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Henry Giroux

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 1, 2010

Now available at
http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/8/issue8_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 8 Number 1 2010, ISSN 1478-2103

Henry A. Giroux. Zombie Politics and Other Late Modern Monstrosities in the Age of Disposability

Sigrid Haunberger. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

Brian McKenna. Exposing Environmental Health Deception as a Government Whistleblower: turning critical ethnography into public pedagogy

John Opute. Managing Reward in Developing Economies: the challenge for multinational corporations

Alex Means & Kendall Taylor. Assessing the Debt: George W. Bush’s legacy and the future of public education under Barack Obama

Mark T. Yates & Richard D. Lakes. After Pell Grants: the neoliberal assault on prisoners

Khalida Tanvir Syed. Storied Understandings: bringing Aboriginal voices to Canada’s multicultural discourse

Stuart Tannock. Learning to Plunder: global education, global inequality and the global city

Janet Mansfield. ‘Literacies’ in the Arts: a new order of presence

D. Brent Edwards Jr. Trends in Governance and Decision-Making: a democratic analysis with attention to application in education

Tina (A. C.) Besley. Digitized Youth: constructing identities in the creative knowledge economy

OCCASIONAL THOUGHTS

Henry A. Giroux. Torturing Children: Bush’s legacy and democracy’s failure

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Dave Hill

STATEMENT AND EDUCATION POLICY MANIFESTO – BY DAVE HILL

Statement and Education Policy Manifesto by Dave Hill

Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition Parliamentary Candidate for Brighton Kemptown

Details at: http://www.brightontusc.blogspot.com

I have spent my lifetime as a teacher in ‘challenging’ primary and secondary schools, in teacher ‘training’ and in universities trying to tackle inequalities in schooling: inequalities that result in millions of working class children having far less educational opportunities – and subsequently, usually lower paid jobs – than the children of richer parents; especially the 7% who go to private schools – and snap up most of the highest paid, elite, jobs.

The very choice of what and how it should be taught, how and what schooling should be organised, how it should be funded, and where and how the funding should be targeted, and a consideration of ‘who wins and who loses’ through all of the above, are all intensely political. And we want that politics to be in the interests of the millions not the millionaires!

I come from a working class family brought up in some poverty: for example on free School Meals (like a million others!) in St. Martins’ St., off the Lewes Rd., Brighton. I went to Westlain Grammar School, my brothers to under-funded secondary modern schools, such as Queens Park and Moulscoomb. Three times as much was spent on the education of grammar school students than on Secondary Modern students! My children went to local state schools. The inequalities I have witnessed – and lived – as a child, as a teacher and socialist political activist, have led me to spending my life fighting for greater equality in education and society, and against racism, sexism and against homophobia.

What an indictment of our divisive education system that students from private schools are 25 times more likely to get to one of the top British universities than those who come from a lower social class or live in a poor area! And that (in 2008) only 35% of pupils eligible for free school meals obtained five or more A* to C GCSE grades; compared with 63% of pupils from wealthier backgrounds.  This stark education inequality mirrors that in our grossly unequal society.

It is incredible, actually it is only too believable, in Britain today, that the richest section of society has 17 years of healthy life more than the least well-off in society. The minimum wage should be raised by 50%. How can people – decent hard working people like some in my own family, live on take-home pay of less than £200 a week! And there should be a maximum wage, too! Nobody, banker, boss, or buy-out bully, should be on more than £250,000 a year. This figure should reduce progressively so that within 10 years no-one is taking more than four times the average wage, nobody should be creaming off £27 million or £67 million a year for example! Certainly not when there are 4 million children living in poverty! I was once one of them. I was helped by the welfare state. We need our public services.  We need to improve them, not cut them; not attack them.

All three parties, New Labour, Lib Dem, and Tory, dance to the music of big business. All are promising cuts. Whatever they say, those cuts will hit schools, children, and the quality of education in our state schools. Already we are seeing staff cuts and course closures in universities up and down the country. In Brighton, for example, both Brighton and Sussex Universities are promising to cut out the nurseries, and Sussex to chop over 100 jobs. Brighton University is proposing to cut its Adult Ed art courses. Vandalism! Cutting popular and widely used public services!

And don’t believe cuts are necessary. They’re not! Cutting the Trident nuclear submarine replacement programme, bringing troops home from Afghanistan and Iraq, stopping the Identity Card programme, and collecting even some even of the £120 billion in taxes unpaid by the rich… yes, £120 billion!…would mean cuts are not necessary at all!

But you won’t hear that from the other parties, just from Socialists, like the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition, and from Respect.

A Socialist Manifesto for Education is:

[1] Cut class sizes (they are currently some of the largest in the rich world- much larger than in private schools for example). According to OECD research Britain is 23rd out of 30 developed countries in terms of large class size. Other countries such as Finland have a maximum class size of 20. Finland is widely seen as providing an extremely high quality of education. For a maximum class size of 20 by 2020 in both primary and secondary schools!

[2] Abolish league tables and abolish SATS (some external testing is necessary, but SATS so very often restricts teaching to ‘teaching to the test’, and results in undue stress (and an increase in bedwetting, compared to the pre-SATS era, for example).

[3] Restore local democratic control of ‘Academies’. They should be run by the democratically elected local councils, and keep to national pay and conditions agreements. Why should rich businessmen and women take control of any of our schools? Let’s keep the added investment- but it’s the government that pays for that added investment anyhow! Let’s keep and enhance the added investment, but distribute it fairly between all schools. Our schools and the children in them are not for sale! Nor, through uneven funding for different types of school (e.g. Academies) should some schools be set up for success at the expense of others being set up (and under-funded) for relative failure.

[4] Private profiteering out of our schools! Bring the education services hived off to private profiteers back into either national or local private ownership! These include Ofsted, Student grants, school meals, cleaning and caretaking.

[5] Free, nutritious, balanced school meals for every child to combat poor diets, obesity, and… yes… for some children… hunger!

[6] Restore free adult education classes in pastime and leisure studies as well as in vocational training/ studies

[7] Restore free, state-funded residential centres and Youth Centres/Youth clubs for our children so they can widen their experiences of life in safe circumstances and enhance their education beyond the confines of the home or city.

[8] For a fully Comprehensive Secondary School system; so that each school has a broad social class mix and mix of ability and attainment levels. 

[9] For the integration of Private schools into the state education system – so that the goodies of the private school system are shared amongst all pupils/ students. All schools to be under democratic locally elected local council control. No to Private Schools. No to religious groups running schools. No to big business / private capital running our schools and children! 

[10] Free up the curriculum so there can be more creativity and cross-subject/ disciplinary work.

[11] Get Ofsted and their flawed tick-box system off the back of teachers. The results of Ofsted are to penalise even the best schools (outstanding in every aspect- other than in SATS attainments) in the poorest areas.

[12] Encourage Critical Thinking across the curriculum. Teach children not ‘what to think’, but ‘how to think’: including how to think critically about the media and politicians.

[13] Teach in schools for ecological literacy and a readiness to act for environmental justice as well as economic and social justice. Encourage children to ‘reach for the stars’ – and to work for a society that lets that happen – a fairer society with much more equal chances, pay packets and power, and about environmental and sustainability issues.  

[14] Proper recognition of all school workers, and no compulsory redundancies. For teachers, secretarial and support staff, teaching assistants, school meals supervisory assistants, caretaking staff, there should be workplace democratic regular school forums in every school. Regarding jobs (for example the threatened job cuts at Sussex University – and the ‘inevitable’ job cuts in every? school after the election – and no compulsory redundancies – any restructuring to be conditional on agreement with the trade unions.

[15] Setting up of school councils – to encourage democratic understanding, citizenship, social responsibility, and a welcoming and valuing of ‘student/pupil voice’.

[16] Ensuring that schools are anti-racist, anti-sexist and anti-homophobic – making sure schools encourage equality, welcoming different home and group cultures. As part of this, anti-bullying practices in every school must be fully implemented, to combat bullying of all sorts, including racism, sexism, homophobia, and bullying based on disabilities. And this should be not just in anti-bullying policies, but also be part of the curriculum too!

[17] An honest sex education curriculum in schools that teaches children not just ‘when to say no’, but also when to say ‘yes’; a programme that is focused on positives and pleasure and personal worth, not on stigmatising sex and sexualities.

[18] No to ‘Faith Schools’ and get organised religion out of schools. If Christians, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Zoroastrians, or whichever religion wishes to teach religion, let them do it in their own time, places of worship (Saturday/Sunday schools) or in their supplementary or complementary schools. Teach ethics and spirituality by all means, and teach about religions. But no brainwashing. Teach a critical approach to religions.

[19] Broaden teacher education and training so that the negative effects of the ‘technicisation and de-theorising’ of teacher training (that were the result of the 1992/1993 Conservative re-organisation of what was then called teacher education- subsequently retitled teacher training). Bring back the study and awareness of the social and political and psychological contexts of teaching, including an understanding of and commitment to challenge and overturn racism, sexism, homophobia and other forms of underexpectation and discrimination – such as discrimination against working class pupils.

[20] A good, local school for every child. No school closures! “Surplus places” should actually mean lower class sizes! And increased community use of school facilities.

[21] A completely fully funded, publicly owned and democratic education system from pre-school right through to university. Education is a right not a commodity to be bought and sold. So: no fees, like in Scandinavia, Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia, where education up to PhD level is free. No to university or further education/vocational training fees! And bring in a living grant for students from less well-off backgrounds/ income.

In my jobs, firstly as a teacher, and now as a Professor of Education (and writer/editor of 17 books on education and equality) I have been round hundreds of schools. Many of them are brilliant. Schools in the poorest areas, schools in better off areas! Brilliant. But, with better funding, smaller class sizes, an end to the destructive competition between schools (if every school is a good local school) and with more professional judgement being allowed for teachers- then I look forward to a time when all state schools match the class sizes and results of the currently more lavishly funded private schools’. And working class kids – black, brown, white – get the fair deal currently trumpeted – but in actuality denied – by all three major parties.  

Professor Dave Hill, The Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition (TUSC) parliamentary candidate for Brighton Kemptown

Professor Dave Hill teaches at Middlesex University and is Visiting Professor of Critical Education Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland.

The Brighton Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition blogspot is at: http://www.brightontusc.blogspot.com

Dave’s Wiki and Publications are at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Hill_(professor)

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Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12th MARCH 2010

 

EVENTS

BRIDGING THE GAP: RALLY IN SUPPORT OF SUDBURY STEELWORKERS

USW Local 6500 is in the hometown fight of their lives. Our members have been fighting strong for 8 months.

On Monday, March 22nd at 4:30 pm we are having a massive rally to show the solidarity and support that our local has from our members, our community, our province, and from around the world. There are 30 delegates from around the world (Brazil, Germany, Australia, Geneva, Indonesia, Zambia, and more) who have already committed to attending. Can I count on you to attend as well? Can I count on you to share this message with everyone you know?

We are looking for community members, organizations, clubs, unions, political groups, and community businesses to attend. Show up in large numbers and bring your banners, your flags and your signs! We need your help!

For more info, email: usw@uswsudbury.ca

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NORMA SCARBOROUGH: TRIBUTE TO A PRO-CHOICE FIGHTER

Saturday, April 17
3:00pm – 5:00pm
Koffler House
569 Spadina Avenue, Room 108, Toronto

Join us to pay tribute to Norma Scarborough’s life of feminism and pro-choice activism. Memorial donations will be accepted for the Canadians for Choice Norma Scarborough Fund.

For more information or to donate to the fund, please contact Canadians for Choice at info@canadiansforchoice.ca

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THE FIFTH (AND FINAL) ANNUAL SOUTHERN ONTARIO SOCIAL ECONOMY NODE SYMPOSIUM

April 12 (8:30-4:30) and 13 (8:30-3:30)
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St W. (St. George subway station), Ground Floor Library

Keynote:
The Social Economy: A New Way to Manage Wealth
Michel Labbé, President and Founder of Options for Homes and more recently Options for Green Energy.

Interactive sessions with academic and community researchers who will share their work and insights
Short workshops on topics relevant to social economy organizations

A preliminary program is below and more information is posted on our website: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/symposium_10.php

There is no cost for this event. However, registration is required: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/95GS5NH

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THE GREEN ECONOMY: PRACTICAL STRATEGIES TO CREATE COMMUNITY-BASED ECO-ECONOMIES

Taught by Brian Milani, author of Designing the Green Economy: the postindustrial alternative to corporate globalization

30 Hours over 10 weeks, Thursdays
April 8-June 10, 6 to 9pm

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
U of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W.
(directly above St. George subway stop)
Eighth Floor, Room 8-214

Cost: $180

The Green Economy is an overview of radical potentials for reorganizing the economy for social and ecological purposes, while at the same time showcasing exciting alternatives being built right now in the existing economy.

The premise of the course is that today’s social, economic and environmental crises are not problems of management, but of design. A process of economic conversion is necessary to create economic structures which facilitate human self-development, social justice, community enrichment and ecological regeneration.

Sponsored by the Transformative Learning Centre, OISE.

For more info: http://www.greeneconomics.net/cour2010.htm

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APRIL 28: DAY OF MOURNING FOR INJURED, KILLED, OR SICK WORKERS

On Christmas Eve 2009, four workers in Toronto were killed and one seriously injured when a construction swing stage snapped in half and plummeted 13 storeys to the ground. Another 400 Ontario workers were killed the same year and about 374,000 were injured.

On Wednesday, April, 28th, we remember our sisters and brothers who have been killed on the job or who have died as a result of workplace diseases. This special day also offers an opportunity to re-dedicate our efforts to achieve healthier and safer workplaces and seek justice and fair compensation for injured workers.

For more details visit: http://www.whsc.on.ca/events/day_mourn.cfm

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CITY IS A SWEATSHOP: MARCH 19 & 20

As we prepare to flood the streets of Toronto on May Day (May 1, 2010), and as we build our resistance to the G8/G20 Summits coming to Toronto in June 2010, this series of events will lay out a vision for a city that includes everyone that lives, works, loves and struggles here.

More details: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/422

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NEWS & VIEWS

WE’VE SOLD OFF ASSETS SO OFTEN, BRANCH PLANTS ‘R’ US

In a global economy, a country needs global companies, headquartered at home. Canada doesn’t have enough of them… Other countries know this. In Brazil, Vale is shielded from unwanted takeover by the government’s “golden shares,” which give authorities veto power. No Brazilian government would dream of allowing Vale to fall into foreign hands, whereas Ottawa waves takeovers through like a cop trying to speed traffic along.

To read more: http://bit.ly/bGCUnJ

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WOMEN’S EQUALITY HAS DECLINED UNDER HARPER TORIES

Describing it as a “Reality Check,” labour and women’s groups have issued a stinging new report describing Canada’s lagging performance in achieving women’s equality.

The report, entitled Reality Check: Women in Canada and the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action Fifteen Years On, cites regression in everything from pay equity to child care. It was prepared by the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action and the Canadian Labour Congress.

To read more: http://www.nupge.ca/content/womens-equality-has-declined-under-harper-tories

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WORKERS, BANKING, AND CRISIS IN MEXICO

A striking feature of the global financial crisis is the narrow and technical focus on banks and financial corporations without accounting for ordinary workers in these institutions and in society more broadly. Yet through the intensification of work, workers have also underwritten the profitability of finance. This has been generally ignored.

In the nexus between workers, banking, and crisis, the case of Mexico is revealing due to the nature, evolution, and history of its emerging capitalist banking system. Examining the conditions of workers in Mexico is particularly important because it helps to explain not only the increase in bank profitability leading up to the global financial crisis but also the capacity of banks in Mexico to weather its worst consequences.

This focus seeks to complement, not replace, analyses concerned with large interest differentials, rising commissions and fees, as well as usurious consumer and state debt servicing.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/323.php

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BUDGET 2010: OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY

This budget includes two major measures: another tax cut for business  and ongoing cuts to federal public services.

Check out CUPE’s comprehensive budget analysis on everything from climate to child care to EI to education, water, women and more.

To read more: http://cupe.ca/budget/budget-2010-overview-analysis-summary

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VIDEO: TORONTO RALLY FOR STEELWORKER LOCALS 6500 AND 6200 ON STRIKE AT VALE INCO

Three years ago, Vale – a giant multinational corporation, based in Brazil – bought Canada’s mining company Inco. Now it has forced 3,500 miners and smelter workers in Sudbury, Port Colborne and Voisey’s Bay out on strike. It’s demanding huge rollbacks in pensions, nickel bonus and seniority rights.

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JOB POSTINGS

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, RAINBOW HEALTH ONTARIO, TORONTO

Deadline: March 29, 2010

Full job description: http://www.sherbourne.on.ca/PDFs/jobs/RHO-10-0207-Comm-Coordinator-FT.pdf

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ADVISOR, OFFICE OF THE PROVINCIAL ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH, TORONTO

Deadline: 5pm March 15, 2010

For more information on this position follow this link: http://www.charityvillage.com/cvnet/viewlisting.aspx?id=209592&eng=true&

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COMMUNITY URBAN FORESTRY INTERNS (3), SUMMER, GREENHERE, TORONTO ON

Start Date: June 14 2010
End Date: August 13 2010
Employment Type: Full time
Closing Date: March 19 2010

Organization:  GreenHere http://www.greenhere.ca
Please submit your cover letter and resume by mail or email to: info@greenhere.ca
Mail: 21 Blackthorn Ave., Toronto, Ontario M6N 3H4

(from Canada’s Green Job Site, http://www.GoodWorkCanada.ca)

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

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Tony Benn

TONY BENN – A LETTER TO MY GRANDCHILDREN

Tony Benn

Tuesday 15 December 2009

Stratford Circus, Theatre Square, Stratford, London, E15 1BX
7pm
£6

Tickets

Box Office: 0844 357 2625

The past is the past but there may be lessons to be learned which could help the next generation to avoid mistakes their parents and grandparents made. In his new book, A Letter to my Grandchildren: Lessons for the future, he talks about how each generation has to fight the same battles as their ancestors had to fight, again and again, for there is no final victory and no final defeat. ‘Two flames have burned from the beginning of time – the flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope. If this book serves its purpose it will fan both flames.’

Tony’s book will be on sale and he will be signing copies.

Newham Bookshop in partnership with Stratford Circus

Link: http://www.stratford-circus.com/events/literature/tonybenn.htm

DeadwingWORK, PLAY & BOREDOM

Call for Papers on ‘Work, Play & Boredom’ for an ephemera Conference at University of St. Andrews, 5-7 May 2010. Deadline for abstracts: 31 January 2010.

In recent years, play has become an abiding concern in the popular business literature and a crucial aspect of organizational culture. While managerial interest in play has certainly been with us for some time, there is a sense that organizations are becoming ever-more receptive to incorporating fun and frivolity into everyday working life. Team-building exercises, simulation games, puzzle-solving activities, office parties, themed dress-down days, and colourful, aesthetically-stimulating workplaces are notable examples of this trend. Through play, employees are encouraged to express themselves and their capabilities, thus enhancing job satisfaction, motivation, and commitment. Play also serves to unleash an untapped creative potential in management thinking that will supposedly result in innovative product design, imaginative marketing strategies and, ultimately, superior organizational performance. Play, it seems, is a very serious business indeed.

But this has not always been the case. Until very recently, play was seen as the antithesis of work. Classical industrial theory, for examples, hinges on a fundamental distinction between waged labour and recreation. Play at work is thought to pose a threat not only to labour discipline, but also to the very basis of the wage bargain: in exchange for a day’s pay, workers are expected to leave their pleasures at home. Given this context, we can well understand Adorno’s (1978: 228) comment that the purposeless play of children – completely detached from selling one’s labour to earn a living – unconsciously rehearses the ‘right life’. But play no longer holds the promise of life after capitalism, as it once did for Adorno; today, the ‘unreality of games’ is fully incorporated within the reality of  
organizations. When employees are urged to reach out to their ‘inner child’ (Miller, 1997: 255), it becomes clear that the traditional boundary between work and play is in the process of being demolished.

A certain utopianism underpins contemporary debates about play at work, evoking the pre-Lapsarian ideal of a happy life without hard work. In this respect, organizations seem to have taken notice of Burke’s (1971: 47) compelling vision of paradise: ‘My formula for utopia is simple: it is a community in which everyone plays at work and works at play. Anything less would fail to satisfy me for long’. But such idealism is not necessarily desirable. For while play promises to relieve the monotony and boredom of work, it is intimately connected to new forms of management control: it is part of the panoply of techniques that seek to align the personal desires of workers with bottom-line corporate objectives. We should not be surprised, then, when an overbearing emphasis on fun in the workplace leads to cynicism, alienation, and resentment from employees (Fleming, 2005).

While play at work has been extensively discussed in the popular and academic literature, the role of boredom in organisations has been somewhat neglected. It seems that boredom is destined to share the fate of other ‘negative emotions’, such as anger and contempt, which have generally been silenced in organization studies (Pelzer 2005). But boredom remains an important part of organisational life. As Walter Benjamin (1999: 105) observes, ‘we are bored when we don’t know what we are waiting for’. Boredom thus contains a sense of anticipation, even promise: ‘Boredom is the threshold to great deeds’ (ibid.). Since capitalism is preoccupied with fun and games, perhaps it is boredom rather than play that now serves unconsciously to rehearse the ‘right life’ in contemporary times.

This ephemera conference and special issue ask its participants to explore the interrelated themes of work, play, and boredom alongside an exploration of the cultural and political context out of which they have emerged.

Possible topics include:
–    The politics of play
–    Play and reality
–    Anthropology of play
–    Play and utopia
–    The boredom of play
–    Boredom as resistance
–    Identity and authenticity when played
–    The blurring of work and play
–    Playfulness at work
–    Creativity and play
–    Experience economy
–    Management games
–    Cultures of fun
–    Play and pedagogy
–    Seriousness and indifference
–    Foolishness and fooling around
–    Tedium and repetition
–    Humour, jokes, and cynicism
–    Childishness and management
–    Invention and innovation through play
–    Organizing spontaneity

The best papers of the conference will be published in a special issue of ephemera.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Niels Åkerstrøm Andersen, Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. Author of many books, including his recent Power at Play: The Relationship between Play, Work and Governance (2009, Palgrave Macmillan).

Professor René ten Bos, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. His many books include Fashion and Utopia in Management Thinking (John Benjamins, 2000).

Dates and Location:

5-7 May 2010 at School of Management, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.

Deadline, Conference Website, and Further Information:

The deadline for abstracts is 31 January 2010. The abstracts should be submitted as a Word document to Martyna Sliwa at martyna.sliwa@newcastle.ac.uk  The conference fee has not been set yet, as it is dependent on the number of participants, but will be kept to a minimum. PhD candidates pay a reduced fee.

Further information about the conference can be found on the conference website: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/conference With queries, you can also contact one of the conference organizers: Bent Meier Sørensen (bem.lpf@cbs.dk), Lena Olaison (lo.lpf@cbs.dk), Martyna Sliwa (martyna.sliwa@ncl.ac.uk), Nick Butler (nick.butler@st-andrews.ac.uk), Stephen Dunne (s.dunne@le.ac.uk), Sverre Spoelstra (sverre.spoelstra@fek.lu.se).

References:

Adorno, T. (1978) Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life. London and New York: Verso.
Benjamin, W. (1999) The Arcades Project. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press.
Burke, R. (1971) ‘“Work” and “play”’, Ethics, 82(1): 33-47.
Fleming, P. (2005) ‘Workers’ playtime? Boundaries and cynicism in a “culture of fun” programme’, Journal of Applied Behavioural Science, 41(3): 285-303.
Miller, J. (1997) ‘All work and no play may be harming your business’, Management Development Review, 10(6/7): 254-255.
Pelzer, P. (2005) ‘Contempt and organization: Present in practice – Ignored by research?’ Organization Studies, 26(8): 1217-1227.

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Deadwing

Deadwing

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Red Feather

Red Feather

RED FEATHER

 

Call for Papers

http://redfeatherjournal.org/interior_pages/call.html

Red Feather facilitates an international dialogue among scholars and professionals through vigorous discussion of the intersections between the child image and the conception of childhood, children’s material culture, children and politics, the child body, and any other conceptions of the child within local, national, and global contexts.

The journal invites critical and/or theoretical examination of the child image to further our understanding of the consumption, circulation, and representation of the child throughout the world’s visual mediums. Some sample topics include, but are certainly not limited to: studies of images of children of color; child as commodity; images of children in Africa, Asia, Middle East, South America, etc.; political uses of the child image; children in film; children in advertising; visual adaptations of children’s literary works; child welfare images; children and war; or any other critical examination of the child image in a variety of visual mediums.

Red Feather is published twice a year, in February and September, and adheres to the MLA citation system. Authors may submit articles in other citations systems, with the understanding that conversion to MLA is a condition of acceptance.

Interested contributors please submit the paper, an abstract, a current CV, and a brief biography as attachments in Word to debbieo@okstate.edu

Deadline for submissions for the premier issue is December 15th 2009

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk