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Marxism and Art

Marxism and Art

MARXISM AND ART

The Marx Memorial Library presents lectures on Marxism and Art with Dr Grant Pooke

 

Tuesday 24 September:

‘Red-Spectre Jitters: Francis Klingender, Art History and the Cold War’

 

Lectures begin at 7 pm in the Library.

Lectures are free although a collection will be taken.

 

Dr Laura Miller

Administrator

Marx Memorial Library

37a Clerkenwell Green

London EC1R 0DU

(Tel)  0207 253 1485

(Web site): http://www.marx-memorial-library.org

Marx Memorial Library

Marx Memorial Library

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

BOOM!

BOOM! Growth, Form and Sustainable Bodies 1946–67

4-5 April

History of Art Department

University College London

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

This conference is organised to coincide with the Richard Hamilton retrospective at the Tate Modern in February 2014, which will include the reconstruction of Growth and Form (ICA, 1951). Growth and Form negotiated a problematic that in the two decades after the end of WWII preoccupied different strands of artistic and architectural research across Europe. Namely, the effects of booming expansion – economic, demographic, urban, technological, material, visual –  on the embodied subject within the context of a spreading capitalist pan-humanism championed abroad by the US. Some of the key historical coordinates that this conferences sets out to engage with in relation to cultural production include: the so-call consumer-led miracle in Europe, the international context of Edward Steichen’s The Family of Man (1955), the baby boom, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the first tests of the H-bomb, postwar developments in cybernetics and artificial intelligence, futurology and technological dystopia.

We encourage submissions for 30 minutes papers in the following areas of research: growth, reproducibility and sustainability as artistic strategies; urban growth, future habitats and exhibitions as habitats; technology, ecology and new sciences in art and exhibition making; humanism, ecology and sustainability; reproduction and feminist practices. We invite papers that address how artworks, films, images and exhibitions in the 1950s and early 60s mediated this experience within the boundaries of US-rescued Europe and explore the extent to which the local, national and global became increasingly interdependent for artists caught between the end of WWII and the early Cold War phase.

DEADLINE for submission: extended to 25 February 2014

Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words. Please include your name, email address and institutional affiliation (where possible) at the end of the document.

Send to: BoomUCL@gmail.com

Organised by Giulia Smith and Teresa Kittler

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Inca

RADICAL AMERICAS

Call for Papers

Radical Americas

Institute of the Americas, University College London

28-29 January 2013

 

“To be a radical is no more than… to go to the roots”. José Martí, “A la raíz” in Patria (26 August, 1893)

In recent years, a significant body of research has been undertaken into the various historical, political and social contexts in which political radicalism has developed throughout the Americas. However, little effort has been made to highlight the benefits of comparative or transnational approaches to these developments.

This event (at UCL’s new Institute of the Americas) will seek to address this problem by bringing a range of disciplinary and geographical perspectives to bear on the issue of radicalism in the Americas. It will consist of a two-day symposium designed to promote the existence of an international community of researchers whose work ranges in disciplinary focus from political science and international relations to history, literature, and cultural studies. A selection of papers stemming from the symposium will be submitted for a planned edited volume. In addition to the academic papers, there will be films, poetry and songs.

The proposed definition of “radicalism” is a broad one, encompassing both political radicalism as an object of study, and radical analytical approaches to societies and cultures of the Americas. We aim to begin with the democratic and republican radicalisms of the nineteenth century; to then move through the socialist, anarchist, communist, populist and social-democratic radicalisms of the early to mid twentieth century; finally, to confront identity politics, the New Left, social movements and contemporary state radicalisms.

The symposium aims to include papers ranging both geographically and temporally, and will encourage conversation between scholars working on specific national topics and those whose focus is comparative or transnational.

 

Subjects might include:

· State and non-state radicalisms

· Anti-imperialism and solidarity movements

· Radical populism in contemporary and historical perspective

· Race and radicalism

· Radical art, literature, music and architecture

· The Cold War

· Feminist and LGBTQ activism

· Anti-radicalism and the contested nature of radicalisms

· National and transnational labour movements

 

If you wish to give a paper, please send a proposal of no more than 300 words along with a short CV to the contact details below. Papers should be of 20 minutes duration. There will be a number of travel bursaries available for postgraduate presenters, and information about accommodation options will be available shortly.

The deadline for abstracts is 30th September 2012 but we strongly encourage an early response.

Email: radicalamericas@gmail.com

Conference Website: http://www.community-languages.org.uk/radical-americas/

Originally at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-radical-americas-university-college-london-28-29-january-2013  

 

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‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Austerity No!

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AUSTRALASIA CONFERENCE 2012 – CALL FOR PAPERS

Historical Materialism Australasia2012—Call For Papers
Following the end of the Cold War, Francis Fukuyama’s “end of history” thesis epitomized the prevailing attitude, summed up more brutally by Margaret Thatcher’s injunction that “There is No Alternative.” Twenty years on from Fukuyama’s assertion, liberal triumphalism has been battered by war, recession and political radicalization on the left and the right. In this context even Fukuyama has conceded that history does indeed have a future.

Karl Marx famously remarked that we make our own history, adding that we do not do so “under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past”. Today, history is being re-made on the streets of the Middle East and North Africa, and now also across the Global North. These struggles will shape the world’s future. Yet they take place in conditions marked by protracted economic crisis, continuing wars and imperialist “interventions”, and the rule of the market over all of life. The reoccupation of the world’s streets, squares and commons is matched by the ever-increasing subordination of parliaments to the dictates of the market, witnessed most profoundly in the imposition of technocratic rule in Greece, Italy and elsewhere.

These events have seen Marx return to mainstream debate, but all too often in the form of having his insights cherry picked and reified in an attempt to rescue capitalism from itself. There is a need to go beyond such appropriation, to re-establish a living critique of political economy, to work towards the “determinate negation” of capitalism that Marx spoke of. Such a project requires raising questions about the meaning, the form and the very desirability of democracy in an era of growing technocratic rule. Similarly, as human rights provide a moral cover for wars it becomes necessary to interrogate the language of rights in contemporary political struggles. And, as revolution re-appears on the global stage, if in new forms hardly recognizable to revolutionaries of the past, it is clear that the categories of our political thought and practice must be subjected to renewed thought and debate.

Historical Materialism Australasia is a one-day conference to be held in Central Sydney on Saturday 21 July 2012.

To facilitate this, Historical Materialism welcomes individual paper submissions and panel proposals that seek to contribute to this debate.

Please email paper abstracts of no more than 250 words and panel proposals of no more than 100 words to historicalmaterialism2012@gmail.com by Friday, April 13th.

—Jessica Whyte, Rory Dufficy & Tad Tietze (organising group)

Further details: http://historicalmaterialism2012.wordpress.com/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island of Chaos

TROPIC OF CHAOS

Tropic of Chaos: The Catastrophic Convergence of Poverty, Violence, and Climate Change

Christian Parenti in conversation with Vijay Prashad and David Harvey

Monday, August 29, 2011 from 7-9 pm
The James Gallery
CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue @ 34th Street

Free and open to the public; reception and book signing to follow

In TROPIC OF CHAOS: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (Nation Books; July 1, 2011), award-winning writer Christian Parenti argues that the new era of climate war has begun, intertwining environmental disasters, poverty, social inequality, and violence in the Global South. Parenti, historian Vijay Prashad and Marxist scholar David Harvey will discuss the historical legacy of Cold War militarism, neoliberal economic restructuring, and the convergent onset of climate change expressed as warfare, crime, repression, state failure, and a planet in peril.

About the author:

Christian Parenti is a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow, a contributing editor at The Nation, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the City University of New York, Graduate Center. The author of Lockdown America, The Soft Cage, and The Freedom, he has written for Fortune, The New York Times, Mother Jones, The London Review of Books, and Salon, among others. His latest book is, Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (Nation Books, 2011).

About the panelists:

Vijay Prashad is the author of eleven books, most recently, The Darker Nations: A People’s History of the Third World (The New Press, paperback 2008), which won the 2009 Muzaffar Ahmad Book Prize. His forthcoming books include The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South (Verso and LeftWord, 2012). His web dispatches can be read at Counterpunch (counterpunch.org), at ZNET (http://zmag.org/znet) and at Pragoti (http://www.pragoti.org).

David Harvey is Director of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics and Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the CUNY Graduate Center. He is the author of numerous books, including The Engima of Capital (Oxford University Press, 2010), A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Oxford University Press, 2005), and Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development (Verso, 2006).

Sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics Co-sponsored by the Center for Humanities at the GC and the Brecht Forum

 

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Revolution

REVOLUTIONARY VOICES: MARXISM, COMMUNICATION, AND SOCIAL CHANGE

National Communication Association (NCA) Preconvention Seminar
“Revolutionary Voices: Marxism, Communication, and Social Change”
10:30 am-5:00 PM, Wednesday, November 16th.
New Orleans, LA

In the wake of the Soviet Union’s collapse, and the subsequent worldwide retreat of the communist and socialist Left, the very concept of “revolution” was deemed by many theorists to be outdated and passé. Liberal, poststructuralist and conservative intellectuals jointly proclaimed Marxist project -with its emphasis on class struggle, anti-imperialism and a totalizing critique of capitalism– no longer relevant to an understanding of our “postmodern” world. Today, with the popular uprisings associated with the “Arab Spring” roiling dictatorships in countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Syria and Yemen and with the global capitalist economy just barely emerging from the throes of its worst crisis since the Great Depression, Marxism is not so easily dismissed. The recent popularity of thinkers like Giovanni Arrighi, Alain Badiou, Antonio Negri, David Harvey and Slavoj Zizek suggests a renewal of scholarly interest in Marxist and post-Marxist theory. The fact that Karl Marx himself was featured on the cover of the February 2, 2009 TIME Magazine suggests that this revival of interest is not confined to the academy.

This pre-convention conference aims to explore the continued relevance of Marxism and Marxist theoretical concepts (i.e. ideology, hegemony, class, dialectics, reification, commodification ) to the study of communication, focusing on communication’s instrumental role in maintaining, perpetuating and contesting capitalism’s structures of domination. Unlike other theoretical orientations within the social sciences and the humanities, Marxism has long insisted that theory be informed by and inform social and political praxis. Thus, one special emphasis of our discussions will be on the way that Marxist work in field of communication can help to advance and clarify current struggles for progressive social change in the US and around the world. Moreover, at a time when even the mainstream corporate press speaks openly of the revolutionary currents spreading across North Africa and the Middle East, we will devote special attention to the concept of “revolution” and the way that it can refine and enhance our understanding of communication, political conflict and social change.

We hope that by bringing together a critical mass of scholars whose work is informed by Marxist theory, our seminar will “make a difference” both in our discipline and in the larger fight for social justice. Ultimately, we plan to publish an edited volume or a special issue of an academic journal as a way of bringing the scholarship produced by seminar participants to an even larger audience.

This mini-conference builds on a series of NCA panels, pre-conference seminars and publications about Marxism and communication that began with a well-attended panel at the 2003 NCA convention in Miami. Last year’s mini-conference “Bridging Theory and Practice” drew dozens of participants to a series of three inter-related panels at the national conference in San Francisco. The year before that, in Chicago, our panel “The 2009 Crisis of Neoliberalism: Marxist Scholars on Rhetorics of Stability and Change,” drew a standing-room-only crowd. And in 2006, three of the co-organizers of this seminar (Artz, Cloud and Macek) published an anthology — Marxism and Communication Studies: The Point is to Change It (Peter Lang)-composed almost entirely of conference papers delivered at our NCA panels and seminars. This seems to us an opportune moment for yet another pre-convention seminar and yet another publication devoted to this topic.

The organizers invite potential participants to submit complete papers or extended abstracts (350-500 words) relevant to the subject of Marxism, communication and social change for inclusion in this pre-convention seminar. Work in political economy of the media, cultural studies, rhetoric, critical theory, social movement studies and political communication is especially welcome. Send your submissions along with complete contact information (mailing address, e-mail and phone #) to both Steve Macek (at shmacek@noctrl.edu) and Dana Cloud (at dcloud@mail.utexas.edu) no later than August 8th, 2011.

Steve Macek
Associate Professor
Speech Communication
Program Coordinator, Urban and Suburban Studies
North Central College
30 N. Brainard
Naperville, IL 60540-4690
Phone: 630-637-5369
Fax: 630-637-5140
Webpage: http://shmacek.faculty.noctrl.edu/

Out now from U of MN Press:
Urban Nightmares: The Media, the Right, and the Moral Panic over the City. Winner of the 2006 Urban Communication Foundation Publication Award.
ISBN: ISBN 0-8166-4361-X
http://www.upress.umn.edu/Books/M/macek_urban.html

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Anarchism

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON ANARCHISM, LABOUR AND SYNDICALISM

Cambridge Scholars Publishing (CSP):

New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism: The Individual, the National and the Transnational

Editors: David Berry and Constance Bantman
Date Of Publication: Oct 2010
Isbn13: 978-1-4438-2393-7
Isbn: 1-4438-2393-7

This collection presents exciting new research on the history of anarchist movements and their relation to organised labour, notably revolutionary syndicalism. Bringing together internationally acknowledged authorities as well as younger researchers, all specialists in their field, it ranges across Europe and from the late nineteenth century to the beginnings of the Cold War. National histories are revisited through transnational perspectives—on Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Poland or Europe as a whole—evidencing a great wealth of cross-border interactions and reciprocal influences between regions and countries. Emphasis is also placed on individual activist itineraries—whether of renowned figures such as Errico Malatesta or of lesser-known yet equally fascinating characters, whose trajectories offer fresh perspectives on the complex interplay of regional and national political cultures, evolving political ideologies, activist networks and the individual.

The volume will be of interest to specialists working on the history of anarchism and/or trade unionism as well as the political or social history of the countries concerned; but it will also be useful to students and the general reader looking for discussion of the most recent thinking on the historiography of labour and anarchist movements or those wanting a comprehensive overview of the history of syndicalism. 

“This promises to become a very significant contribution to the ongoing debate. The book clearly breaks new ground by considering revolutionary syndicalism as a group of different movements (indeed, a “family”) and by discussing not only West European, but also East European experiences. All in all, this is an excellent collection.” —Marcel van der Linden, IISH, Amsterdam.

“This book is both a timely and authoritative reappraisal of anarchism and syndicalism in Europe, breaking new ground in its analysis of these movements from a transnational and comparative perspective. Through its focus on international networks and personal connections, it represents a major contribution to our understanding of labour history. New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism will be enjoyed by anyone interested in the history of working-class internationalism.” —Jeremy Jennings, Professor of Political Theory, Queen Mary, University of London

See: http://www.c-s-p.org/Flyers/New-Perspectives-on-Anarchism–Labour-and-Syndicalism–The-Individual–the-National-and-the-Transnat1-4438-2393-7.htm
CONTENTS

Introduction: New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism: The Individual, the National and the Transnational
Constance Bantman and David Berry

Part I. The Syndicalist Family

Chapter One
Uneasy Family: Revolutionary Syndicalism in Europe from the Charte d’Amiens to World War I
Wayne Thorpe

Part II. Militants

Chapter Two 
From Gustav Schmidt to Gus Smith: A Tale of Labour Integration (Hull, 1878-1913)
Yann Béliard

Chapter Three:  The Rooted Cosmopolitan: Errico Malatesta, Syndicalism, Transnationalism and the International Labour Movement
Carl Levy

Chapter Four 
Internationalism in the Border Triangle: Alfons Pilarski and Upper Silesian Anarcho-syndicalism during the Interwar Years
Dieter Nelles

Chapter Five 
Mission Impossible: Ángel Pestaña’s Encounter as CNT Delegate with the Bolshevik Revolution in 1920
Reiner Tosstorff

Part III. Movements

Chapter Six The 1896 London Congress: Epilogue or Prologue?
Davide Turcato

Chapter Seven
From Trade Unionism to Syndicalisme Révolutionnaire to Syndicalism: The British Origins of French Syndicalism
Constance Bantman

Chapter Eight
Polish Anarchism and Anarcho-Syndicalism in the Twentieth Century
Rafał Chwedoruk

Chapter Nine
How and Why the French Anarchists Rallied to the CGT-FO (1947–1950)
Guillaume Davranche

Part IV. Interpretations
Chapter Ten 
Analysing Revolutionary Syndicalism: The Importance of Community
Bert Altena

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CRITIQUE CONFERENCE: STALINISM AND ITS DESTRUCTIVE LEGACY

Critique: Journal of Socialist History

SATURDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2011

9am-5pm, rm. H216, Connaught Housese, London School of Economics, Houghton St., Holborn tube

What is Stalinism?

Was capitalism stabilised by the end of Stalinism and the Cold War?

Why is it so difficult to defeat Stalinism?

 

Critique Conference: http://www.critiquejournal.net/conf2007.html

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Ralph Miliband

LESSONS OF RWANDA AND DARFUR

Lessons of Rwanda and Darfur: Some Questions for Human Rights Activists

Special Ralph Miliband Public Lecture

Date: Monday 10 May 2010
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, London School of Economics

Speaker: Professor Mahmood Mamdani
Chair: Professor Mary Kaldor

Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government and Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1974 and specializes in the study of African history and politics. His works explore the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights. Prior to joining the Columbia faculty, Mamdani was a professor at the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania (1973-79), Makerere University in Uganda (1980-1993), and the University of Cape Town (1996-1999). He has received numerous awards and recognitions, including being listed as one of the “Top 20 Public Intellectuals” by Foreign Policy (US) and Prospect (UK) magazine in 2008. From 1998 to 2002 he served as President of CODESRIA (Council for the Development of Social Research in Africa). His essays have appeared in the New Left Review and the London Review of Books, among other journals.

He is the author of Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror (Pantheon, 2009), Scholars in the Marketplace: The Dilemmas of Neo-Liberal Reform at Makerere University, 1989-2005, (CODESRIA, Dakar, 2007), Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, the Cold War and the Origins of Terror (Pantheon, 2004), When Victims Become Killers: Colonialism, Nativism and Genocide in Rwanda (Princeton, 2001) and Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism (Princeton, 1996) and ten other books.

He teaches courses on: major debates in the study of Africa; the modern state and the colonial subject; the Cold War and the Third World; the theory, history, and practice of human rights; and civil wars and the state in Africa.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For more information, email events@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 6043.

Media queries: please contact the Press Office if you would like to reserve a press seat or have a media query about this event, email pressoffice@lse.ac.uk

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Jean-Paul Sartre

UNFINISHED PROJECTS: DECOLONIZATION AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF JEAN-PAUL SARTRE
By
Paige Arthur

A major rereading of the life and work of Jean-Paul Sartre, published on the 30th anniversary of his death (April 15, 1980)

Sartre’s anticolonialism proves, in Paige Arthur’s sophisticated rendition, far richer and more complex than snide dismissals of his ‘totalitarian’ impulses have allowed.” –— Samuel Moyn, Columbia University

———————————-

In this major rereading of Sartre’s life and work, Paige Arthur traces the relationship between the philosopher’s decades-long commitment to decolonization and his intellectual thought. Where other commentators have focused on the tensions between Sartre’s Marxism and his account of existential freedom—usually to denigrate one in favor of the other—Arthur shows that Sartre’s political engagement with global liberation movements and his philosophical framework were inextricably intertwined.

Closely following the postwar movements for decolonization, and then supporting the war of independence in Algeria, Sartre proposed an influential and uncompromising view of imperialism. Analyzing the Western attitude to the “subhuman” colonial subject, he offered an account of the social constraints applying to both ruler and ruled, and came to argue that political violence—on both sides—was a systematic consequence of the colonial order. Arthur’s rich and nuanced book locates Sartre within the political discussions of his time, while also looking forward to contemporary debates about new forms of imperialism and resistance.

“Since the late 1970s, anti-totalitarian discourse has reduced Sartre to an unwitting casualty of the Cold War split. Now, Paige Arthur counters the hysteria and moralizing of the last thirty years with a carefully reasoned and erudite study that reveals Sartre for what he was: a profound and consistent thinker of liberation and decolonization.”—Kristin Ross, author of May’68 and its Afterlives

“Overcoming today’s amnesia about Sartre as a founding spirit of ‘postcolonialism,’ Paige Arthur shows his relevance for our own encounters with ‘globalization.’”—Ronald Aronson, author of Sartre’s Second Critique and Camus and Sartre

Paige Arthur is Deputy Director of Research at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She has taught at both UC Berkeley and the New School University.

——————————–

FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES PLEASE CONTACT CLARA HEYWORTH: clara@versobooks.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Clara Heyworth
Publication: 15th April, 2010 clara@versobooks.com
ISBN: 978-1-84467-399-5 Tel. 718-246-8160
20 Jay Street, Suite 1010
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel: +1 (718) 246 8160
Fax: +1 (718) 246 8165
Email: clara@versobooks.com
http://www.versobooks.com

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Noir

Noir

FILM NOIR, AMERICAM WORKERS AND POSTWAR HOLLYWOOD

 

New Noir Book:

“Busts This Town Wide Open”: Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood

Dennis Broe, University of Florida Press

Order now for a 40% Discount with Code Listed Below

Ever since French critics began using the term film noir in the mid-1940s, a clear definition of the genre has remained elusive. Broe’s interdisciplinary examination is a cogent argument for the centrality of class in the creation of film noir, demonstrating how the form itself came to fruition during one of the most active periods of working-class agitation and middle-class antagonism in American history.

In the 1940s, both radicalized union members and protagonists of noir films were hunted and pursued by the law. The book details how, after World War II, members of the labor movement who waged a series of strikes that paralyzed American industry, including Hollywood, were forced to use extralegal means because of pressure applied by new legislation such as the Taft-Hartley Act. In the same way the film noir protagonist moves further and further outside the law in this period until the films become a lament for a change hoped for but not achieved. The book then marks the sharp distinction between noir and the police procedural where the working class cop, now shorn of his or her radical sympathies, becomes the subject of the film.

A coda describes noir under Reagan and Bush (“A Thousand Points of Dark”) and post-9/11 noir which alternately resists and validates the replaying of the Cold War as the War on Terror.

What the Critics are saying:

‘[This is] an intriguing study of U.S. film noir as a left-wing cultural formation. Broe makes an informative and convincing case for the repressed, often overlooked working class determinants of early noir, and his discussion of individual films is consistently insightful. This is an important addition to the literature on the subject.’ James Naremore, author of More Than Night: Film Noir in Its Contexts

‘With keen insight and a deep appreciation of the politics of film noir, Broe has broken new ground in the interpretation of cinema itself. With this book film noir has found its most astute and informed critic.’ Gerald Horne, author of Class Struggle in Hollywood, 1930-50

‘Broe puts the red back in the black. His book contours amidst the shadows of film noir those battles and tussles of the laboring classes that have too often been written out of film history, as out of the authorized narrative of U.S. history. Through wonderfully synthetic overviews and deft extended readings, a panoply of films is shown to chart in devious and overt ways the ups and down of union power and working class perspectives.’ Esther Leslie, author of Walter Benjamin and Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory and the Avant-Garde

‘[The book is] a bracing alternative history of how noir represented the roiling state of American culture in the 1940s … His categorization scheme will carry great weight in all future discussion of noir’s thematic landscape.’ Donald Malcolm, Noir City Sentinel

For a special 40% discount, until October 1, 2009, call toll free 800-226-3822, or order online at: http://upf.com/book.asp?id=BROEXS07 with discount code NOIR9.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Unusual Pussus

Unusual Pussus

ENGAGING PETER McLAREN AND THE NEW MARXISM IN EDUCATION

 

David Geoffrey Smith

Interchange, Vol.40/1, pp.93-117 (2009) 

David Geoffrey Smith has written a very interesting and useful article in the latest issue of Interchange. Not only does he review Peter McLaren’s Rage + Hope: Interviews with Peter McLaren on War, Imperialism, & Critical Pedagogy (Peter Lang Publishing, 2006), but he also explores the New Marxism in Education, or the New Marxist Educational Theory (as it is sometimes called). Thus, he examines the impact of McLaren’s work along with other writers on the New Marxism in Education: Paula Allman, Glenn Rikowski, Mike Cole and Dave Hill.

He does spell my name wrong, though: having ‘Glen’ rather than ‘Glenn’ Rikowski. But that’s easily forgivable as Smith has produced an enlightening article. 

You can view the article at: http://www.springerlink.com/content/858j592687nt2554/fulltext.pdf

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk