Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Common Sense

Globalization

AFTER GLOBALIZATION

After Globalization
Eric Cazdyn and Imre Szeman

ISBN: 978-1-4051-7794-8 – Hardcover – 264 pages
May 2011, Wiley-Blackwell
http://ca.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1405177942.html

In lively and unflinching prose, Eric Cazdyn and Imre Szeman argue that contemporary thought about the world is disabled by a fatal flaw: the inability to think “an after” to globalization. After establishing seven theses (on education, morality, history, future, capitalism, nation, and common sense) that challenge the false promises that sustain this time-limit, After Globalization examines four popular thinkers (Thomas Friedman, Richard Florida, Paul Krugman and Naomi Klein) and how their work is dulled by these promises. Cazdyn and Szeman then speak to students from around the globe who are both unconvinced and uninterested in these promises and who understand the world very differently than the way it is popularly represented.

After Globalization argues that a true capacity to think an after to globalization is the very beginning of politics today.

“Relentlessly, remorselessly, endlessly, we are told there is no alternative to globalization, whether our lecturers are bourgeois economists, progressive journalists, or imaginative litterateurs. Eric Cazdyn and Imre Szeman dare to go beyond the standard thinking of the day and query the very heart of mobile capital and its impact on daily life. Their alternative vision breathes new life into our sense of evolution and inevitability.” –—Toby Miller, author of Globalization and Sport and Global Hollywood

“Cazdyn and Szeman begin the with the idea that the current economic crisis has historicized globalization, turning it from a process that looked as inevitable as, say, global warming still does, into an episode in the history of capitalism: hence the possibility not just of more globalization but of an ‘after globalization.’ And hence also, they argue, the renewed possibility of an ‘after capitalism.’ In powerful critiques of what they describe as the common sense of capital today they sketch out the terms in which changes more radical than substituting generous and honest leaders for the greedy and dishonest ones we’ve currently got might begin to be imagined.” –—Walter Benn Michaels, University of Illinois at Chicago

Eric Cazdyn is Professor of Cultural and Critical Theory, Psychoanalysis, and Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. He is author of The Flash of Capital: Film and Geopolitics in Japan (2003) and the forthcoming book, The Already Dead: The New Time of Politics, Culture, and Medicine.

Imre Szeman is Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta. He is co-editor of Cultural Theory: An Anthology (Wiley-Blackwell 2010), author of Zones of Instability: Literature, Postcolonialism and the Nation (2003) and co-author of Popular Culture: A User’s Guide (2nd. ed. 2009).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Antonio Gramsci

RETHINKING GRAMSCI

Rethinking Gramsci
Edited by Marcus E. Green
New York: Routledge, 2011
ISBN: 9780415779739
Details: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415779739/

Contents

Introduction Marcus E. Green, Rethinking Marxism and Rethinking Gramsci

I. Culture and Criticism

1. Stuart Hall. Race, Culture, and Communications: Looking Backward and Forward at Cultural Studies

2. Paul Bové. Dante, Gramsci and Cultural Criticism

3. Daniel O’Connell. Bloom and Babbitt: A Gramscian View

4. Marcia Landy. Socialist Education Today: Pessimism or optimism of the intellect?

II. Hegemony, Subalternity, Common Sense

5. Derek Boothman. The Sources for Gramsci’s Concept of Hegemony

6. Marcus E. Green. Gramsci Cannot Speak: Presentations and Interpretations of Gramsci’s Concept of the Subaltern

7. Cosimo Zene. Self-consciousness of the Dalits as ‘subalterns’: Reflections on Gramsci in South Asia

8. Evan Watkins. Gramscian Politics and Capitalist Common Sense

9. Frank R. Annunziato. Gramsci’s theory of trade unionism

10. Nelson Moe. Production and Its Others, Gramsci’s ‘Sexual Question’

11. Adam David Morton. Social Forces in the Struggle over Hegemony: Neo-Gramscian Perspectives in International Political Economy

12. Richard Howson. From Ethico-Political Hegemony to Post-Marxism

III. Political Philosophy

13. Richard D. Wolff. Gramsci, Marxism and Philosophy

14. Carlos Nelson Coutinho. General Will and Democracy in Rousseau, Hegel, and Gramsci

15. Wolfgang Fritz Haug. From Marx to Gramsci, from Gramsci to Marx: Historical Materialism and the Philosophy of Praxis

16. Steven R. Mansfield. Gramsci and the Dialectic

17. Esteve Morera. Gramsci’s Critical Modernity

IV. On Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

18. David F. Ruccio. Unfinished Business: Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

19. Joseph W. Childers. Of Prison Notebooks and the Restoration of an Archive

20. Peter Ives. The Mammoth Task of Translating Gramsci

21. William V. Spanos. Cuvier’s Little Bone: Joseph Buttigieg’s English Edition of Antonio Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

22. Joseph A. Buttigieg. The Prison Notebooks: Antonio Gramsci’s Work in Progress

Antonio Gramsci

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Antonio Gramsci

THE POLITICAL THOUGHT OF ANTONIO GRAMSCI

The Political Thought of Antonio Gramsci: New Developments in Theory and Practice
Manchester Workshop in Political Theory
September 1-3, 2010

Panel 1: New Debates on Gramsci’s Political Thought
Chair: Ian Bruff

Antonio Gramsci and the Lyons Theses: The Dialectics of Living History
Adam Morton

Democratizing the Alliance: Lenin, Bukharin and Gramsci
Mark McNally

Panel 2: New Debates on Gramsci’s Political Thought 2
Chair: Adam Morton

Gramsci and the autonomy of the political
Peter Thomas

Thinking in a ‘Common Sense’ Gramscian Way about Capitalist State Practices
Ian Bruff

The Struggle for Signification and the Construction of Hegemony
Javier Balsa

Panel 3: New Applications of Gramsci in International Relations
Chair: Mark McNally

Transnational Capitalist Practices and the Political Economy of Biofuels. A Gramscian Approach to the Study of European Environmental Policy
Kim Bizzarri

Gramsci and Ambekar on Subalterns/Dalits
Cosimo Zene

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Karl Marx

COMMON SENSE JOURNAL NOW ONLINE

For me, Common Sense: Journal of the Edinburgh Conference of Socialist Economists was particularly significant in terms of my intellectual development during the 1990s. The work of John Holloway and Werner Bonefeld in Common Sense was especially important for me during that time.

Artlces from Common Sense are now online at: http://commonsensejournal.org.uk

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk