL, London)

Jane Wills has research interests in low paid employment, migration, trade unionism and new forms of labour organisation, the living wage, community organising and political-economy. Her new co-authored book on low paid migrant labour in London entitled Global Cities at Work: new migrant divisions of labour was published by Pluto in 2010. Jane is convenor of the MA Community Organising and an active member of London Citizens.

RESOURCES:

C. Petcou, D.Petrescu, Acting Space
Published in Multitudes 3/ 2007, Urban/Act and included in the disobedience archive
http://www.disobediencearchive.com/texts/index.html

D. Petrescu, Jardinieres du commun
published in Multitudes 44/2010
http://multitudes.samizdat.net/Jardinieres-du-commun

and Trans-Local-Act.
C. Petcou, D.Petrescu, At the Ground Level of the City
Published in Multitudes 20/2005
http://multitudes.samizdat.net/Au-rez-de-chaussee-de-la-ville

and The Right to the City (Sydney, 2011)
What makes a biopolitical place?
A Discussion with Toni Negri, Constantin Petcou, Doina Petrescu, Anne Querrien, Paris – September 17, 2007
Published in Multitudes 3/ 2007 – In English: http://www.peprav.net/tool/spip.php?article59

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Autonomia

POST/AUTONOMIA – CALL FOR PAPERS

Post/autonomia – Call for Papers

Amsterdam, 19-22 May 2011

University of Amsterdam/SMART Project Space

Keynote speakers include:

Franco Berardi (‘Bifo’)

Vittorio Morfino

Stevphen Shukaitis (to be confirmed)

Immaterial labour; multitude; the communism of capital; commons; precarity; biopolitics: autonomist thought has undoubtedly provided contemporary critical theory with some of its major concepts and/or allowed for an important reconsidering of these. Most importantly, autonomist thought has been at the forefront of thinking the crucial shifts in contemporary capitalism and its effects in both the social and cultural sphere. Autonomism’s impact on current critical theory in both European and American academia can therefore hardly be underestimated. Moreover, today we witness a resurgence of autonomist models of activism and thought in social movements in for example Italy, Greece, the UK and California.

What can ‘post/autonomia’ mean today?’ therefore is one of the pivotal questions in contemporary critical theory and activism. Rather than packaging it as ‘Italian Theory’, we would like to explore the international dissemination of autonomous thought and activism today and their possible futures; in particular we would like to explore critical engagements and uses of autonomist ideas that shape what we might call post/autonomia. It is precisely the dynamics, tensions and ruptures between autonomia and its possible futures (or ‘posts’) that we would like to investigate. What are the effects of autonomia, as a thought and a movement, in a variety of domains: from critical theory to cinema, from activism to academic practice?

Crucial questions raised by the notion of post/autonomia are:

* How did autonomist thought move from what was in fact a specific local context to the global activist and intellectual sphere?

* What are the possible connections between (post)autonomia and other contemporary conceptualizations of ‘communism’?

* What is the role of (post)autonomist thinking in current efforts to reassemble and reconstitute the militant left?

* What are possible connections/convergences between (post)autonomism and post-situationism, anarchism or the green movement?

* How can post/autonomia be situated in the aftermath or even afterlife of the ‘no global’ moment?    * How is post/autonomia taking shape in diverse cultural and artistic interventions?

* What is the significance of autonomist thought in non-western/global contexts (e.g. the debates concerning precarious labour in China)?

* How does the current the interest in autonomism and its relevance relate to political discourses concerning the ‘heritage’ of 68/77 and their alleged ‘liquidation’ (by Berlusconi/Sarkozy); to what extent does it encourage or block these debates?

* What elements of autonomism remain unaddressed today (e.g. the feminist heritage)?

* What particular nexus between theory/militant practice takes shape in post/autonomia (e.g. in media activism and precarity-movements)?

* What new perspectives/connections can be created: e.g. post/autonomia and queer, the metropolis, bioeconomy, etc. etc.

The conference will provide a platform for addressing these and other important questions. Papers may address the following topics (but are by no means bound to these):

Post/autonomia and:

–       contemporary activism

–       conceptualizations of bio-politics

–       the neo-liberal state

–       precarity

–       media activism

–       academic activism and new student movements (L’Onda che viene etc)

–       post-situationism

–       queer autonomy

–       feminism

–       the work of individual theorists (e.g. Negri, Virno, Berardi, Guattari, Lazzerato, Marazzi etc)

–       semiocapitalism

–       artistic and cultural activism

–       political/cultural memories of autonomia

–       the metropolis and the social factory today

–       the new communism

–       transversality

–       new spinozisms

–       (the lessons of) Genoa 2001

–       strategies of resistance

–       populism

–       the law, the state of exception and legitimacy

We welcome both academic and practice-oriented contributions in English. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Please send abstracts (350 words) before March 15 to postautonomia@gmail.com. For further information, please contact postautonomia@gmail.com.

This conference is the first of a series within the project Precarity and Post-autonomia: the Global Heritage funded by NWO (Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research).

Organizing committee:

–       Vincenzo Binetti, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)

–       Joost de Bloois, University of Amsterdam

–       Silvia Contarini, Université Paris Ouest, Nanterre La Défence

–       Monica Jansen, Utrecht University

–       Federico Luisetti, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)

–       Frans-Willem Korsten, Leiden University/Erasmus University Rotterdam

–       Gianluca Turricchia, University of Amsterdam

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Feminism

DIMINISHING RETURNS? FEMINIST ENGAGEMENTS WITH THE RETURN TO ‘THE COMMONS’

_____________________

An international workshop hosted by the Kent Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality and Kent Law School

Wednesday 23 March 2011
Kent Law School
Canterbury, UK*
12-6pm

With presentations by:

Rosemary Coombe (York University, Canada)
Radhika Desai (University of Manitoba, Canada)
Denise Ferreira da Silva (Queen Mary, UK)
Nina Power (Roehampton, UK)

Discussed by:

Donatella Alessandrini (Kent, UK)
Brenna Bhandar (Kent, UK)

The day will consist of two sessions, broken up with a light lunch (provided) and followed by dinner (not provided). Please join us for part or all of the day. More information about the theme of the workshop can be found below.

The event is free but spaces are limited. To book a spot please register by emailing Stacy Douglas at: S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk before 1 March 2011.

*There are some funds available for postgraduate students who wish to travel to Kent for the workshop. If you are interested please email Stacy Douglas at S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk with a brief case for support as well as an estimated cost for your train travel. Information about traveling to Kent can be found here.

_____________________

Background:

Garrett Hardin’s now infamous essay “Tragedy of the Commons” (1968) stands as a Hobbesian analogy for what he claims are the inherent destructive capacities of human beings that perpetually stand in the way of realizing a free community of individuals with shared resources. Hardin’s essay suggests that, when faced with the responsibility of sharing the commons, individual human self-interest – or fear of it – will win out over practices of collectivity, sharing, and mutual aid.

More recently, there has been a resurgence in political theory and political philosophy in addressing the concept of “the commons”. Some of the most popularly cited references to the idea can be found in the work of Slavoj Žižek (2009) and Hardt and Negri (2009). This work has further been expounded upon in international conferences devoted to the “Idea of Communism” in London (2009) and Berlin (2010).  Steeped in the philosophy of Spinoza, Hardt and Negri use a notion of the common that “…does not position humanity separate from nature, as either its exploiter or its custodian, but focuses rather on the practices of interaction, care, and cohabitation in a common world, promoting the beneficial and limiting and detrimental forms of the common” (2009). For Žižek, the commons is comprised of culture (“primarily language, our means of communication and education, but also shared infrastructure such as public transport, electricity, post, etc…”), external nature (“from oil to forests and the natural habitat itself”), and internal nature (“the biogenetic inheritance of humanity”), and are all increasingly enclosed by the forces of global capital. It is the process of our exclusion from these commons (“our own substance”) that Žižek argues should effectively proletarianize us into fighting for something more than capitalist liberal democracy – a system whose laissez-faire violence is justified through the empty gesture of “universal inclusion” without any material bite. Žižek’s answer to this political conundrum is a call for communism.

And yet, the past century has seen vast and varied critical feminist engagements with historically changing concepts of communism and “the commons”. Struggles for universal suffrage, critiques of universality, denouncements of the hollowing out of the welfare state as a result of neoliberalisation, and challenges to the concept of the human, are all examples of a rich and diverse feminist tradition of engagement with the concept of “the commons”. Given the popular return to the idea of the commons, what more does feminist analysis have to give to this conversation? Does the concept still have potential for future feminist projects? If so, what is this potential and what do these projects look like? How do they resonate – or not – with those of the past? Further, given the broader theme of the workshop series, what role – if any – does the “the state” play in these imaginings?

The Kent Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality (KCLGS) and Kent Law School invite you to participate in a workshop exploring the contemporary feminist work of Rosemary CoombeRadhika DesaiDenise Ferreira da Silva, and Nina Power as it resonates or clashes with these questions. For more information or to register, email S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk or visit www.kent.ac.uk/law/kentclgs/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Incident

NEW COMMONER AND CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Dear friends

This is to announce that a new issue of the commoner is out consisting essentially of a long essay by J. Martin Pedersen on Property, Commoning and the Politics of Free Software and a call for contributions on real-case commoning projects. 

The Commoner: http://www.commoner.org.uk/

Happy New Year

Massimo De Angelis

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Jacob

COMMON | RESISTANCE | INDEPENDENCE | EXODUS

Common is a political inquiry journal that is born during the crisis, during the global tsunami. We have set this journal as a dispositive to investigate the present time in the framework of the economic crisis that we are experiencing, looking for some directions of political action, measuring a new temporality and discovering the mutations of behaviour and imagery.

The journal forces us or, as you prefer, facilitate us to think collectively about the phase; identifying the common feature of the time we are living in, looking for a sense that enables us to understand the contingency, using it as a effective compass for the political action.

The field of education, the process of impoverishment in terms of perspective and future for the young generation, are the research fields for the debut of Common. In the epoch of cognitive capitalism, in an apparent paradox, it seems that the governance of the productive forces passes through a sort of war on knowledge. Starting from inquiring the biggest student movement in Italy and Europe since 1968, this issue is an attempt to analyze the new political anthropology within the temporality of the movement, its discontinuity and challenges.

“In the background”, “In figura” and “Lines of flight” are the three main sections that compose Common. The methodology of inquiry, the themes treated in this issue, such as institutions, self-education and common, are dispositive to strengthen our resistance, to organize our independence, to defend our exodus.

Common |Resistance |Independence |Exodus

Editorial Collective:

Marco Bascetta / Claudia Bernardi / Francesco Brancaccio / Antonio Conti/ Alberto De Nicola / Paolo Do / Serena Fredda / Fabio Gianfrancesco / Augusto Illuminati / Federico Marini / Antonio Negri / Isabella Pinto / Francesco Raparelli / Judith Revel / Tania Rispoli / Benedetto Vecchi / Giuliana Visco

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Table of contents Zero issue

Editorial:  making inquiry within the crisis

// In the background

Toni Negri: Corruption, new accumulation, refeudalization
Antonio Conti: The crisis and the general intellect
Marco Bascetta: Reactionary philosophy
Alberto De Nicola: The triumph of the brain
Carlo Vercellone: Models of welfare and social services in the systemic crisis of the cognitive capitalism

// In figura

Isabella Pinto, Tania Rispoli: Who values whom? Merit and cooperative innovation
Ugo Mattei (interviewed by Francesco Brancaccio): The university beyond public and private
Marco Baravalle: The Wave in the factory of the culture
Bartleby: Experiments of self-education
Francesco Brancaccio: Self-education as prefiguration of an institution to come
Chiara Bastianoni, Vanessa Bilancetti, Serena Fredda, Tiziano Trobia (edited by): Medium waves
Luca Cafagna, Fabio Gianfrancesco, Giuliana Visco (edited by): The shape of water
Morgan Adamson: The financialization of student life
Claudia Bernardi, Paolo Do: Europe sauvage
Alberto De Nicola, Francesco Raparelli: After the backwash

// lines of flight

Serena Fredda, Viola Mordenti: Lexicon – difference
Girolamo De Michele: Festina lente
Infosex: becoming whore

Augusto Illuminati: About tyrant, corruption and more

Common: http://www.commonrivista.org

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Money Menace

Antonio Negri

UNINOMADE

This is a new website by Andrea Fumagelli, Antonio Negri and others
About Uninomade

How is it possible to create a laboratory where the separation of theory and political practice is continually put into discussion? A space where research becomes the elaboration of programmatic points, that is to say, co-research?

Enter Uninomade: http://uninomade.org/about-uninomade/

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Utopia

WORLD COMMUNAL HERITAGE MANIFESTO

Since the so called victory of western neo-liberal capitalism, communal services and public space are being predatory privatized. It’s our task to stop the destructive appropriation of communal heritage by the tycoons! Before the words public and communal fade away from our vocabulary we want to remind of one great achievement of the 20th century: equally accessible public space. Here we are not referring to the public space as the place of representation for the state and its elites, such as public squares or state cultural institutions.
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We think of the non-proprietary communal space created around the Modernist apartment-blocks often – though not always – built at the periphery of urban centers.
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From France to the Soviet Union, Modernist town planning and public housing was driven by the idea of securing equal access to urban infrastructure, to light, air and green space. The solution were high-rise apartment-blocks that left a lot of open space for communal facilities such as schools, kindergartens, community houses with playgrounds, sports fields, pathways, and meadows in between the developments. These park-like spaces, immediately outside the dwelling, are available to all in equal measure and open for everybody’s use.

Let us constitute those open spaces as political space! There are no safeguards or fences that could slow down your pace! You can gather together without paying a fortune for the gentrified lifestyle in the inner-city! The openness, porosity and communicability of Modernist social architecture and landscaping that takes shape in a wealth of free space, pedestrian pathways, bridges, passages, niches, little woods and bushes is giving possibility of direct action, so let’s take it:
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Between the blocks, social movements are born! Obviously some part of society perceives this potential as a security risk that is hard to control. In former welfare-states, Modernist multi-storey apartment-blocks are being violently condemned and – like the Heygate Estate in London – are being torn down to make room for new buildings for wealthier clients. According to the same profit-driven logics, the city authorities in former socialist states sell open communal spaces to private investors that use them for the purposes of individual exploitation.
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The World Communal Heritage campaign supports communities and individuals that want to organize and take action to prevent the destruction of communal space in their neighbourhoods.
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We affirm the idea of common goods that are managed by the community and we acknowledge the communal as heritage that must be further developed by the community – and not by individualistic interests.
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Therefore we call to organize and to take over the future of the communal spaces in our hands!

Join in the World Communal Heritage Campaign!
Any communal, open space can be nominated by citizens, individuals, groups or communities as World Communal Heritage.

We initially present several spaces that bear the attributes of World Communal Heritage. These are communal spaces in the following micro-raions, housing estates or satellite towns: Botanica, Rîºcani and Buiucani in Chiºinãu (Moldavia), Heygate Estate in London (United Kingdom), Block 70 and Block 63 in New Belgrade (Serbia), Gropiusstadt in Berlin and Langwasser in Nürnberg (Germany).

We invite everyone interested to nominate and affirm their additional suggestions!

You can use the stickers, the logo and material for the initiation of a new campaign anywhere in the world.

You are invited to self-organize and to install a panel indicating that a space is acknowledged as World Communal Heritage Site as shown on the pictures from New Belgrade and Chiºinãu.

World Communal Heritage is an initiative by Rena Rädle & Vladan Jeremiæ to affirm the open spaces of Modernist urbanism as non-proprietary communal heritage.

WCH: http://communalheritage.wordpress.com/

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