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Karl Marx

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE 2010

Extended Abstract Deadline

Due to high demand, the deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2010 Historical Materialism Conference in London has now been extended to 1 JULY 2010. This will be the last extension.

‘Crisis and Critique’: Historical Materialism Annual London Conference 2010,

Central London, Thursday 11th to Sunday 14th November*

Call for Papers

Notwithstanding repeated invocations of the ‘green shoots of recovery’, the effects of the economic crisis that began in 2008 continue to be felt around the world. While some central tenets of the neoliberal project have been called into question, bank bailouts, cuts to public services and attacks on working people’s lives demonstrate that the ruling order remains capable of imposing its agenda. Many significant Marxist analyses have already been produced of the origins, forms and prospects of the crisis, and we look forward to furthering these debates at HM London 2010. We also aim to encourage dialogue between the critique of political economy and other modes of criticism – ideological, political, aesthetic, philosophical – central to the Marxist tradition.

In the 1930s, Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht projected a journal to be called ‘Crisis and Critique’. In very different times, but in a similar spirit, HM London 2010 aims to serve as a forum for dialogue, interaction and debate between different strands of critical-Marxist theory. Whether their focus is the study of the capitalist mode of production’s theoretical and practical foundations, the unmasking of its ideological forms of legitimation or its political negation, we are convinced that a renewed and politically effective Marxism will need to rely on all the resources of critique in the years ahead. Crises produce periods of ideological and political uncertainty. They are moments that put into question established cognitive and disciplinary compartmentalisations, and require a recomposition at the level of both theory and practice. HM London 2010 hopes to contribute to a broader dialogue on the Left aimed at such a recomposition, one of whose prerequisites remains the young Marx’s call for the ‘ruthless criticism of all that exists’.

We are seeking papers that respond to the current crisis from a range of Marxist perspectives, but also submissions that try to think about crisis and critique in their widest ramifications. HM will also consider proposals on themes and topics of interest to critical-Marxist theory not directly linked to the call for papers (we particularly welcome contributions on non-Western Marxism and on empirical enquiries employing Marxist methods).

While Historical Materialism is happy to receive proposals for panels, the editorial board reserves the right to change the composition of panels or to reject individual papers from panel proposals. We also expect all participants to attend the whole conference and not simply make ‘cameo’ appearances. We cannot accommodate special requests for specific slots or days, except in highly exceptional circumstances.

*Please note that, in order to allow for expected demand, this year the conference will be three and a half days’ long, starting on the Thursday afternoon.

Please submit a title and abstract of between 200 and 300 words by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual7/submit by 1 JULY 2010

Possible themes include:

•       Crisis and left recomposition

•       Critique and crisis in the global south

•       Anti-racist critique

•       Marxist and non-Marxist theories of crisis

•       Capitalist and anti-capitalist uses of the crisis

•       Global dimensions of the crisis

•       Comparative and historical accounts of capitalist crisis

•       Ecological and economic crisis

•       Critical theory today

•       Finance and the crisis

•       Neoliberalism and legitimation crisis

•       Negation and negativity

•       Feminism and critique

•       Political imaginaries of crisis and catastrophe

•       The critique of everyday life (Lefebvre, the Situationists etc.)

•       The idea of critique in Marx, his predecessors and contemporaries

•       Art criticism, political critique and the critique of political economy

•       Geography and crisis, geography and the critique of political economy

•       Right-wing movements and crisis

•       Critiques of the concept of crisis

•       New forms of critique in the social and human sciences

•       Aesthetic critique

•       Marxist literary and cultural criticism

•       Reports on recent evolution of former USSR countries and China

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Chinese Revolution

THE TRAGEDY OF THE CHINESE REVOLUTION

New from Haymarket Books:

The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution
By Harold R. Isaacs

Introduction by Leon Trotsky

MOST ACCOUNTS OF the modern Chinese state begin with Mao’s 1949 Revolution; but to understand how the contest for power in one of the world’s most controversial nations began, it is necessary to look further back. In The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution, Isaac’s classic work of Marxist scholarship, the story of a promising struggle of workers and peasants for genuine self-government in 1925-27 is masterfully reclaimed. The defeat of their fight for socialism from below profoundly shaped the course of China’s development thereafter, in which the crude and illegitimate formulation of socialism from above became the order of the day. Originally published in 1938, The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution makes an important contribution to discussions of the developing clash between China and other international powers, as well as to the country’s enigmatic internal conflicts.

HAROLD R. ISAACS was a Marxist historian who identified closely with Trotsky’s critique of the Soviet Union’s degeneration under the control of an authoritarian Stalinist bureaucracy.

ORDERING INFORMATION
Haymarket Books
Amazon
Indiebound

Desk/Exam copy requests: We are pleased to provide exam copies to University professors teaching related courses, for a flat rate of $5. Requests can be paid by check or credit card, and submitted on a university letterhead via the methods below.

Mail: Haymarket Books, P.O. Box 180165, Chicago, IL 60618
Email: info@haymarketbooks.org
Fax: 773-583-6144

Interview/Review copy requests:

If you are interested in reviewing The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution, please contact: Sarah Macaraeg at sarah@haymarketbooks.org.

The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution
By Harold R. Isaacs
March 2009
ISBN: 9781931859844
Paperback
$24.00
RELATED TITLES
History of The Russian Revolution
By Leon Trotsky

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Karl Marx

MARX AT THE MARGINS – KEVIN B. ANDERSON

Kevin B. Anderson
Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies

336 pages,
6 x 9
© 2010
Cloth $66.00
ISBN: 9780226019826
Published May 2010
Paper $22.50
ISBN: 9780226019833
Published May 2010

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/presssite/metadata.epl?mode=synopsis&isbn=9780226019833

http://www.amazon.com/Marx-Margins-Nationalism-Ethnicity-Non-Western/dp/0226019837/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265048394&sr=1-1

In Marx at the Margins, Kevin Anderson uncovers a variety of extensive but neglected texts by the well-known political economist which cast what we thought we knew about his work in a startlingly different light. Analyzing a variety of Marx’s writings, including journalistic work written for the New York Tribune, Anderson presents us with a Marx quite at odds with our conventional interpretations. Rather than providing us with an account of Marx as an exclusively class-based thinker, Anderson here offers a portrait of Marx for the twenty-first century: a global theorist whose social critique was sensitive to the varieties of human social and historical development, including not just class, but nationalism, race, and ethnicity, as well.

Marx at the Margins ultimately argues that alongside his overarching critique of capital, Marx created a theory of history that was multi-layered and not easily reduced to a single model of development or revolution. Through highly-informed readings on work ranging from Marx’s unpublished 1879–82 notebooks to his passionate writings about the antislavery cause in the United States, this volume delivers a groundbreaking and canon-changing vision of Karl Marx that is sure to provoke lively debate in Marxist scholarship and beyond.

CONTENTS:

Acknowledgments

List of Abbreviations

Introduction

1. Colonial Encounters in the 1850s: The European Impact on India, Indonesia, and China

2. Russia and Poland: The Relationship of National Emancipation to Revolution

3. Race, Class, and Slavery: The Civil War as a Second American Revolution

4. Ireland: Nationalism, Class, and the Labor Movement

5. From the Grundrisse to Capital: Multilinear Themes

6. Late Writings on Non-Western and Precapitalist Societies

Conclusion

Appendix: The Vicissitudes of the Marx-Engels Gesamtausgabe from the 1920s to Today

Notes

References

Kevin B. Anderson is professor of sociology and political science at the University of California–Santa Barbara and most recently, with Janet Afary, the co-author of ‘Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism’, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Kevin B. Anderson at: http://www.kevin-anderson.com/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Karl Marx

CRISIS AND CRITIQUE: HISTORICAL MATERIALISM ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2010

Central London, Thursday 11th to Sunday 14th November*

Call for Papers

Submission and Abstract Deadline: 1 June 2010

Notwithstanding repeated invocations of the ‘green shoots of recovery’, the effects of the economic crisis that began in 2008 continue to be felt around the world. While some central tenets of the neoliberal project have been called into question, bank bailouts, cuts to public services and attacks on working people’s lives demonstrate that the ruling order remains capable of imposing its agenda. Many significant Marxist analyses have already been produced of the origins, forms and prospects of the crisis, and we look forward to furthering these debates at HM London 2010. We also aim to encourage dialogue between the critique of political economy and other modes of criticism – ideological, political, aesthetic, philosophical – central to the Marxist tradition.

In the 1930s, Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht projected a journal to be called ‘Crisis and Critique’. In very different times, but in a similar spirit, HM London 2010 aims to serve as a forum for dialogue, interaction and debate between different strands of critical-Marxist theory. Whether their focus is the study of the capitalist mode of production’s theoretical and practical foundations, the unmasking of its ideological forms of legitimation or its political negation, we are convinced that a renewed and politically effective Marxism will need to rely on all the resources of critique in the years ahead. Crises produce periods of ideological and political uncertainty. They are moments that put into question established cognitive and disciplinary compartmentalisations, and require a recomposition at the level of both theory and practice. HM London 2010 hopes to contribute to a broader dialogue on the Left aimed at such a recomposition, one of whose prerequisites remains the young Marx’s call for the ‘ruthless criticism of all that exists’.

We are seeking papers that respond to the current crisis from a range of Marxist perspectives, but also submissions that try to think about crisis and critique in their widest ramifications. HM will also consider proposals on themes and topics of interest to critical-Marxist theory not directly linked to the call for papers (we particularly welcome contributions on non-Western Marxism and on empirical enquiries employing Marxist methods).

While Historical Materialism is happy to receive proposals for panels, the editorial board reserves the right to change the composition of panels or to reject individual papers from panel proposals. We also expect all participants to attend the whole conference and not simply make ‘cameo’ appearances. We cannot accommodate special requests for specific slots or days, except in highly exceptional circumstances.

*Please note that, in order to allow for expected demand, this year the conference will be three and a half days’ long, starting on the Thursday afternoon.

Please submit a title and abstract of between 200 and 300 words by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual7/submit by 1 June 2010

Possible themes include:
        •       Crisis and left recomposition
        •       Critique and crisis in the global south
        •       Anti-racist critique
        •       Marxist and non-Marxist theories of crisis
        •       Capitalist and anti-capitalist uses of the crisis
        •       Global dimensions of the crisis
        •       Comparative and historical accounts of capitalist crisis
        •       Ecological and economic crisis
        •       Critical theory today
        •       Finance and the crisis
        •       Neoliberalism and legitimation crisis
        •       Negation and negativity
        •       Feminism and critique
        •       Political imaginaries of crisis and catastrophe
        •       The critique of everyday life (Lefebvre, the situationists etc.)
        •       The idea of critique in Marx, his predecessors and contemporaries
        •       Art criticism, political critique and the critique of political economy
        •       Geography and crisis, geography and the critique of political economy
        •       Right-wing movements and crisis
        •       Critiques of the concept of crisis
        •       New forms of critique in the social and human sciences
        •       Aesthetic critique
        •       Marxist literary and cultural criticism
        •       Reports on recent evolution of former USSR countries and China

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Harvesting

Harvesting

AGRARIAN CHANGE SEMINARS 2009

 

Journal of Agrarian Change and Department of Development Studies,
School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), University of London, Room 4421 (fourth floor, main building), SOAS

15 October, 5.15 pm

The agricultural workers movement, Naxalism and martyrdom in Bihar: the case of Manju devi

Nicolas Jaoul (Paris)

22 October, 5.15 pm

Issues in farmer – commercial buyer relationships and trade practices in Uganda – recent empirical findings

Joerg Wigratz (Sheffield)

5 November, 5.15 pm

Labour migration from rural to urban China

Jan Breman (Amsterdam)

26 November, 5.15 pm

Ecology and Accumulation Crisis: Food, Factories, and Fuel in the Making and Unmaking of Neoliberalism, 1973-2015

Jason Moore (University of North Carolina and Lund)

27/28/29 November: day, time and room to be confirmed

Historical Materialism conference: panel on Agrarian Change in Contemporary Capitalism: Technical Dynamics and Environmental Trajectories

Les Levidow (Open University), Peter Mollinga (Bonn), Jason Moore (UNC
and Lund), Phil Woodhouse (Manchester), chair Henry Bernstein (SOAS)

3 December, 5.15 pm

More poverty, more class, and more gender? Rural labour markets in Tanzania 20 years after Sender and Smith

Bernd Mueller (SOAS)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Global Capitalism

Global Capitalism

WHAT IS THE COMMON?

 

An International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

10-11 October 2009, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Submission  deadline: September 5
Contact: info@kurrents.org

Keynotes: David Harvey, Yitzhak Laor, Jacques Rancière, Antonio Negri (unconfirmed)

New Sessions
• The Iranian Revolution 30 Years Later
• Constructing the Common in Contemporary China
• Conflictual Democracy and Institutional Production of Space

In the shadow of the global crisis of capitalism, the common, somehow obliterated in the recent past, has emerged as an indispensable and central notion. The conference addresses this notion both as a real movement and as an already present horizon, a dynamic principle, for societal life. It is a critical topic today, not only because the public, administrated by the state, is reduced to expendable assets for regulating a supposedly self-regulating machine called Market, but more importantly because the emerging forms of the common impose themselves with an unprecedented acuity and in opposition to the doxa of the private property.

The common refers not only to primary resources, such as water or ecological conditions on a planetary level, but it is at the same time a political force that traverses diverse fields of tension such as art and culture, law and gender relations. The question “What is the Common?” is addressed as a real agenda that conditions the thought. The conference is a program that extends over 4 years. Each year will treat two themes. The conference 2009 will welcome papers related to the following two axes:
1. The Common and the Economy
Which are the specific emerging forms of the common today and what defines its relation to the material conditions of production of values in contemporary capitalism? Under this axis, both theoretical discussions and case-specific investigations in areas such as autonomous popular organisations, regional movements or global changes in one specific economic sector are welcome.

2. The Philosophical Understanding of what the Common Is
The common has since Plato’s Republic been a central question for the philosophical thinking. What is the relation or non-relation between the common and the totality of social relations? In which form and based upon what ontological or existential categories does it emerge? What is the difference between the common as the name of a real movement and the nostalgies of the return to a simple life?

Submission Guidelines:
We are welcoming papers from all disciplines regardless of academic affiliation or other background. All Interested researchers are required to submit an abstract of no more than 500 words, not later than September 15. Submissions via email must be in MS Word, RTF, or PDF format. Presentations will be given in English. Presenters will each be given 30 minutes for their presentation, followed by a 15 minutes discussion with the floor. Each session will be appointed a chair. Please specify if you are interested to chair a session. Number of sessions are limited to 8. If accepted, you will be required to provide a complete version of your 10-15 page double-spaced paper by January 1, 2010. Your abstract should not include your name, but do include the following on a separate page: Name, paper title, affiliation (university, other), email address. 

Submissions should be sent either by electronic mail to: info@kurrents.org or as a paper copy to: Sylva Frisk, School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Box 700, SE-405 30 Goteborg, Sweden.

About the Organization:
The conference is organized upon an original proposal by Dr Dariush Moaven Doust. He is also responsible for the organization of the conference and the head of the Scientific committee in which Tomas Jonsson, researcher at CEFOS, Professor emeritus Sven-Eric Liedman, History of Ideas, Professor Lennart Nilsson, CEFOS, Professor emeritus Jan Ling, Sylva Frisk, Director of Studies at the School of Global Studies participate. The host for the conference is the School of Global Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences.

Web site: http://www.kurrents.org/

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The Geopolitics of Global Energy: International Competition, Rivalry and Conflict

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/polsoc/news/thegeopoliticsofglobalenergy

The Geopolitics of Global Energy: International Competition, Rivalry and Conflict
An International Workshop on 28-29 May 2009, Birkbeck College, University of London

For further information and free registration please contact: a.colas@bbk.ac.uk

 

In recent years questions surrounding energy security have become the focus of international security and global politics. A number of issues have been central to these debates:

 
    • The impact of high energy prices on economic development and 
political stability within states
    • The dependence of industrialised states on sources of energy from 
unstable geopolitical zones
    • The role of states in securing access to and control of energy 
resources
    • The relationship between commercial energy producers and 
distributors to governments
    • The geopolitical consequences of the increased leverage of energy 
producing states
    • The international political and geopolitical consequences of the 
competition amongst states to secure access to and control of energy resources

This workshop brings together a number of international specialists on energy security and geopolitics in order to shed further theoretical and empirical light on contemporary resource competition and rivalry, especially – though not exclusively – between the West and its Eurasian contenders. In particular the workshop will compare and contrast the strategies and policies of states in the Europe, the Americas, East Asia and Africa, as both producers and consumers of energy. It seeks, additionally, to explore with greater rigour and precision the meaning and purchase of the ‘geopolitical’ turn in contemporary international studies.

 

Programme:

 

Mark BASSIN, University of Birmingham – ‘Energy and the Geopolitics of Russian Neo-Imperialism’

Cyrus BINA, University of Minnesota, USA – ‘Oil: The Geopolitics of Energy in the Epoch of Globalization’

Klaus DODDS, Royal Holloway, University of London – ‘The Arctic in the Global Imagination: Geopolitics, Resources, and Environment’

Dominick JENKINS, formerly of Greenpeace, London – ‘Churchill, Oil and the Royal Navy’

Ray KIELY, Queen Mary, University of London – ‘Theories of Imperialism, Contemporary Geopolitics and the Rise of China’

Kees VAN DER PIJL, University of Sussex – ‘The West, Georgia and Russia-Rearticulating Politics and Economics’

Gonzalo POZO-MARTIN, School of Slavonic and East-European Studies, University of London – ‘Inflammable Politics: Russia, Ukraine and NATO Enlargement’

Sam RAPHAEL, University of Kingston – ‘US Empire and the Control of Oil: Lessons from the Caspian Basin’

Doug STOKES, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Kent – ‘Unpacking the Logics of the US Global Oil Order’

Javier VADELL, Catholic University, Belo Horizonte, Minais Gerais, Brazil – ‘The Chinese Economic Penetration of South America and the US Response’

Paris YEROS, Catholic University, Belo Horizonte, Minais Gerais, Brazil – ‘Emergent (Sub) Imperialisms: The New Scramblers for Africa’s Energy and Minerals’

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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