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CLR James

CLR James

REVOLUTIONARY DIALECTICS AFTER MARX: C.L.R. JAMES AND RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 

6:00-8:00 PM

WestsidePeaceCenter

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

Speaker:

Brian Lovato, author of a book in progress on James and Dunayevskaya

C.L.R. James and Raya Dunayevskaya both emerged out of the radical wing of the anti-Stalinist left during the 1940s. Before their break in 1955, they worked together in the “Johnson-Forest Tendency,” which elaborated new perspectives on race and class, on state-capitalism, on non-vanguardist forms of organization, and on dialectics. This meeting will concentrate on the latter point.  In 1948, James wrote “Notes on Dialectics,” an exploration of the dialectic in Hegel, Marx, and Lenin.  During this period, Dunayevskaya translated and commented upon Lenin’s “Philosophical Notebooks” and composed her “1953 Letters on Hegel’s Absolutes.”  Later, Dunayevskaya developed her version of the dialectic further, in works like “Philosophy and Revolution” (1973). We will explore this rich dialectical heritage as a crucial resource for today’s left.

Suggested readings:

“Review and Leninist Interlude,” from James, “Notes on Dialectics”: http://www.marxists.org/archive/james-clr/works/dialecti/james4.htm

1963 Dunayevskaya letter to Erich Fromm on Hegel’s “Phenomenology,” from Dunayevskaya, “Power of Negativity,” ed. Hudis and Anderson: http://newsandletters.org/issues/2008/Feb-March/FTA_Feb-Mar_08.htm

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org

Raya Dunayevskaya

Raya Dunayevskaya

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Marx for TodayINSURGENT NOTES – ISSUE 6 (March 2013)

Insurgent Notes: http://insurgentnotes.com

 

Editorial: In This Issue

Loren Goldner: Fictitious Capital and Contracted Social Reproduction Today: China and Permanent Revolution

John Garvey: The New Worker Organizing

Matthew Quest: CLR James and Maoism

John Garvey: Trotsky Reconsidered: Claude Lefort’s Perspective

Michael Rectenwald: A Post-Mortem on Post-Modernism

 

Book Reviews:

Loren Goldner.  Review/Essay:  Cesar Chavez, the United Farm Workers, and the Question of Unions in Contemporary Capitalism

Freddy Fitzsimmons. Review/Essay: The Condition of the Working Classes in England

Maury Moriarity  on  Michael Schmidt/Lucien van der Walt

Black Flame: The Revolutionary Class Politics of Anarchism and Syndicalism.

AK Press 2009. Vol. 1.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-issue-of-insurgent-notes

Posthuman

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

CLR James

CLR James

CONFERENCE ON THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF C.L.R. JAMES

We are pleased to announce that the C.L.R James Legacy Project, in partnership with the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) will be hosting a conference on the Life & Legacy of C.L.R. James in London Saturday 13th April 2013. The format for the day is still to be planned and we invite anyone interested to:

– Send suggestions for presentations, papers and speakers. We already have some high profile speakers that have said they will present..more news to follow. We will also be showing films and launching some exciting new projects. We hope to document the conference by producing a book after the event. If you want to get involved then please let us know. 

– Volunteer time to help organise and publicise the conference.  

– Donate and/or help raise money to help make the conference a success. We currently have no funding to put on this event but are committed to it going ahead. If you would like to donate personally or help fundraise then please get in touch.
 
If you think you can help in any way to make this conference the success it deserves to be then please email: andrea@hackneyunites.org.uk.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/conference-on-the-life-and-legacy-of-c.l.r.-james-london-saturday-13th-april-2013

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

CLR James

C.L.R. JAMES’ ‘BEYOND A BOUNDARY’

C.L.R. James’ Beyond a Boundary 

50th Anniversary Conference 
University of Glasgow. 
Friday 10th and Saturday 11th May, 2013.

Regularly cited as one of the great sports books of the twentieth century, C.L.R. James’ Beyond a Boundary (1963) is, by his own famous definition, about far more than cricket. Developing a concern to understand sport as part of a much wider social and political context (a concern first articulated in his earlier writings for the Glasgow Herald), James’ study is part-autobiography, part-historical study and part-political-call-to-arms written against the backdrop of the decolonisation struggles. His reflections thus reach out into a critical account of racism and imperialism, into wider questions of aesthetics and popular culture, and into the struggle for revolutionary social change which was the enduring concern of his life. Crucially, James insisted that such questions were not simply of concern to academics or to experts, but were also a central part of what drew ordinary men and women to sport. 
 
Much loved, and widely read, James’ study has also been the subject of searching criticism: he has been accused, among other things, of a failure of critical judgement in relation to cricket’s role in the moral framework of empire, of a lack of attentiveness to gendered inequalities, and of a naïve faith in the spontaneity of popular political resistance. 
 
This conference is convened on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the publication of Beyond a Boundary, with the intention of both celebrating and questioning, drawing out the book’s intellectual legacies and identifying the issues it leaves unanswered. We would welcome original papers dealing with any aspects of Beyond a Boundary. These might include:
 
– critical engagement with or reinterpretation of James’ arguments; 
– studies of the production and reception of the book itself;
– interpretations, via James, of contemporary sport;
– reflections on the transnational responses to James’ text;
– discussion of Beyond a Boundary within James’ wider corpus and in relation to his political practice;
– papers reporting on the use of James’ insights and methods in social research, in teaching, in journalism or in political activism.
 
Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Andy Smith:  andrew.smith.2@glasgow.ac.uk In keeping with James’ own practice, we would ask potential speakers to avoid unnecessary technical jargon, and to prepare papers intended for a general audience. 
 
Abstracts should be submitted by the end of October, 2012.
 
Already confirmed keynote speakers for the conference are Mike Brearley (former England Test captain and previously President of the British Psychoanalytic Society), and Wai Chee Dimock (Department of English, Yale) and Robert A. Hill (History, UCLA and C.L.R. James’ Literary Executor). We expect also to have contributions from Selwyn Cudjoe, Selma James and Mike Dibb.

Further keynotes to be announced; to be added to the conference mailing list, please e-mail the address given above. 

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-clr-jamess-beyond-a-boundary-50th-anniversary-conference-glasgow-10-11-may-2013

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

THE SPIRIT OF CAPITAL – WITH MOISHE POSTONE

This message is to announce the Tenth Annual Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy at the New School For Social Research entitled “The Spirit of Capital: A Conference on Hegel and Marx

Date: April 28-29, 2011
Paper Submission Deadline: Dec 1st, 2010
Keynote Speaker: Moishe Postone (University of Chicago)

Submission Guidelines:

Papers ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 words should be submitted in blind review format via spiritofcapital@gmail.com and should include the following in the body of the email:

i. Author’s name

ii. Title of Paper

iii. Institutional affiliation

iv. Contact information (email, phone number, mailing address)
Please omit any self-identifying information within the body of the paper.

PLEASE POST, FORWARD AND CIRCULATE WIDELY

Sincerely,

Graduate Conference Committee 2010-2011, The New School for Social Research, spiritofcapital@gmail.com

THE SPIRIT OF CAPITAL: A CONFERENCE ON HEGEL AND MARX

THE TENTH ANNUAL GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE IN PHILOSOPHY

AT THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: MOISHE POSTONE

APRIL 28TH -29TH, 2011

“It is impossible completely to understand Marx’s Capital, and especially its first chapter, without having thoroughly studied and understood the whole of Hegel’s Logic. Consequently, half a century later none of the Marxists understood Marx!!” wrote Lenin in 1915. In 1969, Althusser responded, “A century and a half later no one has understood Hegel because it is impossible to understand Hegel without having thoroughly studied and understood Capital.” What are we to make of this challenge today? Are we now ready to understand Hegel through Marx, and Marx through Hegel?

It is high time for a reassessment of the core stakes of the Marx-Hegel debate. What would it mean to think the concepts of capital and spirit together? This conference is a place to explore the internal relations between Hegel and Marx’s philosophical projects. Some possible questions include: how does Hegel’s phenomenology, logic, philosophy of nature, history and right internally contain the elements that Marx will use to decipher the world of property, labor, commodities and capital? Is Capital a logical theory of forms or a theory of history? How does Marx negate and realize Hegel’s project? What is the role of labor in Hegel, and the role of spirit in Marx? Does the development of history show the unfolding of freedom or the unfolding of capital?  This conference echoes the early Frankfurt School tradition, with its project for a critique of the social forms of the present. We encourage submissions on a wide range of topics and thinkers:

Possible Themes:

Capital and Spirit

Hegel’s Logic and Marx’s Grundrisse

Property, Alienation, and Class

Form and Content in Hegel and Marx

Concrete and Abstract Labor

Master and Slave

Critique, Dialectic and Method

Time and History

Freedom and Necessity

Substance and Subject in Capital

The Value-Form

Critique of Labor

Revolution and Negation

Materialism and Idealism

Proletarian Self-Abolition

Commodity, Money and Capital

The Philosophy of Right

Possible Thinkers:

I.I. Rubin

Gyorgy Lukacs

Karl Korsch

Ernst Bloch

Walter Benjamin

Alfred Sohn-Rethel

Theodore Adorno

Herbert Marcuse

CLR James

Raya Dunayevskaya

Guy Debord

Alexander Kojeve

Jean Hyppolite

Frantz Fanon

Helmut Reichelt

Hans-Georg Backhaus

Gillian Rose

EMAIL SUBMISSIONS TO: spiritofcapital@gmail.com

SUBMISSION DEADLINE is Dec 1st, 2010

Papers should be sent as word documents or pdfs, not exceeding 5000 words. Personal information including institutional affiliation is to be sent in the body of the email and should not appear on the paper itself or in the file name.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

CLR James

SAVE THE CLR JAMES LIBRARY

The CLR James Library, in Hackney, east London, is being ‘renamed’. History is being re-written, and a proud tradition and a significant historical figure are being downgraded and hope for the future marginalized on the alter of managerialism.

Sign the petition here: http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/saveclrjameslibrary/

At the Rendezvous of Victory

September 22, 2010

By Scott McLemee

http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee307

One of the turning points in my life came in 1988, upon discovery of the writings of C.L.R. James. The word “discovery” applies for a couple of reasons. Much of his work was difficult to find, for one thing. But more than that, it felt like exploring a new continent.

James was born in Trinidad in 1901, and he died in England in 1989. (I had barely worked up the nerve to consider writing him a letter.) He had started out as a man of letters, publishing short stories and a novel about life among the poorest West Indians. He went on to write what still stands as the definitive history of the Haitian slave revolt, The Black Jacobins (1938). His play based on research for that book starred Paul Robeson as Toussaint Louverture. In 1939, he went to Mexico to discuss politics with Leon Trotsky. A few years later — and in part because of certain disagreements he’d had with Trotsky — James and his associates in the United States brought out the first English translation of Karl Marx’s Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. (By the early 1960s, there would be a sort of cottage industry in commentary on these texts, but James planted his flag in 1947.)

He was close friends with Richard Wright and spoke at Martin Luther King, Jr.’s church. At one point, the United States government imprisoned James on Ellis Island as a dangerous subversive. While so detained, he drafted a book about Herman Melville as prophet of 20th century totalitarianism — with the clear implication that the U.S. was not immune to it.

Settled in Britain, he wrote a book on the history and meaning of cricket called Beyond a Boundary (1963). By all accounts it is one of the classics of sports writing. Being both strenuously unathletic and an American, I was prepared to take this on faith. But having read some of it out of curiosity, I found the book fascinating, even if the game itself remained incomprehensible.

This is, of course, an extremely abbreviated survey of his life and work. The man was a multitude. A few years ago, I tried to present a more comprehensive sketch in this short magazine article, and edited a selection of his hard-to-find writings for the University Press of Mississippi.

In the meantime, it has been good to see his name becoming much more widely known than it was at the time of his death more than two decades ago. This is particularly true among young people. They take much for granted that a literary or political figure can be, as James was, transnational in the strongest sense — thinking and writing and acting “beyond the boundary” of any given national context. He lived and worked in the 20th century, of course, but James is among the authors the 21st century will make its own.

So it is appalling to learn that the C.L.R. James Library in Hackney (a borough of London) is going to be renamed the Dalston Library and Archives, after the neighborhood in which it is located. James was there when the library was christened in his honor in 1985. The authorities insist that, in spite of the proposed change, they will continue to honor James. But this seems half-hearted and unsatisfying.

There is a petition against the name change, which I hope readers of this column will sign and help to circulate.

Some have denounced the name change as an insult, not just to James’s memory, but to the community in which the library is located, since Hackney has a large black population. I don’t know enough to judge whether any offense was intended. But the renaming has a significance going well beyond local politics in North London.

C.L.R. James was a revolutionary; that he ended up imprisoned for a while seems, all in all, par for the course. But he was also very much the product of the cultural tradition he liked to call Western Civilization. He used this expression without evident sarcasm — a remarkable thing, given that he was a tireless anti-imperialist. Given his studies in the history of Africa and the Caribbean, he might well have responded as Gandhi did when asked what he thought of Western Civilization: “I think it would be a good idea.”

As a child, James reread Thackeray’s satirical novel Vanity Fair until he had it almost memorized; this was, perhaps, his introduction to social criticism. He traced his ideas about politics back to ancient Greece. James treated thefuneral oration of Pericles as a key to understanding Lenin’s State and Revolution. And there is a film clip that shows him speaking to an audience of British students on Shakespeare — saying that he wrote “some of the finest plays I know about the impossibility of being a king.” As with James’s interpretation of Captain Ahab as a prototype of Stalin, this is a case of criticism as transformative reading. It’s eccentric, but it sticks with you.

Harold Bloom might not approve of what James did with the canon. And Allan Bloom would have been horrified, no doubt about it. But it helps explain some of James’s discomfort about the emergence of African-American studies as an academic discipline. He taught the subject for some time as a professor at Federal City College, now called the University of the District of Columbia — but not without misgivings.

“For myself,” he said in a lecture in 1969, “I do not believe that there is any such thing as black studies. There are studies in which black people and black history, so long neglected, can now get some of the attention they deserve. … I do not know, as a Marxist, black studies as such. I only know the struggle of people against tyranny and oppression in a certain political setting, and, particularly, during the past two hundred years. It’s impossible for me to separate black studies from white studies in any theoretical point of view.”

James’s argument here is perhaps too subtle for the Internet to propagate. (I type his words with mild dread at the likely consequences.) But the implications are important — and they apply with particular force to the circumstance at hand, the move to rename the C.L.R. James Library in London.

People of Afro-Caribbean descent in England have every right to want James to be honored. But no less outspoken, were he still alive, would be Martin Glaberman — a white factory worker in Detroit who later became a professor of social science at Wayne State University. (I think of him now because it was Marty who was keeping many of James’s books in print when I first became interested in them.) James was the nexus between activists and intellectuals in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, and his cosmopolitanism included a tireless effort to connect cultural tradition to modern politics. To quote from the translation he made of a poem by Aimé Cesaire: “No race holds the monopoly of beauty, of intelligence, of strength, and there is a place for all at the rendezvous of victory.”

Having C.L.R. James’s name on the library is an honor — to the library. To remove it is an act of vandalism. Please sign the http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/saveclrjameslibrary/.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Raya Dunayevskaya

MARXIST-HUMANIST WEBSITE

FROM US MARXIST-HUMANISTS http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/

JUNE 10, 2010

OUR NEWLY REVAMPED WEBSITE CONTAINS THESE FEATURED AND CURRENT ARTICLES:

Peter Hudis, co-editor of the Rosa Luxemburg Reader, “Today’s Global Financial/Economic Crisis and the Legacy of Rosa Luxemburg”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/todays-global-financialeconomic-crisis-and-the-legacy-of-rosa-luxemburg/

Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins, “From the Grundrisse to Capital, Multilinear Themes”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/from-the-grundrisse-to-capital-multilinear-themes/

David Black, author of Helen Macfarlane, “Why Philosophy? Why Now? On the Revolutionary Legacies of Raya Dunayevskaya, CLR James, and Anton Pannekoek”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/why-philosophy-why-now-on-the-revolutionary-legacies-of-raya-dunayevskaya-clr-james-and-anton-pannekoek/

Eli Messinger, radical psychiatrist, “Review Essay: Michael Löwy’s The Theory of Revolution in the Young Marx”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/review-essay-michael-lowy%E2%80%99s-the-theory-of-revolution-in-the-young-marx/

Statement of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization, “We Are All Palestinians Now”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/we-are-all-palestinians-now/

Ba Karang, writer for Africa Links, “Africom and the USA’s Hidden Battle Front in Africa”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/africom-and-the-usa%E2%80%99s-hidden-battle-front-in-africa/

Kamran Afary, author of Performance and Activism, and Kevin Anderson, “Behind the 2009 Upheaval in Iran”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/authors/kamran-afary/

Batay Ouvriye (Haiti), “Behind the January 12, 2010 Haiti Earthquake”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/after-the-january-12-2010-haiti-earthquake/

Peter Hudis and Kevin Anderson, interview with Simon Birnbaum for iz3w, “The Obama Effect Undermines the Left” (in German and English)
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/the-obama-effect-undermines-the-left/

Dale Parsons, labor activist, “A Deeper Look at the Massey Coal Mine Deaths”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/a-deeper-look-at-massey-coal-mine-deaths/

Statement of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization, “Support the People of Afghanistan and Pakistan in the Face of Imperialist War and Fundamentalist Retrogression”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/support-the-people-of-afghanistan-and-pakistan-in-the-face-of-imperialist-war-and-fundamentalist-retrogression/

Yasmin Nair, LGBT activist, “What’s Left of Queer?: Immigration, Sexuality, and Affect in a Neoliberal World”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/what%E2%80%99s-left-of-queer-immigration-sexuality-and-affect-in-a-neoliberal-world/

THE SITE ALSO INCLUDES A GROWING ARCHIVE OF EARLIER ARTICLES FROM THE PAST DECADE

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISM 126

http://www.isj.org.uk

Issue 126

Analysis
The radical left and the crisis

Venezuela at the crossroads: Voices from inside the revolution
Luke Stobart

Crisis and conflict in Pakistan
Sartaj Khan & Yuri Prasad

Climate politics after Copenhagen
Jonathan Neale

The changing face of racism
Richard Seymour

CLR James and the Black Jacobins
Christian Høgsbjerg

25 years after the Great Miners’ Strike
Jack Robertson

Tony Cliff: Deflected permanent revolution in Africa
Leo Zeilig

Rethinking imperialism: past, present and future
Gilbert Achcar

Conceding the Russian Revolution to liberals
Kevin Murphy

Book Reviews

Getting the “Change We Need”
Brian Richardson

Fighting for women’s liberation today
Siân Ruddick

Socialism through devolution?
Tim Evans

Refusing to be pessimistic
Dan Swain

Resisting revisionism
Matthew Cookson

Apologising for the Chilean coup
Nathaniel Mehr

Vote for Prisoner 9653
John Newsinger

Finance and capitalism in Europe
Christakis Georgiou

A true reflection of the system
Ken Olende

Pick of the quarter
This quarter’s selection

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Socialism and Hope

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com