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Capitalism

THE ELLEN MEIKSINS WOOD READER

Now Out! The Ellen Meiksins Wood Reader 

http://www.brill.com/ellen-meiksins-wood-reader

Edited by Larry Patriquin, NipissingUniversity

 

Volume: 40

Series: Historical Materialism Book Series

ISSN: 

1570-152

ISBN: 9789004230088

Publication Year: 2012

Edition info:  1

Version: Hardback

Publication Type: Book

Pages, Illustrations: xiii, 335 pp.

Imprint: BRILL

Language: English

Ellen Meiksins Wood is a leading contemporary political theorist who has elaborated an innovative approach to the history of political thought, the ‘social history of political theory’. She has been described as the founder, together with the historian Robert Brenner, of ‘Political Marxism’, a distinct version of historical materialism which has inspired a research program that spans a number of academic disciplines. Organized thematically, this Reader brings together selections from Wood’s groundbreaking scholarship, published over three decades, providing an overview of her original interpretations of capitalism, precapitalist societies, the state, political theory, democracy, citizenship, liberalism, civil society, the Enlightenment, globalization, imperialism, and socialism

Readership

All those interested in the history and theories of capitalism, socialism, imperialism, Marxism, liberalism, social classes, democracy, civil society, and citizenship.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction: The ‘Method’ of Ellen Meiksins Wood

1. Capitalism
The ‘economic’ and the ‘political’ in capitalism
Class-power and state-power
Feudalism and private property
Capitalism as the privatisation of political power
The localisation of class-struggle
England vs. the dominant model of capitalism
The bourgeois paradigm
Begging the question
Opportunity or imperative?
The commercialisation-model
Marx on the transition
Towns and trade
Agrarian capitalism
Market-dependent producers
A different kind of market-dependence?
Competitive markets

2. Precapitalist Societies
Class and state in China and Rome
Rome and the empire of private property
The city-states of Florence and Venice
Master and slave vs. landlord and peasant
Free producers and slaves
Slavery and the ‘decline’ of the Roman Empire
The ‘logic’ of slavery vs. the logic of capitalism
The ‘slave-mode of production’
Agricultural slavery and the peasant-citizen
The nexus of freedom and slavery in democratic Athens

3. The State in Historical Perspective
Class and state in ancient society
The emergence of the polis in ancient Athens
The ‘essence’ of the polis
Class in the democratic polis
Village and state, town and country, in democratic Athens
The rise and fall of Rome
The culture of property: the Roman law
From imperial Rome to ‘feudalism’
Absolutism and the modern state
The idea of the state
The peculiarities of the English state
Contrasting states: France vs. England

4. Social and Political Thought
The social history of political theory
Political theory in history: an overview
Plato
The Greek concept of freedom
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
John Locke
Revolution and tradition, c. 1640–1790

5. Democracy, Citizenship, Liberalism, and Civil Society
Labour and democracy, ancient and modern
From ancient to modern conceptions of citizenship
Capitalism and democratic citizenship
The American redefinition of democracy
A democracy devoid of social content
From democracy to liberalism
Capitalism and ‘liberal democracy’
Liberal democracy and capitalist hegemony
The idea of ‘civil society’
The civil-society argument
‘Civil society’ and the devaluation of democracy

6. The Enlightenment, Postmodernism, and the Post-‘New Left’
Modernity vs. capitalism: France vs. England
From modernity to postmodernity
Modernity and the non-history of capitalism
Themes of the postmodern left
Enlightenment vs. capitalism: Condorcet vs. Locke
Enlightenment-universalism
The periodisation of the Western left
Left-intellectuals and contemporary capitalism

7. Globalisation and Imperialism
Globalisation and the nation-state
Nation-states, classes, and universal capitalism
The indispensable state
Precapitalist imperialism
The classic age of imperialism
Globalisation and war
Globalisation and imperial hegemony
The contradictions of capitalist imperialism

8. Socialism
The end of the welfare-state ‘compact’
There are no social democrats now
Market-dependence vs. market-enablement
Left-strategies of market-enablement
The political implications of competition
The working class and the struggle for socialism
Class-conflict and the socialist project
Socialism and democracy
The state in classless societies
Liberalism vs. democracy
‘Universal human goods’
The self-emancipation of the working class
The socialist movement
Democracy as an economic mechanism

Bibliography of Works by Ellen Meiksins Wood, 1970–2012

References
Index

Originally published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-the-ellen-meiksins-wood-reader

**END**

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Japan Crisis

THE JAPAN SOCIETY OF POLITICAL ECONOMY – 59th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Japan Society of Political Economy (JSPE)

Declaration on the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake and Fukushima Nuclear Accident

The JSPE expresses its deep condolences to the victims of the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake and the giant tsunami it triggered. We sympathize with those in the disaster area who are still in distress and appreciate the efforts of those engaged in the disaster response, relief, and recovery in that area. Further, we express our deep concern over the ongoing accident at the First Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, its spreading radioactive contamination, and the flaws in the present system of nuclear power plants that the accident has revealed.

The JSPE decided to devote a special plenary session to the problems raised by this disaster on the second morning of the 59th JSPE Annual Conference, which is to be held on September 17 and 18 at the Ikebukuro campus of the Rikkyo University, Tokyo (for details http://www.jspe.gr.jp/drupal/en_cfp2011). Yasuo Goto (Fukushima Univ.), Koji Morioka (Kansai Univ.), and Kiichiro Yagi (Setsunan Univ.) were nominated as its organizers. In the proposed plenary session we plan to discuss the problems jointly based on all the comments and proposals that are directed to the organizers of this session. We hope that this discussion will be a step toward the realization of a new concept in the activities of JSPE. We therefore welcome all opinions presented in the spirit of social science, from members as well as non-members, for this special plenary session. Please send your opinion within 200 to 400 words to the JSPE (Jspecice@jspe.gr.jp) by 10 June.

Even though the scale of the earthquake was well beyond anything anticipated, we as social scientists cannot set our judgment aside by saying that this was an “unprecedented natural disaster.” Concerning the temblor alone, a series of questions promptly emerges: Was sufficient forecasting, warning and prevention provided? Wasn’t a more effective relief system that would have avoided the loss of information at the early stage possible? What was the reason for the vulnerability of the lifeline revealed by this disaster? Has an appropriate system of aid and recovery been established? What form should the economic support for relief, maintenance and recovery take? As for the accident at the nuclear power plant in particular, we cannot avoid asking whether the system and policies that have promoted the use of nuclear energy thus far lie behind the occurrence of the disaster and the apparent delay and helplessness in efforts to deal with it. Nuclear energy policy in Japan has been promoted by a closed circle of the government and the so-called “atomic lobby” of politicians, agents of the atomic energy industry including certain scientists and journalists. Along with the measures taken for disaster prevention and response, the system of policy formation as well should be placed under comprehensive and critical examination. Further, we need plans for the maintenance of industry and daily life under the current condition of electric power shortage, for recovery and its concomitant economic burdens, as well as the future renovation of our industrial economy and finances.

As the Japanese term for economy, or keizai, was derived from a classic term for “managing society and salvaging the life of the people” (keisei saimin), political economy as a discipline is concerned with relieving society and the lives of each of its members from distress and restoring their stability. Political economy as a social science emerged when this task shifted from being one of the arts of rule to a constituent of the self-knowledge of civil society. We believe that all of the researchers who together make up the JSPE are in accord in seeking to deal with this disaster from the viewpoint of social scientists, and to consider the problems associated with this disaster as significant challenges for the development of the theory of political economy.

Executive Board of the Japan Society of Political Economy
April 16, 2011

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World Crisis

BEYOND PRECARIOUS LABOR: RETHINKING SOCIALIST STRATEGIES

A Conference sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics & The Socialist Register

May 12th and 13th, 2011

CUNYGraduateCenter

365Fifth Avenue@34th Street

Free and open to the public; no registration required

Final schedule TBA

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS include:

Gilbert Achcar, Professor of Development Studies and International Relations, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Patrick Bond, Professor and Director of the Centre for Civil Society, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Ursula Huws, Professor of International Labour Studies at the Working Lives Research Institute, London Metropolitan University

Saru Jayaraman, Restaurant Opportunities Center

Leo Panitch, Editor, the Socialist Register

Ai-Jen Poo, Domestic Workers United

Saket Soni, New Orleans Worker Center for Racial Justice

Hilary Wainwright, Co-editor of Red Pepper and Research Director of the New Politics Project of the Transnational Institute, Amsterdam

And many others …

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Education

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION – VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: www.wwwords.co.uk/rcie/content/pdfs/6/issue6_1.asp

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Volume 6 Number 1 2011   ISSN 1745-4999

SPECIAL ISSUE
Girls and Young Women’s Education and Empowerment in Marginalized Regions of the World
Guest Editors: VILMA SEEBERG & KAREN MONKMAN

Karen Monkman. Introduction. Framing Gender, Education and Empowerment

Halla B. Holmarsdottir, Ingrid Birgitte Møller Ekne & Heidi L. Augestad. The Dialectic between Global Gender Goals and Local Empowerment: girls’ education in Southern Sudan and South Africa

Joan DeJaeghere & Soo Kyoung Lee. What Matters for Marginalized Girls and Boys in Bangladesh: a capabilities approach for understanding educational well-being and empowerment

Vilma Seeberg. Schooling, Jobbing, Marrying: what’s a girl to do to make life better? Empowerment Capabilities of Girls at the Margins of Globalization in China

Kristen J. Molyneaux. Uganda’s Universal Secondary Education Policy and its Effect on ‘Empowered’ Women: how reduced income and moonlighting activities differentially impact male and female teachers

Sofie Haug Changezi & Heidi Biseth. Education of Hazara Girls in a Diaspora: education as empowerment and an agent of change

Payal P. Shah. Girls’ Education and Discursive Spaces for Empowerment: perspectives from rural India

Supriya Baily. Speaking Up: contextualizing women’s voices and gatekeepers’ reactions in promoting women’s empowerment in rural India

Mary Ann Maslak. Education, Employment and Empowerment: the case of a young woman in northwestern China

Joshua A. Muskin, Abdelhak Kamime & Abdellah Adlaoui. Empowered to Empower: a civil society-government partnership to increase girls’ junior secondary school outcomes in Morocco

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS: For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor David Phillips (david.phillips@education.ox.ac.uk). Full details concerning the submission of articles can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/RCIE/04.html

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes access to ALL PAST ISSUES) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeRCIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge your Librarian to take out a subscription so that we can provide unrestricted access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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Utopia

APORDE: CALL FOR APPLICATIONS 2011

Call for Applications

APORDE
African Programme on Rethinking Development Economics

5 – 19 May 2011
Johannesburg, South Africa

Supported by
the Department of Trade and Industry of South Africa (the dti), the French Development Agency (AFD), and the French Embassy in South Africa, with the French Institute of South Africa (IFAS)

We are pleased to announce that the fifth edition of the African Programme on Rethinking Development Economics (APORDE) will be held in Johannesburg (South Africa) from the 5th to the 19th of May 2011.

APORDE is a high-level training programme in development economics which aims to build capacity in economics and economic policy-making. The course will run for two weeks and consist of lectures and seminars taught by leading international and African economists. This call is directed at talented African, Asian and Latin American economists, policy makers and civil society activists who, if selected, will be fully funded.

We encourage everyone with an interest in development to read and distribute this call for applications. Please note that we receive many high quality applications and that, as a result, entry into APORDE will be very competitive (only 30 applicants will be selected).

APORDE is a joint initiative of the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), the French Development Agency (AFD) and the French Embassy in South Africa. Alice Amsden (MIT), Thandika Mkandawire (LSE), Michel Aglietta (Institut Universitaire de France), Ha-Joon Chang (University of Cambridge) and Ben Fine (SOAS) are among the lecturers who have taught on the programme. Nicolas Pons-Vignon (CSID, Wits University) is the APORDE Course director.

For more information, visit http://www.aporde.org.za

APORDE is being conducted in a climate when there is much greater contestation of ideas around the possible options for economic development and industrialisation than in many decades. An initiative like APORDE can make a very important contribution in offering us new insights and reflections on the critical questions of building a developmental state and mounting a serious industrial policy.

Dr. Rob Davies, Minister of Trade and Industry, Republic of South Africa

Background
Africa is probably the continent most affected by the poor availability of cutting-edge research and teaching in economics. While only a few African countries have experienced sustained economic development in the past 50 years, African governments and civil societies are weakly equipped to respond critically to external initiatives aimed at their development and to generate endogenous strategies. The tide is, however, gradually turning: in South Africa and in other African countries, the need for “more” (rather than merely “better”, which has often proved to mean “less”) state intervention in economic affairs is increasingly recognised.

Crucially, economic take-off appears bound to remain a pipedream unless it is premised on developmental policy; while South Africa’s DTI is leading the way with its industrial policy, few African decision makers feel equipped to design and implement such policies, a gap which APORDE aims to help filling.

APORDE
APORDE will allow talented academics, policy makers and civil society representatives from Africa, Asia and Latin America to gain access to alternatives to mainstream thinking on development issues and to be equipped in a way that will foster original thinking. Participants will receive intensive high-level training and interact with some of the best development economists in the world and with other participants.

APORDE will cover essential topics in development economics, including industrial policy, inequality, poverty, financial crises and social policy. Lectures will equip participants with key information pertaining to both mainstream and critical approaches. Day lectures will last for three and a half hours, while a number of shorter lectures will also be organised. The programme of the seminar will be communicated at the beginning of 2011 and posted on the APORDE website. For information, the programmes of the first four seminars are available on http://www.aporde.org.za

All costs – travel, accommodation, conference fee and per diem – will be covered for selected applicants.

The seminar will be held in Johannesburg from the 5th to the 19th of May 2011.

The venue will be confirmed at a later stage.

Applications
Applicants must demonstrate first-class intellectual capacity and (at least some) prior knowledge in economics, as well as proficiency in English. However, the objective of APORDE is to draw participants from a broad range of backgrounds; persons who have demonstrated exceptional capacity in their professional lives are invited to apply.

The main body of participants will be drawn from Africa, but we welcome applications from Asians and Latin Americans who have research or work experience related to Africa.

Prospective applicants should send:

* A completed application form (available on http://www.aporde.org.za);
* An official transcript (showing courses taken and grades obtained);
* 2 reference letters, where possible 1 academic and 1 professional, which should be sent directly to aporde@ifas.org.za <mailto:aporde@ifas.org.za> or faxed to +27 11 836 5850;
* Proof of English proficiency for applicants whose main medium of instruction or work is not English. Results of standard English proficiency tests (e.g. TOEFL or IELTS) will be preferable, but other proof may also be accepted (e.g. a sample of written work in English).

Applications, accompanied by a covering letter indicating the applicant’s full contact details (including e-mail address and telephone numbers), should be sent to aporde@ifas.org.za to the attention of Nicolas Pons-Vignon.

The application should actually reach Nicolas Pons-Vignon by Monday 6 December 2010 at midnight at the latest.

Incomplete or late applications will not be considered. Please note that individual acknowledgement of applications will be sent by e-mail only. Candidates will be notified by e-mail of the outcome of their applications at the latest by early March 2011.

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Harvesting

NATURE INC? QUESTIONING THE MARKET PANACEA IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND CONSERVATION

The Second Call for Papers for a conference next year 30 June – 2 July on Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation.

Please consider sending in an abstract, and/or send it on to your networks

Second Call for Papers
Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation

International Conference
30 June – 2 July 2011
ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands

Special guests:  Amita Baviskar (IEG, Delhi University), Nancy Peluso (University of California, Berkeley), Fander Falconi (FLACSO, Former Foreign Minister, Ecuador) and Ton Dietz (University of Leiden)

Nature is dead. Long live Nature™ Inc.! This adagio inspires many environmental policies today. In order to respond to the many environmental problems the world is facing, new and innovative methods are necessary, or so it is argued, and markets are posited as the ideal vehicle to supply these. Indeed, market forces have been finding their way into environmental policy and conservation to a degree that seemed unimaginable only a decade ago. Payments for ecosystem services, biodiversity derivatives and new conservation finance mechanisms, species banking, carbon trade and conservation 2.0 are just some of the market mechanisms that have taken a massive flight in popularity in recent years, despite, or perhaps because of the recent ‘Great Financial Crisis’.

The conference seeks to critically engage with the market panacea in environmental policy and conservation in the context of histories and recent developments in neoliberal capitalism. The conference is steeped in traditions of political economy and political ecology, in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of where environmental policies and conservation in an age of late capitalism come from, are going and what effects they have on natures and peoples.

‘Nature™ Inc’ follows a successful recent conference in Lund, Sweden, in May 2010 and several earlier similar initiatives that have shown the topic to be of great interest to academics, policy-makers and civil society. The present conference is thus meant not only to deepen and share critical knowledge on market-based environmental policies and practices and nature-society relations more generally, but also to strengthen and widen the networks enabling this objective.

 Topics include but are not limited to:
   • General trends in market-based environmental policies and instruments
   • New forms of neoliberal conservation (including web 2.0, species banking, etc)
   • Agro-food systems, the meat-industrial complex, and aquaculture
   • Agro-fuels, energy and climate change
   • The relation between conservation and land (including protected areas, etc.)
   • Financialisation of the environment
   • New social, environmental and peasant movements and left alternatives
   • Accumulation by dispossession, property regimes, and the “new” enclosures
   • Ecological imperialisms, including the recent ‘land grabs’
   • Urban and rural political ecologies and the links between them
   • Theoretical advancements in nature-society relations

Paper proposals are due 15 December 2010. Please send a 250-300 word proposal, with title, contact information, and three keywords as a Word attachment to: nature2011@iss.nl. Proposals for complete panels are welcome.

Conference language is English. Authors will be notified by 15 January 2011. Complete papers are due by 1 April, 2011. More information on: http://www.iss.nl/nature2011 and http://www.worldecologyresearch.org  
 
Organization
The conference is organized by the Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, together with the University of Manchester and the University of Queensland.

Conference organizing committee (OC): Bram Büscher, Murat Arsel, Lorenzo Pellegrini, Max Spoor (ISS, Erasmus University, the Netherlands) Wolfram Dressler (University of Queensland, Australia) Dan Brockington (SERG, Manchester University, UK)

Conference advisory committee (AC): Ben White (ISS, Erasmus University) Patrick Bond (University of KwaZulu Natal) Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck College) Jason W. Moore (Umeå University) Blessing J Karumbidza (Socio-Economic Rights Institute, South Africa) Eric Swyngedouw (SERG, Manchester University) Noel Castree (SERG, Manchester University) Rosaleen Duffy (SERG, Manchester University) Holly Buck (Lund University) Scott Prudham (University of Toronto) Jun Borras (ISS, Erasmus University) Dean Bavington (Nipissing University) Mark Hudson (University of Manitoba)
Jim Igoe (Dartmouth College) Dhoya Snijders (VU University Amsterdam) Caroline Seagle (VU University Amsterdam) Diana C. Gildea (Lund University) Christian Alarcon Ferrari (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) Katja Neves (Concordia University) Roldan Muradian (Nijmegen University)

 ———————————————
Dr. Bram Büscher
Lecturer in Environment & Sustainable Development
International Institute of Social Studies
Erasmus University
Kortenaerkade 12
2518 AX The Hague
The Netherlands
T +31 (0)70 4260 596
buscher@iss.nl
http://www.iss.nl/buscher

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Radical Politics

SPACES OF DEMOCRACY: FORTHCOMING ACTIVITIES

Please see below for details of FIVE forthcoming Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space activities:-

1] SPATIAL JUSTICE: RADICAL SPATIAL FOUNDATIONS
A one-day workshop organised by Chantal Mouffe (node director), The Westminster Centre for the Study of Democracy, and Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, The Westminster International Law & Theory Centre.

Keynote Addresses: David Harvey AND Doreen Massey

Roundtable:
Mustafa Dikec, Engin Isin, Ruth Levitas, Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, David Slater

19th November 2010, 10-6pm, The Pavilion, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 7UW

Admission free but places limited. Please contact Andrea Pavoni at a.pavoni@my.westminster.ac.uk to reserve your seat.

2] During 2009-2011, the new Rutgers University node has organized an extensive university-wide series of nearly two hundred lectures, colloquia, panel discussions, and other events exploring the theme of “Ecologies in the Balance.”
For the current academic year 2010-2011, they have designated eight specific events to inaugurate the Spaces of Democracy initiative at Rutgers.
These are as follows:

Sept 27 Steve Lerner, Research Director, Commonweal
“Sacrifice Zones: The Front Lines of Toxic Chemical Exposure in the US”

Oct 26 Etienne Balibar, Paris X-Nanterre, University of California-Irvine
“Europe: the Final Crisis?

Oct 27 Matthew Jelacic, Architecture, University of Colorado
“Traumatic Urbanization and its Consequences”

Oct 29 Carolyn Finney, Geography, University of California-Berkeley
“There Goes the Neighborhood: Race, Resilience and Environmental Change”

Nov 19 Mazen Labban, Geography, University of Miami
“State, Class, and Oil: Sovereignty Over Natural Resources, Nationalization, and Economic Development in Mexico, 1920-2000”

Feb 9 Ananya Roy, City and Regional Planning, University of California-Berkeley
“The Urban Century: Ecologies and Epistemologies of Dwelling in the Global South”

Feb 23 Daniel Nepstad, Woods Hole Research Institute
“Can Carbon Carry the Global Conservation Agenda?”

March 23 Sharyle Patton, Health and Environment Program, Commonweal
“Our Body Burden of Toxic Chemicals: Implications for Chemical Policy Reform”

For details contact the new Rutgers node Directors: Joanna Regulska and Robert Lake

Joanna Regulska
Professor of Women’s Studies and Geography
Dean of International Programs
School of Arts and Sciences
Rutgers University
77 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA
tel 1-732-932-2699 ext 159
fax 1-732-932-1226
regulska@rci.rutgers.edu

Robert W. Lake
Professor and Graduate Director
Director of the Doctoral Program
Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy
Rutgers University
33 Livingston Avenue, Suite 400
New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA
tel 1-732-932-3133 ext 521
fax 1-732-932-2363
rlake@rutgers.edu>

3] ANANYA ROY ON POVERTY, DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC SCHOLARSHIP: A micro-seminar on the research and activism of ANANYA ROY

(organised by Katharyne Mitchell (node Director University of Washington) and Victoria Lawson at University of Washington).

This includes a public lecture by Ananya Roy: Monday, Oct 11, 6:00pm, Kane Hall; a preliminary seminar on Friday, Oct 8, 2:30 – 5:20pm,

CMU 202 and a concluding seminar on Tuesday, Oct 12, 3:30 – 5:20pm, CMU 202 where there will be a discussion of intersections between public lecture,

Roy’s publications and her public activism and scholarship.

4] CALL FOR PAPERS!!! – Building states and civil societies in Africa: Liberal interventions and global governmentality

Many African states have been subject to donor programmes that place great emphasis on the participation of national and international civil society actors in the formation and implementation of development policy.

Donor policy suggests that the post-Cold War form of civil society is both autonomous from the post-colonial African state, as well as fundamental to the development of responsible liberal democratic states in Africa.

However, a number of studies have documented the emergence of non-state actors that may provide some form of institutional stability but challenge the clear-cut distinction between state and civil society.

Examples include religious organisations, so-called social movements and informal associational practices. This workshop takes as its starting point critical, postcolonial and governmentally derived insights on the limitations of the public/private, state/society, and domestic/international binaries for comprehending African politics and governance.

The aim is to bring together a wide, and sometimes disparate body of research on state-formation and civil society in a post-development context, and to ask whether civil society remains a meaningful term in attempting to understand social, political and economic practices in African societies.

This workshop has been kindly sponsored by the Journal for Intervention and State Building, and the African Studies Association UK.

Papers presented at the workshop will be considered for a special issue of the journal due to be published in 2011/12.

Participants are requested to produce a paper of 7-8,000 words, with Harvard referencing, a month prior to the workshop, and undertake to read and act as a discussant for one other paper, to a facilitate a close engagement with the research presented, and to allow time for 10  papers to be discussed.

Please submit an abstract of 200 words to: Clive Gabay c.gabay@qmul.ac.uk or Carl Death crd@aber.ac.uk by 15 November 2010, with your institutional affiliation.

5] The book WHAT IS RADICAL POLITICS TODAY? (2009) Palgrave-MacMillan, edited by Jonathan Pugh, Newcastle University, is now available for £10 on Amazon.

Including original contributions from Zygmunt Bauman, Will Hutton, Frank Furedi, Clare Short, Ken Worpole, Nick Cohen, Hilary Wainwright, Paul Kingsnorth, Chantal Mouffe, Terrell Carver, Edward W. Soja, David Chandler, Dora Apel, Doreen Massey, Jason Toynbee, James Martin, Michael J. Watts, Jeremy Gilbert and Jo Littler, Gregor McLennan, Tariq Modood, Amir Saeed & David Bates, Alastair Bonnett, Nigel Thrift, Sheila Jasanoff, Saul Newman, David Featherstone, James Heartfield, Alejandro Colás and Jason Edwards, David Boyle, Saskia Sassen.
“Provocative, authoritative and timely …” (New Statesman)

END

For “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network website: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/

For Radical Politics Today magazine: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/publications/magazine/magazine.html

For more on the book What is radical politics today?, published in 2009 by Palgrave MacMillan: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/resources_bookstoread.html

Jonathan Pugh
Senior Academic Fellow
Director “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network
School of Geography, Politics and Sociology
5th Floor Daysh Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
United Kingdom
Honorary Fellow, The Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

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Dharma Initiative

THE RISE AND FALL OF NEOLIBERALISM

The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism: The Collapse of an Economic Order?
London and New York: Zed Books, 2010
Edited by Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Hardback: £70.00   ISBN: 9781848133488
Paperback: £18.99  ISBN: 9781848133495

Book website: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/book.asp?bookdetail=4351 

About the Book

The recent, devastating and ongoing economic crisis has exposed the faultlines in the dominant neoliberal economic order, opening debate for the first time in years on alternative visions that do not subscribe to a ‘free’ market ethic. In particular, the core contradiction at the heart of neoliberalism – that states are necessary for the functioning of free markets – provides us with the opportunity to think again about how we want to organise our economies and societies. The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism presents critical perspectives of neoliberal policies, questions the ideas underpinning neoliberalism, and explores diverse response to it from around the world.

In bringing together the work of distinguished scholars and dedicated activists to question neoliberal hegemony, the book exposes the often fractured and multifarious manifestations of neoliberalism which will have to be challenged to bring about meaningful social change.

What People Have Said About the Book

‘Since the 1970s, the politics of “neoliberalism,” based on the purported concern to minimize state interference in the economy and thus to unleash “free” markets, have been mobilized at various sites and scales across the world economy. This book provides useful intellectual tools for deciphering the ideological, social and institutional foundations of neoliberalism and its wide-ranging implications for the still ongoing regulatory reorganization of capitalism.’ – Neil Brenner, New York University 

‘This is an outstanding book not only because of the sophisticated critiques offered by some of the most highly regarded thinkers on the topic of the destruction and misery wrought through neoliberal capitalism, but also because its forward looking emphasis on a more egalitarian and hopeful future offers insights about the work that needs to be done by activists and scholars alike. Moreover, this book helps us recognize that the emergence of any talk of a post-neoliberal era is premature beyond helping to construct a road map for ways citizens of the world can collectively, and deliberately, move forward.’ – Nik Heynen, University of Georgia

‘This timely and wide ranging book traces the changing contours of neoliberalism, demonstrating how market-oriented policies gave rise to a globally hegemonic political-economic project. The emphasis is on identifying the different forms neoliberalism takes and the diverse responses to it. At a juncture when this political-economic project is under increasing scrutiny from supporters and opponents alike, the book challenges existing conceptions of neoliberalism and makes an important contribution to the reinvigorated search for political alternatives.’ – Wendy Larner, Professor of Human Geography and Sociology, University of Bristol

‘A timely volume on the nature, varied manifestations, and above all limitations of a an economic order that is failing so spectacularly with the financial crisis. Highly recommended for academics, students, or for that matter anyone interested in the politics of our times.’ – Magnus Ryner, Professor of International Relations, Oxford Brookes University.

Table of Contents:
1. Introduction: A World Turned Right-Way Up – Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Part 1: The Rise of Neoliberalism

2. How Neoliberalism Got Where It Is: Elite Planning, Corporate Lobbying and the Release of the Free Market – David Miller

3. Making Neoliberal Order in the United States – Kean Birch and Adam Tickell

4. Neoliberalism, Intellectual Property and the Global Knowledge Economy – David Tyfield

5. Neoliberalism and the Calculable World: The Rise of Carbon Trading – Larry Lohmann

6. Tightening the Web: The World Bank and Enforced Policy Reform – Elisa van Waeyenberge

7. The Corruption Industry and Transition: Neoliberalising Post-Soviet Space? – Adam Swain, Vlad Mykhnenko and Shaun French

8. Remaking the Welfare State: From Safety Net to Trampoline – Julie MacLeavy
Part 2: The Fall of Neoliberalism

9. Zombieconomics: The Living Death of the Dismal Science – Ben Fine

10. From Hegemony to Crisis? The Continuing Ecological Dominance of Neo-Liberalism – Bob Jessop

11. Do It Yourself: A Politics for Changing Our World – Paul Chatterton

12. Dreaming the Real: A Politics of Ethical Spectacles – Paul Routledge

13. Transnational Companies and Transnational Civil Society – Leonith Hinojosa and Anthony Bebbington

14. Defeating Neo-liberalism: A Marxist Internationalist Perspective and Programme – Jean Shaoul

15. Conclusion: The End of an Economic Order? – Vlad Mykhnenko and Kean Birch

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Russian Capitalism

ECONOMICS, POLITICS, ECOLOGY: POST-SOVIET CAPITALISM IN HISTORICAL AND GLOBAL CONTEXT

An International Conference

Moscow, 4-5 September 2010
Sponsors: Praxis Research and Education Center, Moscow; “Ecopolis” and “Alternativy,” Moscow

The purposes of the Conference are: 1) to establish the context of global tendencies in capitalism 2) within this context to discuss the problems of the genesis, nature, contradictions and prospects of the social system in contemporary Russia and other post-Soviet countries 3) to search for alternative paths of social and environmental development.  Contributions to the conference are invited on the following basic themes:

ECONOMY: World economic crisis: cyclical phenomenon or manifestation of system’s decline? Post-Soviet and global capitalism, common and specific features. Place and role of Russia, Ukraine and other ex-Soviet countries in the world capitalist economy under conditions of globalization. Origins of the post-Soviet social system. Transformation of the “really existing socialism”: restoration or change of models of capitalism? Nature and contradictions of post-Soviet capitalism. Historical dynamics of social contradictions and class structure of post-Soviet societies. Conceptual alternatives to the dominating economic order.

POLITICS: Fate of democracy in contemporary world. The international left today: theoretical thought and political practice. Factors of establishment of authoritarian bureaucratic regimes in most of post-Soviet states. Rise of reactionary forces across the world (religious fundamentalism, nationalism etc) and ways of countering them. Is there a danger of (neo)totalitarianism now? Condition of global civil society and problems of social self-organization in ex-Soviet countries. Nature of contemporary military conflicts and post-Soviet states’ participation in them. Reasons for weakness of the left and democratic forces in ex-Soviet countries. Perspectives for anti-totalitarian socialism.

ECOLOGY: The problem of global climate change and climate politics. Socio-political dimension of the ecological crisis. Ecological situation in the present-day world and on post-Soviet space. A search for strategies and tactics of struggle to solve ecological problems. Could sustainable development be possible under capitalism? Condition and prospects of Green movements. Possibilities for a dialogue and cooperation between Green and non-authoritarian left political forces.

The working languages of the conference will be Russian, English and French. Conference fee (for organizational expenses): 40 Euros. Proposals for papers should include brief summary and authors’ CV.

Deadline for submitting proposals is 1 July, 2010. Inexpensive housing available in Moscow apartments.

Contact with the organizing committee: praxiscenter@gmail.com

Website: http://www.praxiscenter.ru

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New Media

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

CALL FOR PAPERS:

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA & SOCIAL CHANGE

Media Annual Conference:

Organised by the School of Social Sciences, Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK

Date: Saturday 8th May 2010

Venue: LT-C101, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

Why this conference?

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers and civil society organisations to discuss youth use of new media and the implication this has on identity construction, public opinion, citizenship and social change. Although their development is a recent phenomenon, new media have not only opened up new opportunities for journalism but also empowered audiences and civil society organisations with unprecedented platforms for ‘free’ expression and social activism around the world. New technologies are said to have reinvigorated a sense of a ‘transnational public sphere’ and strengthened marginalized communities and provided a platform for subcultural groups and the voiceless. The possible consequences of such rapid developments on social and political change are not hard to imagine. The sweeping victory of US president elect Barak Obama (in the latest American presidential elections) characterised by the unprecedented outreach to marginalised communities including the youth through YouTube, Facebook, and other internet platforms is a case in point.

This conference aims to map out the above mentioned phenomena, focusing on the role of new media in the perceived social changes. It debates how audiences, users, civil society organisations, political/social groups and subcultures have understood and found in these technologies the right tools and strategies to power their work sustainably.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– Blogging and bloggers as citizen journalists; are bloggers making a social difference?

– Satellite TV and the internet as cites of resistance/alternative media or sets of ‘censored national enclosures’

-E-campaigning and political/social groups

– How are  activists/the youth interacting with platforms like ‘YouTube’, ‘MySpace’, ‘Flicker’, ‘Faithtube’, ‘Facebook’ and ‘Blogging’ to pursue their objectives?

– Challenges of the Internet in war zones

– The new media and women empowerment amongst ethnic minorities.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– In the absence of real democracy in some parts of the Arab and Muslim world is new media creating a new form of social/political capital: e-democracy?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in mobilising public opinion?

– What expectations and perceptions are there regarding changes in cultural and political values?

Attendance: Participation in this conference will be open to academics, researchers, policy makers, government agencies, youth workers, students, parents and other members of the public.

Fees: £35 waged; £10 non-waged and students

Call for submissions: Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 30th November 2009. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s). Deadline for full papers is 10th April 2010.

Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Contact: Please send all submissions and enquiries to:

Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator),

Senior Lecturer in Media & Sociology

School of Social Sciences

University of Northampton

Park Campus

NORTHAMPTON

NN2 7AL

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1604892104

E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk + www.northampton.ac.uk

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Crisis Theory

Crisis Theory

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND THE CURRENT CRISIS

 

Call for Papers

A Special Issue of tripleC (http://www.triple-c.at): Information and Communication Technologies and the Current Crisis: How Are They Connected?

The Crisis that began in 2007 continues to convulse the world. Labelled by some as merely a recession, yet it is associated with dramatic changes in national and global power. Others frame the Crisis as merely a consequence of over-promoting a narrow range of financial transactions associated with subprime mortgage instruments. These were indeed overly aggressively oversold by deregulated bankers, but this was likely only an important trigger of the Crisis, not the primary cause.

In this special issue, we will explore the notion that much of the basis of the Crisis should be assigned to financial transactions not just made possible but also strongly afforded by use of computer technologies. Thus, those operating at the highest levels of algorithmic capacity bear substantial responsibility for the Crisis.

For students of technological innovation and diffusion, many questions emerge about the connection between the Crisis in general and computerization. Some of the questions involve the tight relationship between cultures of technological empowerment and financial elites. Others questions, while appearing initially to be purely economic, turn out on examination to articulate strongly with the public interest, civil society, policymaking, and public discourse more generally.

These in turn lead to further, perhaps quite new critical questions about the emerging relationships between capitalism, democracy and the data-information-knowledge-technology nexus. Thus, equally important for responsibility is specification of what is known within computer science about the technological dimensions of the Crisis of this crisis. Ultimately, a rethinking of the very notion of “crisis” itself may be needed.

Some specific questions authors may choose to address include:

* What kind of crisis is this, how is it different from previous ones, how are these differences related to automated ICTs and the changed practices they have afforded?

* What role do computer professionals have in the crisis?

* Does this crisis suggest a dystopian post-human future?

* What media theories best explain the crisis, or has the time arrived for newly radical approaches in this area?

* How does public policy fit in the private world of computerization?

* What historical guides are available as tools to foster better analyses of technological crisis?

* Will the BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China) be the “winners” of this crisis?

* Are there artistic innovations that help refine political and policy responses to this crisis?

* What new knowledge innovations are needed to understand the forces at work in this crisis and its implications for democracy?

* What new questions need to be addressed to orientate research about the crisis?

* How are the computing-, information-, and media-industries affected by this crisis? How will they develop in the future?

This special issue of tripleC is intended to feature research from both theoretical and practical perspectives. We seek contributions from any theoretical, professional, or disciplinary perspective that offers innovative analysis that promotes debate about technology and the Crisis.

Submission deadline: Full papers should be submitted until October 31st, 2009. All papers will be peer reviewed. The special issue will be published in spring 2010. 

tripleC – Cognition, Communication, Co-operation: Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society (http://www.triple-c.at) promotes contributions within an emerging science of the information age with a special interest in critical studies following the highest standards of peer review.

Submissions must be formatted according to tripleC’s guidelines: http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, make use of APA style, and use the style template: http://triplec.at/files/journals/1/template-0.dot. Papers should be submitted online by making use of the electronic submission system: http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/user/register, http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/login). When submitting to the electronic system, please select “Special issue on crisis & communication” as the journal’s section.

ISSUE CO-EDITORS: David Hakken (dhakken@indiana.edu) and Marcus Breen (m.breen@neu.edu)

David Hakken is professor of informatics at Indiana University. Marcus Breen is associate professor of communication studies at Northeastern University.

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Sextures

QUERYING SEXUAL CITIZENSHIPS: DIFFERENCE, SOCIAL IMAGINARIES AND EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP 

‘Harbingers of death’, ‘the shame and ruin of humanity’, ‘anti-life’, ‘threat to the survival of the human race’, ‘moral and physical cripples’, and ‘vampires sucking the life blood of the nation’ are only some of the images of radical alterity invoked and regularly rehearsed by major political figures in post-socialist European countries when faced with native lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual and queer (LGBTQ) claims to citizenship. Citizenship, understood here as the practicing of social, cultural, political and economic rights, and the active involvement in the organized life of a political community, is still firmly tied in most countries of Central and Eastern Europe to a heteropatriarchal social imaginary in which the nation continues to be metaphorically configured as the exclusive home of the traditional heterosexual family – the purveyor of pure ethnic bloodlines based on rigid asymmetrical power system of gender relations. The conflation of heterosexism with ethnic nationalism that permeates this imaginary also fuels a vicious politics of national belonging where the use of highly inflammatory, offensive and dehumanising language has led to a dramatic increase in violence against members of various sexual minorities, which in turn has resulted in the effective silencing of queer voices in the public sphere and the paradoxical feeling that sexually different people were somehow ‘more free’ under the previous regime.The Amsterdam Treaty, a legal document attempting to define the evolving concept of European citizenship, intends to temper the current trend of hyper-nationalist integration into ‘Europe of nations’ by moving to a vision of Europe of (individual) citizens. The Treaty, particularly Article 13, clearly states that the respect for human rights and the principle of non-discrimination based on sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation forms the basis of 21st century European citizenship. However, many new member-states of the EU and candidate-countries blatantly and proudly flout their human rights obligations derived from their (current or future) accession into the EU and continue to devise a raft of laws and policies denying basic human and citizenship rights to lesbians, gays, transsexuals and queers, including the right to assembly and free expression.

Deep historical distrust in identity based organizations and identity politics, a weak civil society, a fragile rule of law, and the ignorance about, or unpreparedness to use, the legal and political instruments of European citizenship, create a very unique set of challenges for LGBTQ people in post-socialist Europe on their road to freedom and equality. Transnational LGBTQ rights movements arising from the institutional, legal, social, political, economic and intellectual successes of the gay, lesbian and queer movements in Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand become increasingly aware that a western model of sexual politics and citizenship based on political and economic (capitalist) liberalism is simply unworkable in post-socialist Europe.

Given this context, SEXTURES invites theoretical, conceptual and empirical essays from scholars of all disciplines (philosophy, women’s studies, gay and lesbian studies, Slavonic/Eastern European/ Balkan studies, cultural studies, sociology, geography, anthropology, political science, history, and comparative literatures) who are working on topics related to gender, sexuality and citizenship in post-socialist Europe.

We are particularly interested in inter- and transdisciplinary essays, critically drawing from feminist, gay and lesbian, transsexual, queer, postcolonial and critical race theories, that examine the concept of (sexual) citizenship in all its complexity; from being a social relationship inflected by intersecting sexual, gender, ethnic, national, class and religious identities; positioning across various cross-cutting social hierarchies; cultural assumptions about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ citizens and ‘humans’ and ‘aliens’; to institutional practices of active discrimination and marginalization, and a sense and politics of belonging to an imagined community like the nation or  ‘united Europe’.

We welcome thoughtful philosophical reflections on the relationship between ideology, utopia and European citizenship with a particular emphasis on the productive function of the social imaginary as understood, for example, by Deleuze and Ricoeur. In this context, we particularly encourage submissions examining the promises and limits of the concepts of ‘flexible’ or ‘nomadic’ citizenship for lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transsexuals, and queers living in post-socialist Europe.

We are also interested in empirically grounded close examinations of actual practices of social belonging (or non-belonging) as lived by ordinary LGBTQ people in a number of everyday social situations at home, school, work, dealing with the state, etc. In this context, we welcome submissions that explore the emotional dynamic, and the cultural politics of emotions, played out in these situations.

While we focus on Central and Eastern Europe, we welcome submissions that cover issues of sexual citizenship in other parts of the world.

Submissions should be no longer than 8000 words. Please consult our guide for contributors when preparing your manuscripts. The guide can be found at http://www.sextures.net/guidelines-for-contributors. Deadline for submission of papers is 2 June 2009.

About the Journal

Sextures is a refereed international, independent, transdisciplinary electronic scholarly journal that aims to provide a forum for open intellectual debate across the arts, humanities and social sciences about all aspects affecting the intricate connections between politics, culture and sexuality primarily, but not exclusively, in the Balkans, Eastern and Central Europe. It is published in English twice a year. Sextures is dedicated to fast turnaround of submitted papers. We expect this special issue to be published in September 2009. More information about the journal can be found on its website: http://www.sexturesnet.

Please direct all inquiries regarding this special issue or send manuscripts to:


Dr Alexander Lambevski

Founding Editor and Publisher

alex@sextures.net, editor@sextures.net

http://www.sextures.net

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