Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Class War

Social Class

Social Class

HOW CLASS WORKS 2016 CONFERENCE

A Conference at SUNY Stony Brook

June 9-11, 2016

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

The Center for Study of Working Class Life is pleased to announce the How Class Works – 2016 Conference, to be held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, June 9-11, 2016.

Proposals for papers, presentations, and sessions are welcome until December 9, 2015, according to the guidelines below.  For more information, visit our Web site at <www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass>.

Purpose and orientation: This conference explores ways in which an explicit recognition of class helps to understand the social world in which we live, and the variety of ways in which analysis of societies can deepen our understanding of class as a social relationship across the globe.  Theoretical and historical presentations should take as their point of reference the lived experience of class in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, within nations and internationally.  Presentations are welcome from people outside academic life when they sum up and reflect upon social experience in ways that contribute to conference themes and discussion.  Formal papers are welcome but are not required.  All presentations should be accessible to an interdisciplinary audience.

Conference themes: The conference welcomes proposals for sessions and presentations that advance our understanding of any of the following themes:

* The mosaic of class, race, and gender: To explore how class shapes racial, gender, and ethnic experience, and how different racial, gender, and ethnic experiences within various classes shape the meaning of class.

*  Class, power, and social structure: To explore how the social lives of working, middle, and capitalist classes are structured by various forms of power; to explore ways in which class dynamics shape power structures in workplaces and across broader societies.

*  Class in an age of income inequality:  To explore the implications and consequences of the growing income gap between top earners and the rest for the lived experience in class in different corners of the world.

*  Class, Community, and the Environment: To explore ways in which class informs communities and environmental conditions where people work as well as where they live; also to consider questions of “home,” community formation and sustenance, and environmental justice.

*  Class in a global economy: To explore how class identity and class dynamics are influenced by globalization, including the transnational movements of industry, capital, and capitalist elites; the experience of cross-border labor migration and organizing; and international labor and environmental standards.

*  Middle class? Working class? What’s the difference and why does it matter? To explore the claim that the U.S. and other developed nations have become middle class societies, contrasting with the notion that the working class is the majority; to unpack the relationships between the middle class and capitalist, working and other subordinate classes both in the developed and the developing world.

*  Class, public policy, and electoral politics: To explore how class affects public deliberations and policy in a variety of nations around the world, with special attention to health care, the criminal justice system, labor law, poverty, tax and other economic policy, housing, and education; to explore the place of electoral politics in the arrangement of class forces on policy matters.

*  Class and culture: To explore ways in which cultures and subcultures transmit, sustain, and transform class dynamics around the world.

*  Pedagogy of class: To explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class, at K-12 levels, in college and university courses, and in labor studies and adult education courses.

How to submit proposals for How Class Works – 2016 Conference:  We encourage proposals for panel sessions (three or four papers) and roundtables that bring diverse perspectives and experiences into dialogue: scholars with activists; those working on similar themes in different disciplines; as well as those working on similar issues in different parts of the world. Proposals for individual presentations are also welcome. Proposals for presentations must include the following information [for session proposals this information must be included for all proposed presentations, as well as indication of presenters’ willingness to participate]: a) short descriptive title; b) which of the conference themes will be addressed; c) a maximum 250 word summary of the main subject matter, points, and methodology; d) relevant personal information indicating institutional affiliation (if an y) and what training or experience the presenter brings to the proposal; e) presenter’s name, address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address. A person may present in at most two conference sessions. To allow time for discussion, sessions will be limited to three twenty-minute or four fifteen-minute principal presentations. Sessions will not include official discussants.

Submit proposals as an e-mail attachment to michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu or as hard copy by mail to: The How Class Works – 2016 Conference, Center for Study of Working Class Life, Department of Economics, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384.

Timetable:  Proposals must be received by December 9, 2015. After review by the program committee, notifications will be mailed by the end of January 2016. The conference will be at SUNY Stony Brook June 9-11, 2016.  Conference registration and housing reservations will be possible after March 7, 2016.

Details and updates will be posted at: http://www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass

See flyer: http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/workingclass/images/HCW-2016%20call.pdf

images (5)

Conference coordinator:

Michael Zweig

Director, Center for Study of Working Class Life

Department of Economics

State University of New York

Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384

631.632.7536

michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu                   ##

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/how-class-works-2016-conference-proposals-due-december-9-2015

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Advertisements
Situationism

Situationism

THE GAME OF WAR

Class Wargames Presents “The Game of War” @ Essex

2:00 PM, June 10th @ the Waiting Room, St Botolphs (http://st-botolphs.org)
The Street with No Name (off Queen Street) Colchester, Essex CO1 2PQ

Class Wargames (http://www.classwargames.net) will come to Essex on June 10th to present “The Game of War,” staging a participatory playing of Guy Debord’s board military-strategy board game.

Class Wargames is playing Guy Debord’s The Game of War using a replica of his original 1977 design for the board game. Guy Debord is celebrated as the chief strategist of the Situationist International and author of the searing critique of the media-saturated society of consumer capitalism: The Society of the Spectacle. What is less well known is that after the French May ’68 Revolution, Debord devoted much of the rest of his life to inventing, refining and promoting what he came to regard as his most important project: The Game of War.

The Game of War is a Clausewitz simulator: a Napoleonic era military strategy game where armies must maintain their communications structure to survive – and where victory is achieved by smashing your opponent’s supply network rather than by taking their pieces. For Debord, The Game of War wasn’t just a game – it was a guide to how people should live their lives within Fordist society. By playing this Clausewitz simulator, revolutionary activists could learn how to fight and win against the oppressors of spectacular society.

Politics is a continuation of war by other means. Wargames are a continuation of politics by other means.

Requisite Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/681989125188070

Guy Debord

Guy Debord

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 26th OCTOBER 2013

EVENTS

FILMS FROM THE CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2013
November 29
7 pm
PSAC Headquarters
233 Gilmour Street
Ottawa, ON

The Workers’ History Museum is proud to host Ottawa’s first-ever Canadian Labour International Film Festival. CLIFF gives a stage to those who seek justice on the job and dignity in their workplaces, so it is a perfect fit for our museum. This successful festival, now in its fifth year, has brought independent films about working people to cities throughout Canada. On November 29th, we’re bringing them to Ottawa.

Please join us for five films — and five perspectives — that you won’t see anywhere else. Information about the films can be found at: http://workershistorymuseum.ca/cliff2013/

Admission is $5.00. For more information or for advance tickets, please contact: treasurer@workershistorymuseum.ca

+++++

PEOPLE UNITED – CREATING A NEW SPACE FOR COMMUNITY DIALOGUE

November 28
6 p.m.
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto (2 blocks west of Bathurst St., south side of Bloor St. W.)

Join other activists, advocates, and organizers:
–  Weaving connections between community groups, city-wide organizations, social justice networks, and progressive movements
–  Sharing stories from our struggles
–  Finding common ground on issues, goals, values
–  Developing the groundwork for a solidarity strategy and creating the conditions for an active solidarity alliance

Sponsored by the Toronto Community Development Institute (TCDI)
For more information about the TCDI, visit: http://www.torontocdi.ca/

We invite you to join us or work with us on our projects. For more information about how you can be a part of TCDI, email: organizing.tcdi@gmail.com or call (416) 231-5499.

+++++

TORONTO BOOK LAUNCH: TAX IS NOT A FOUR LETTER WORD

Tuesday, November 5, 2013
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Sears Atrium, George Vari Engineering Building
245 Church Street, 3rd Floor
Toronto, ON

Join the CCPA (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) Ontario for a special book launch: Tax is Not a Four-Letter Word.

It’s time to start talking about the value of taxes in Canada. Join us for the launch of Canada’s newest book on the subject: Tax is Not a Four Letter Word.

Featuring the book’s co-editors:
– Alex Himelfarb, Glendon College Director and former Clerk of the Privy Council
– Jordan Himelfarb, Toronto Star Opinion Editor
and three of the book’s CCPA contributors:
– Jim Stanford, Ontario Advisory Board Chair
– Hugh Mackenzie, Research Associate
– Trish Hennessy, Ontario Director

We hope you can join us! Space is limited so sign up here: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/8368792283

– See more at: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario/events/toronto-book-launch-tax-not-four-letter-word#sthash.HJZc3oSc.dpuf

+++++

GETTING IN & STAYING IN: LABOUR MARKET CHALLENGES FACING YOUTH

Mon. Nov. 4
9:00am- 4:00pm
Toronto

Youth are experiencing unprecedented barriers to entering the workforce and are resorting to creative, and sometimes unpaid, outlets to gain meaningful experiences, network and secure stable employment.

Co-hosted by Social Planning Toronto (SPT), Toronto Workforce Innovation Group and McMaster University’s School of Labour Studies, this full day event will explore overall trends in youth unemployment in Canada and Ontario, including public policy options.

To register: Contact Mary Micallef, mmicallef@socialplanningtoronto.org, or 416-351-0095 ext. 251

+++++

SEMINAR – COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

Saturday, November 23, 2013
1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario

Sponsored by Tools for Change

This workshop will outline the theory of community organizing and the steps and strategies involved in actively participating in an organization engaged in community organizing.

Exact campus room location given to registrants a week before the event.

Trainer: Effie Vlachoyannacos is the Managing Director of Public Interest, a social enterprise in Toronto working with communities to fuel social change and build the capacity of non-profit organizations and labour groups to do the same. With Public Interest, Effie has worked on diverse community engagement initiatives and campaigns across Toronto’s inner suburbs, with a particular focus on affordable and social housing advocacy.

For more info and to register: http://www.eventbrite.ca/org/1382386439?s=17819903

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO – LET’S TALK ABOUT UNIONS: NORA LORETO’S BOOK LAUNCH AND Q&A

Nora Loreto has released a new book From Demonized to Organized: Building the New Union Movement with support from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives that serves as a call to incite union activists and supporter, debunk anti-union rhetoric and start the conversation around building a strong, community-focus union movement in Canada.

Watch the video: http://rabble.ca/rabbletv/program-guide/2013/10/best-net/lets-talk-about-unions-nora-loretos-book-launch-and-qa

+++++

BRIARPATCH MAGAZINE – SNEAK PEEK AT OUR LABOUR ISSUE: THE POLITICS OF PRECARITY

In the last two decades precarious employment has doubled. The National Urban Worker Strategy, introduced on Monday in the House of Commons by MP Andrew Cash, “proposes a sweeping suite of overdue federal policies that respond to the plight of temps, freelancers, interns, part-timers and other flexworkers who flit from gig to gig, shift to shift, contract to contract, with no guarantee of income or future work, let alone access to benefits or pensions.” What promise does it hold for precarious workers? In this issue, award-winning writers Nicole Cohen and Grieg de Peuter take a critical look at the Urban Worker Strategy and the politics of precarity.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1ae4EBI

+++++

LET’S GET THIS CLASS WAR STARTED

By Chris Hedges, Common Dreams

“The rich are different from us,” F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, “Yes, they have more money.”

The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway. The rich are different. The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/10/21

+++++

HOW DOMESTIC WORKERS WON THEIR RIGHTS: FIVE BIG LESSONS

By Amy Dean, Alternet

Domestic workers have had some breakthrough wins over the past two weeks. Up until then, these workers were excluded from protections such as a guaranteed minimum wage, paid breaks, and overtime pay. On September 17, the Obama administration  announced new rules extending the Fair Labor Standards Act to include the 800,000 to 2 million home health workers—who help seniors and others with self-care tasks like taking medications, bathing, and shopping—under the federal government’s wage and hour protections.

Read more: http://www.alternet.org/activism/how-domestic-workers-won-their-rights-five-big-lessons

+++++

VIDEO – TRADE UNION AND ‘PROGRESSIVE’ STRATEGIES: THE RESPONSIBLE INVESTMENT, CAPITAL STEWARDSHIP, AND ‘PENSION FUND ACTIVISM’ MOVEMENTS

It is noteworthy that as finance has been on the ‘rise,’ some activists began to formalize anti-corporate and targeted activist campaign strategies through pension and personal investment funds. In Canada and the U.S., several faith organizations began to argue that anti-social corporate behaviour should be, in some sense, sanctioned by individual investors and ultimate owners, on the basis of social principle or humanitarian values.

These initiatives then crystallized and drew broader support with the rise of the sanctions and divestment movement directed against corporate and government support for apartheid South Africa in the 1980s.

Such initiatives have seen their labels evolving from “ethical investment,” to “socially responsible investment” (SRI), to the most recent simplified term of “responsible investment.” While many trade unions, NGOs, and activists have embraced these efforts, others have not, and a substantial differentiation on the political left has emerged. Most recently, Queen’s political economist Susanne Soederberg has produced a sharply critical analysis of these investor-activist efforts from a Marxist political economy framework. This critique follows previous analyses by CAW economists Sam Gindin and Jim Stanford, both of whom have raised serious questions about these strategies as projections of trade union or working class power. Other unions and labour organizations have embraced these strategies with enthusiasm, as is notable in the establishment of a “Committee on Workers Capital” at the international level.

Moderated by Greg Albo. Convenor: Kevin Skerrett. Presentations by:
– Susanne Soederberg (Queen’s University) – Corporate Power and Ownership in Contemporary Capitalism.
– Jim Stanford (UNIFOR) – Paper Boom.

Sponsors: Centre for Social Justice, Global Labour Research Centre (York University), Canada Research Chair in Political Economy (York University) and Socialist Project.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls189.php

++++++++++
++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Marxism and Culture

MARXIST LITERARY GROUP SUMMER INSTITUTE ON CULTURE AND SOCIETY

 

Monday, June 20

9:00-10:15: MARXISM AND BOURGEOIS REVOLUTION 
Spencer Leonard: Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: Proletarian Socialism Continuing the Bourgeois Revolution?
Pamela Nogales: Marx on the U.S. Civil War as the 2nd American Revolution
Jeremy Cohan: Lukács on Marx’s Hegelianism and the Dialectic of Marxism

10:30-11:30: WAR AND SOCIAL CLASS
Pat Keeton: “Class, War, and Class War: Changing Ideology in American Films from Vietnam to Post-9/11
Peter Scheckner: “End of Empire: How American Cinema since Vietnam Narrates the Erosion of American Global Power.

12:30-1:30: ROUNDTABLE: AFTER GLOBALIZATION

1:45-3:00: POLITICS AND CONSCIOUSNESS
Eric Vazquez: Counterinsurgency’s Suppositions
Joel Nickels: From Spontaneity to Self-government: Imagining Self-Organization in the Twentieth Century and Beyond
Gino Signoracci: Marxism and Eastern Thought: Toward a Philosophy of Perpetual Revolution?

3:15-4:45: COMMODITIES
Ariane Pasternak: Commodity Fetishism and the Feminized Sphere of Non-Value
Ericka Beckman: Seeing the World System: The Latin American “Commodity Novel”
Sina Rahmani: Einwaggonieren: Containerization, Displacement, and the “Forbidden Commodities”
Max Haiven: Abject Finance: Wal-Mart and the Unbankables

7:00: FILM SCREENING: SHASHWATI TALUKDAR’S PLEASE DON’T BEAT ME, SIR.

Tuesday, June 21

9:00-10:15: HISTORY, LITERATURE, REVOLUTION
Eldon Birthwright: Caribbean Literature and the Sanitizing of History
Sheshalatha Reddy: Bodies in Bondage, Bodies in Labor: Class Consciousness and the “Oppressed Natives” in the Morant Bay Uprising
Aisha Karim: Literature and Revolution

10:30-11:45: RACE, REVOLUTION, POSTCOLONIALITY
Julie Fiorelli: Recurrent Revolutions? Arna Bontemps’s Conception of Time and African American Race-War Novels of the Late 1960s
LaRose Parris: The African Diasporic Proletariat
Henry Schwarz: Marxism and Postcolonial Studies

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: ANTONIO GRAMSCI 
Led by Jaafar Aksikas

2:45-4:00: REVOLUTION AS EVENT
Kanishka Chowdhury: Revolution and the “Hidden Abode of Production”
Barbara Foley: Event, Non-Event, and “Arrested Dialectic”: The Aftermath of 1919.
Neil Larsen: Revolution as Event and the Temporality of Crisis

4:15-5:30: REVOLUTION AND UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT, AKA THE SPATIAL DIALECTIC 
Laura Martin: Colonial Servitude in the Transition to Capitalism.
Joe Ramsey: Learning from Failures, and from Afar: The Problem of Revolutionary Subjectivity in the US of A, Today

5:45-6:30: WHAT IS A MARXIST POLITICS TODAY?
Oded Nir: Waltz With Bashir: Mediating Class In and Out of Globalized Israeli Culture
Niamh Mulcahy: Class Struggle and the Possibility of a Science of Aleatory History
Andrew Culp: Three Theses for Marxist Politics Today
Joshua Kurz, respondent

Wednesday, June 22

9:00-10:15: AESTHETICS AND POLITICS
Vin Adiutori: Appearance and Phantasm: Reconfiguring Misrecognition
Anthony Squiers: Rethinking Brecht’s Split Character: Dialectics, Social Ontology and Literary Technique
Eleanor Kaufman: Revolution and the Question of Party in Sartre, Brecht, and Badiou

10:30-11:45: BETWEEN REVOLUTIONS: RESISTANCE, CULTURAL POLITICS, AND THE CLICHÉ
Joe Hughes: Ethico-Aesthetics and the Politics of the Cliché
Christian Haines: “It is you who give the life”: On Walt Whitman, Cultural Revolution, and Biopolitics
Hyeryung Hwang: “I prefer not to”: Embodied Subjectivity as the Site of Resistance

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: MARXISM AND FEMINISM REVISITED 
Led by Ann Mattis and Susan Comfort)

2:45-4:00: THE MARXISM OF SECOND INTERNATIONAL RADICALISM: LENIN, LUXEMBURG, TROTSKY AND LUKÁCS 
Chris Cutrone: Vladmir Lenin
Greg Gabrellas: Rosa Luxemburg
Ian Morrison: Leon Trotsky
Spencer Leonard, respondent

4:15-5:30:  END TIMES
Mathias Nilges: The Tenses of Form or, Literature at the End of Time
Brent Bellamy: Foreclosing Revolution, or the Apocalyptic Contradiction of Late Capitalism
Eui Kang: Apocalyptic Marx

7:00: FILM SCREENING: MICHAEL TRUSCELLO’S CAPITALISM IS THE CRISIS

Thursday, June 23

9:00-10:15: HISTORY I
Lucas Johnson: Measuring History in the Post-National
Jackson Petsche: Marxism, Posthumanism, and the Future of Animal Liberation
Nathaniel Boyd: Re-thinking the Contingent Political Sequence of Revolutionary Class Struggle

10:30-11:45: HISTORY II
Grover Furr: Why Is It Vital To All of Us To Get the Stalin Period Right?
Ryan Culpepper: 5 Years After the 1929 Economic Collapse
Justin Sully: Population Decline and the Historical Lateness of Capitalism

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: C.L.R. JAMES AND JAMES BOGGS 
Led by Joel Woller

2:45-3:45: THE PERIPHERAL STANDPOINT
Jefferson Agostini Mello: Desiring the World: A New Brazilian Culture?
Maria Elisa Cevasco: Misplaced Ideas: What We Can Learn from How Ideas Fare in Brazil

4:00-5:00: BUSINESS MEETING

7:00: FILM SCREENING: ANDREW FRIEND’S WORKERS’ REPUBLIC

Friday, June 24

8:45-10:15: LITERATURE I
Emilio Sauri: Cognitive Mapping, Then and Now
David Aitchison: Literature and Revolution: Radical Politics and the Novel in the U.S.A.
Jen Hammond: The Lyric Moment and Revolution
Madeleine Monson-Rosen: The Structure of Media Revolution: Thomas Pynchon and the Politics of Paradigm Shift

10:30-12:00: LITERATURE II
Jonathan Poore: John Steinbeck and the Proletarian Aesthetic
Carolyn Lesjak: Realism and Revolution
Peter Gardner: The Political Unconscious of A Farewell to Arms
Kristin Bergen: Gertrude Stein and the Relation of Political Periodization to Aesthetic Form

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: THE STRUCTURE OF REVOLUTION 
Led by Joe Ramsey and Rich Daniels

2:45-4:00: GUY DEBORD
Sarah Hamblin: Repetition as a Revolutionary Aesthetic in the Cinema of Guy Debord
Jane Winston: Revolution in Debord
Vanessa R. S. Cavalcanti and Antonio Carlos Silva: The Society of the Spectacle to the Beat of the Capital: a Contribution to the Criticism of Modernity’s Ritual

6:30: MLG BARBECUE

Marxist Literary Group: http://mlg.eserver.org/the-institute/2011-chicago/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Egypt

THE MYTH OF HUMANITARIAN WAR

International Socialist Review: http://isreview.org/
Issue 77: May–June

The Myth of Humanitarian War

Lance Selfa 
Libya’s revolution, U.S. intervention, and the left

Michael Corcoran and Stephen Maher 
Hypocrisy, ideology, and imperialism 
The myth of humanitarian intervention inLibya

Lee Wengraf 
Somalia’s Operation Restore Hope, 1992-1994 
How an ostensible “humanitarian” operation made things worse

Roger Annis and Kim Ives 
Haiti’s humanitarian crisis 
Haiti’s crisis is rooted in a history of military coups andU.S. occupations

Learning from Wisconsin

Phil Gasper • Critical Thinking 
Class Struggle in Wisconsin 
Signs of the end of a one-sided class war?

Lee Sustar 
Lessons of Wisconsin’s labor revolt

Other features

Mostafa Omar 
Egypt’s unfinished revolution 
The dictator is gone‹and the battle begins over how far the revolution will go

Chris Williams 
The case against nuclear power 
In the shadow of a still-unfolding nuclear crisis inJapan, an argument for why nuclear power should be dismantled everywhere

Arundhati Roy, interviewed by David Barsamian 
Rebellion and revolt in India

Duncan Hallas 
The nature of revolutions 
Speech to a socialist conference in 1998

Reviews

Lee Sustar 
What are the roots of capitalist crisis? 
Review of Chris Harman’s Zombie Capitalism

Hadas Thier 
Roots of Egypt’s revolution 
Review of Egypt: The Moment of Change

PLUS: Sharon Smith on voices of U.S. labor, Jason Farbman review’s From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia; Natalia Tylim reviews The Millenium trilogy; Elizabeth Schulte reviews The Triangle Fire; Gary Lapon reviews The History of White People

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Punk

INTERFACE – VOLUME 3 ISSUE 1 (MAY 2011)

Interface: a journal for and about social movements

Interface: http://interfacejournal.net

Volume three, issue one (May 2011): Repression and social movements Issue editors: Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Lesley Wood http://www.interfacejournal.net/current/

Volume three, issue one of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Repression and social movements”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.

This issue of Interface includes 296 pages with 20 pieces in English and Portuguese, by authors writing from / about Angola, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Germany, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palestine, South Africa, the UK and the US.

Articles include:

Cristina Flesher Fominaya and Lesley Wood, Editorial: repression  and social movements
Theme-related articles:

Peter Ullrich and Gina Rosa Wollinger, A surveillance studies perspective on protest policing: the case of video surveillance of demonstrations inGermany

Liz Thompson and Ben Rosenzweig, Public policy is class war pursued by other means: struggle and restructuring in international education economy

Kristian Williams, Counter-insurgency and community policing

Fernanda Maria Vieira and J. Flávio Ferreira, “Não somos chilenos, somos mapuches!”: as vozes do passado no presente da luta mapuche por seu território

Roy Krøvel, From indios to indígenas: guerrilla perspectives on indigenous peoples and repression in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua Action / practice notes and event analysis from:
    • Musab Younis, British tuition fee protest, November 9, 2010
    • Dino Jimbi, Campanha “Não partam a minha casa”
    • Mac Scott, G20 mobilizing in Toronto and community organizing: opportunities created and lessons learned
    • Aileen O’Carroll, Alessio Lunghi, Laurence Cox, “I’m in the news today, oh boy”: smear tactics and media bullying

Other articles:

Eurig Scandrett and Suroopa Mukherjee, Globalisation and abstraction in theBhopalsurvivors’ movement

George Sranko, Collaborative governance and a strategic approach to facilitating change: the South East Queensland Forest Agreement and the Great Bear Rainforest Agreement

John Agbonifo, Territorialising Niger Delta conflicts: place and contentious mobilisation
 

This issue’s reviews include the following titles:
    • Laurence Davis and Ruth Kinna, Anarchism and utopianism
    • Fiona Dukelow and Orla O’Donovan, Mobilising classics: reading radical writing in Ireland
    • David Graeber, Direct action: an ethnography
    • Nathalie Hyde-Clarke, The citizen in communication: re-visiting traditional, new and community media practices in South Africa
    • Gabriel Kuhn, Sober living for the revolution: hardcore punk, Straight Edge, and radical politics
    • Alf Gunvald Nilsen, Dispossession and resistance in India: the river and the rage

A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 1 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “The season of revolution: the Arab spring” (submissions deadline November 1 2011).

We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu.

The website has the full CFP and details on how to submit articles for this issue at http://www.interfacejournal.net/2011/05/call-for-papers-volume-4-issue-1-the-season-of-revolution-the-arab-spring/

Volume 3, issue 2 on “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement” is due to be published in November 2011. A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 2, on “The global emancipation of labour: new movements and struggles around work and workers” will shortly be published (deadline May 1 2012 for publication in November 2012).

Interface is always open to new collaborators. We need activists and academics who can referee articles in Chinese, Indonesian and Russian in particular, and translators to help with our multilingual project more generally. We are also looking for people willing to help set up regional groups in East Asia and Central Asia. We are also looking for collaborators for our existing groups, particularly but not only the African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, and Oceania / SE Asian groups. More details can be found on our website: http://interfacejournal.net

Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Red

THE ROUGE FORUM MAY DAY EDITION

Dear Friends, The Rouge Forum Dispatch with Mayday greetings, news of the schools and society (class war and empires’ wars) is updated here: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

Just weeks until the Rouge Forum Conference, May 20-22, at Lewis University in Chicagoland. Come join a truly participatory conference of leading school workers, students, vets, and community people who, at base, recognize that social class has a lot to do with our current conditions.

Here is a link on the schedule, directions, and more: http://www.rougeforumconference.org/

Good luck to our side.
Rich Gibson

 

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor,  north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

WORLD CRISIS AND RESISTANCE

International Socialism Northern Day School
The Dance House, Oxford Road, Manchester (opposite the BBC)
Sunday 6th February 2011, 10.30-5.00

The world is now in the midst of the biggest economic crisis since the 1930s. This is a crisis brought on by the capitalist system. The response of our rulers, everywhere, is to make ordinary people pay the price—even though they didn’t cause it. Their policies are a declaration of class war.

Unevenly, but with growing strength, workers and students are developing a fightback in country after country. In Britain, the head of the Metropolitan Police says we are entering an era of mass protests.

In the past fortnight, mass protests have brought down a hated regime in Tunisia, and are now challenging Mubarak’s dictatorship in Egypt.

International Socialism journal invites you to join in a day school on the crisis, organizing in the resistance, and the possibilities for revolutionary politics.

Sessions on:

[1] Understanding the capitalist crisis;
[2] How should revolutionaries organise in the 21st century?;
[3] What do we really mean by socialist revolution?

Speakers include:
Session 1: 11.00-12.30
Jane Hardy (Professor of Politics, Hertfordshire)
Joseph Choonara (editorial board, International Socialism)

Session 2: 1.30-3.00
Esme Choonara (London ambulance worker, former Socialist Worker journalist)
Jen Wilkinson (SWP organiser, Manchester)

Session 3: 3.30-5.00
Jonny Jones (deputy editor, International Socialism)
Megan Trudell (editorial board, International Socialism)

There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion. And an extensive socialist bookstall.

Admission: £10 waged, £5 unwaged, £2 school and FE students.

For further information, and for advance bookings, contact ISJ Day School, PO Box 111, Manchester M21 0AA or call 0777 234 6819.

International Socialism
http://www.isj.org.uk
+44 (0)20 7819 1177

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 8th NOVEMBER 2010

EVENTS

MENNONITE NEW LIFE CENTRE PREMIERS NEWCOMER ADVOCACY FILM “RAISING OUR VOICE”

Wednesday, November 16, 2010
6:30 PM
Mennonite New Life Centre (Auditorium)
1774 Queen Street East, Toronto

It is with great pleasure that UFCW Canada is pleased to support the Mennonite New Life Centre featured documentary entitled RAISING OUR VOICE.

The documentary was created by the Newcomer Advocacy Committee of the MNLC and highlights the importance of poverty reduction, access to meaningful employment and political engagement.

The message is portrayed from a newcomer perspective.  It is not only entertaining but is a solid evaluation of the immigrant and racialized experience in the Greater Toronto Area.

+++++

FROM MOSQUITOES TO MARX:  THE CHANGING DYNAMICS OF STATE AND SOCIAL MOBILIZATION IN BRAZILIAN LAND REFORM

Friday, December 03, 2010
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
208N – Seminar Room, North House
Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place

with Wendy Wolford, Cornell University

Wendy Wolford’s work draws upon and contributes to political economies of development, social movements and resistance, agrarian societies, political ecology, land use, land reform, and critical ethnography, all with a regional concentration in Latin America, particularly Brazil. For over fifteen years, she has worked with one of the most exciting and important grassroots social movements in Latin American history, the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (the Movement of Rural Landless Workers, or the MST).
   
Register online at: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9090

Co-sponsored by the Departments of Anthropology, Geography and Program in Planning, Political Science, Sociology, and the Centre for Comparative, International and Development Education at OISE/UT.

+++++

BOLIVIAN LEADER SPEAKS IN TORONTO

Monday November 8
7 pm
Centre for Social Justice
489 College St. 3rd Floor Board Room

with Dr. Hugo Salvatierra, one of Evo Morales’s top advisors and a founder of the MAS in Bolivia

One of the most important leaders of the MAS will be in Canada in early October to discuss the Bolivian process and their global battle on climate change. Dr. Hugo Salvatierra is a founder of the MAS and the Minister of Rural Development, Agriculture and the Environment in the first MAS Cabinet.

Hugo will speak primarily about the internal process in Bolivia, its importance as the basis of the international campaign against climate change and why the Bolivian experience is important to Canada and Canadians. He is in Canada at the invitation of Guelph University to give the keynote address on a conference on Bolivia.

For more info contact:  jrebick@ryerson.ca

Sponsors:  CSJ, Toronto Bolivia Solidarity, Socialist Project

+++++

NAOMI KLEIN AND HAWKSLEY WORKMAN G20 LEGAL DEFENCE FUNDRAISER

Thursday, November 11
7 p.m. – midnight
The Great Hall, 1087 Queen St. West
Toronto

Please join us for a evening of song and speech to defend the G20 arrestees and raise money for the defense fund.

7:00pm – Pre-event with Naomi Klein – Food and drinks provided
Tickets: $100 available (includes pre-event and main event) ONLINE at GalleryAC (http://www.galleryac.com)

8:00pm – Naomi Klein & Hawksley Workman
Tickets: $50 in advance / $60 at the door
Tickets available ONLINE at GalleryAC (http://www.galleryac.com)

During the G20 summit in June this year, the residents of Toronto bore witness to the largest mass arrest in Canadian history as approximately 1200 people were assaulted, harassed, beaten and arrested by the police. More than 250 were charged and six remain in jail. Others are out on bail under extraordinarily restrictive conditions, continuing to face police harassment and re-arrest. Legal costs are mounting. As we continue to organize against the G20 agenda, we must now also raise money to defend all those who are forced to go through expensive legal proceedings.

Tickets also available at the following stores: Another Story, 315 Roncesvalles Ave; Rotate This, 801 Queen Street W; Soundscapes, 572 College Street Toronto; Women’s Bookstore, 3 Harbord St

This is a 19+ event. Limited capacity: Please book your ticket as early as possible to ensure availability.
Unfortunately, this venue is not an accessible venue. We sincerely apologize.

More Info: http://g20.torontomobilize.org/nov11 or http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=108578439206467

Please contact nov11fundraiser@gmail.com for any inquiries.

+++++

FREE LABOUR FILMS IN TORONTO

Welcome back to the Second Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF). Last year we had more than forty locations across Canada participate in our unique national film festival.

This year, we have more than fifty!

Join us to watch some of the best labour films from across the world. Share in the struggles of others and find out how workers all over the world are succeeding by standing up and speaking out!

In Toronto:

Saturday, 20 November: 2:00pm – 9:00pm
Sunday, 21 November: 2:00pm – 8:30pm
Saturday, 27 November: 2:00pm – 9:00pm
Sunday, 28 November: 2:00pm – 8:30pm

For a complete list of films visit: http://labourfilms.ca/cliff/cliff-2010/2010-complete-list-of-films/

(416) 970-2543 / festival@labourfilms.ca

+++++

CCPA 30TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE AND DINNER

Thursday, Nov 18, 2010
9:00am – 10:00pm
Ottawa

For 30 years, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has been giving voice to progressive ideas. In an era of shrinking progressive think tanks and growing right-wing think tanks, we’d like to celebrate our three decades
of accomplishments.

We hope you will be central part of the celebration. On November 18, we celebrate 30 years with a gala dinner and a conference entitled Advancing Democracy and Social Justice in Canada: The Next 30 Years.

The conference and gala dinner, hosted by inveterate Canadian actor Eric Peterson, will be a who’s who of progressive thinkers, activists, politicians as well as CCPA staff, research associates, board from across Canada.

Conference: University of Ottawa, Tabaret Hall Room 112, 550 Cumberland Street, Ottawa

Evening Gala Dinner: Chateau Laurier Ballroom, Ottawa

Cocktails: 6:30 p.m.
Dinner: 7:30 p.m.

For more information and to register, visit: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/30

+++++

AFTER THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS: A GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY COFFEEHOUSE

Friday November 19, 2010
7:00pm
Regal Beagle Pub
335 Bloor St. West, Toronto

The Workers’ Assembly is already organizing post-election drinking so we can commiserate about the new Fordism and try to make sense of the elections.

Speakers:

* Jonah Schein – City Councillor Candidate in Ward 17 Davenport
* Desmond Cole – Torontoist, City Idol
* Helen Kennedy – CUPE 79
* Stefan Kipfer – York University

We will meet in the back room of the pub. The Regal Beagle is an accessible space.

For more information: http://www.workersassembly.ca/

+++++

EDUCATION REFORM: WHERE NEXT?

November 10
5:30-7pm
OISE/UT
252 Bloor St West, Toronto, Room 5-150

A major public Policy Forum discussing transatlantic education reform: the triumphs, the failures and the lessons to be learned.

Presenters: Prof Julia O’Sullivan, Dean, OISE, University of Toronto; Prof Geoff Whitty, Director, Institute of Education, University of London; Prof Ben Levin, Former Deputy Minister of Education, Ontario, Prof TPS; Prof Carol Campbell, Stanford University, California; and Mary Jean Gallagher, Chief Student Achievement Officer of Ontario.

A lively and controversial exploration of education policy in Ontario and the UK and an opportunity to engage with leading academics and practitioners from Canada and the UK

A collaboration between OISE, University of Toronto and the Institute of Education, University of London

RSVP to c.price@ioe.ac.uk

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

I’M NO SUPERMAN

by Sabina Strand, Common Dreams

I realize Davis Guggenheim’s documentary Waiting for Superman (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1566648/) wasn’t intended to bash teachers. In fact, most viewers probably left the theater impressed by the educators he documented, the ones who cared enough to fight: the Michelle Rhees, David Levins, and Mike Feinbergs of the world (all fellow Teach for America alums). I’m here to argue that glorifying these teachers and the schools they’ve created undermines our end goal of fundamental change.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2010/11/05-2

On the “NOT Waiting for Superman” campaign: http://www.notwaitingforsuperman.org/

+++++

BEWARE THE NATIONAL SECURITY STATE

by Murray Dobbin, rabble.ca

As conditions worsen, as wages and living standards fall, as insecurity increases, as the social safety net frays, objection and dissent increases. The government spends money and builds its response.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/11/beware-national-security-state

+++++

UNIONS REACH FOR SHORT STRIKES TO STOP CONCESSIONS

by Jenny Brown & Mischa Gaus, Labor Notes

Short strikes to stop concessions – Around the country, owners are recovering profitability but refusing to share the gains. Nurses and hotel workers are pulling short strikes, just to stay in place, as employers demand givebacks and cut staffing to the bone.

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/2010/11/unions-reach-short-strikes-stop-concessions

+++++

CLASS WAR SPURS VIOLENT CLASHES IN EUROPE — WHY ARE AMERICANS JUST LETTING THE SUPER RICH WIN?

by David Rosen, Alternet

It is time for Americans to reclaim the concept of class war, to actively combat the great squeeze ruining the lives of untold millions of Americans.

Read more: http://bit.ly/9jl5YM

+++++

U.S. HEALTHCARE: PRIVATIZED — BUT GOVERNMENT STILL SPENDS MORE

by Doug Allan, leftwords

The privatized health care system in the United States is widely known for being extremely expensive. U.S. citizens are stuck paying (through taxes or by private payment) much more than any other developed country for health
care –in fact about 50% more than the next most expensive (Norway), according to the  recently released Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) report on health care spending.

But less well known is that, even though millions of U.S. citizens have no health care insurance, and millions more are covered only by the basic ‘medicaid’ system, public spending on health care is actually higher in the U.S. than it is in Canada’s (largely public) health care system.

Read more: http://www.ochu.on.ca/leftwords_ochuBlog.php

+++++

JOURNAL ARTICLES

IN A DIFFERENT WAY: SOCIAL UNIONISM IN THE NONPROFIT SOCIAL SERVICES – AN AUSTRALIAN/CANADIAN COMPARISON
Donna Baines
Labor Studies Journal 2010;35 480-502
http://lsj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/35/4/480

+++++

THE PROMISE AND LIMITS OF COLLECTIVE ACTION FOR NONPROFIT SELF-REGULATION:
EVIDENCE FROM ASIA
Mark Sidel
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 2010;39 1039-1056
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/39/6/1039

+++++

WORKFORCE CROSS TRAINING: A RE-EMERGING TREND IN TOUGH TIMES
Carmen Abrams, Zane Berge
Journal of Workplace Learning, Volume 22 issue 8
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1891206&show=abstract

(END)

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com